the portland daily sun, friday, september 2, 2011

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The Portland Daily Sun, Friday, September 2, 2011

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  • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2011 VOL. 3 NO. 151 PORTLAND, ME PORTLANDS DAILY NEWSPAPER 699-5801

    Police arrest two, say fi ve children living in squalor

    A Portland couple was arrested Wednesday after police say they allowed their fi ve children, including a newborn baby, to live in inhabitable conditions.

    Siyad Abdi, 30, and Kathleen Johnson, 31, were both charged with endangering the welfare of a child after offi cials found their home was without running water and infested with insects, fi lled with scattered debris and had its windows broken out, police said.

    Offi cers responded to the resi-dence on Hemlock Street and also reported fi nding feces on the fl oor, broken glass and no cleaning sup-plies.

    "The conditions were pretty bad," said Lt. Gary Rogers, a police spokesman. "Bad enough that the offi cers felt the parents were endangering the welfare of

    (the children)."The kids were

    ages 2, 4, 7, 12 and two months.

    Rogers said the children were already removed once by the Depart-ment of Health and Human Ser-vices. He didn't know how long ago they were removed.

    "After having been removed from there, apparently they came back and that's what the offi cers were fol-lowing up on,"

    Abdi

    Johnson

    FREE

    Police seize crack and heroinSee the story of arrests on page 3

    Portlands unseen scene See Jeffrey S. Spofford on page 4

    WH predicts high jobless rate See the story on page 6

    Equality and the golden ruleSee Justin Chenette on page 5

    Jesse LaCasse spent much of the day Thursday re-installing banners in downtown Portland. Roughly 60 of the banners, which denote various city neighborhoods and districts, were removed late last week in anticipation of Hurricane Irene. LaCasse said high winds could have damaged the banners and even the light poles had the banners been left up (and the winds were much higher than they actually were). Here, he installed a banner on Congress Street in the Arts District. (CASEY CONLEY PHOTO)

    Police: Teens likely behind S. Portland racist graf ti

    South Portland police believe one or more teenagers, rather than an organized hate group, are responsible for spray paint-ing swastikas and other racist symbols on the Southern Maine Community College campus.

    Community response offi cer Jeff Caldwell said yesterday the department had collected sev-eral leads in the case but still hadnt made any arrests.

    Swastikas, racist remarks

    about President Barack Obama, and "KKK" were found spray painted on Fort Preble, path-ways leading to the fort, and an academic building on the col-leges South Portland campus Aug. 23.

    Visitors reported seeing the racist graffi ti several days after it was fi rst reported. In fact, a local photographer reported that a swastika near Fort Preble was still there as recently as Aug. 31.

    PPD: Conditions pretty bad for kids

    Storm precaution

    BY CASEY CONLEYTHE PORTLAND DAILY SUN

    BY MATTHEW ARCOTHE PORTLAND DAILY SUN

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  • Page 2 THE PORTLAND DAILY SUN, Friday, September 2, 2011

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    NOW AVAILABLE Shipyard Pumpkinhead

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    Saranac Fall Harpoon Octoberfest Grittys Halloween

    72 Commercial St., Portland, ME Open Sun. thru Thurs 11:30am9:00pm, Fri. & Sat. 11:30am10:00pm

    Every Tue. Night is Benefit Night at Flatbread

    Join us from 5 - 9

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    $3.50 will be donated for every

    pizza sold.

    Benefit: Cultivation Community

    THETIDESFriday

    High: 2:34 a.m., 2:56 p.m.Low: 8:39 a.m., 9:16 p.m.

    SaturdayHigh: 3:31 a.m., 3:52 p.m.Low: 9:33 a.m., 10:16 p.m.

    WORLD/NATION

    DIGEST

    3DAYFORECAST LOTTERY#SDAILY NUMBERS

    Wednesday Evening0-0-1 2-8-5-2Thursday Day

    3-0-6 5-0-9-1

    SAYWHAT...Anyone who says theyre not afraid

    at the time of a hur-ricane is either a fool or a liar, or a little bit of both.

    Anderson Cooper

    Covered bridges, beloved remnants

    of another era, were casualties, too

    THEMARKET

    1,755U.S. military deaths in

    Afghanistan.

    (NY TIMES) As the country watched scenes of devastation from Hur-ricane Irene, thousands of history and engineer-ing buffs were on edge for another reason, waiting to hear the fate of hundreds of antique covered bridges that dot the Eastern Seaboard and that are especially concentrated and beloved in the unex-pectedly ravaged state of Vermont.Cov e r e d - b r i d g e

    enthusiasts and others shuddered as they watched an amateur video, on the Internet, of the Bartonsville bridge in Vermont sliding almost intact into the Williams River on Sunday.

    Vermont of cials have found several other cov-ered bridges, among the 100 or so statewide, that have been seri-ously damaged, but the loss of the Bartonsville bridge, built in 1871, with a wooden lattice spanning 158 feet, was considered the greatest historical blow. (Another badly damaged bridge, in Quechee, was cov-ered but built of con-crete in the 1970s.)

    TodayHigh: 71

    Record: 94 (1953)Sunrise: 6:05 a.m.

    TonightLow: 55

    Record: 41 (1994)Sunset: 7:15 p.m.

    TomorrowHigh: 76Low: 65

    Sunrise: 6:06 a.m.Sunset: 7:14 p.m.

    SundayHigh: 78Low: 67

    DOW JONES119.96 to 11,493.57

    NASDAQ33.42 to 2,546.04

    S&P14.47 to 1,204.42

    Relief in Vermont towns as crews make inroadsROCHESTER, Vt. (NY TIMES) There

    is still no electricity in this town at the foot of the Green Mountains, but after days of being cut off from the world, there is a way out.

    Road crews had cleared enough of the wreckage on Wednesday to allow in utility trucks and emergency vehicles. Still, most of the 1,100 residents remained unable to come or go after Sundays devastating fl oods. Many had made peace with it, for now.

    Spirits are pretty good, said Virginia Scott Bowman, who had joined dozens of

    her neighbors at a community supper in the yard of a local inn before night fell. Many had contributed food from their powerless freezers for what has become a twilight ritual. A massage table had been set up, and children were playing Frisbee on the town green across the street.

    By Wednesday night, crews had completed makeshift roads into all of the isolated towns, state offi cials said. They reached the last, Wardsboro, population 850, in south central Vermont, just before 6 p.m.

    But the roads, some of which pass

    through treacherous mountain landscape, are accessible only by all-terrain vehicles and four-wheel-drive trucks and cannot support regular traffi c, offi cials said.

    On Thursday morning, Central Vermont Public Service, the states largest utility company, said only 5,900 of its customers remained without power, down from more than 73,000 just after the storm. In areas where bucket trucks cannot get through, workers are arriving on all-terrain vehi-cles and four-wheel-drive vehicles, the company said.

    Rebels extend deadline as Q