the fix - oct 2010

of 12 /12
1 Top CONTENTS Click on links to access these articles Children Concerned about par- ents drinking 2 Naphyrone banned 2 Steroid Advice 3 Green fingered dealers 4 Statistics 5 Local events 6 Substance in focus 7 Service Profile 8 Training 10 Community Support 11 “ The Fix is a bi-monthly e-newsletter that keeps you up to date about drug or alcohol related issues” Issue 15 October 2010 THE FIX A leading Northern Ireland anti-smoking charity has called for stricter laws to safeguard children from the dangers associated with sec- ond hand smoke. Action Cancer is campaign- ing for smoke to be banned in vehicles carrying children and teenagers under 16 years of age. Smoking has been banned in public places, such as bars and restaurants since 2007, however the charity says this only goes part way towards protecting young people from second hand smoke. Geraldine Kerr, spokesperson for Action Cancer states ―the damaging effects of environ- mental tobacco smoke (ETS), otherwise known as second- hand smoke, are well docu- mented and it‘s now recog- nised as a substantial public health hazard. The main places children and young people face exposure to ETS is within the home and in ve- hicles‖ Action Cancer is to launch a lobbying and briefing cam- paign aimed at ensuring wide -ranging political support for a commitment to early legis- lation on a smoking ban to protect minors. Ms Kerr said the charity would be encour- aging the political parties to adopt a pledge to support the ban as a commitment in their manifestos or the forthcoming Assembly election. The Charity hopes that North- ern Ireland could lead the way and introduce a smoking ban in vehicles to ensure our children are not exposed to second hand smoke, reducing the levels of health problems, economic commitment to treating these health problems and the likelihood of smoking uptake later in life. For more on this topic, click here The Fix is an electronic news- letter issued by the Drug and Alcohol Community Support Service which is a partnership between ASCERT and FASA. This service is funded by The Public Health Agency. Drug and Alcohol misuse is something that affects all communities and sectors and this newsletter will provide information on things like training opportunities, what helping services are available, like drug information and issues that are in the news Leading Charity Calls for Tighter Smoking Laws Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

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  • 1

    Top

    CONTENTS

    Click on links to access these articles

    Children Concerned about par-ents drinking 2

    Naphyrone banned 2

    Steroid Advice 3

    Green fingered dealers 4

    Statistics 5

    Local events 6

    Substance in focus 7

    Service Profile 8

    Training 10

    Community Support 11

    The Fix is a bi-monthly e-newsletter that keeps you up to date about drug or alcohol related issues

    Issue 15 October 2010 THE FIX

    A leading Northern Ireland

    anti-smoking charity has

    called for stricter laws to

    safeguard children from the

    dangers associated with sec-

    ond hand smoke.

    Action Cancer is campaign-

    ing for smoke to be banned in

    vehicles carrying children and

    teenagers under 16 years of

    age. Smoking has been

    banned in public places, such

    as bars and restaurants since

    2007, however the charity

    says this only goes part way

    towards protecting young

    people from second hand

    smoke.

    Geraldine Kerr, spokesperson

    for Action Cancer states the damaging effects of environ-

    mental tobacco smoke (ETS),

    otherwise known as second-

    hand smoke, are well docu-

    mented and its now recog-nised as a substantial public

    health hazard. The main

    places children and young

    people face exposure to ETS

    is within the home and in ve-

    hicles Action Cancer is to launch a

    lobbying and briefing cam-

    paign aimed at ensuring wide

    -ranging political support for

    a commitment to early legis-

    lation on a smoking ban to

    protect minors. Ms Kerr said

    the charity would be encour-

    aging the political parties to

    adopt a pledge to support the

    ban as a commitment in their

    manifestos or the forthcoming

    Assembly election.

    The Charity hopes that North-

    ern Ireland could lead the

    way and introduce a smoking

    ban in vehicles to ensure our

    children are not exposed to

    second hand smoke, reducing

    the levels of health problems,

    economic commitment to

    treating these health problems

    and the likelihood of smoking

    uptake later in life. For more

    on this topic, click here

    The Fix is an electronic news-

    letter issued by the Drug and

    Alcohol Community Support

    Service which is a partnership

    between ASCERT and

    FASA.

    This service is funded by The

    Public Health Agency.

    Drug and Alcohol misuse is

    something that affects all

    communities and sectors and

    this newsletter will provide

    information on things like

    training opportunities, what

    helping services are available,

    like drug information and

    issues that are in the news

    Leading Charity Calls for Tighter Smoking Laws

    Page

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

  • 2

    Naphyrone Banned.

    Top

    The childrens charity NSPCC have revealed that the ChildLine helpline are receiving

    more that 100 calls a week from children

    who are worried about their parents sub-stance use.

    Of the 5,700

    calls re-

    ceived be-

    tween March

    2009 and

    March 2010,

    over two-

    thirds of the callers had mentioned their par-

    ents drinking as a source of concern for them.

    The report also suggested that children call-

    ing about their parents substance use were

    also more likely than other child callers to

    report abuse.

    The Head of the service highlighted that

    some children told ChildLine about their parents severe mood swings, episodes of violence and emotional instability and rec-ognised that children living with parental al-

    cohol and drug issues were at a higher risk of

    harm than other children, and highlights that

    ways needed to be found of helping them

    sooner.

