The Riddles of Solomon in Rabbinic Literature

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  • The Riddles of Solomon in Rabbinic LiteratureAuthor(s): S. SchechterSource: Folklore, Vol. 1, No. 3 (Sep., 1890), pp. 349-358Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd. on behalf of Folklore Enterprises, Ltd.Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1253100 .Accessed: 14/06/2014 03:26

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  • THE RIDDLES OF SOLOMON IN

    RABBINIC LITERA TURE.

    HE place which the Solomon Riddles occupy in the literature of almost every nation suggested to me that

    the publication of a previously inedited Hebrew text on the

    subject, with an English translation and a few introductory and explanatory remarks, will not be without interest to the readers of FOLK-LORE.

    As to the Hebrew text, it is edited for the first time from the Midrasli Hackephez, existing only in Yemen MSS., of which the British Museum has four copies, bearing the

    press marks Oriental 2351 and Or. 2380-82. Our copy is

    prepared from Or. 2382. The MSS. vary very little, and the only essential variation we found we have inserted in its

    place. The Bodleian (see Dr. Neubauer's Catalogue, No.

    2492) and the Royal Library in Berlin also possess copies of this Midrash. In the catalogue of the latter, by Dr. Stein-

    schneider, p. 71, a full description is given of this work, and we see there that its compiler, Yachya Ben Sulieman, wrote as late as I430. The new version of the Riddles, which we give here, would accordingly have no claim to

    any great antiquity. But, on the other hand, it has been

    proved already, at least with regard to other Midrashic col- lections coming from Yemen, that the Jews in this country were, up to a comparatively late date, in possession of very ancient Rabbinic sources, which had long before dis-

    appeared among their coreligionists in Europe. Thus the late age of the compiler wbuld not prove much against the

    antiquity of his version of the legend. Now, it is true that that part of the Rabbinic literature

    in which the Solomon Riddles are mentioned at all, as the

    THE RIDDLES OF SOLOMON IN

    RABBINIC LITERA TURE.

    HE place which the Solomon Riddles occupy in the literature of almost every nation suggested to me that

    the publication of a previously inedited Hebrew text on the

    subject, with an English translation and a few introductory and explanatory remarks, will not be without interest to the readers of FOLK-LORE.

    As to the Hebrew text, it is edited for the first time from the Midrasli Hackephez, existing only in Yemen MSS., of which the British Museum has four copies, bearing the

    press marks Oriental 2351 and Or. 2380-82. Our copy is

    prepared from Or. 2382. The MSS. vary very little, and the only essential variation we found we have inserted in its

    place. The Bodleian (see Dr. Neubauer's Catalogue, No.

    2492) and the Royal Library in Berlin also possess copies of this Midrash. In the catalogue of the latter, by Dr. Stein-

    schneider, p. 71, a full description is given of this work, and we see there that its compiler, Yachya Ben Sulieman, wrote as late as I430. The new version of the Riddles, which we give here, would accordingly have no claim to

    any great antiquity. But, on the other hand, it has been

    proved already, at least with regard to other Midrashic col- lections coming from Yemen, that the Jews in this country were, up to a comparatively late date, in possession of very ancient Rabbinic sources, which had long before dis-

    appeared among their coreligionists in Europe. Thus the late age of the compiler wbuld not prove much against the

    antiquity of his version of the legend. Now, it is true that that part of the Rabbinic literature

    in which the Solomon Riddles are mentioned at all, as the

    THE RIDDLES OF SOLOMON IN

    RABBINIC LITERA TURE.

    HE place which the Solomon Riddles occupy in the literature of almost every nation suggested to me that

    the publication of a previously inedited Hebrew text on the

    subject, with an English translation and a few introductory and explanatory remarks, will not be without interest to the readers of FOLK-LORE.

    As to the Hebrew text, it is edited for the first time from the Midrasli Hackephez, existing only in Yemen MSS., of which the British Museum has four copies, bearing the

    press marks Oriental 2351 and Or. 2380-82. Our copy is

    prepared from Or. 2382. The MSS. vary very little, and the only essential variation we found we have inserted in its

    place. The Bodleian (see Dr. Neubauer's Catalogue, No.

    2492) and the Royal Library in Berlin also possess copies of this Midrash. In the catalogue of the latter, by Dr. Stein-

    schneider, p. 71, a full description is given of this work, and we see there that its compiler, Yachya Ben Sulieman, wrote as late as I430. The new version of the Riddles, which we give here, would accordingly have no claim to

    any great antiquity. But, on the other hand, it has been

    proved already, at least with regard to other Midrashic col- lections coming from Yemen, that the Jews in this country were, up to a comparatively late date, in possession of very ancient Rabbinic sources, which had long before dis-

    appeared among their coreligionists in Europe. Thus the late age of the compiler wbuld not prove much against the

    antiquity of his version of the legend. Now, it is true that that part of the Rabbinic literature

    in which the Solomon Riddles are mentioned at all, as the

    THE RIDDLES OF SOLOMON IN

    RABBINIC LITERA TURE.

    HE place which the Solomon Riddles occupy in the literature of almost every nation suggested to me that

    the publication of a previously inedited Hebrew text on the

    subject, with an English translation and a few introductory and explanatory remarks, will not be without interest to the readers of FOLK-LORE.

    As to the Hebrew text, it is edited for the first time from the Midrasli Hackephez, existing only in Yemen MSS., of which the British Museum has four copies, bearing the

    press marks Oriental 2351 and Or. 2380-82. Our copy is

    prepared from Or. 2382. The MSS. vary very little, and the only essential variation we found we have inserted in its

    place. The Bodleian (see Dr. Neubauer's Catalogue, No.

    2492) and the Royal Library in Berlin also possess copies of this Midrash. In the catalogue of the latter, by Dr. Stein-

    schneider, p. 71, a full description is given of this work, and we see there that its compiler, Yachya Ben Sulieman, wrote as late as I430. The new version of the Riddles, which we give here, would accordingly have no claim to

    any great antiquity. But, on the other hand, it has been

    proved already, at least with regard to other Midrashic col- lections coming from Yemen, that the Jews in this country were, up to a comparatively late date, in possession of very ancient Rabbinic sources, which had long before dis-

    appeared among their coreligionists in Europe. Thus the late age of the compiler wbuld not prove much against the

    antiquity of his version of the legend. Now, it is true that that part of the Rabbinic literature

    in which the Solomon Riddles are mentioned at all, as the

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  • The Riddles oj Solomon in The Riddles oj Solomon in The Riddles oj Solomon in The Riddles oj Solomon in

    Midrash on Proverbs and the Second Targum to Esther, are, according to the best authorities, not older than the tenth

    century,l whilst neither the Talmud of Jerusalem nor that of

    Babylon, nor any of the other earlier Midrashim (homiletic comments on the Old Testament), ever allude to them. But the silence of these sources may be explained on other

    grounds. Indeed, it would seem that the earlier Rabbis

    purposely avoided touching on the whole subject. For we read in the name of R: Samuel bar Nachmani, a famous

    Aggadist of the third century: "He who translates the words Malkath Sheba as 'the Queen of Sheba' is mistaken, its real meaning being 'the kingdom of Sheba."'" It is

    hardly necessary to say that this Rabbi Samuel's explana- tion is against all grammar. But we know from other

    places that this Rabbi was rather fond of such forced in-

    terpretations of Scriptural stories, which in their simple meaning would rather be irreconcilable with the ideal which posterity has formed of their heroes.2 We may therefore assume, I think, that also in the present case the passage quoted was also meant as a protest against some legends about Solomon, current at the time, which the Rabbis considered unworthy of the Solomon idealised by a later generation. The legend which scandalised the Rabbis was probably that which is to be found first in the Pseudo-Sirach,3 according to which the relation be- tween Solomon and the Queen ended in a love affair of which Nebuchadnezzar was the result. This legend, again, is based on the Scriptural words: " And the King Solomon gave unto the Queen (Malkath) of Sheba all her desire" (I Kings, x, 13; 2 Chron. ix, I2; and Bertheau, ad loc.). The best way to make an end to all such stories was, therefore, to explain the word Malkath as if it were

    1 See Zuns, Die gottesdienstliche Vortrdge, p. 268, and Munk's edition of the Second Targum, p. io. Comp. also Rapoport, Erech Millim, p. 23.

    2 See Baba Bat/ira, I5a, and Sabbath, 56a and b. 3 See Pseudo Ben Sira, ed. Steinschneider, p. 2Ib; Munk's Second

    Targum, p. 23; and A. Epstein's Beitraege, etc., p. I22.

    Midrash on Proverbs and the Second Targum to Esther, are, according to the best authorities, not older than the tenth

    century,l whilst neither the Talmud of Jerusalem nor that of

    Babylon, nor any of the other earlier Midrashim (homiletic comments on the Old Testament), ever allude to them. But the silence of these sources may be explained on other

    grounds. Indeed, it would seem that the earlier Rabbis

    purposely avoided touching on the whole subject. For we read in the name of R: Samuel bar Nachmani, a famous

    Aggadist of the third century: "He who translates the words Malkath Sheba as 'the Queen of Sheba' is mistaken, its real meaning being 'the kingdom of Sheba."'" It is

    hardly necessary to say that this Rabbi Samuel's explana- tion is against all grammar. But we know from other

    places that this Rabbi was rather fond of such forced in-

    terpretations of Scriptural stories, which in their simple meaning would rather be irreconcilable with the ideal which posterity has formed of their heroes.2 We may therefore assume, I think, that also in the present case the passage quoted was also meant as a protest against some legends about Solomon, current at the time, which the Rabbis considered unworthy of the Solomon idealised by a later generation. The legend which scandalised the Rabbis was probably that which is to be found first in the Pseudo-Sirach,3 according to which the relation be- tween Solomon and the Queen ended in a love affair of which Nebuchadnezzar was the result. This legend, again, is based on the Scriptural words: " And the King Solomon gave unto the Queen (Malkath) of Sheba all her desire" (I Kings, x, 13; 2 Chron. ix, I2; and Bertheau, ad loc.). The best way to make an end to all such stories was, therefore, to explain the word Malkath as if it were

    1 See Zuns, Die gottesdienstliche Vortrdge, p. 268, and Munk's edition of the Second Targum, p. io. Comp. also Rapoport, Erech Millim, p. 23.

    2 See Baba Bat/ira, I5a, and Sabbath, 56a and b. 3 See Pseudo Ben Sira, ed. Steinschneider, p. 2Ib; Munk's Second

    Targum, p. 23; and A. Epstein's Beitraege, etc., p. I22.

