the$arts:$ thepowerbehindstem$ ·...

Click here to load reader

Post on 06-Jul-2020

3 views

Category:

Documents

0 download

Embed Size (px)

TRANSCRIPT

  • The  Arts:    The  Power  behind  STEM  

    Presented  by  R.  Scot  Hockman  

    Education  Associate  for  the  Visual  and  Performing  Arts  South  Carolina  Department  of  Education  

     

  • *  The  term  STEM  was  coined  by  Dr.  Judith  Ramaley    

    *  Ramaley's  concept  of  STEM  situates  learning  in  the  context  of  solving  real  world  problems  or  creating  new  opportunities/pursuits  of  innovation.    *  Spurred  by  a  public  and  private  sector  push  for  global  

    competitiveness,  STEM  has  become  a  lightning  rod  for  education  in  2010.    

    *  Connecting  STEM  and  Arts  (TEAMS)  to  Spur  U.S.  Innovation:  Part  1  of  5  *  Today's  guest  blogger  is  Jim  Brazell(1),  a  technology  forecaster,  author,  public  

    speaker,  and  consultant.  

    What  is  all  this  STEM  about?  

  • *  What  the  arts  can  do  for  STEM,    *  What  STEM  can  do  for  the  Arts,  *  Integration  and  infusion  of  the  arts  in  other  content  areas  and  vice  versa,    *  How  the  arts  are  embedded  in  the  work  of  STEM,  *  Transferrable  skills  and  the  need  for  STEM  students  and    

           ALL  students  to  be  a  part  of  an  arts              experience.  

     What  is  all  this  STEAM  about?  

     

  • * The  movement  is  about  transformative  practices  in  education  that  unify  knowing  and  doing/theory  and  application.            * Jim  Brazell,  Futurist    

    Melding  of  Content  Areas  

  • *  What  do  you  think  about  the              value  of  the  arts  in  S  T  E  M?    

    *  What  significance  do  the  arts  have  in  these  areas?  

    *  What  significance  do  the  arts  have  in  the  lives  of  students  who  are  involved  in  areas  other  than  the  arts?  

    STEAM/TEAMS/STREAM  

  • *  Robert  and  Michele  Root-‐Bernstein  as  printed  in  Psychology  Today  

    *  We've  argued  that  the  arts  are  essential  for  the  development  of  scientific  imagination  

    *  The  arts  stimulate  economic  development  by  fostering  scientific  and  technological  innovation.  

    What  others  are  saying  about  STEAM  

  • *  Science  educators  have  begun  to  realize  that  the  skills  required  by  innovative  STEM  professionals  include  arts  and  crafts  thinking.    *  Visualizing,  recognizing,  and  forming  patterns,  modeling  and  getting  a  "feel"  for  systems,  as  well  as  the  manipulative  skills  acquired  in  the  use  of  tools,  pens,  and  brushes,  are  all  demonstrably  valuable  for  developing  STEM  capability.  *  www.psychologytoday.com  -‐  November  15,  2011  3:17  PM    

    From  Psych  Today  

  • *  Illustration  of  some  of  the  thinking  tools  that  artists  and  scientists  share,  derived  from  autobiographical  material  and  interviews  with  highly  creative  scientists  and  artists,  from  the  book  Sparks  of  Genius:  The  Thirteen  Thinking  Tools  of  the  World¹s  Most  Creative  People  by  Robert  and  Michèle  Root-‐Bernstein,  1999.    

    *  Drawing  by  and  courtesy  of  Robert  Root-‐Bernstein  ©  *  http://artworks.arts.gov/?tag=nea-‐and-‐nsf    

    *  Robert  Root-‐Bernstein  is  the  keynote  speaker  at  SCCAE  in  2015  

    *  Proprioceptive-‐A  sensory  receptor,  found  chiefly  in  muscles,  tendons,  joints,  and  the  inner  ear,  that  detects  the  motion  or  position  of  the  body  or  a  limb  by  responding  to  stimuli  arising  within  the  organism.  

