the ionian august 2011

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Leading, glossy, English language, travel, yachting and lifestyle magazine for the Ionian part of Greece. Our mission is to promote tourism and yachting in the Ionian while serving as a platform for environment and culture appreciation and protection.

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  • August 2011 www.theionian.com The Ionian 1

    The Ionian

    Homer, herbs and health

    Page 4

    Two boys on a boat

    Page 5

    The art of road travel

    Page 6 Dawn over Kastos

    Page 8

    The monastery of Rodia

    Page 10

    Off the beaten track in the Ionian dream or reality?

    Page 11

    August 2011 Volume 2. Issue 5 www.theionian.com COMPLIMENTARY/ Please recycle: give to a friend or neighbour when finished.

  • 2 The Ionian www.theionian.com August 2011

  • August 2011 www.theionian.com The Ionian 3

    Escape!

    Its nearly August as I write this and its been HOT, HOT, HOT in the Ionian. It takes a huge amount of effort to work in the mid-

    dle of the day so many of us give in to the afternoon siesta culture to take a nap, swim or perhaps meet friends in a shady corner of a village as this months cover suggests. Besides being hot, the Ionian in August can also get very

    crowded and so we have several suggestions on how to es-cape and to find your own peaceful corner in the shade. Cathy King reveals the locations of her secret, secluded an-

    chorages in Off the beaten track in the Ionian dream or reality? Pssst, dont tell anyone. If you are on land, you can also escape the heat and the

    crowds and perhaps even meditate a little. Where? Read, The Rodia Monastery by Yannis Kontopoulos to find out. Yet, another way is to do what Martin Stote did and writes

    about in Dawn over Kastos wake up early to watch the sun rise. Its amazingly cool and quiet at that time of the day. Perhaps you prefer to drive to get away from it all? Barbara

    de Machula recounts her and her husbands sometimes hairy experiences of exploring the Ionian in an ancient Land Rover in The art of road travel. And to begin, James Mills tells us about the joys of cruising

    life for children in Two boys in a boat and Vicky Iliopoulou acquaints us with the history and healing properties of some of the Greek herbs.

    We also have a race cal-endar for the Ionian area for you, so whatever you do, I hope you have the best August ever! Enjoy reading... ~~~_/) Barbara Molin

    Editorial The Ionian

    Address: Lefkadiou Chern 24, Lefkada 31100, Greece Email: barbara.molin@theionian.com Website: www.theionian.com Fax: The Ionian c/o (0030) 26820 61306 Telephone: (0030) 69486 46764 Founding Publisher: Justin Smith Publisher/ Editor: Barbara Molin Deputy Editor Martin Stote Business Advisor: Yannis Dimopoulos Business Advisor: Ryan Smith Accountant: Pavlos Dagla: 0030 26450 23008 Greek Editors: Venetia Gigi and Vasilis Lekkas Childrens Editor James Mills Layout: Barbara Molin Printing: Plamen Rusanov Advertising: Barbara Molin Distribution: Barbara Molin Subscriptions: Barbara Molin

    You can download The Ionian as a PDF document from our website: www.theionian.com. To subscribe, please call: 0030 69486 46764 : 148426549. 24, , 31100. ISSN 1792-4650. The Ionian is published monthly. Published on the last day before each month, approx. Publication is for informational purposes only. Although The Ionian has made every effort to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this publication, the publisher cannot be held responsible for any errors or omissions it may contain. The opinions expressed by the contributors are not necessarily held by the publisher.

    August Cover Photo: Ionian Village Scene; B. Molin. To purchase any of the photographs in The Ionian, please contact the Editorial Department: editor@theionian.com.

    PHOTO CONTEST: Send in your best photos of the Ionian. Twelve winning images will feature in The Ionian 2012 Calendar. Subject: Ionian people, nature and landscape. Digital images only, horizontal format. One per email. Please check photographers guidelines and contest rules at: www.theionian.com. The best photos will feature on our website and the winning entries will be published in the calendar. Deadline for entries: September 30, 2011; Email: editor@theionian.com.

    Robert Romero

  • 4 The Ionian www.theionian.com August 2011

    Brush your hand over a pot of lemony basil, sniff a handful of zesty mint, or just inhale the pungent aroma of a hillside of wild thyme, and it is easy to see how herbs have made such an impact on Greek religion, medicine, cookery, and folklore.

    It is a love affair that dates back thousands of years. Ancient Greeks infused wine with honey and herbs during their Dionysian revels - Dionysius was often portrayed holding a stick of fennel. Homer described the herbs native to his country, and Odysseus outwitted Circe, a particularly unpleasant she-witch who could turn men into pigs, using the holy herb Moly. (The name may sound familiar from another context. "Holy Moly" was an exclamation of surprise used by the comic book superhero Captain Marvel.)