    Midrash on Proverbs and the Second Targum to Esther, are, according to the best authorities, not older than the tenth

    century,l whilst neither the Talmud of Jerusalem nor that of

    Babylon, nor any of the other earlier Midrashim (homiletic comments on the Old Testament), ever allude to them. But the silence of these sources may be explained on other

    grounds. Indeed, it would seem that the earlier Rabbis

    purposely avoided touching on the whole subject. For we read in the name of R: Samuel bar Nachmani, a famous

    Aggadist of the third century: "He who translates the words Malkath Sheba as 'the Queen of Sheba' is mistaken, its real meaning being 'the kingdom of Sheba."'" It is

    hardly necessary to say that this Rabbi Samuel's explana- tion is against all grammar. But we know from other

    places that this Rabbi was rather fond of such forced in-

    terpretations of Scriptural stories, which in their simple meaning would rather be irreconcilable with the ideal which posterity has formed of their heroes.2 We may therefore assume, I think, that also in the present case the passage quoted was also meant as a protest against some legends about Solomon, current at the time, which the Rabbis considered unworthy of the Solomon idealised by a later generation. The legend which scandalised the Rabbis was probably that which is to be found first in the Pseudo-Sirach,3 according to which the relation be- tween Solomon and the Queen ended in a love affair of which Nebuchadnezzar was the result. This legend, again, is based on the Scriptural words: " And the King Solomon gave unto the Queen (Malkath) of Sheba all her desire" (I Kings, x, 13; 2 Chron. ix, I2; and Bertheau, ad loc.). The best way to make an end to all such stories was, therefore, to explain the word Malkath as if it were

    1 See Zuns, Die gottesdienstliche Vortrdge, p. 268, and Munk's edition of the Second Targum, p. io. Comp. also Rapoport, Erech Millim, p. 23.

    2 See Baba Bat/ira, I5a, and Sabbath, 56a and b. 3 See Pseudo Ben Sira, ed. Steinschneider, p. 2Ib; Munk's Second

    Targum, p. 23; and A. Epstein's Beitraege, etc., p. I22.

    Midrash on Proverbs and the Second Targum to Esther, are, according to the best authorities, not older than the tenth

    century,l whilst neither the Talmud of Jerusalem nor that of

    Babylon, nor any of the other earlier Midrashim (homiletic comments on the Old Testament), ever allude to them. But the silence of these sources may be explained on other

    grounds. Indeed, it would seem that the earlier Rabbis

    purposely avoided touching on the whole subject. For we read in the name of R: Samuel bar Nachmani, a famous

    Aggadist of the third century: "He who translates the words Malkath Sheba as 'the Queen of Sheba' is mistaken, its real meaning being 'the kingdom of Sheba."'" It is

    hardly necessary to say that this Rabbi Samuel's explana- tion is against all grammar. But we know from other

    places that this Rabbi was rather fond of such forced in-

    terpretations of Scriptural stories, which in their simple meaning would rather be irreconcilable with the ideal which posterity has formed of their heroes.2 We may therefore assume, I think, that also in the present case the passage quoted was also meant as a protest against some legends about Solomon, current at the time, which the Rabbis considered unworthy of the Solomon idealised by a later generation. The legend which scandalised the Rabbis was probably that which is to be found first in the Pseudo-Sirach,3 according to which the relation be- tween Solomon and the Queen ended in a love affair of which Nebuchadnezzar was the result. This legend, again, is based on the Scriptural words: " And the King Solomon gave unto the Queen (Malkath) of Sheba all her desire" (I Kings, x, 13; 2 Chron. ix, I2; and Bertheau, ad loc.). The best way to make an end to all such stories was, therefore, to explain the word Malkath as if it were

    1 See Zuns, Die gottesdienstliche Vortrdge, p. 268, and Munk's edition of the Second Targum, p. io. Comp. also Rapoport, Erech Millim, p. 23.

    2 See Baba Bat/ira, I5a, and Sabbath, 56a and b. 3 See Pseudo Ben Sira, ed. Steinschneider, p. 2Ib; Munk's Second

    Targum, p. 23; and A. Epstein's Beitraege, etc., p. I22.

    3o50 3o50 3o50 3o50

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  • Rabbiznic Litzeratzire. Rabbiznic Litzeratzire. Rabbiznic Litzeratzire. Rabbiznic Litzeratzire.

    Mel/tlcath, meaning "kingdom". Thus the Queen goes altogether out of the story, and the Riddles with her, though they were circulating among the people, and it took centuries before the above objections were subdued -at least with regard to the Riddles. On the other hand, it is clear from the statement in the Bible, "The

    Queen of Sheba . . . came to prove Solomon with hard

    questions" (I Kings, x, I; 2 Chron. ix, I), that even in Biblical times some such riddles or puzzles were current

    among the people. That those which we here rescue from oblivion cannot trace back to the riddles current in Biblical times is clear from the anachronisms contained in them. The student of folk-lore is familiar with the tenacity of

    popular memory, and there is therefore the remote chance that similar riddles to those given in our text are referred to in the Bible. The above considerations would then

    explain how they failed to make any appearance in the

    literary productions of the Rabbis. This exclusion from what we may call the official litera-

    ture for such a long time may perhaps also acc6unt for the corrupt and incomplete condition in which these Riddles are found. We possess nowadays three versions of them: the version of the Second Targum to Esther, i, 2, con-

    sisting of three riddles; the version of the Midrash on

    Proverbs, i, I, consisting of four; and the version which we now publish for the first time, consisting of nineteen riddles. The first four riddles of this version, as well as the introduc-

    tion, agree on the whole with the Midrash on Proverbs. There is only this difference: that the verse from Job which is here given by R. Ishmael is quoted in the Midrash from another Rabbi of a much later date. The quotation was

    probably shortened by the copyist; for there can hardly be any doubt that the Rabbi's allusion aimed at the suc-

    ceeding verses in Job, in which the treasures of Ethiopia (Cush) are spoken of, which country was, as it is well known, confused by the ancients with Sheba.

    We may now proceed at once to give the text and trans- lation of the Yemen Midrash.

    Mel/tlcath, meaning "kingdom". Thus the Queen goes altogether out of the story, and the Riddles with her, though they were circulating among the people, and it took centuries before the above objections were subdued -at least with regard to the Riddles. On the other hand, it is clear from the statement in the Bible, "The

    Queen of Sheba . . . came to prove Solomon with hard

    questions" (I Kings, x, I; 2 Chron. ix, I), that even in Biblical times some such riddles or puzzles were current

    among the people. That those which we here rescue from oblivion cannot trace back to the riddles current in Biblical times is clear from the anachronisms contained in them. The student of folk-lore is familiar with the tenacity of

    popular memory, and there is therefore the remote chance that similar riddles to those given in our text are referred to in the Bible. The above considerations would then

    explain how they failed to make any appearance in the

    literary productions of the Rabbis. This exclusion from what we may call the official litera-

    ture for such a long time may perhaps also acc6unt for the corrupt and incomplete condition in which these Riddles are found. We possess nowadays three versions of them: the version of the Second Targum to Esther, i, 2, con-

    sisting of three riddles; the version of the Midrash on

    Proverbs, i, I, consisting of four; and the version which we now publish for the first time, consisting of nineteen riddles. The first four riddles of this version, as well as the introduc-

    tion, agree on the whole with the Midrash on Proverbs. There is only this difference: that the verse from Job which is here given by R. Ishmael is quoted in the Midrash from another Rabbi of a much later date. The quotation was

    probably shortened by the copyist; for there can hardly be any doubt that the Rabbi's allusion aimed at the suc-

    ceeding verses in Job, in which the treasures of Ethiopia (Cush) are spoken of, which country was, as it is well known, confused by the ancients with Sheba.

    We may now proceed at once to give the text and trans- lation of the Yemen Midrash.

    Mel/tlcath, meaning "kingdom". Thus the Queen goes altogether out of the story, and the Riddles with her, though they were circulating among the people, and it took centuries before the above objections were subdued -at least with regard to the Riddles. On the other hand, it is clear from the statement in the Bible, "The

    Queen of Sheba . . . came to prove Solomon with hard

    questions" (I Kings, x, I; 2 Chron. ix, I), that even in Biblical times some such riddles or puzzles were current

    among the people. That those which we here rescue from oblivion cannot trace back to the riddles current in Biblical times is clear from the anachronisms contained in them. The student of folk-lore is familiar with the tenacity of

    popular memory, and there is therefore the remote chance that similar riddles to those given in our text are referred to in the Bible. The above considerations would then

    explain how they failed to make any appearance in the

    literary productions of the Rabbis. This exclusion from what we may call the official litera-

    ture for such a long time may perhaps also acc6unt for the corrupt and incomplete condition in which these Riddles are found. We possess nowadays three versions of them: the version of the Second Targum to Esther, i, 2, con-

    sisting of three riddles; the version of the Midrash on

    Proverbs, i, I, consisting of four; and the version which we now publish for the first time, consisting of nineteen riddles. The first four riddles of this version, as well as the introduc-

    tion, agree on the whole with the Midrash on Proverbs. There is only this difference: that the verse from Job which is here given by R. Ishmael is quoted in the Midrash from another Rabbi of a much later date. The quotation was

    probably shortened by the copyist; for there can hardly be any doubt that the Rabbi's allusion aimed at the suc-

    ceeding verses in Job, in which the treasures of Ethiopia (Cush) are spoken of, which country was, as it is well known, confused by the ancients with Sheba.

    We may now proceed at once to give the text and trans- lation of the Yemen Midrash.

    Mel/tlcath, meaning "kingdom". Thus the Queen goes altogether out of the story, and the Riddles with her, though they were circulating among the people, and it took centuries before the above objections were subdued -at least with regard to the Riddles. On the other hand, it is clear from the statement in the Bible, "The

    Queen of Sheba . . . came to prove Solomon with hard

    questions" (I Kings, x, I; 2 Chron. ix, I), that even in Biblical times some such riddles or puzzles were current

    among the people. That those which we here rescue from oblivion cannot trace back to the riddles current in Biblical times is clear from the anachronisms contained in them. The student of folk-lore is familiar with the tenacity of

    popular memory, and there is therefore the remote chance that similar riddles to those given in our text are referred to in the Bible. The above considerations would then

    explain how they failed to make any appearance in the

    literary productions of the Rabbis. This exclusion from what we may call the official litera-

    ture for such a long time may perhaps also acc6unt for the corrupt and incomplete condition in which these Riddles are found. We possess nowadays three versions of them: the version of the Second Targum to Esther, i, 2, con-

    sisting of three riddles; the version of the Midrash on

    Proverbs, i, I, consisting of four; and the version which we now publish for the first time, consisting of nineteen riddles. The first four riddles of this version, as well as the introduc-

    tion, agree on the whole with the Midrash on Proverbs. There is only this difference: that the verse from Job which is here given by R. Ishmael is quoted in the Midrash from another Rabbi of a much later date. The quotation was

    probably shortened by the copyist; for there can hardly be any doubt that the Rabbi's allusion aimed at the suc-

    ceeding verses in Job, in which the treasures of Ethiopia (Cush) are spoken of, which country was, as it is well known, confused by the ancients with Sheba.