  • *  National  Science  Foundation  (NSF)  and  the    *  National  Endowment  for  the  Arts  (NEA)    *  fund  productive  research  and    *  teaching  at  the  intersections  between  these  sets  of  

    disciplines.    (Arts  and  Sciences)  Follow  the  blog  including  these  topics  *  A  New  Culture:  Integrated  Metaphoric  Life?  Symbiotic  Art  &  Science,  Part  5  Artists  and  Scientists:  A  Question  of  Creativity  *  http://artworks.arts.gov/?tag=nea-‐and-‐national-‐science-‐

    foundation    

    A  Meeting  of  Minds  

  • * "At  Boeing,  innovation  is  our  lifeblood.  The  arts  inspire  innovation  by  leading  us  to  open  our  minds  and  think  in  new  ways  about  our  lives  -‐  including  the  work  we  do,  the  way  we  work,  and  the  customers  we  serve."    

       

    W.  James  McNerney,  Jr.,  Chairman,  President  and  Chief  Executive  Officer,  The  Boeing  Company  

     

  • * "We  are  a  company  founded  on  innovation  and  believe  the  arts,  like  science  and  engineering,  both  inspire  us  and  challenge  our  notions  of  impossibility."  

       

    George  David,  Chairman  and  Chief  Executive  Officer,    

    United  Technologies  Corporation      

  • *  "The  arts  foster  creativity,  and  creativity  is  central  to  our  business  strategy.  Indeed,  we  believe  there  is  a  strong  link  between  the  creativity  nurtured  by  the  arts  and  scientific  creativity.  If  our  scientists  are  stimulated  through  their  involvement  with  the  arts,  then  it's  ultimately  good  for  our  business  -‐-‐  and  our  community.  

     Randall  L.  Tobias,    

    Chairman  of  the  Board  and  CEO,    Eli  Lilly  and  Company  

  • *  "A  good  well-‐rounded  education  must  include  the  study  of  both  the  arts  and  the  sciences.  As  a  company  we  explore  the  synergies  between  arts  and  science.  Of  all  subjects,  the  arts  and  sciences  are  the  closest  and  most  interrelated.  They  offer  complementary  ways  of  understanding  the  same  object  or  event...  They  also  teach  critical  thinking,  creativity  and  curiosity  -‐  skills  that  make  for  an  educated  and  innovative  work  force."    

     Helge  W.  Wehmeier,  President  and  

    Chief  Executive  Officer,    Bayer  Corporation    

  • *  The  data  our  scientists  and  engineers  provided  to  us  demonstrate  that  the  more  arts  and  crafts  a  person  masters,  the  greater  their  probability  of  becoming  an  inventor  or  innovator.    *  Honors  College  graduates  in  the  sciences,  technology,  engineering  and  math  were  three  to  eight  times  as  likely  to  have  had  lessons  in  any  particular  art  or  craft  as  the  average  American.  Those  Honors  College  graduates  who  have  founded  companies  or  produced  licensed  patents  have  even  higher  exposures  to  arts  and  crafts  than  the  average  Honors  College  scientist  or  engineer.  

    The  More  Arts  the  Better  

  • * Honors  College  scientists  and  engineers  reached  this  conclusion  themselves.  Eighty-‐one  percent  of  the  respondents  to  our  survey  recommend  arts  and  crafts  education  as  a  useful  or  even  essential  background  for  a  scientific  or  engineering  innovator.  

    Honors  College    Recommend  the  ARTS  

  • *  Theo  Jansen:  My  creations,  a  new  form  of  life  *  “The  walls  between  art  and  engineering  exist  only  in  our  minds.”  *  http://www.ted.com/talks/theo_jansen_creates_new_creatures  

    STEAM  into  Practice  

  • *  What  did  you  do  on  your  summer  vacation?  *  http://cainesarcade.com/    *  2014  Global  Cardboard  Challenge-‐October  11-‐presented  by  the  Imagination  Foundation  *  http://imagination.is/our-‐projects/cardboard-‐challenge/    

    Caine’s  Arcade  

  • *  Linsey  Pollak  turns  a  carrot  into  a  clarinet  using  an  electric  drill  a  carrot  and  a  saxophone  mouthpiece,  and  plays  it  all  in  a  matter  of  5  minutes.    Linsey  Pollak  is  an  Australian  musician,  instrument  maker,  composer,  musical  director  and  community  music  facilitator.  

