The graven palm; a manual of the science of palmistry

Download The graven palm; a manual of the science of palmistry

Post on 02-Jan-2017

217 views

Category:

Documents

3 download

Embed Size (px)

TRANSCRIPT

  • THE GRAVEN PALM

    A MANUAL OF THE SCIENCE OFPALMISTRY

    BY

    MRS. ROBINSON

    " In the hand of all the sons of men God places marks,that all

    the sons of men may know their own works."

    Chaldean Version of the Book of Job.Ch. xxxvi. 7

    " Behold I have graven thee upon the palms of My hands."!ISA. xlix. i6

    LONDONEDWARD ARNOLD

    1911

    [All rights reserved]

    K/'LAM 5 Q;/25, /fTHE GRAVEN PALM

    A MANUAL OF THE SCIENCE OF

    PALMISTRY

    BY

    l/IRS. ROBINSON

    I tl l cl f ll th fG d pl marks, that all

    tl f 5 k thk

    C N BOOKOF ]OB.

    Ch. Xxxvi. 7

    B h ld I h g th p th pl fMy hzmds."I

    ISA. xlix. 16

    LONDON

    EDWARD ARNOLD

    IQII

    [A ZZ rzlghfs res wed]

    I

  • THE LIBKATtTCPJGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITT

    PROVO, UTAH

    {''v`

    THE LIBRARY

    BIHGHAM YOUNG IJNIVERSTFY

    PROVO, UTAH

  • PEEFACE

    In presenting this volume to the public, I crave their kind

    indulgence for all its imperfections, asking them only to

    reserve their opinion of it until they have carefully read

    from cover to cover.

    I have tried to express myself as clearly and simply as

    possible, and I think that, if the pictures are studied

    attentively in the sequence in which they are placed (not

    looked at haphazard), my readers will find that Palmistry

    is a Science, though as yet an inexact one, and meant, if

    interpreted rightly, to be a guide and assistance to us on

    our journey through life.

    I doubt whether I should ever have attempted to write

    a book at all had I not received so much encouragement

    from many clever and well-known persons, amongst them

    the late Sir Walter Besant, who assured me that he

    believed a book of mine would be well received by many.

    I should also like to take this opportunity of thanking

    my many friends and clients for their kindness to me

    during the nineteen years I have been a professional.

    A. ROBINSON.

    October, 1911.

    PREFACE

    IN presenting this volume to the public, I crave their kind

    indulgence for all its imperfections, asking them only to

    reserve their opinion of it until they have carefully read

    from cover to cover.

    I have tried to express myself as clearly and simply' as

    possible, and I think that, if the pictures are studied

    attentively in the sequence in which they are placed (notlooked at haphazard), my readers Will ind that Palmistryis a Science, though as yet an inexact one, and meant, if

    interpreted rightly, to be a guide and assistance to us on

    our journey through life.

    I doubt Whether I should ever have attempted to Write

    a book at all had I not received so much encouragementfrom many clever and Well-known persons, amongst them

    the late Sir Walte1" Besant, Who assured me that he

    believed a book of mine would be Well received by many.I should also like to take this opportunity of thanking

    my many friends and clients fortheir kindness to me

    during the nineteen years I have been a professional.A. ROBINSON.

    October, 1911.

    V

  • CONTENTS

    CHAPTER

    I. INTRODUCTORY

    II. THE HAND - - ""

    III. THE MOUNTS - - ''

    IV. THE LINE OF LIFE

    V. THE LINE OF HEART -

    VI. THE LINE OF HEAD -

    VII. THE LINE OF FATE

    VIII. THE LINES OF FORTUNE AND OF FAME

    IX. THE LINE OF HEALTH

    X. OTHER LINES AND MARKS

    XL THE MOUNT OF VENUS

    XII. ILLUSTRATED HANDS -

    PA GE

    1

    34

    62

    73

    95

    103

    116

    120

    126

    148

    173

    245

    8 PLATESFAMOUS HANDS - Between Images 324 and325

    INDEX326

    Vll

  • V

    'i

  • THE GKAVEN PALM

    CHAPTER I

    INTRODUCTORY

    I HAVE often been asked to write a book on tlie subject of

    Palmistry^ but hitherto have had no desire to do so, as I

    felt that it would take months of continuous labour to bring

    out a book which would set forth and explain my systemclearly and comprehensively ; and, also, my life was for manyyears such a busy one, owing to my professional work, thatit was difficult to find sufficient leisure in which to attempt

    so great an undertaking. As it has, however, been very

    clearly brought home to me that a great many people havenow learnt my systemI myself having had many pupils inthe past, and these in their turn having had pupils of their

    ownit seemed that it was only just to myself to write ashort sketch of my method of looking at the hand and ofinterpreting the lines before the system, which I had

    myself discovered, became quite an old story.