    We may now proceed at once to give the text and trans- lation of the Yemen Midrash.

    35I 35I 35I 35I

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  • The Riddles of Solornon in The Riddles of Solornon in The Riddles of Solornon in The Riddles of Solornon in

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    *xrn lr 1Dn,n [nwlN1 IVn] O:5n TnT 1i1D -T D0TyT ;nmt v Innnn ;irw^r 4 nw n ir t '-rvn Oilp rtmN

    ;n-v , ^ ':1^ N Ny ;rTn Dm s inrn -nmw tnN m iit

    n5mNu- ri rp vn?3n r 1tiy nvlnvy ri n?InN nNrN

    n*Y7 rsn, ^nn InI 'r n ;N5 vn D-7IU3 rm- 7nrN

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    nin pnT nt mwnt *Nn -*r nZ,5nn t 'ri *i -Tu1z

    "717 155 15DN) 1n1i .NIr B-y :7nN avn 07 mz lRD

    *ilnnn :Si S:n rnN '+bYrn "jpn 89 7N ^^ mi1? n j IL

    i1,1 :Irmv 315 ;nir i'n IOr nN ln2 rt1 ru1 Im5 t1

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    rin n 15 ^ Inni m ,N4t TY :or nw yp3rt onI nim)p

    1rVnII Onl= Invwn Inn3 I nNs II MnlnHD in^ Dnnmvn -7-im ', mvN 5tW cm iT nv m5 nwm ' -iD= -7r 7'1ln

    D: n'mvW r5r 5v irn3n it iyNtr -i mw rntyn

    *xrn lr 1Dn,n [nwlN1 IVn] O:5n TnT 1i1D -T D0TyT ;nmt v Innnn ;irw^r 4 nw n ir t '-rvn Oilp rtmN

    ;n-v , ^ ':1^ N Ny ;rTn Dm s inrn -nmw tnN m iit

    n5mNu- ri rp vn?3n r 1tiy nvlnvy ri n?InN nNrN

    n*Y7 rsn, ^nn InI 'r n ;N5 vn D-7IU3 rm- 7nrN

    'Mt D) Wl.t D nIT N i ln ^ n v f15 nN fn 'rn1in 1 nn nynm In* 1rY, 3 4 iT ny " n71 Iv ', ,nnM IfnnI

    nin pnT nt mwnt *Nn -*r nZ,5nn t 'ri *i -Tu1z

    "717 155 15DN) 1n1i .NIr B-y :7nN avn 07 mz lRD

    *ilnnn :Si S:n rnN '+bYrn "jpn 89 7N ^^ mi1? n j IL

    i1,1 :Irmv 315 ;nir i'n IOr nN ln2 rt1 ru1 Im5 t1

    TQ +n595 159 1'^ 83 rnDn ,HniNi nlp:n31 D1rt 1b i nt^r

    r,n N5w nDtn Dlllw' nkrt p 15 -n'4;5 DInDnip tON nnnm nInp* 01 nunpz;n I-npIzM limrr I5np.v lr^n 5v

    :nmp^ n5n ODs:T 159 n5 ni?^ 'plilW T n4 nnn pn:TI

    ,nN fnm 15 l-61 'nnrrn nr7l D nNI) IIn -n7 -Tpt

    1p: 115 -NNi 'nn aYn N5 tt?n3 nnwl N^v Yl"( IINr

    rin n 15 ^ Inni m ,N4t TY :or nw yp3rt onI nim)p

    1rVnII Onl= Invwn Inn3 I nNs II MnlnHD in^ Dnnmvn -7-im ', mvN 5tW cm iT nv m5 nwm ' -iD= -7r 7'1ln

    D: n'mvW r5r 5v irn3n it iyNtr -i mw rntyn

    *xrn lr 1Dn,n [nwlN1 IVn] O:5n TnT 1i1D -T D0TyT ;nmt v Innnn ;irw^r 4 nw n ir t '-rvn Oilp rtmN

    ;n-v , ^ ':1^ N Ny ;rTn Dm s inrn -nmw tnN m iit

    n5mNu- ri rp vn?3n r 1tiy nvlnvy ri n?InN nNrN

    n*Y7 rsn, ^nn InI 'r n ;N5 vn D-7IU3 rm- 7nrN

    'Mt D) Wl.t D nIT N i ln ^ n v f15 nN fn 'rn1in 1 nn nynm In* 1rY, 3 4 iT ny " n71 Iv ', ,nnM IfnnI

    nin pnT nt mwnt *Nn -*r nZ,5nn t 'ri *i -Tu1z

    "717 155 15DN) 1n1i .NIr B-y :7nN avn 07 mz lRD

    *ilnnn :Si S:n rnN '+bYrn "jpn 89 7N ^^ mi1? n j IL

    i1,1 :Irmv 315 ;nir i'n IOr nN ln2 rt1 ru1 Im5 t1

    TQ +n595 159 1'^ 83 rnDn ,HniNi nlp:n31 D1rt 1b i nt^r

    r,n N5w nDtn Dlllw' nkrt p 15 -n'4;5 DInDnip tON nnnm nInp* 01 nunpz;n I-npIzM limrr I5np.v lr^n 5v

    :nmp^ n5n ODs:T 159 n5 ni?^ 'plilW T n4 nnn pn:TI

    ,nN fnm 15 l-61 'nnrrn nr7l D nNI) IIn -n7 -Tpt

    1p: 115 -NNi 'nn aYn N5 tt?n3 nnwl N^v Yl"( IINr

    rin n 15 ^ Inni m ,N4t TY :or nw yp3rt onI nim)p

    1rVnII Onl= Invwn Inn3 I nNs II MnlnHD in^ Dnnmvn -7-im ', mvN 5tW cm iT nv m5 nwm ' -iD= -7r 7'1ln

    D: n'mvW r5r 5v irn3n it iyNtr -i mw rntyn

    *xrn lr 1Dn,n [nwlN1 IVn] O:5n TnT 1i1D -T D0TyT ;nmt v Innnn ;irw^r 4 nw n ir t '-rvn Oilp rtmN

    ;n-v , ^ ':1^ N Ny ;rTn Dm s inrn -nmw tnN m iit

    n5mNu- ri rp vn?3n r 1tiy nvlnvy ri n?InN nNrN

    n*Y7 rsn, ^nn InI 'r n ;N5 vn D-7IU3 rm- 7nrN

    'Mt D) Wl.t D nIT N i ln ^ n v f15 nN fn 'rn1in 1 nn nynm In* 1rY, 3 4 iT ny " n71 Iv ', ,nnM IfnnI

    nin pnT nt mwnt *Nn -*r nZ,5nn t 'ri *i -Tu1z

    "717 155 15DN) 1n1i .NIr B-y :7nN avn 07 mz lRD

    *ilnnn :Si S:n rnN '+bYrn "jpn 89 7N ^^ mi1? n j IL

    i1,1 :Irmv 315 ;nir i'n IOr nN ln2 rt1 ru1 Im5 t1

    TQ +n595 159 1'^ 83 rnDn ,HniNi nlp:n31 D1rt 1b i nt^r

    r,n N5w nDtn Dlllw' nkrt p 15 -n'4;5 DInDnip tON nnnm nInp* 01 nunpz;n I-npIzM limrr I5np.v lr^n 5v

    :nmp^ n5n ODs:T 159 n5 ni?^ 'plilW T n4 nnn pn:TI

    ,nN fnm 15 l-61 'nnrrn nr7l D nNI) IIn -n7 -Tpt

    1p: 115 -NNi 'nn aYn N5 tt?n3 nnwl N^v Yl"( IINr

    rin n 15 ^ Inni m ,N4t TY :or nw yp3rt onI nim)p

    1rVnII Onl= Invwn Inn3 I nNs II MnlnHD in^ Dnnmvn -7-im ', mvN 5tW cm iT nv m5 nwm ' -iD= -7r 7'1ln

    35- 35- 35- 35-

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  • Rabbiizc Literature. Rabbiizc Literature. Rabbiizc Literature. Rabbiizc Literature.

    .tn*z 'vy,Y i '1 = Ip mvW iV DTr 11 ?t jnnPViu ,yOn 75r1,rD ' UC5W) nY3nn Dpi)b ' 1'MO1 ( rsi ' rmn

    INtw vtop=n 151, ;p;7 1 0) Sn ri nnt N i1zr n ) n- T

    15Zn4 ti 'mr in 1? rnv imnpm i r ir n^rr

    InRN Ni5 v 1,v 7 ='D8 i73D 0 t 'Inv '7 51U

    *m nl's rvrwn 15\ N1 o rnW rivv ,Np^^n^ Nr Ln

    .n7n5 r m rrv n1 i NnnDIn -n Q^n^ siw lln Dn 1n5ltv

    [nI1 .r 5n: p tiw 1i n ?np1 pm nn m N Inn t,8nis D^ wDp 1'n)31 bnul Q^i , nnw , runn 1^r"7

    ;i^ m:sb 'n nt3 nb; 5n: nnn : n n ^n ^ aN^j ;

    ,n 'r n^ It t5Dnn;rl J^n, nt n^, i :!pN ;rri lt nnTn

    ':9 flT 'tD pnfl 51N rR 5Nnl xfllm ic

    Dni nUt rn ;nns 'PIn rsy'n tn n: bT nh 1U O::rr ,l^Si

    "MR 1 1n DnlI 'In^ n a1rTN Yn1 Y:n'Ip Iml ln5 n Iv 1nn mon -nl r* n't, '^s1 UI7Ns mw nln nl7)nn rion Dnwv

    nI] n\W mlpnq = onv8nS Sin nQ 4 n-IrOl rN;n n 5 nU

    *Dr^S)f) T)^?^^ n? r6 I 7 nn p^ ^L m rn^n r

    15DR,nl Ino bmw1 -11m jinm4n, R1r mn - '5xvin mt 1n5 -InN

    nfiSpNn Rinn l -1 n ,ND 4 Iin lt ,5 -InR 11 ',nINRI "Is7

    'IT ;r7 nwr '-n IIm,N19 m:n4 p-1T Ilnn n-715 1 mn5

    mnt r lr n n-r5n 13inm -r r n 1n nI r nn nrmr ['4]n1,m lmn b5n-m tnsz l1o, mn ',mn;i8 I-It -in II1n1m 1D0nwM5 lJILWtnWill U1 -Inr JIM= -1 M R! Mnl JIM'=1 5.V