    *  http://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=carrot+clarinet&FORM=VIRE1#view=detail&mid=AC4078320C0BE4EAAFAFAC4078320C0BE4EAAFAF  

    Carrot  Clarinet    

  •  Lewis  Thomas  studied  the  undergraduate  majors  of  medical  school  applicants.    He  found  that  66  percent  of  music  majors  who  applied  to  med  school  were  admitted.  This  was  the  highest  percentage  of  any  group  studied.    In  comparison,  44  percent  of  biochemistry  majors  were  admitted.        "The  Comparative  Academic  Abilities  of  Students  in  Education  and  in  Other  Areas  of  a  Multi-‐focus  University,"  Peter  H.  Wood,  ERIC  Document  No.  ED327480  

     From  Americans  for  the  Arts:  

     

  • A  popular  approach  to  physics  was  introduced  several  years  ago  at  a  Music  and  STEM  conference.    It  involves  teaching  an  entire  class  the  physics  of  pitch,  frequency  and  resonance  by  building  a  guitar.      A  lesson  plan  can  be  found  at  Engineering  Go  For  It  site.    The  National  Science  Federation  sponsors  the  STEM  Guitar  Project  which  provides  innovative  professional  development  to  high  school  and  community  college  faculty.  

    The  STEM  GUITAR  PROJECT  

  • Researchers  have  found  a  strong  relationship  between  instruction  in  the  arts,  learning  mathematical  skills  and  improving  student  observational  skills  in  science.    According  to  one  study,  students  who  studied  music  showed  improved  spatial  temporal-‐reasoning  skills,  which  helped  them  later  learn  math  concepts.  (Graziano,  Critical  Links)  

    Science  News:  August  14,  2010  

  • *  Nobel  laureates  in  the  sciences  are  seventeen  times  likelier  than  the  average  scientist  to  be  a  painter,  twelve  times  as  likely  to  be  a  poet,  and  four  times  as  likely  to  be  a  musician.    

    *  Camouflage  for  soldiers  in  the  United  States  armed  forces  was  invented  by  American  painter  Abbot  Thayer.    

    *  Earl  Bakken  based  his  pacemaker  on  a  musical  metronome.    *  Japanese  origami  inspired  medical  stents  and  improvements  to  

    vehicle  airbag  technology.    *  Steve  Jobs  described  himself  and  his  colleagues  at  Apple  as  

    artists.  *  Apple  is  a  prime  example  of  creativity  and  artistry  spurring  

    innovation  Steven  Ross  Pomeroy  

    From  Scientific  American    August  22,  2012    

  • that  the  science,  technology,  engineering  and  math  approach,  known  as  "STEM,"  won't  work  as  well  without  the  arts.    “Neuroscientists  have  shown  that  the  brain  is  hardwired  for  the  arts,  innovation  and  creativity,  all  other  human  activities  follow.    No  human  culture  known  to  historians  or  anthropologists  has  ever  existed  without  music  and  dance.”  

    Mickey  Hart    wrote  in  the  Huffington  Post    

  • The  arts  are  a  necessity  for  insight:  the  arts  make  us  human.  The  energy  that  you  acquire  from  art  and  music  turns  inspiration  into  invention.  This  allows  an  inventor  to  dream  up  something  never  envisioned  before  and  creates  new  industries  and  good-‐paying  jobs.    If  STEM  is  to  truly  work  the  arts  need  to  be  added.”  

    Mickey  Hart  continues  

  • The  Center,  led  by  Dr.  Ian  Cross,  provides  a  home  for  research  linking  the  field  of  music  with    psychology,    speech,  science,    acoustics,    computer  science,  and    neuroscience.      

    The  center  is  cross-‐disciplinary  with  an  emphasis  on  all  aspects  of  communicative  interaction,  including  speech  and  body  movement.    It  serves  as  a  base  for  collaborative  research  with  other  departments  in  Cambridge  and  with  those  in  outside  institutions.  