    The doctors and physicians of Ancient Greece treated their athletes and soldiers with herbs like hypericum, also known as St Johns wort, or chase-devil, said to be a cure for depression. They used plantago for insect bites, rashes and sores; arnica part of the sunflower family - to heal bruising; and achillea to staunch the flow of blood from wounds. Balsam oil was used by Spartan soldiers for bruises and scratches, and even broken bones.

    Hippophaes comes from the shrub known as sea-buckthorn, and is used in pharmaceutical products today. It is rich in vitamins and antioxidants. Its properties were discovered by the troops of Alexander the Great who noticed that when their horses grazed on it, their coats became beautifully shiny.

    The warm, sun-kissed and well-drained hillsides of the Ionian islands provide the perfect environment for the herbs for which Greece and the wider Mediterranean are so well known today, and to which the characteristic flavours of Greek cooking owe so much.

    Modern research also points to the Mediterranean diet, and its heavy reliance on olive oil, as being particularly healthy. Many of the herbs used in modern Greek cookery have traditional medicinal properties, and roots buried deep in mythology and folklore.

    Oregano, which features widely in Greek cuisine, was known as the herb of happiness, and was used to make garlands for young engaged couples. Mint, used as a garnish for drinks, and delicious in salads and with yoghurt, is a traditional remedy for stomach upsets. Bay leaf, used in stocks soups and casseroles, and in bouquet garni with parsley and thyme, was used to treat sprains and bruises, and was the leaf woven into crowns of laurels for heroes and poets.

    Parsley, which is full of iron, also used historically in garlands, is probably the best known herb in the world, and is used in a vast array of savoury foods. Thyme, known for its antiseptic and anti-bacterial qualities, is used in stuffings, roasts and casseroles.

    Lemon balm is used in salads and stuffings. Many scholars think it is one of the plants which adorned the meadows around Calypsos cave in The Odyssey. And there are records of people who drank it regularly who lived to be well over 100 years old.

    Vicky Iliopoulou and her husband Marios Fotiadis own a Herb Shop in Lefkada. Vicky has 20 years of experience in Aromatherapy and Aesthetics. She has also worked as a Spa Manager in Athens. Herbs and Spices Shop; Iroon Politechneiou 32 -Lefkada theprinceofteas@yahoo.com Tel: 26450-26230

    Health and Beauty

    Homer, herbs and health

    Vicky Iliopoulou

    News/Calendar

    Race Calendar for Southern Ionian

    The Yacht Club of Lefkada/Nautical Omilo Lefkada (NOL) organizes races under IRC ratings with also a class for non-measured yachts, which use a PY (Portsmouth Yardstick)handicap. All yachts are welcome to participate in the races and the club welcomes new members.

    July 31 - August 7 Ionian Rally

    Patras Yacht Club Races 1st race August 1 Patras- Kilini 2nd race August 3 Kilini- Vathi (Ithaca) 3rd race August 5 Vathi (Ithaca) Vathi (Meganinsi) 4th race August 6 Triangle race in the Meganisi area July 31 welcome party Patras August 7 prize giving party Vathi (Meganisi)

    Ionian Regional Races - NOL September 23 - September 25 windward-leeward and course races - Lefkas area.

    NOL Winter Series. October 9 Lefkas-Preveza triangle race. October 23 Lygia- Nikiana windward-leeward race. November 5 Round the island race. November 19 - 20 Lefkas- Meganisi. Meganisi-Lefkas races. December 4 Lygia-Agios Nikolas race. December 11 Lygia-Nikiana windward-leeward race.

    For more information call Neil McRobert at: 693 271 6258.

  • August 2011 www.theionian.com The Ionian 5

    Hi, my name is James and I am going to tell you what it is like to be a kid living on a boat. It is actually good fun. You can see all these different places and see different cultures and

    wildlife. My brother and I have now been to nine different countries, which include Spain, France, Italy, Tunisia, Montenegro, Croatia, Greece, Turkey and England. As you can see that is a lot of countries. I have also seen some amazing creatures, such as dolphins, sperm whales, turtles, sharks, sea slugs, seals and octopuses. That is a lot of animals. And we can move when we have bad neighbours. But of course there are a few downsides. There is a very small amount of room on a boat, so we dont have a lot of things. We have to maintain our friendships by e-mail. We have friends in Austria, England, Slovenia and Jamaica. But on the bright side, my brother and I are home educated and dont have to sit in a stuffy classroom, but instead we sit out in the s