    .8115 --nR1 -vnmn D13 tnm; irlml sm7 ,N21 -TrnnlY -n:

    ;nypntV O^n Lhrni rh ,nv . sn n A'N trn nAT ,r ;r6 *IDt 'FDbn 539 f72 ,"32 n8n^ 8:urn 9Mi Tnns T^

    VOL. I. AA

    .tn*z 'vy,Y i '1 = Ip mvW iV DTr 11 ?t jnnPViu ,yOn 75r1,rD ' UC5W) nY3nn Dpi)b ' 1'MO1 ( rsi ' rmn

    INtw vtop=n 151, ;p;7 1 0) Sn ri nnt N i1zr n ) n- T

    15Zn4 ti 'mr in 1? rnv imnpm i r ir n^rr

    InRN Ni5 v 1,v 7 ='D8 i73D 0 t 'Inv '7 51U

    *m nl's rvrwn 15\ N1 o rnW rivv ,Np^^n^ Nr Ln

    .n7n5 r m rrv n1 i NnnDIn -n Q^n^ siw lln Dn 1n5ltv

    [nI1 .r 5n: p tiw 1i n ?np1 pm nn m N Inn t,8nis D^ wDp 1'n)31 bnul Q^i , nnw , runn 1^r"7

    ;i^ m:sb 'n nt3 nb; 5n: nnn : n n ^n ^ aN^j ;

    ,n 'r n^ It t5Dnn;rl J^n, nt n^, i :!pN ;rri lt nnTn

    ':9 flT 'tD pnfl 51N rR 5Nnl xfllm ic

    Dni nUt rn ;nns 'PIn rsy'n tn n: bT nh 1U O::rr ,l^Si

    "MR 1 1n DnlI 'In^ n a1rTN Yn1 Y:n'Ip Iml ln5 n Iv 1nn mon -nl r* n't, '^s1 UI7Ns mw nln nl7)nn rion Dnwv

    nI] n\W mlpnq = onv8nS Sin nQ 4 n-IrOl rN;n n 5 nU

    *Dr^S)f) T)^?^^ n? r6 I 7 nn p^ ^L m rn^n r

    15DR,nl Ino bmw1 -11m jinm4n, R1r mn - '5xvin mt 1n5 -InN

    nfiSpNn Rinn l -1 n ,ND 4 Iin lt ,5 -InR 11 ',nINRI "Is7

    'IT ;r7 nwr '-n IIm,N19 m:n4 p-1T Ilnn n-715 1 mn5

    mnt r lr n n-r5n 13inm -r r n 1n nI r nn nrmr ['4]n1,m lmn b5n-m tnsz l1o, mn ',mn;i8 I-It -in II1n1m 1D0nwM5 lJILWtnWill U1 -Inr JIM= -1 M R! Mnl JIM'=1 5.V

    .8115 --nR1 -vnmn D13 tnm; irlml sm7 ,N21 -TrnnlY -n:

    ;nypntV O^n Lhrni rh ,nv . sn n A'N trn nAT ,r ;r6 *IDt 'FDbn 539 f72 ,"32 n8n^ 8:urn 9Mi Tnns T^

    VOL. I. AA

    .tn*z 'vy,Y i '1 = Ip mvW iV DTr 11 ?t jnnPViu ,yOn 75r1,rD ' UC5W) nY3nn Dpi)b ' 1'MO1 ( rsi ' rmn

    INtw vtop=n 151, ;p;7 1 0) Sn ri nnt N i1zr n ) n- T

    15Zn4 ti 'mr in 1? rnv imnpm i r ir n^rr

    InRN Ni5 v 1,v 7 ='D8 i73D 0 t 'Inv '7 51U

    *m nl's rvrwn 15\ N1 o rnW rivv ,Np^^n^ Nr Ln

    .n7n5 r m rrv n1 i NnnDIn -n Q^n^ siw lln Dn 1n5ltv

    [nI1 .r 5n: p tiw 1i n ?np1 pm nn m N Inn t,8nis D^ wDp 1'n)31 bnul Q^i , nnw , runn 1^r"7

    ;i^ m:sb 'n nt3 nb; 5n: nnn : n n ^n ^ aN^j ;

    ,n 'r n^ It t5Dnn;rl J^n, nt n^, i :!pN ;rri lt nnTn

    ':9 flT 'tD pnfl 51N rR 5Nnl xfllm ic

    Dni nUt rn ;nns 'PIn rsy'n tn n: bT nh 1U O::rr ,l^Si

    "MR 1 1n DnlI 'In^ n a1rTN Yn1 Y:n'Ip Iml ln5 n Iv 1nn mon -nl r* n't, '^s1 UI7Ns mw nln nl7)nn rion Dnwv

    nI] n\W mlpnq = onv8nS Sin nQ 4 n-IrOl rN;n n 5 nU

    *Dr^S)f) T)^?^^ n? r6 I 7 nn p^ ^L m rn^n r

    15DR,nl Ino bmw1 -11m jinm4n, R1r mn - '5xvin mt 1n5 -InN

    nfiSpNn Rinn l -1 n ,ND 4 Iin lt ,5 -InR 11 ',nINRI "Is7

    'IT ;r7 nwr '-n IIm,N19 m:n4 p-1T Ilnn n-715 1 mn5

    mnt r lr n n-r5n 13inm -r r n 1n nI r nn nrmr ['4]n1,m lmn b5n-m tnsz l1o, mn ',mn;i8 I-It -in II1n1m 1D0nwM5 lJILWtnWill U1 -Inr JIM= -1 M R! Mnl JIM'=1 5.V

    .8115 --nR1 -vnmn D13 tnm; irlml sm7 ,N21 -TrnnlY -n:

    ;nypntV O^n Lhrni rh ,nv . sn n A'N trn nAT ,r ;r6 *IDt 'FDbn 539 f72 ,"32 n8n^ 8:urn 9Mi Tnns T^

    VOL. I. AA

    .tn*z 'vy,Y i '1 = Ip mvW iV DTr 11 ?t jnnPViu ,yOn 75r1,rD ' UC5W) nY3nn Dpi)b ' 1'MO1 ( rsi ' rmn

    INtw vtop=n 151, ;p;7 1 0) Sn ri nnt N i1zr n ) n- T

    15Zn4 ti 'mr in 1? rnv imnpm i r ir n^rr

    InRN Ni5 v 1,v 7 ='D8 i73D 0 t 'Inv '7 51U

    *m nl's rvrwn 15\ N1 o rnW rivv ,Np^^n^ Nr Ln

    .n7n5 r m rrv n1 i NnnDIn -n Q^n^ siw lln Dn 1n5ltv

    [nI1 .r 5n: p tiw 1i n ?np1 pm nn m N Inn t,8nis D^ wDp 1'n)31 bnul Q^i , nnw , runn 1^r"7

    ;i^ m:sb 'n nt3 nb; 5n: nnn : n n ^n ^ aN^j ;

    ,n 'r n^ It t5Dnn;rl J^n, nt n^, i :!pN ;rri lt nnTn

    ':9 flT 'tD pnfl 51N rR 5Nnl xfllm ic

    Dni nUt rn ;nns 'PIn rsy'n tn n: bT nh 1U O::rr ,l^Si

    "MR 1 1n DnlI 'In^ n a1rTN Yn1 Y:n'Ip Iml ln5 n Iv 1nn mon -nl r* n't, '^s1 UI7Ns mw nln nl7)nn rion Dnwv

    nI] n\W mlpnq = onv8nS Sin nQ 4 n-IrOl rN;n n 5 nU

    *Dr^S)f) T)^?^^ n? r6 I 7 nn p^ ^L m rn^n r

    15DR,nl Ino bmw1 -11m jinm4n, R1r mn - '5xvin mt 1n5 -InN

    nfiSpNn Rinn l -1 n ,ND 4 Iin lt ,5 -InR 11 ',nINRI "Is7

    'IT ;r7 nwr '-n IIm,N19 m:n4 p-1T Ilnn n-715 1 mn5

    mnt r lr n n-r5n 13inm -r r n 1n nI r nn nrmr ['4]n1,m lmn b5n-m tnsz l1o, mn ',mn;i8 I-It -in II1n1m 1D0nwM5 lJILWtnWill U1 -Inr JIM= -1 M R! Mnl JIM'=1 5.V

    .8115 --nR1 -vnmn D13 tnm; irlml sm7 ,N21 -TrnnlY -n:

    ;nypntV O^n Lhrni rh ,nv . sn n A'N trn nAT ,r ;r6 *IDt 'FDbn 539 f72 ,"32 n8n^ 8:urn 9Mi Tnns T^

    VOL. I. AA

    353 353 353 353

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    http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp

  • 354 354 354 354 The Riddles of Solomon in The Riddles of Solomon in The Riddles of Solomon in The Riddles of Solomon in

    rmMN Ir, 1rinINZ 'I 3Vir Nli7 ;21rr 1 p^m w N n Ypnnv

    R. Ishmal related the f wing" Tis is the n isom n olo :VtttMni) itT 0 n5:Vr11 5 n=n)m In: rnl nrzw R. Ishmael related the following:-" This is the wisdom of Solo-

    mon, (the fame of) which extended from end to end of the world, as it is written, 'and he was wiser than all men' (i Kings, v, 1); and it is said, 'But where shall wisdom be found, and where is the place of understanding?' (Job, xxviii, 12). This is the Queen of Sheba, who heard of the wisdom of Solomon and said, 'I will go and see his wisdom, whether he be wise or not."'