    University  of  Cambridge:  Centre  for  Music  and  Science  

  • *  At  TED  2002,  Mae  Jemison,  a  doctor,  dancer,  and  the  first  African  American  woman  in  space,  said,  “The  difference  between  science  and  the  arts  is  not  that  they  are  different  sides  of  the  same  coin…  or  even  different  parts  of  the  same  continuum,  but  rather,    

     they  are  manifestations  of  the  same  thing.    *  The  arts  and  sciences  are  avatars  of  human  creativity.”  

    What  they  are  saying  

  • Several  studies  from  the  report  correlated  training  in  the  arts  to  improvements  in  math  and  reading  scores,  while  others  showed  that  arts  boost    *  attention,    *  cognition,    *  working  memory,  and    *  reading  fluency.    https://www.dana.org/�  

    *  Dr.  Jerome  Kagan,  an  Emeritus  professor  at  Harvard  University  and  listed  in  one  review  as  the  22nd  most  eminent  psychologist  of  the  20th  

    century,  says  that    the  arts  contribute  amazingly  well  to  learning  because  they  regularly  

    combine  the  three  major  tools  that  the  mind  uses  to  acquire,  store,  and  communicate  knowledge:  motor  skills,  perceptual  representation,  and  

    language.  

    *  “Art  and  music  require  the  use  of  both  schematic  and  procedural  knowledge  and,  therefore,  amplify  a  child’s  understanding  of  self  and  the  world,”    

                   Kagan  said  at  the  John  Hopkins  Learning,  Arts,  and  the  Brain  Summit  in  2009.  

    Dana  Arts  and  Cognition  Consortium  

  • Articles  on  how  to  use  dance  to  teach  the  principles  of    Physics,    Chemistry,  and    Algebra  are  explained  on  this  site.  ARTStem:  www.artstem.org      The  Atom  dance,  along  with  many  other  middle  and  high  school  dance  lessons  can  be  found  on  the  Kennedy  Center’s  ArtsEdge  website.    

    Dance  and  STEAM  

  • “In  order  to  increase  the  level  of  “coolness”  retention  over  time,  the  original  STEM  activity  was  redesigned  from  an  inquiry  activity  in  which  students  verified  given  mathematical  relationships  to  a  dance  synchronization  activity.  “The  addition  of  music  styling  and  dance  choreography  provided  a  positive  reminder  of  the  “coolness”  of  the  project  every  time  students  ran  their  robots  to  the  music—even  as  their  intermediate  solutions  didn’t  yet  get  their  robots  to  dance  fully  in  sync!”                                by  Eli  Silk,  Ross  Higashi,  Robin  Shoop,  and  Christian  D.  Schunn  

    Designing  Technology  Activities    that  Teach  Mathematics  

  • Students  focused  on  specifying  dance  routines.  They  learned  the  principals  of  dance.  Students  spent  up  to  12  hours  developing  precise  choreography  and  measuring  each  dance  move  individually.  Only  after  this  lengthy  process  was  completed  did  they  begin  to  think  about  the  issue  of  synchronizing  across  different  robots.    by  Eli  Silk,  Ross  Higashi,  Robin  Shoop,  and  Christian  D.  Schunn  

    Dance  and  Technology    

  • “Visual  and  Performing  Arts  teachers  have  been  making  connections  to  mathematics  and  language  arts  through  the  content  of  their  individual  disciplines  for  years.”  Artistic  Behaviors:  •  Critical  Thinking  and  Problem  Solving  •  Creating  Personal  Meaning  •  Social,  Cultural,  Historical,  and  Contemporary  Context  •  Communication  and  Collaboration  •  Creativity  &  Innovation  •  Information  and  Technology  Literacy  •  Productivity,  Accountability  and  Self-‐Direction  •  Leadership  and  Responsibility  

    Mark  Coates,  the    Coordinator  of  Fine  Arts,  Howard  County  Public  Schools  in  Maryland    

