understanding traditional and progressive approaches to learner-centered instruction

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Understanding Traditional and Progressive Approaches to Learner-Centered Instruction – Karen Bull, Assistant Director of Distance Learning, Onondaga Community College SLN SOLsummit 2012 March 7-9, 21012 SUNY Global Center

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  • 1. Understanding Traditional and Progressive Approaches to Learner-Centered Instruction Karen Z. Bull, M.Ed. Assistant Director of Distance Learning Onondaga Community College
  • 2. Agenda * Current Course Design * Understanding By Design * Results * Evidence * Experiences and Instruction * 6 Facets of Understanding * Conclusion 2
  • 3. Be Clear Identify Desired Results 3
  • 4. Should we put down what we think is right, or what we think you think is right? Be Specic Determine Acceptable Evidence 4
  • 5. Course Design * Focus on a Topic (Racial Prejudice) * Use a Particular Resource (To Kill A Mockingbird) * Choose Specic Instructional Method (Seminar to discuss the book and cooperative groups to analyze stereotypical images in lms and on television) * To cause learning to meet a giving standard (The student will understand the nature of prejudice and the dierence between generalizations and stereotypes) 5
  • 6. Road Trip 6
  • 7. Understanding By Design To begin with the end in mind means to start with a clear understanding of your destination. It means to know where youre going so that you better understand where you are now so that the steps you take are always in the right direction. -Stephen R. Covey 7
  • 8. Educational objectives become the criteria by which materials are selected, content is outlined, instructional procedures are developed, and tests and examinations are preparedThe purpose of a statement of objectives is to indicate the kinds of changes in the student to be brought about so that instructional activities can be planned and developed in a way likely to attain these objectives (Tyler, 1949, pp 1, 45). 8
  • 9. Many Hats 9
  • 10. Rethinking Course Design * 3 Main Stages 1. Identify desired results 2. Determine acceptable evidence 3. Plan learning experiences and instruction 10
  • 11. Curricular Priorities 11
  • 12. Rethinking Course Design * 3 Main Stages 1. Identify desired results 2. Determine acceptable evidence 3. Plan learning experiences and instruction 12
  • 13. Assessment Methods 13
  • 14. Fair Assessment
  • 15. Assessment Alignment
  • 16. Proof 16
  • 17. Specic and Clear 17
  • 18. Rethinking Course Design * 3 Main Stages 1. Identify desired results 2. Determine acceptable evidence 3. Plan learning experiences and instruction 18
  • 19. 6 Facets of Understanding * Explain * Interpret * Apply * Perspective * Empathize * Self-Knowledge 19
  • 20. Facet 1: Explanation We see something moving, hear a sound expectedly, smell an unusual order, and we ask; What is it?...When we have found out what it signies, a squirrel running, two persons conversing, an explosion of gunpowder, we say that we understand. (Dewey, 1933, pp. 137, 146)
  • 21. ...Facet 1 * Course Design: * Assessment * Problem-based learning * Performance tasks * Eective hands-on * Projects * Prompts and tests that ask * Eective minds-on students to explain * Science programs * Link specic facts with larger ideas * Show their work, * Support their conclusions. 21
  • 22. Facet 2: Interpretation Juzo Itamis lms revealed truths to the Japanese they never knew existed even though they were right there in their daily life. He could express the inside story about things people think they understand but really dont, said lm critic Jun Ishiko. (Washington Post, 1997, p. A1) 22
  • 23. ...Facet 2 *Learner-Centered Activities * Invite students to: *fashion an oral history out of disparate interviews *mathematical conclusion out of discrete data *a story interpretation based on careful reading 23
  • 24. Facet 3: Application [By understanding] I mean simply a sucient grasp of concepts, principles, or skills so that one can bring them to bear on new problems and situations, deciding in which ways ones present competencies can suce and in which ways one may require new skills or knowledge. (Gardner, 1991, p. 18) 24
  • 25. ...Facet 3 *Learner-Centered Activities * Performance-based learning: * Authentic tasks * Conventional tests 25
  • 26. Facet 4: Perspective An important symptom of an emerging understanding is the capacity to represent a problem in a number of dierent ways and to approach its solution from varied vantage points; a single, ridge representation is unlikely to suce. (Gardner, 1991, p. 13) 26
  • 27. Facet 5: Empathy To understand is to forgive. -French proverb 27
  • 28. Facet 6: Self-Awareness It is the duty of the human understanding to understand that there are things which it cannot understand, and what those things are. (Kierkegaard, 1959) 28
  • 29. Thinking like an Assessor Thinking like an Activity Designer What would be sucient and revealing What would be interesting and engaging evidence of understanding? activities on this topic? What performance tasks must anchor the What resources and materials are available unit and focus the instructional work? on this topic? How will I be able to distinguish between What will students be doing in and out of those who really understand and those class? What assignments will be given? who dont (though they seem to)? Against what criteria will I distinguish How will I give students a grade (and work?

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