    R. Jeremiah said:-" The Queen of Sheba, addressing Solomon, said to him, 'I have heard of thee and thy wisdom; if now I inquire of thee concerning any matter, wilt thou answer me?' He replied, 'The Lord giveth wisdom : out of His mouth cometh know- ledge and understanding.' She then said to him: (I) 'Seven there are that issue and nine that enter: two yield the draught, and one drinks.' Said he to her, 'Seven are the days of a woman's defilement, and nine the months of pregnancy; two are the breasts that yield the draught, and one the child that drinks it.' Whereupon she said to him 'Thou art wise.' (2) Then she questioned him further: 'A woman said to her son, thy father is my father, and thy grandfather my husband; thou art my son, and I am thy sister.' 'Assuredly,' said he, 'it was the daughter of Lot who spake thus to her son.' (3) She placed before him a number of males and females, and said, ' Dis- tinguish now between them.' Forthwith he made a sign to the eunuchs, who brought him a quantity of nuts and roasted ears of corn. The males, who were not troubled with bashfulness, seized them with bare hands, the females took them putting forth their gloved hands from beneath their garments. Whereupon he exclaimed, 'Those are the males, these the females.' (4) She brought to him a num- ber of persons, some circumcised and others uncircumcised, and asked him to distinguish between them. He instantly made a sign to the high priest, who opened the ark of the covenant; whereupon those that were circumcised bowed their bodies to half their height, while their countenances were filled with the radiance of the Shechinah; the uncircumcised fell prone upon their faces. 'Those,' said he, 'are circumcised, these uncircum- cised.' 'Thou art indeed wise, she exclaimed. (5) She put other questions to him, to all of which he gave replies. 'Who is he who neither was born nor has died?' 'It is the Lord of the Universe, blessed be He.' (6) 'What land is that that has but

    rmMN Ir, 1rinINZ 'I 3Vir Nli7 ;21rr 1 p^m w N n Ypnnv

    R. Ishmal related the f wing" Tis is the n isom n olo :VtttMni) itT 0 n5:Vr11 5 n=n)m In: rnl nrzw R. Ishmael related the following:-" This is the wisdom of Solo-

    mon, (the fame of) which extended from end to end of the world, as it is written, 'and he was wiser than all men' (i Kings, v, 1); and it is said, 'But where shall wisdom be found, and where is the place of understanding?' (Job, xxviii, 12). This is the Queen of Sheba, who heard of the wisdom of Solomon and said, 'I will go and see his wisdom, whether he be wise or not."'

    R. Jeremiah said:-" The Queen of Sheba, addressing Solomon, said to him, 'I have heard of thee and thy wisdom; if now I inquire of thee concerning any matter, wilt thou answer me?' He replied, 'The Lord giveth wisdom : out of His mouth cometh know- ledge and understanding.' She then said to him: (I) 'Seven there are that issue and nine that enter: two yield the draught, and one drinks.' Said he to her, 'Seven are the days of a woman's defilement, and nine the months of pregnancy; two are the breasts that yield the draught, and one the child that drinks it.' Whereupon she said to him 'Thou art wise.' (2) Then she questioned him further: 'A woman said to her son, thy father is my father, and thy grandfather my husband; thou art my son, and I am thy sister.' 'Assuredly,' said he, 'it was the daughter of Lot who spake thus to her son.' (3) She placed before him a number of males and females, and said, ' Dis- tinguish now between them.' Forthwith he made a sign to the eunuchs, who brought him a quantity of nuts and roasted ears of corn. The males, who were not troubled with bashfulness, seized them with bare hands, the females took them putting forth their gloved hands from beneath their garments. Whereupon he exclaimed, 'Those are the males, these the females.' (4) She brought to him a num- ber of persons, some circumcised and others uncircumcised, and asked him to distinguish between them. He instantly made a sign to the high priest, who opened the ark of the covenant; whereupon those that were circumcised bowed their bodies to half their height, while their countenances were filled with the radiance of the Shechinah; the uncircumcised fell prone upon their faces. 'Those,' said he, 'are circumcised, these uncircum- cised.' 'Thou art indeed wise, she exclaimed. (5) She put other questions to him, to all of which he gave replies. 'Who is he who neither was born nor has died?' 'It is the Lord of the Universe, blessed be He.' (6) 'What land is that that has but

    rmMN Ir, 1rinINZ 'I 3Vir Nli7 ;21rr 1 p^m w N n Ypnnv

    R. Ishmal related the f wing" Tis is the n isom n olo :VtttMni) itT 0 n5:Vr11 5 n=n)m In: rnl nrzw R. Ishmael related the following:-" This is the wisdom of Solo-

    mon, (the fame of) which extended from end to end of the world, as it is written, 'and he was wiser than all men' (i Kings, v, 1); and it is said, 'But where shall wisdom be found, and where is the place of understanding?' (Job, xxviii, 12). This is the Queen of Sheba, who heard of the wisdom of Solomon and said, 'I will go and see his wisdom, whether he be wise or not."'

    R. Jeremiah said:-" The Queen of Sheba, addressing Solomon, said to him, 'I have heard of thee and thy wisdom; if now I inquire of thee concerning any matter, wilt thou answer me?' He replied, 'The Lord giveth wisdom : out of His mouth cometh know- ledge and understanding.' She then said to him: (I) 'Seven there are that issue and nine that enter: two yield the draught, and one drinks.' Said he to her, 'Seven are the days of a woman's defilement, and nine the months of pregnancy; two are the breasts that yield the draught, and one the child that drinks it.' Whereupon she said to him 'Thou art wise.' (2) Then she questioned him further: 'A woman said to her son, thy father is my father, and thy grandfather my husband; thou art my son, and I am thy sister.' 'Assuredly,' said he, 'it was the daughter of Lot who spake thus to her son.' (3) She placed before him a number of males and females, and said, ' Dis- tinguish now between them.' Forthwith he made a sign to the eunuchs, who brought him a quantity of nuts and roasted ears of corn. The males, who were not troubled with bashfulness, seized them with bare hands, the females took them putting forth their gloved hands from beneath their garments. Whereupon he exclaimed, 'Those are the males, these the females.' (4) She brought to him a num- ber of persons, some circumcised and others uncircumcised, and asked him to distinguish between them. He instantly made a sign to the high priest, who opened the ark of the covenant; whereupon those that were circumcised bowed their bodies to half their height, while their countenances were filled with the radiance of the Shechinah; the uncircumcised fell prone upon their faces. 'Those,' said he, 'are circumcised, these uncircum- cised.' 'Thou art indeed wise, she exclaimed. (5) She put other questions to him, to all of which he gave replies. 'Who is he who neither was born nor has died?' 'It is the Lord of the Universe, blessed be He.' (6) 'What land is that that has but

    rmMN Ir, 1rinINZ 'I 3Vir Nli7 ;21rr 1 p^m w N n Ypnnv

    R. Ishmal related the f wing" Tis is the n isom n olo :VtttMni) itT 0 n5:Vr11 5 n=n)m In: rnl nrzw R. Ishmael related the following:-" This is the wisdom of Solo-

    mon, (the fame of) which extended from end to end of the world, as it is written, 'and he was wiser than all men' (i Kings, v, 1); and it is said, 'But where shall wisdom be found, and where is the place of understanding?' (Job, xxviii, 12). This is the Queen of Sheba, who heard of the wisdom of Solomon and said, 'I will go and see his wisdom, whether he be wise or not."'

    R. Jeremiah said:-" The Queen of Sheba, addressing Solomon, said to him, 'I have heard of thee and thy wisdom; if now I inquire of thee concerning any matter, wilt thou answer me?' He replied, 'The Lord giveth wisdom : out of His mouth cometh know- ledge and understanding.' She then said to him: (I) 'Seven there are that issue and nine that enter: two yield the draught, and one drinks.' Said he to her, 'Seven are the days of a woman's defilement, and nine the months of pregnancy; two are the breasts that yield the draught, and one the child that drinks it.' Whereupon she said to him 'Thou art wise.' (2) Then she questioned him further: 'A woman said to her son, thy father is my father, and thy grandfather my husband; thou art my son, and I am thy sister.' 'Assuredly,' said he, 'it was the daughter of Lot who spake thus to her son.' (3) She placed before him a number of males and females, and said, ' Dis- tinguish now between them.' Forthwith he made a sign to the eunuchs, who brought him a quantity of nuts and roasted ears of corn. The males, who were not troubled with bashfulness, seized them with bare hands, the females took them putting forth their gloved hands from beneath their garments. Whereupon he exclaimed, 'Those are the males, these the females.' (4) She brought to him a num- ber of persons, some circumcised and others uncircumcised, and asked him to distinguish between them. He instantly made a sign to the high priest, who opened the ark of the covenant; whereupon those that were circumcised bowed their bodies to half their height, while their countenances were filled with the radiance of the Shechinah; the uncircumcised fell prone upon their faces. 'Those,' said he, 'are circumcised, these uncircum- cised.' 'Thou art indeed wise, she exclaimed. (5) She put other questions to him, to all of which he gave replies. 'Who is he who neither was born nor has died?' 'It is the Lord of the Universe, blessed be He.' (6) 'What land is that that has but

    This content downloaded from 62.122.72.154 on Sat, 14 Jun 2014 03:26:34 AMAll use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions

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  • Rabbinzc Li/er ature. 355

    once seen the sun ?' 'The land upon which (after the creation) the waters were gathered, and (the bed of the sea on) the day when the sea was divided.' (7)' There is an enclosure with ten doors, when one is open, nine are shut; when nine are open, one is shut.' 'That enclosure is the womb: the ten doors are the ten orifices of man-his eyes, ears, nostrils, mouth, the apertures for the discharge of the excreta and the urine, and the navel; when the child is in the embryonic state, the navel is open and the other orifices are closed, but when it issues (from the womb) the navel is closed, and the others are opened.' (8) '(There is something which when) living moves not, yet when its head is cut off it moves?' 'It is the ship in the sea' (the living tree has no motion, the trunk from which the crowning branches have been severed supplies the material for the moving vessel). (9) 'Which are the three that neither ate, nor drank, nor had breath put into them, yet saved three lives from death?' 'The seal, the thread and the staff (of Judah)' are those three, and the lives they saved were Tamar, Pharez, and Zarah.' (io) 'Three entered a cave, and five came forth therefrom?' 'Lot and his two daughters, and their two children.' (II) 'The dead lived, the grave moves, and the dead prays: what is that?' 'The dead one was Jonah; the moving grave, the fish; Jonah was also the one that prayed.' (I2) 'Who were the three that ate and drank on the earth, yet were not born of male and female?' 'The three angels who revealed themselves to our father Abraham, peace be unto him.' (I3) 'Four entered a place of death and came forth alive, and two entered a place of life and came forth dead ?' 'The four were Daniel, Hananiah, Mishael, and Azariah; and the two who entered a place of life and came forth dead were Nadab and Abihu.' (14) 'Who was he who was born and died not?' 'Elijah and the Messiah.' (I5) 'What was that which was not born, yet life was given to it ?' 'The (golden) calf.' (i6) ' What is that which is produced from the ground, yet man produces it, while its food is of the fruit of the ground ?' 'A wick.' (17) 'A woman was wedded to two, and bare two sons, yet these four had one father ? ' Tamar was married by two, Er and Onan; she bore two (sons), Pharez and Tarah; and the father of (all) four was Judah.' (i8) 'A house full of dead: no dead one came among them, nor did a living one come forth from them?' 'It is the story of Samson and the Philistines.' (I9) She next ordered the sawn (trunk of a) cedar tree to be brought, and asked him to point out which (end) the root had been and at which the branches. He bade her cast it into the water, when one end sank and the other floated upon the surface of the water. That part which sank was the root, and that which remained uppermost