  • Visual  and  Performing  Arts  Artistic  Behaviors  share  commonalities  with  Common  Core  Mathematics  Standards:  *  Make  sense  of  problems  and  persevere  in  solving              them  *  Reason  abstractly  and  quantitatively  *  Construct  viable  arguments  and  critique  the  reasoning  of                  others  *  Model  with  mathematics  *  Use  appropriate  tools  strategically  *  Attend  to  precision  *  Look  and  make  use  of  structure  *  Look  for  and  express  regularity  in  repeated  reasoning  

     Mark  Coates  continue  to  state:  

     

  • *  Artists  and  musicians  addressing  scientific  and  technological  problems  invented    

    *  chest  percussion  (musician  Joseph  Auenbrugger),    *  the  stethoscope  (musician  and  artist  Rene  Leannec),    *  the  laryngoscope  (singer  Manuel  Garcia),    *  the  first  pill-‐making  machine  (artist  William  Brockedon),    *  the  principles  governing  tree  growth  (artists  Leonardo  da  Vinci  and,  

    independently,  John  Ruskin),    *  camouflage  (painter  Abbott  Thayer),    *  frequency  hopping—a  standard  mode  of  encrypting  electronic  information  

    (actress  Hedy  Lamarr  and  composer  George  Antheil),  and    *  the  first  artificial  intelligence  program  (composer  Lejaren  Hiller).  *  http://artworks.arts.gov/?tag=nea-‐and-‐nsf    

                         

    Symbiotic  Art  &  Science:    Can  Artists  Make  Scientific  Discoveries?    Symbiotic  Art  &  Science:  Can  Artists  Make  Scientific  Discoveries?  Tuesday,  March  15th,  2011  March  15,  2011  Washington,  DC  by  Dr.  Robert  Root-‐Bernstein,  Professor  of  Physiology,  Michigan  State  University      

     

  • *  Wallace  Walkers  kaleidocycles,    *  Buckminster  Fullers  geodesic  domes,  and    *  Ken  Snelsons  tensegrity  structures.    *  The  invention  of  pointillism  by  Seurat  led  directly  to  modern  pixelization  

    as  well  as  to  the  color  blindness  tests.    *  The  Fauvists  gave  rise  to  false  coloring,  which  is  employed  for  data  

    analysis  in  every  science.    *  The  chip—our  modern  integrated  circuit—is  made  using  mainly  

    artistic  techniques:  the  logic  is  embedded  into  the  design  by  drawing,  it  is  then  printed  using  silk  screen  methods,  miniaturized  using  photolithography,  and  the  patterns  are  then  etched  into  the  chip.    

    In  other  words,    the  modern  world  would  not  be  possible  without  the  insights  and  inventions  of  artists.    We  lose  sight  of  this  conclusion  at  our  peril.  

    *  http://artworks.arts.gov/?tag=nea-‐and-‐nsf    

       

    Artists  have  invented  several  classes  of  novel  geometrical  objects  and  structures  that  have  been  appropriated  by  scientists  in  both  life  and  physical  sciences,  including    

     

  • *  “My  kids  didn’t  grow  up  in  grade  school  saying,  ‘I  want  to  be  a  technical  sound  engineer.’  They  grew  up  saying,  ‘I  want  to  be  a  rock  star,’”  asserts  Stephen  Lane,  CEO  of  medical  device  design  company  Ximedica  and  a  huge  proponent  of  STEAM.  

    *  Celebrated  physicist  Richard  Feynman  once  said  that  scientific  creativity  is  imagination  in  a  straitjacket.  Perhaps  the  arts  can  loosen  that  restraint,  to  the  

    benefit  of  all.  