    Palmistry is one of the most ancient sciences in the

    world, and Desbarrolles, the great French palmist, says

    that it emanated from India. It is known that theChaldeans were adepts in the art of hand-reading, and

    that it was much practised in Egypt, and afterwards inGrreece. Many ancient writers refer to it, amongst them

    1

    THE GRAVEN PALM

    CHAPTER I

    INTRODUCTORY

    I HAVE often been asked to write a book on the subject of

    Palmistry, but hitherto have l1ad no desire to do so, as Ifelt that it would take months of continuous labour to bringout a book which would set forth and explain my systemclearly and comprehensively ; and, also, my life was for manyyears such a busy one, owing to my professional work, thatit was difficult to find sufficient leisure in which to attemptso great an undertaking. As it has, however, been veryclearly brought home to me that a great many people havenow learnt my system-I myself having had many pupils inthe past, and these in their turn having had pupils of theirown-it seemed that it was only just to myself to write ashort sketch of my method of looking at the hand and of

    interpreting the lines before the system, which I had

    myself discovered, became quite an old story.Palmistry is one of the most ancient sciences in the

    world, and Desbarrolles, the great French palmist, saysthat it emanated from India. It is known that the

    Chaldeans were adepts in the art of hand-reading, andthat it was 1nucl1 practised in Egypt, and afterwards inGreece. Many ancient writers refer to it, amongst them

    1

  • 2 THE GEAVEN PALM

    Anaxagoras (428 B.C.), and, in later times, Josephus(in

    the first century a.d.) .

    The science, as we now have it, is unfortunatelymost

    incomplete. We undoubtedly know far less upon the

    subject than was known by the ancients, as, duringmany

    hundreds of years, palmistry fell into disrepute,and was

    classed as a form of witchcraft : in fact, asDesbarrolles

    says, the science was long lost to the world, andwas only

    recovered by an erudite savant, Eliphas Levi(Alphonse

    Louis Constant), the author of a clever work on theKabbala.

    Another reason for the incompleteness of thesubject is

    that there is no general rule which can beapplied un-

    failingly to every hand with reference to dates, andwith

    regard to the interpretation of those lines which aredirectly

    under the influence of the subject's own character.

    It is a great error to imagine that, becausesome people

    are often clever interpreters of the lines, theyshould there-

    fore be infallible, and never liable to make mistakes.

    Palmistry is a science, but as yet an inexact one,insomuch

    as every hand is of a diiferent size and shape, and,in conse-

    quence, no uniform standard of measurement can beused

    really successfully in every case. Each hand hasto be

    interpreted alone, just as each life has to be livedalone.

    I propose in this little book giving a fewdirections,

    which will, I trust, enable my readers to tell others what

    has happened to them in the past with theapproximate

    dates, and will also be a guide to them in foretellingthe

    probable dates at which events are likely to occurin the

    future. It will be many times more useful and interestmg

    to be able to do this, when reading a hand, than togive,

    however correctly, any number of vague generalities.

    Practical palmistry is what is really needed. Such vague

    remarks, for instance, as the following:" You have signs

    which show that you will become famous,'' "that youwill

    2 THE GRAVEN PALM

    Anaxagoras (428 B.C.), and, in later times, Josephus (in

    the first century A.D.>.The science, as we now have it, is unfortunately

    most

    incomplete. VVe undoubtedly knowfar less upon the

    subject than was known by the ancients, as, during many

    hundreds of years, palmistry fell into disrepute,and was

    classed as a form of witchcraft: in fact, as Desbarrolles

    says, the science was long lostto the world, and was only

    recovered by an erudite savant, EliphasLevi (Alphonse

    Louis Constant) , the author of a clever work on theKabbala.

    Another reason for the incompleteness of the subject is

    that there is no general rule which can be appliedun-

    failingly to every hand with referenceto dates, and with

    regard to the interpretation of those lineswhich are directly

    under the influence of the subject's own character.

    lt is a great error to imagine that, becausesome people

    are often clever interpreters of the lines, they shouldthere-

    fore be infallible, and never liable to makemistakes.

    Palmistry is science, but as yet an inexact one,insomuch

    as every hand is of a differentsize and shape, and, in conse-

    quence, no uniform standardof measurement can be used

    really successfully in every case. Eachhand has to be

    interpreted alone, just as ea