    AA2

    Rabbinzc Li/er ature. 355

    once seen the sun ?' 'The land upon which (after the creation) the waters were gathered, and (the bed of the sea on) the day when the sea was divided.' (7)' There is an enclosure with ten doors, when one is open, nine are shut; when nine are open, one is shut.' 'That enclosure is the womb: the ten doors are the ten orifices of man-his eyes, ears, nostrils, mouth, the apertures for the discharge of the excreta and the urine, and the navel; when the child is in the embryonic state, the navel is open and the other orifices are closed, but when it issues (from the womb) the navel is closed, and the others are opened.' (8) '(There is something which when) living moves not, yet when its head is cut off it moves?' 'It is the ship in the sea' (the living tree has no motion, the trunk from which the crowning branches have been severed supplies the material for the moving vessel). (9) 'Which are the three that neither ate, nor drank, nor had breath put into them, yet saved three lives from death?' 'The seal, the thread and the staff (of Judah)' are those three, and the lives they saved were Tamar, Pharez, and Zarah.' (io) 'Three entered a cave, and five came forth therefrom?' 'Lot and his two daughters, and their two children.' (II) 'The dead lived, the grave moves, and the dead prays: what is that?' 'The dead one was Jonah; the moving grave, the fish; Jonah was also the one that prayed.' (I2) 'Who were the three that ate and drank on the earth, yet were not born of male and female?' 'The three angels who revealed themselves to our father Abraham, peace be unto him.' (I3) 'Four entered a place of death and came forth alive, and two entered a place of life and came forth dead ?' 'The four were Daniel, Hananiah, Mishael, and Azariah; and the two who entered a place of life and came forth dead were Nadab and Abihu.' (14) 'Who was he who was born and died not?' 'Elijah and the Messiah.' (I5) 'What was that which was not born, yet life was given to it ?' 'The (golden) calf.' (i6) ' What is that which is produced from the ground, yet man produces it, while its food is of the fruit of the ground ?' 'A wick.' (17) 'A woman was wedded to two, and bare two sons, yet these four had one father ? ' Tamar was married by two, Er and Onan; she bore two (sons), Pharez and Tarah; and the father of (all) four was Judah.' (i8) 'A house full of dead: no dead one came among them, nor did a living one come forth from them?' 'It is the story of Samson and the Philistines.' (I9) She next ordered the sawn (trunk of a) cedar tree to be brought, and asked him to point out which (end) the root had been and at which the branches. He bade her cast it into the water, when one end sank and the other floated upon the surface of the water. That part which sank was the root, and that which remained uppermost

    AA2

    Rabbinzc Li/er ature. 355

    once seen the sun ?' 'The land upon which (after the creation) the waters were gathered, and (the bed of the sea on) the day when the sea was divided.' (7)' There is an enclosure with ten doors, when one is open, nine are shut; when nine are open, one is shut.' 'That enclosure is the womb: the ten doors are the ten orifices of man-his eyes, ears, nostrils, mouth, the apertures for the discharge of the excreta and the urine, and the navel; when the child is in the embryonic state, the navel is open and the other orifices are closed, but when it issues (from the womb) the navel is closed, and the others are opened.' (8) '(There is something which when) living moves not, yet when its head is cut off it moves?' 'It is the ship in the sea' (the living tree has no motion, the trunk from which the crowning branches have been severed supplies the material for the moving vessel). (9) 'Which are the three that neither ate, nor drank, nor had breath put into them, yet saved three lives from death?' 'The seal, the thread and the staff (of Judah)' are those three, and the lives they saved were Tamar, Pharez, and Zarah.' (io) 'Three entered a cave, and five came forth therefrom?' 'Lot and his two daughters, and their two children.' (II) 'The dead lived, the grave moves, and the dead prays: what is that?' 'The dead one was Jonah; the moving grave, the fish; Jonah was also the one that prayed.' (I2) 'Who were the three that ate and drank on the earth, yet were not born of male and female?' 'The three angels who revealed themselves to our father Abraham, peace be unto him.' (I3) 'Four entered a place of death and came forth alive, and two entered a place of life and came forth dead ?' 'The four were Daniel, Hananiah, Mishael, and Azariah; and the two who entered a place of life and came forth dead were Nadab and Abihu.' (14) 'Who was he who was born and died not?' 'Elijah and the Messiah.' (I5) 'What was that which was not born, yet life was given to it ?' 'The (golden) calf.' (i6) ' What is that which is produced from the ground, yet man produces it, while its food is of the fruit of the ground ?' 'A wick.' (17) 'A woman was wedded to two, and bare two sons, yet these four had one father ? ' Tamar was married by two, Er and Onan; she bore two (sons), Pharez and Tarah; and the father of (all) four was Judah.' (i8) 'A house full of dead: no dead one came among them, nor did a living one come forth from them?' 'It is the story of Samson and the Philistines.' (I9) She next ordered the sawn (trunk of a) cedar tree to be brought, and asked him to point out which (end) the root had been and at which the branches. He bade her cast it into the water, when one end sank and the other floated upon the surface of the water. That part which sank was the root, and that which remained uppermost

    AA2

    Rabbinzc Li/er ature. 355

    once seen the sun ?' 'The land upon which (after the creation) the waters were gathered, and (the bed of the sea on) the day when the sea was divided.' (7)' There is an enclosure with ten doors, when one is open, nine are shut; when nine are open, one is shut.' 'That enclosure is the womb: the ten doors are the ten orifices of man-his eyes, ears, nostrils, mouth, the apertures for the discharge of the excreta and the urine, and the navel; when the child is in the embryonic state, the navel is open and the other orifices are closed, but when it issues (from the womb) the navel is closed, and the others are opened.' (8) '(There is something which when) living moves not, yet when its head is cut off it moves?' 'It is the ship in the sea' (the living tree has no motion, the trunk from which the crowning branches have been severed supplies the material for the moving vessel). (9) 'Which are the three that neither ate, nor drank, nor had breath put into them, yet saved three lives from death?' 'The seal, the thread and the staff (of Judah)' are those three, and the lives they saved were Tamar, Pharez, and Zarah.' (io) 'Three entered a cave, and five came forth therefrom?' 'Lot and his two daughters, and their two children.' (II) 'The dead lived, the grave moves, and the dead prays: what is that?' 'The dead one was Jonah; the moving grave, the fish; Jonah was also the one that prayed.' (I2) 'Who were the three that ate and drank on the earth, yet were not born of male and female?' 'The three angels who revealed themselves to our father Abraham, peace be unto him.' (I3) 'Four entered a place of death and came forth alive, and two entered a place of life and came forth dead ?' 'The four were Daniel, Hananiah, Mishael, and Azariah; and the two who entered a place of life and came forth dead were Nadab and Abihu.' (14) 'Who was he who was born and died not?' 'Elijah and the Messiah.' (I5) 'What was that which was not born, yet life was given to it ?' 'The (golden) calf.' (i6) ' What is that which is produced from the ground, yet man produces it, while its food is of the fruit of the ground ?' 'A wick.' (17) 'A woman was wedded to two, and bare two sons, yet these four had one father ? ' Tamar was married by two, Er and Onan; she bore two (sons), Pharez and Tarah; and the father of (all) four was Judah.' (i8) 'A house full of dead: no dead one came among them, nor did a living one come forth from them?' 'It is the story of Samson and the Philistines.' (I9) She next ordered the sawn (trunk of a) cedar tree to be brought, and asked him to point out which (end) the root had been and at which the branches. He bade her cast it into the water, when one end sank and the other floated upon the surface of the water. That part which sank was the root, and that which remained uppermost

    AA2

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  • The Riddles of Solomon in The Riddles of Solomon in The Riddles of Solomon in The Riddles of Solomon in

    was the branch end. Then she said to him,'Thou exceedest in wisdom and goodness the fame which I heard, blessed be thy God.' Therefore it is said, 'And the Lord gave wisdom unto Solomon.'"

    The chief critical problem of interest in connection with these Riddles is to trace how far they occur in other Jewish or Eastern sources. The following notes bearing on this side of the subject may perhaps be of service to students of folk-lore, who seem to an outsider to be more interested in parallels than in originals. Rabbinic literature, which is in a large measure one vast system of parallels, ought to offer them wide scope for their study.

    With regard to the separate Riddles, there is in the Midrash on Lamentations,ch.i, a parallel to Riddle I. In Perles' work, Zur Rabbinischen Sprach- und Sagenkunde, p. 97, note I, Persian parallels are also given. Riddle 2 is of a genea- logical character,and so are Riddles Io and 17. The study of the forbidden degrees in marriage may have encouraged the discussion of such questions. See, for instance, the Talmud of Babylon, Yebamoth, 9b. As to Riddle 3, on which there was a question in Folk-Lore Journal, viip. 36, besides this version four others are known, put together by the late Prof. Delitzsch in his work, Iris (Edinburgh, 1889), of which we give here a brief extract. Two are of Mahomedan origin. According to one: "The boys and girls he thus distinguished; when, according to the usual custom in the harems, water was brought to be poured on their hands, the girls received it in the palm, the boys on the backs of their hands." According to the other: "The boys lifted the hand, on which the water was poured, immediately to their face, whereas the girls first filled the right hand with the water falling on the left, and then washed the face with both hands at once." In the Byzantine version, as related by Georgius Cedrenus and Michael Glykas, the male children, when commanded to wash themselves, "rubbed their faces with right good will, the females gently and timidly." In another version, again, Solomon distinguished between the boys and girls by the

    was the branch end. Then she said to him,'Thou exceedest in wisdom and goodness the fame which I heard, blessed be thy God.' Therefore it is said, 'And the Lord gave wisdom unto Solomon.'"