    Final  Thoughts  

  • #  of  Years          #  Students  Reading    Math    Writing  *  More  Than  4  Years    234              578            566            559  *  4  Years      403              586            567              560  *  3  Years      288              546          535              528  *  2  Years      382              547            547              526  *  1  Year      360    540            542              516  *  1/2  Year  or  Less    371    507            505              481  *  No  Response    278    541            544              520  *  AP/Honors  Courses  152    613            591              592  *  New  Mexico  Students  who  take  the  arts  four  or  more  years  

    outperform  their  non-‐arts  peers  by  210  points  on  the  SAT.  *  Four  years  is  a  difference  of  220  points.  *  https://secure-‐media.collegeboard.org/digitalServices/pdf/sat/NM_14_03_03_01.pdf  

     2014  New  Mexico  Arts  and  Music  Test-‐Takers  Percent  SAT  Mean  Scores  

     

  • *  #  of  Students        Reading      Math      Writing  *  Acting  or  Play  Production              419          584    553    556  *  Art  History  or  Appreciation        245          558    532    538  *  Dance                                      274          565    543    550  *  Drama:  Study  or  Appreciation          348          557    528    535  *  Music:  Study  or  Appreciation              294          565  553    547  *  Music  Performance                912            572    560    548  *  Photography  or  Film                505          547    531

     526  *  Studio  Art  and  Design      529          568      552    544  *  None          304          498      510    473  There  is  a  difference  of  212  points  for  students  with  course  experince  in  the  arts  and  those  with  none.  

    New  Mexico  2014  Course  Work    and  Experience  

  • *  Arts  and  Music  Test-‐Takers  SAT  Mean  Scores  *  Years  of  Study    Test  Takers  Critical  Reading  Mathematics  Writing  *  More  Than  4  Years    1,969    509      512    496  *  4  Years                                                3,003    504      501    486  *  3  Years                                                2,950    488      487    469  *  2  Years                                                4,439    479      486    461  *  1  Year                                                    6,083    484      498    464  *  1/2  Year  or  Less                4,030    455      467    434  *  No  Response                        3,978    476      487    457  *  AP/Honors  Courses  2,520    542      542    526  

     SC  2011  SAT  Results  of  SC  Students  

     from  the  College  Board  Difference  of  161  points    

    from  more  than  four  years  to  ½  years  or  less  

  • Difference  of  161  points    from  more  than  four  years  to  ½  years  or  less  

    *  Arts  and  Music  Test-‐Takers  SAT  Mean  Scores  *  Years  of  Study    Test  Takers  Critical  Reading  Math  Writing  *  More  Than  4  Years  1,939                                      510        507          494  *  4  Years                                              3,058              498      491          479                                      *  3  Years                                              2,828              483      480        465  *  2  Years                                              4,617              481        484        462  *  1  Year                                                  6,314              484      493        463                                                *  1/2  Year  or  Less              3,261              453      459        431  *  No  Response                    4,303              488      493        470  *  AP/Honors  Courses  2,696              537      534        520  

    SC  2013  SAT  Scores  

  •                        Test  Takers  Critical  Reading    Math  Writing  

    *  Acting  or  Play  Production    3,173    519    503    501  *  Art  History  or  Appreciation    5,056    487    493    468  *  Dance        2,300    471    472    466  *  Drama:Study  or  Appreciation3,990        493    485    475  *  Music:  Study  or  Appreciation  3,351    504    500    484  *  Music  Performance      8,177    502    503    484  *  Photography  or  Film      3,200    495    493  

     478  *  Studio  Art  and  Design    3,783    511    515    492  *  None        3,794    448    465    429  

    SC  Course  Work  or  Experience  http://professionals.collegeboard.com/profdownload/SC_11_03_03_01.pdf  

    Difference  of  193  points  for  arts  to  non-‐arts  test  takers  

  •                                                                                              Test  Takers        Critical  Reading    Math  Writing  

    *  Acting  or  Play  Production    3,094        513                        497                    495  *  Art  History  or  Appreciation    5,160        486                      487    466  *  Dance        2,263        469    466    462  *  Drama:  Study  or  Appreciation      4,204        486    478    469  *  Music:  Study  or  Appreciation          3,679        503    496        483  *  Music  Performance      7,889      500    497      482  *  Photography  or  Film      2,940      492    485    475  *  Studio  Art  and  Design      3,750        507    507    489  *  None          2,930        445    456  

     422  

    SC  2013  SC  SAT  Scores    Course  Work  or  Experience  

    Difference  of  192  points  for  arts  to  non-‐arts  test  takers  

  • * We  teach  the  arts  in  our  schools  to  create  great  people  so  they  are  empowered  with  skills  and  knowledge  to  be  successful  in  life…  to  do  great  things  regardless  of  the  vocational  pathway  they  choose.  

