the minor prophets

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The Minor Prophets. Introduction. Probably the least studied section of the Bible. “Minor” designation is not given based on the importance of the material contained, but rather the shortness of each respective writing. This study will basically be an “overview” of each of the 12 books. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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  • Divided Kingdom

    INDEX

    After Solomons reign his kingdom was divided into two parts.

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    The pride of your heart has deceived you, you who dwell in the clefts of the rock, whose habitation is high; you who say in your heart, Who will bring me down to the ground? Though you ascend as high as the eagle, and though you set your nest among the stars, from there I will bring you down, says the Lord. (Obadiah 3-4)

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    Entranceto the Valley Of Petra

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    Edom was located in the mountainous region of the Dead Sea. Sela (now Petra) was its capital. From mount strongholds like this the Edomites launched their raids on Israel.

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    ObadiahObadiah means servant of Jehovah.Date: Most likely 845 BC (2 Chronicles 21:8-10,16-17).Message: Edom was to be destroyed for its cruelty and pride (vs. 3-4).History: Edomites were descendants of Esau (Genesis 36:6-9). Struggle began in the womb (Genesis 25:21-28). Always had a rocky relationship with Israel.Outline:National Security will be taken away (vs. 1-9)Watched and participated in Judahs destruction (vs. 10-14)Edoms destruction foretold (vs. 15-16)Israel would recover but Edom would never (vs. 17-21)

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    JoelJoel means Jehovah is God.Probably around 830 BC.Message: Warning to Judah that the day of the Lord is at hand, and as a destruction from the Almighty shall it come (1:15). A plague of locusts covers the land and strips every living green thing bare (vs 7). This message is brought during the reign of Joash (835 796 BC).

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    A Swarm of Locusts

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    A Cornfield Destroyed by Locusts

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    JoelJoel means Jehovah is God.Probably around 830 BC.Message: Warning to Judah that the day of the Lord is at hand, and as a destruction from the Almighty shall it come (1:15). A plague of locusts covers the land and strips every living green thing bare (vs 7). This message is brought during the reign of Joash (835 796 BC).The book is divided into two parts:The prophets call to repentance (1:1 2:17).Gods direct message (2:18 3:21).

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    JonahJonah means Dove.Probably around 780 BC.Message:God cared for all nations of the earth, and He was willing to save even the heathen nation of Assyria if they would repent. God wanted all men to recognize Him as the One True God.

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    Dunkleosteus This skull was about three and a half feet tall. Its body length would be incredible. This huge fish would be a fright to anyone who saw it. It's mouth would have the ability easily swallow an average size human being

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    JonahJonah means Dove.Probably around 780 BC.Message:God cared for all nations of the earth, and He was willing to save even the heathen nation of Assyria if they would repent. God wanted all men to recognize Him as the One True God.Chapter 1 God calls Jonah to go to NinevahChapter 2 Jonahs prayer and deliveranceChapter 3 God repeats His call to JonahChapter 4 Jonah reacts to Ninevahs repentance

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    AmosAmos means burden-bearer.Probably around 755 BC.Messenger: Amos was a herdsman and a dresser of sycamore trees, a strong rural character (7:14-15).Message:A message of doom for both Israel and Judah. Each were given some rest from the threats of Assyrian invasion. In this state of comfort, moral and political corruption began to flourish. They began to adopt the worship of the gods of the Assyrians, and thus of apostasy from the One True Jehovah. In short, luxury and wealth had bred moral decay and spiritual disinterest.

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    AmosOutline:Introduction of the Prophet (1:1-2)Coming of divine judgment upon sinful nations Damascus for cruelty in war and greed (1:3-5)Gaza (Philistia) for their slave trade (1:6-8)Tyre (Phoenicia) remembered not the covenant (1:9-10)Edom for their hatred and mistreatment of Israel (1:11-12)Ammon intense and uncalled-for cruelty (1:13-15)Moab vengeance even on a kings carcass (2:1-3)Judah for her apostasy (2:4-5)Israel for all their sins (2:6-16)

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    AmosOutline (continued)Israels crimes (3-4)Upon wealthy ruling classes for social sins and injustices (3:1- 4:5)Chastisement upon the nation had gone unheeded (4:4-13)Israel's inevitable condemnation (5-6)Five Visions explained (7:19:10)The vision of the locust (grasshoppers) in which the mercy of God averts catastrophe (7:1-3)The vision of devouring fire an even more severe judgment again averted by Gods mercy (7:4-6)

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    AmosOutline (continued)Five Visions Explained (continued)The vision of the plumb-line the destruction of the nation of Israel for its idolatry (7:7-9)Interlude Amaziahs complaint against Amos (7:10-17)Five Visions Explained (continued)The vision of the basket of summer fruit the ripeness of Israel for judgment (8)The vision of the smitten sanctuary destruction for the sinful kingdom (9:1-10)The promise of a bright future in the hope of the Messiah (9:11-15) Acts 15:14-18

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    HoseaHosea means salvation.Probably around 730 BC.Messenger: Hosea was probably a citizen of the northern kingdom of Israel. He appears to be a sympathetic man who mourns the digression of Israel and laments their pending fall. At the same time he is filled with a righteous indignation over their departure from the one true God. His work reflects these moments of sympathy and indignation.