    The chief critical problem of interest in connection with these Riddles is to trace how far they occur in other Jewish or Eastern sources. The following notes bearing on this side of the subject may perhaps be of service to students of folk-lore, who seem to an outsider to be more interested in parallels than in originals. Rabbinic literature, which is in a large measure one vast system of parallels, ought to offer them wide scope for their study.

    With regard to the separate Riddles, there is in the Midrash on Lamentations,ch.i, a parallel to Riddle I. In Perles' work, Zur Rabbinischen Sprach- und Sagenkunde, p. 97, note I, Persian parallels are also given. Riddle 2 is of a genea- logical character,and so are Riddles Io and 17. The study of the forbidden degrees in marriage may have encouraged the discussion of such questions. See, for instance, the Talmud of Babylon, Yebamoth, 9b. As to Riddle 3, on which there was a question in Folk-Lore Journal, viip. 36, besides this version four others are known, put together by the late Prof. Delitzsch in his work, Iris (Edinburgh, 1889), of which we give here a brief extract. Two are of Mahomedan origin. According to one: "The boys and girls he thus distinguished; when, according to the usual custom in the harems, water was brought to be poured on their hands, the girls received it in the palm, the boys on the backs of their hands." According to the other: "The boys lifted the hand, on which the water was poured, immediately to their face, whereas the girls first filled the right hand with the water falling on the left, and then washed the face with both hands at once." In the Byzantine version, as related by Georgius Cedrenus and Michael Glykas, the male children, when commanded to wash themselves, "rubbed their faces with right good will, the females gently and timidly." In another version, again, Solomon distinguished between the boys and girls by the

    was the branch end. Then she said to him,'Thou exceedest in wisdom and goodness the fame which I heard, blessed be thy God.' Therefore it is said, 'And the Lord gave wisdom unto Solomon.'"

    The chief critical problem of interest in connection with these Riddles is to trace how far they occur in other Jewish or Eastern sources. The following notes bearing on this side of the subject may perhaps be of service to students of folk-lore, who seem to an outsider to be more interested in parallels than in originals. Rabbinic literature, which is in a large measure one vast system of parallels, ought to offer them wide scope for their study.

    With regard to the separate Riddles, there is in the Midrash on Lamentations,ch.i, a parallel to Riddle I. In Perles' work, Zur Rabbinischen Sprach- und Sagenkunde, p. 97, note I, Persian parallels are also given. Riddle 2 is of a genea- logical character,and so are Riddles Io and 17. The study of the forbidden degrees in marriage may have encouraged the discussion of such questions. See, for instance, the Talmud of Babylon, Yebamoth, 9b. As to Riddle 3, on which there was a question in Folk-Lore Journal, viip. 36, besides this version four others are known, put together by the late Prof. Delitzsch in his work, Iris (Edinburgh, 1889), of which we give here a brief extract. Two are of Mahomedan origin. According to one: "The boys and girls he thus distinguished; when, according to the usual custom in the harems, water was brought to be poured on their hands, the girls received it in the palm, the boys on the backs of their hands." According to the other: "The boys lifted the hand, on which the water was poured, immediately to their face, whereas the girls first filled the right hand with the water falling on the left, and then washed the face with both hands at once." In the Byzantine version, as related by Georgius Cedrenus and Michael Glykas, the male children, when commanded to wash themselves, "rubbed their faces with right good will, the females gently and timidly." In another version, again, Solomon distinguished between the boys and girls by the

    was the branch end. Then she said to him,'Thou exceedest in wisdom and goodness the fame which I heard, blessed be thy God.' Therefore it is said, 'And the Lord gave wisdom unto Solomon.'"

    The chief critical problem of interest in connection with these Riddles is to trace how far they occur in other Jewish or Eastern sources. The following notes bearing on this side of the subject may perhaps be of service to students of folk-lore, who seem to an outsider to be more interested in parallels than in originals. Rabbinic literature, which is in a large measure one vast system of parallels, ought to offer them wide scope for their study.

    With regard to the separate Riddles, there is in the Midrash on Lamentations,ch.i, a parallel to Riddle I. In Perles' work, Zur Rabbinischen Sprach- und Sagenkunde, p. 97, note I, Persian parallels are also given. Riddle 2 is of a genea- logical character,and so are Riddles Io and 17. The study of the forbidden degrees in marriage may have encouraged the discussion of such questions. See, for instance, the Talmud of Babylon, Yebamoth, 9b. As to Riddle 3, on which there was a question in Folk-Lore Journal, viip. 36, besides this version four others are known, put together by the late Prof. Delitzsch in his work, Iris (Edinburgh, 1889), of which we give here a brief extract. Two are of Mahomedan origin. According to one: "The boys and girls he thus distinguished; when, according to the usual custom in the harems, water was brought to be poured on their hands, the girls received it in the palm, the boys on the backs of their hands." According to the other: "The boys lifted the hand, on which the water was poured, immediately to their face, whereas the girls first filled the right hand with the water falling on the left, and then washed the face with both hands at once." In the Byzantine version, as related by Georgius Cedrenus and Michael Glykas, the male children, when commanded to wash themselves, "rubbed their faces with right good will, the females gently and timidly." In another version, again, Solomon distinguished between the boys and girls by the

    356 356 356 356

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  • Rabbinic Literature. 357

    fact that " the former washed their faces like men without more ado, while the latter, with characteristic prudery, would scarcely touch the water with the tips of their fingers."

    As to the authorities for these different sources, they are fully discussed by Delitzsch (1. c., 154-165), where the reader will find also many interesting points about the migration of this legend in the Wisdom literature, and the use which artists and poets have made of it.' With regard to the solution of the 4th Riddle, it is based on the Jewish belief that those who were not brought into the covenant of Abraham are so overpowered by any strong manifestation of the divine presence that they lose the use of their limbs and fall down. This is supposed to be proved by Balaam, the non-Jewish prophet, of whom it is said in the Scripture: " Which saw the vision of the Almighty falling into a trance" (Numbers, xxiv). For Riddle 7 we have partial parallels in Nedarimn 32b, Niddah 32b, and elsewhere. The completest parallel is to be found in the Appendix to Adra- Viraf- namet,! ed. E. W. West. (See Perles, lib. cit., pp. 98 and 99, and notes.) In Riddle 13 the MSS. vary, but the difference is not material, as may be seen by the translation which was made in this place after Or. 2351. The word Daniel, though it is to be found in all MSS., must be ascribed to a slip of the copyist, being accustomed, from his frequent reading of the Bible, to mention these four names together. With regard to Riddle 14, it is to be noticed that other Jewish sources speak of nine or thirteen persons who have not died. See Epstein's Beitrdge, p. I I I, where all the parallels are put together. The solution of Riddle 15 is based on the legend according to which the magicians Yannes and Yambros (see 2 Tim. iii, 8, and com- mentaries, and Levy, Chald. Wirterb., 337), who belonged to the mixed multitude which went up with the Israelites from Egypt, managed by their charms to make the gold calf speak. According to other versions, it was Satan him-

    1 There is also much of interest and value in A, Wuensche, Die Rithselweisheit der alten HebrZer,

    Rabbinic Literature. 357

    fact that " the former washed their faces like men without more ado, while the latter, with characteristic prudery, would scarcely touch the water with the tips of their fingers."

    As to the authorities for these different sources, they are fully discussed by Delitzsch (1. c., 154-165), where the reader will find also many interesting points about the migration of this legend in the Wisdom literature, and the use which artists and poets have made of it.' With regard to the solution of the 4th Riddle, it is based on the Jewish belief that those who were not brought into the covenant of Abraham are so overpowered by any strong manifestation of the divine presence that they lose the use of their limbs and fall down. This is supposed to be proved by Balaam, the non-Jewish prophet, of whom it is said in the Scripture: " Which saw the vision of the Almighty falling into a trance" (Numbers, xxiv). For Riddle 7 we have partial parallels in Nedarimn 32b, Niddah 32b, and elsewhere. The completest parallel is to be found in the Appendix to Adra- Viraf- namet,! ed. E. W. West. (See Perles, lib. cit., pp. 98 and 99, and notes.) In Riddle 13 the MSS. vary, but the difference is not material, as may be seen by the translation which was made in this place after Or. 2351. The word Daniel, though it is to be found in all MSS., must be ascribed to a slip of the copyist, being accustomed, from his frequent reading of the Bible, to mention these four names together. With regard to Riddle 14, it is to be noticed that other Jewish sources speak of nine or thirteen persons who have not died. See Epstein's Beitrdge, p. I I I, where all the parallels are put together. The solution of Riddle 15 is based on the legend according to which the magicians Yannes and Yambros (see 2 Tim. iii, 8, and com- mentaries, and Levy, Chald. Wirterb., 337), who belonged to the mixed multitude which went up with the Israelites from Egypt, managed by their charms to make the gold calf speak. According to other versions, it was Satan him-

    1 There is also much of interest and value in A, Wuensche, Die Rithselweisheit der alten HebrZer,

    Rabbinic Literature. 357

    fact that " the former washed their faces like men without more ado, while the latter, with characteristic prudery, would scarcely touch the water with the tips of their fingers."

    As to the authorities for these different sources, they are fully discussed by Delitzsch (1. c., 154-165), where the reader will find also many interesting points about the migration of this legend in the Wisdom literature, and the use which artists and poets have made of it.' With regard to the solution of the 4th Riddle, it is based on the Jewish belief that those who were not brought into the covenant of Abraham are so overpowered by any strong manifestation of the divine presence that they lose the use of their limbs and fall down. This is supposed to be proved by Balaam, the non-Jewish prophet, of whom it is said in the Scripture: " Which saw the vision of the Almighty falling into a trance" (Numbers, xxiv). For Riddle 7 we have partial parallels in Nedarimn 32b, Niddah 32b, and elsewhere. The completest parallel is to be found in the Appendix to Adra- Viraf- namet,! ed. E. W. West. (See Perles, lib. cit., pp. 98 and 99, and notes.) In Riddle 13 the MSS. vary, but the difference is not material, as may be seen by the translation which was made in this place after Or. 2351. The word Daniel, though it is to be found in all MSS., must be ascribed to a slip of the copyist, being accustomed, from his frequent reading of the Bible, to mention these four names together. With regard to Riddle 14, it is to be noticed that other Jewish sources speak of nine or thirteen persons who have not died. See Epstein's Beitrdge, p. I I I, where all the parallels are put together. The solution of Riddle 15 is based on the legend according to which the magicians Yannes and Yambros (see 2 Tim. iii, 8, and com- mentaries, and Levy, Chald. Wirterb., 337), who belonged to the mixed multitude which went up with the Israelites from Egypt, managed by their charms to make the gold calf speak. According to other versions, it was Satan him-

    1 There is also much of interest and value in A, Wuensche, Die Rithselweisheit der alten HebrZer,

    Rabbinic Literature. 357

    fact that " the former washed their faces like men without more ado, while the latter, with characteristic prudery, would scarcely touch the water with the tips of their fingers."