     Bob  Morrison,  

     Quadrant  Arts  Education  Research      

  • Expressing  the  sense  of  the    House  of  Representatives  that  adding    art  and  design  into  Federal  programs    that  target  the  Science,  Technology,    Engineering,  and  Mathematics  (STEM)    fields  encourages  innovation  and    economic  growth  in  the  United  States.  

     Congressional  Resolution  H.  RES.  319  

     

  • *  Whereas  the  innovative  practices  of  art  and  design  play  an  essential  role  in  improving  Science,  Technology,  Engineering,  and  Mathematics  (STEM)  education  and  advancing  STEM  research;  

    *  Whereas  art  and  design  provide  real  solutions  for  our  everyday  lives,  distinguish  United  States  products  in  a  global  marketplace,  and  create  opportunity  for  economic  growth;  

    *  Whereas  artists  and  designers  can  effectively  communicate  complex  data  and  scientific  information  to  multiple  stakeholders  and  broad  audiences;  

    *  Whereas  the  tools  and  methods  of  design  offer  new  models  for  creative  problem-‐solving  and  interdisciplinary  partnerships  in  a  changing  world;  

    *  Whereas  artists  and  designers  are  playing  an  integral  role  in  the  development  of  modern  technology;  and  

    *  Whereas  artists  and  designers  are  playing  a  key  role  in  manufacturing,  be  it  

    Where  as  

  • *  (1)  recognizes  the  importance  of  art  and  design  in  the  Science,  Technology,  Engineering,  and  Mathematics  (STEM)  fields;  

    *  (2)  encourages  the  inclusion  of  art  and  design  in  the  STEM  fields  during  reauthorization  of  the  Elementary  and  Secondary  Education  Act;  

    *  (3)  encourages  institutions  of  higher  education  to  incorporate  the  role  of  art  and  design  into  their  STEM  curricula;  and  

    *  (4)  encourages  the  Secretary  of  Commerce,  the  Secretary  of  the  Department  of  Education,  the  Chairman  of  the  National  Endowment  for  the  Arts,  and  the  Director  of  the  National  Science  Foundation  to  develop  a  STEM  to  STEAM  Council  representative  of  artists,  designers,  education  and  business  leaders,  and  Federal  agencies  in  order  to  facilitate  a  comprehensive  approach  to  incorporate  arts  and  design  into  the  Federal  STEM  programs.  

     Resolved,  That  the    

    House  of  Representatives—      

  • *  How  can  myths  help  to  explain  nature  and  science?  Students  will  explore  these  themes  in  this  lesson.  Students  will  read  and  explore  several  myths,  identifying  the  elements  of  this  literary  form.  They  will  then  act  out  a  myth  in  groups.  They  will  write  scientific,  research-‐based  reports,  as  well  as  fantastical  stories  about  physical  phenomena,  making  note  of  the  differences  between  these  two  approaches  to  explaining  the  world.  

    *  http://artsedge.kennedy-‐center.org/educators/lessons.aspx?facet:ArtsSubjectName=Theater&facet:OtherSubjectName=Science&q#results  

    ArtsEdge-‐  Theatre  and  Science  Integration  

  • *  Students  will:  *  Read  for  a  variety  of  purposes  (for  literary  experience  and  to  be  informed)  *  Write  for  a  variety  of  purposes  (to  express  personal  ideas  and  to  inform)  *  Activate  prior  knowledge  and  relate  it  to  a  reading  selection  *  Identify  special  vocabulary  and  concepts  *  Identify  a  main  idea  and  supporting  details  *  Read  and  interpret  myths  *  Identify  structures  of  literature  *  Respond  to  literature  through  writing  and  discussion  *  Read  for  a  variety  of  orientations  and  purposes,  including:  reading  for  

    literary  experience  and  reading  to  be  informed  *  Write  for  various  audiences  and  address  the  following  purposes:  to  inform  

    and  to  express  personal  ideas  

     Learning  Objectives  

     