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    HoseaMessage: The excesses of Israel had now become even more pronounced than in the time of Amos. Hosea sums up his indictment against Israel by emphasizing the theme of whoredom. A theme that he would know first hand. Israel was committing spiritual adultery. They had embarked upon a path of idolatry, and they were giving praise to these pagan gods for the prosperity they were enjoying (Hosea 2:12-13). Hoseas work emphasizes the judgment of God against the wicked while yet reminding his hearers of Gods love and forgiveness.

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    Baal Worship Baal is mentioned widely in the Old Testament as the primary pagan idol of the Phoenicians, often associated with the heathen goddess Ashtaroth. This photo shows Baal's fictitious image from an ancient stone carving. He was the supposed son of the non-existent god Dagon. Unfortunately, to their eventual bitter regret, the Israelites became deeply involved in the cult of the Baals. The evil "worship" included perverted sexual behavior, and even sacrificing their infants in fire.

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    HoseaOutline:Israels adultery against God (1-3)Hoseas personal marriage to adulterous Gomer parallels that of Gods relationship with Israel (1:22:1)Chastisement, repentance & final restoration of idolatrous Israel (2:2-23)Jehovahs controversy with Israel (4-6)Israels corrupt political situation (7-8)Israels religious & moral apostasy resulting in punishment, exile & destruction (9-11)Israels apostasy versus Gods fidelity (12-13)Israels conversion and pardon (14)

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    MicahMicah means Who is like the Lord?.Dated from anywhere between 740 700 BC.Messenger: Micah was from a very rustic, productive, fertile and agricultural area called Moresheth-gath (1:1,14) which was a small village on the border between Judah and Philistia. The village was about 25 miles southwest of Jerusalem. With the viewpoint of the humble peasant from an obscure village he harshly condemns the idolatry, the impiety, and the social corruption of both Judah and Samaria. Using vivid terms, Micah serves as the voice of God to all.

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    MicahMessage: In common with all the eighth century prophets, Micah preached the supreme righteousness of God in contrast to the ungodly character of the luxury-loving age in which they lived. In contrast with the destruction which shall be visited upon the wicked nations of that age, God will bless and keep those who continue to be his servants. Micah declares the nature of true service which God has always sought (6:6-8). There is also a considerable amount of Messianic prediction, comparable to that of Isaiah.

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    MicahOutline:Authorship & time of the prophets work (1:1).Judgment upon Israel & Judah with a remnant to be saved (1-3).Coming of Christ and His church (4-5).Condemnation for sins (6:1 7:6).Ultimate blessing (7:7-20).Messianic prophesy:Forecast of the establishment of the church (4).Birth of the Messiah in Bethlehem (5:2).

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    Present Day Bethlehem

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    ZephaniahZephaniah means Jehovah hides.Probably around 625 BC .Messenger: Zephaniah wrote during the reign of Josiah who was a young king trying to reform the sinful nation after his father, Amon, and his grandfather, Manasseh, brought the religion and morality of Judah to an all-time low. Zephaniah was the great-grandson of Hezekiah, the last good king prior to Josiah. This indicates that he was a descendant of royal blood.

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    ZephaniahMessage: Zephaniah spells out the judgment of God against all who are guilty of idolatry (1:4-6), violence and fraud (1:9), and all who sit by in idle indifference (1:12). They will be set apart for destruction (1:7), and their cry will be heard in every quarter of Jerusalem (1:10-11). The only hope for Gods people is to seek Him, and begin living by His standards. If they do not, they will share the fate of the nations around them: Philisita to the west, Moab & Ammon to the east, Ethiopia to the south and Assyria to the north. Jerusalem will be punished for her sins (3:1-8), but a remnant shall be saved (3:9-20).

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    NahumNahum means consolation.Dated anywhere from 630 to 612 BC .Messenger: We know nothing definite regarding Nahum other than this prophecy. There is no indication as to where and Elkoshite would come from.Message: This prophecy deals directly with the impending destruction of Nineveh. The book declares the reasons for this destruction and shows that the fall is Gods vindication against this wicked place.

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    NahumOutlineGods majest