    As to the authorities for these different sources, they are fully discussed by Delitzsch (1. c., 154-165), where the reader will find also many interesting points about the migration of this legend in the Wisdom literature, and the use which artists and poets have made of it.' With regard to the solution of the 4th Riddle, it is based on the Jewish belief that those who were not brought into the covenant of Abraham are so overpowered by any strong manifestation of the divine presence that they lose the use of their limbs and fall down. This is supposed to be proved by Balaam, the non-Jewish prophet, of whom it is said in the Scripture: " Which saw the vision of the Almighty falling into a trance" (Numbers, xxiv). For Riddle 7 we have partial parallels in Nedarimn 32b, Niddah 32b, and elsewhere. The completest parallel is to be found in the Appendix to Adra- Viraf- namet,! ed. E. W. West. (See Perles, lib. cit., pp. 98 and 99, and notes.) In Riddle 13 the MSS. vary, but the difference is not material, as may be seen by the translation which was made in this place after Or. 2351. The word Daniel, though it is to be found in all MSS., must be ascribed to a slip of the copyist, being accustomed, from his frequent reading of the Bible, to mention these four names together. With regard to Riddle 14, it is to be noticed that other Jewish sources speak of nine or thirteen persons who have not died. See Epstein's Beitrdge, p. I I I, where all the parallels are put together. The solution of Riddle 15 is based on the legend according to which the magicians Yannes and Yambros (see 2 Tim. iii, 8, and com- mentaries, and Levy, Chald. Wirterb., 337), who belonged to the mixed multitude which went up with the Israelites from Egypt, managed by their charms to make the gold calf speak. According to other versions, it was Satan him-

    1 There is also much of interest and value in A, Wuensche, Die Rithselweisheit der alten HebrZer,

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  • The Riddles of Solomon. The Riddles of Solomon. The Riddles of Solomon. The Riddles of Solomon.

    self who went into the calf and spoke (see Tanchuma to Exod. xxxii, I, and the Targum of Jerusalem to the same verse. Riddle i6 reminds us very much of the 2nd Riddle in the version of the Second Targum, which has been translated and fully treated by P. Cassel in his

    Commentary on Esther, pp. 283 and 284. This fact

    may, perhaps, suggest that our version once contained all the Riddles of the Second Targum, as it has all the Riddles of the Midrash, which will prove that none of all these versions is complete in its present form. The MSS. contain here an Arabic gloss, the translations of which I owe to the kindness of Dr. Neubauer. It runs thus: "Men plait the wick and then light it, for if it had not been plaited it would not burn evenly. Therefore it is considered as if men had created it, i.e., made it." Riddle I9 was probably suggested by I Kings, v, 33. (See the excellent remarks of Dr. Jellinek on this point, in his introduction to the fifth volume of his Beth Hammidrash, p. Iv.)

    We think that the foregoing remarks, as well as the few words which we have interpolated in round brackets here and there in the translation, will suffice to make the text

    intelligible to the reader. The parallels from non-Jewish sources we leave to others, and we have no doubt that

    they also will furnish the folk-lorist with interesting matter. See, for instance, the Dialogue of Solomon and Saturnus, by Kemble, p. i99, Riddle 5 and Riddle 6, in our version. There are also many points in the introduction to Kemble's book which will have to be corrected after the researches of Steinschneider and others on the subject. The story of a Man from Jerusalem, which is attributed to R. Abra- ham Maimun, must also not be neglected by the student. We can only hope that Mr. Jacobs, who has equal mastery both of Jewish and non-Jewish sources, will soon find the leisure to favour us with a new edition of the Dialogue.

    self who went into the calf and spoke (see Tanchuma to Exod. xxxii, I, and the Targum of Jerusalem to the same verse. Riddle i6 reminds us very much of the 2nd Riddle in the version of the Second Targum, which has been translated and fully treated by P. Cassel in his

    Commentary on Esther, pp. 283 and 284. This fact

    may, perhaps, suggest that our version once contained all the Riddles of the Second Targum, as it has all the Riddles of the Midrash, which will prove that none of all these versions is complete in its present form. The MSS. contain here an Arabic gloss, the translations of which I owe to the kindness of Dr. Neubauer. It runs thus: "Men plait the wick and then light it, for if it had not been plaited it would not burn evenly. Therefore it is considered as if men had created it, i.e., made it." Riddle I9 was probably suggested by I Kings, v, 33. (See the excellent remarks of Dr. Jellinek on this point, in his introduction to the fifth volume of his Beth Hammidrash, p. Iv.)

    We think that the foregoing remarks, as well as the few words which we have interpolated in round brackets here and there in the translation, will suffice to make the text

    intelligible to the reader. The parallels from non-Jewish sources we leave to others, and we have no doubt that

    they also will furnish the folk-lorist with interesting matter. See, for instance, the Dialogue of Solomon and Saturnus, by Kemble, p. i99, Riddle 5 and Riddle 6, in our version. There are also many points in the introduction to Kemble's book which will have to be corrected after the researches of Steinschneider and others on the subject. The story of a Man from Jerusalem, which is attributed to R. Abra- ham Maimun, must also not be neglected by the student. We can only hope that Mr. Jacobs, who has equal mastery both of Jewish and non-Jewish sources, will soon find the leisure to favour us with a new edition of the Dialogue.

    self who went into the calf and spoke (see Tanchuma to Exod. xxxii, I, and the Targum of Jerusalem to the same verse. Riddle i6 reminds us very much of the 2nd Riddle in the version of the Second Targum, which has been translated and fully treated by P. Cassel in his

    Commentary on Esther, pp. 283 and 284. This fact

    may, perhaps, suggest that our version once contained all the Riddles of the Second Targum, as it has all the Riddles of the Midrash, which will prove that none of all these versions is complete in its present form. The MSS. contain here an Arabic gloss, the translations of which I owe to the kindness of Dr. Neubauer. It runs thus: "Men plait the wick and then light it, for if it had not been plaited it would not burn evenly. Therefore it is considered as if men had created it, i.e., made it." Riddle I9 was probably suggested by I Kings, v, 33. (See the excellent remarks of Dr. Jellinek on this point, in his introduction to the fifth volume of his Beth Hammidrash, p. Iv.)

    We think that the foregoing remarks, as well as the few words which we have interpolated in round brackets here and there in the translation, will suffice to make the text

    intelligible to the reader. The parallels from non-Jewish sources we leave to others, and we have no doubt that

    they also will furnish the folk-lorist with interesting matter. See, for instance, the Dialogue of Solomon and Saturnus, by Kemble, p. i99, Riddle 5 and Riddle 6, in our version. There are also many points in the introduction to Kemble's book which will have to be corrected after the researches of Steinschneider and others on the subject. The story of a Man from Jerusalem, which is attributed to R. Abra- ham Maimun, must also not be neglected by the student. We can only hope that Mr. Jacobs, who has equal mastery both of Jewish and non-Jewish sources, will soon find the leisure to favour us with a new edition of the Dialogue.

    self who went into the calf and spoke (see Tanchuma to Exod. xxxii, I, and the Targum of Jerusalem to the same verse. Riddle i6 reminds us very much of the 2nd Riddle in the version of the Second Targum, which has been translated and fully treated by P. Cassel in his

    Commentary on Esther, pp. 283 and 284. This fact

    may, perhaps, suggest that our version once contained all the Riddles of the Second Targum, as it has all the Riddles of the Midrash, which will prove that none of all these versions is complete in its present form. The MSS. contain here an Arabic gloss, the translations of which I owe to the kindness of Dr. Neubauer. It runs thus: "Men plait the wick and then light it, for if it had not been plaited it would not burn evenly. Therefore it is considered as if men had created it, i.e., made it." Riddle I9 was probably suggested by I Kings, v, 33. (See the excellent remarks of Dr. Jellinek on this point, in his introduction to the fifth volume of his Beth Hammidrash, p. Iv.)

    We think that the foregoing remarks, as well as the few words which we have interpolated in round brackets here and there in the translation, will suffice to make the text

    intelligible to the reader. The parallels from non-Jewish sources we leave to others, and we have no doubt that

    they also will furnish the folk-lorist with interesting matter. See, for instance, the Dialogue of Solomon and Saturnus, by Kemble, p. i99, Riddle 5 and Riddle 6, in our version. There are also many points in the introduction to Kemble's book which will have to be corrected after the researches of Steinschneider and others on the subject. The story of a Man from Jerusalem, which is attributed to R. Abra- ham Maimun, must also not be neglected by the student. We can only hope that Mr. Jacobs, who has equal mastery both of Jewish and non-Jewish sources, will soon find the leisure to favour us with a new edition of the Dialogue.

    S. SCHECHTER, S. SCHECHTER, S. SCHECHTER, S. SCHECHTER,

    358 358 358 358

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    Article Contentsp. [349]p. 350p. 351p. 352p. 353p. 354p. 355p. 356p. 357p. 358

    Issue Table of ContentsFolklore, Vol. 1, No. 3 (Sep., 1890), pp. 289-416English and Scotch Fairy Tales [pp. 289 - 312]The Collection of English Folk-Lore [pp. 313 - 330]Magic Songs of the Finns. II [pp. 331 - 348]The Riddles of Solomon in Rabbinic Literature [pp. 349 - 358]Chinese Folk-Lore [pp. 359 - 368]The Campbell of Islay MSS. at the Advocates' Library, Edinburgh [pp. 369 - 383]Recent Research in Comparative Religion [pp. 384 - 397]Proceedings at the Annual Meeting of the Folk-Lore Society [pp. 398 - 402]CorrespondenceHow They Met Themselves [pp. 403 - 404]"Fascination" and Hypnotism [p. 405]A Tale of Campbell and Its Foundation in Usage [pp. 405 - 406]

    Notes and News [pp. 407 - 408]MiscellaneaA Jataka in Pausanias [p. 409]

    Folk-Lore Bibliography [pp. 410 - 416]