  • *  Through  online  learning  tools  and  the  creation  of  shadow  puppets  and  plays,  students  will  learn  how  light  interacts  with  matter.  This  lesson  serves  as  an  introduction  to  the  properties  of  light  and  its  role  in  creating  shadows.  While  using  puppets  created  by  students  and  performing  shadow  plays,  students  will  learn,  first-‐hand,  what  differentiates  opaque,  translucent,  and  transparent  materials.  They  will  also  learn  how  light  travels  and  how  an  object's  shadow  is  affected  by  the  intensity  and  position  of  light  in  relation  to  both  the  object  and  the  surface  on  which  a  shadow  is  cast.  

    Puppetry/Theatre  and  Science  on  ArtsEdge  

  • *  Make  predictions  about  the  way  light  travels  and  determine  whether  the  predictions  are  correct    

    *  Use  online  resources  to  learn  how  shadows  are  formed    *  Demonstrate  an  understanding  of  the  terms  translucent,  opaque,  and  

    transparent  through  the  creation  of  shadow  puppets    *  Explore  the  way  light  interacts  with  matter  by  way  of  transmission,  

    absorption,  and  reflection    *  Make  observations  about  the  properties  of  shadows  based  on  online  

    interactive  activities    *  Experiment  with  a  light  source,  puppet,  and  screen  to  create  different  

    shadow  effects,  demonstrating  an  understanding  that  the  properties  of  a  shadow  are  determined  by  the  intensity  and  position  of  the  light  source  and  the  distances  and  angles  between  the  light,  object,  and  surface    

    *  In  groups,  create  and  perform  shadow  plays    

    *  http://artsedge.kennedy-‐center.org/educators/lessons/grade-‐6-‐8/Shadows_and_Light.aspx  

    Learning  Objectives  

  • *  Exterior  Notre  Dame  Cathedral  

    Any  Engineering/Technology  Concepts  Here?  

  • *  The  purpose  of  any  buttress  is  to  resist  the  lateral  forces  pushing  a  wall  outwards  (which  may  arise  from  stone  vaulted  ceilings  or  from  wind-‐loading  on  roofs)  by  redirecting  them  to  the  ground.  The  defining  characteristic  of  a  flying  buttress  is  that  the  buttress  is  not  in  contact  with  the  wall  like  a  traditional  buttress;  lateral  forces  are  transmitted  across  an  intervening  space  between  the  wall  and  the  buttress.  

    *  Flying  buttress  systems  have  two  key  components  -‐  a  massive  vertical  masonry  block  (the  buttress)  on  the  outside  of  the  building  and  a  segmental  or  quadrant  arch  bridging  the  gap  between  that  buttress  and  the  wall  (the  "flyer").[1]  

    *  National  Cathedral  in  Washington,  D.C.  *  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flying_buttress    

    Flying  Buttresses  

  • *  South  Rose  Window  Notre  Dame  

    What  are  the  Math  Concepts?  

  • *  Tessellations  

    What  the  Math  Point?  

  • *  Students  will  explore  the  mathematics  behind  mandalas,  including  but  not  limited  to  shapes  and  symmetry.  After  examining  mandalas  that  are  both  natural  and  man-‐made,  students  will  create  their  own  mandalas  using  mathematical  concepts  and  skills.  They  will  then  analyze  other  students’  creative  work  for  style  and  message.    

    Mandalas  and  Math  

  • *  Review  elements  and  basic  vocabulary  of  geometry  *  Apply  geometry  skills  to  increase  understanding  of  

    polygons  *  Learn  about  the  history  and  cultural  background  of  

    mandalas  *  Combine  their  knowledge  of  polygons  and  understanding  

    of  mandalas  to  design  their  own  mandalas  *  Correctly  incorporate  polygons,  symmetry,  and  color  

    scheme  in  the  design  of  their  mandalas  

    Learning  Objectives  

  •  GO  STEAM!!  

    Thank  for  everything  you  do  to  support  the  arts    and  arts  education!  

    If  I  can  be  of  any  help  contact  me  at  [email protected]  

    My  Best  to  YOU!