    Although concerns about parental drug and

    alcohol use see to make up a small percent-

    age of the 150000 calls received annually, the

    head of ChildLine states that the fall out from parental drug and alcohol abuse is a

    ticking time bomb in many childrens lives. Its vital these children are helped before last-ing damage occurs. The report details that children, some as

    young as five, were often trying to cope with

    the additional pressure of role reversal in an

    attempt to look after their parents and other

    siblings, some reported that their parents

    were regularly sick and that caring for them

    had affected their schooling, or prevented

    them from forming friendships with other

    children. But the report also highlights that children

    living in these circumstances can be fiercely

    protective of their parents, which could make

    them reluctant to seek help.

    Chris Sorek, chief executive of charity

    Drinkaware, said Lots of parents might be horrified to learn of the numbers of young

    people seeking help as a result of parental

    alcoholism, but the news should serve as a

    timely reminder that you dont have to be an alcoholic to have a direct impact on your

    children. Regularly drinking to excess in

    from of children will only normalise alcohol

    misuse. To read this report in full click here

    The legal high drug marketed as the replace-

    ment for Mephedrone has been banned under

    the Misuse of Drugs Act.

    Since the 23rd July,

    the substance Na-

    phyrone and its re-

    lated compounds,

    also known as NRG

    1, Energy, and

    Rave1, has been re-

    classified as a class B drug and will carry

    with it a maximum penalty of five years in

    prison for possession and 14 years in prison

    for supply, alongside an unlimited fine.

    This law will be also ban generic compounds

    to prevent suppliers switching to new ver-

    sions of the substance.

    Minister for Crime Prevention, James Bro-

    kenshire stated The gov-ernment is deeply con-

    cerned about the issues of

    legal highs which is why we took swift action

    to ban

    this new drug. There is also clear evidence

    that just because a substance is advertised as

    legal does not meant his is the case. Any-one buying a legal high is putting their health

    at risk and could be committing a criminal

    offence

    To view more on this story please click here

    Children Concerned Regarding Parental Substance Use

    Page

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

  • 3

    Top

    Steroid Advice Considered By Government.

    The Advisory Council on the Misuse of

    Drugs has issued a report recommending

    strengthened laws on ana-

    bolic steroids following con-

    cerns about the number of

    users in the UK. The council

    have considered the potential

    harms of the substances

    which are already controlled as a Class C

    drug.

    The report was issued following concerns

    about an increasing number of people using

    the substance. The British Crime Survey for

    2009 2010 indicated that 50,000 people aged between 16 and 59 years had used ana-

    bolic steroids.

    The recommendations include

    Strengthened laws to reduce availability of

    the drugs,

    Making it illegal to order substances online

    More credible information and advice for

    users

    A better focus on advertising users about

    the risk of blood borne viruses such as

    Hepatitis B and C which can result from

    sharing injecting equipment.

    In response to the report,

    the minister for crime

    prevention James Bro-

    kenshire said: abuse of anabolic steroids is harm-

    ful; we are committed to

    stopping the unlawful

    supply and use of these dangerous substances

    which can cause serious psychiatric and

    physical problems. We will carefully review

    the recommendations set out in this report

    and respond shortly.

    To read this report in full click here

    To learn more about anabolic steroids, click

    here

    The Department for Social Development

    (DSD) has issued proposals for the Introduc-

    tion of Powers to Prohibit or Restrict Irre-

    sponsible Alcohol Promotions.

    The Consultation will be running to Monday

    06th December 2010 and applies to Northern

    Ireland

    The consultation seeks to establish views on

    proposals to address harmful drinking by

    making changes to licensing legislation to

    prohibit or restrict irresponsible alcohol pro-

    motions.

    The DSD is keen to hear from everyone who

    will be affected by the proposed changes, in-

    cluding consumers of alcohol, trade associa-

    tions, criminal justice workers or those who

    run or work in pubs, clubs, supermarkets or

    other outlets selling alcohol.

    Correspondents are asked to submit their

    views as early as possible during the consul-

    tation period to allow as much time as possi-

    ble for consideration.

    Responses may be done online by clicking

    here.

    Alternatively the Microsoft Word version of

    the questionnaire may be downloaded by

    clicking here.

    The closing date for responses is Monday 6th

    December 2010.

    The Community Support Service would like

    to encourage as many people as possible to

    complete this consultation and let the deci-

    sion makers know your thoughts on alcohol

    promotions.

    Introduction of Powers to Prohibit or Restrict Irresponsible Alcohol Promotions

    Page

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

    Telephone: 08457 90 90 90

  • 4

    Police seizures of cannabis plants in Northern

    Ireland have been steadily increasing for the

    past number of years from 1,448 in 2006/07

    to 5, 484 plants in

    2009/10 (and in

    actual fact, a total

    of 31,000 plants

    were seized in

    2008/09 as a result

    of PSNI operations

    actively targeting

    cannabis factories). PSNI are putting the

    finds down to better detection work, better

    information being provided by people in local

    communities and the fact that they are mak-

    ing good use of their hi-tech heat-seeking helicopters (warm rooftops are a clear give-

    away especially in winter)!

    Its big business when you consider that ten

    seeds can be bought on the internet for less

    than 50 and that each plant can make up to a

    1000. The rise is being attributed not only to

    enterprising dealers but also to social grow-ers people growing enough to supply only themselves and a small circle of friends.

    It is perfectly legal to buy cannabis seeds

    however it is illegal to actually grow canna-

    bis plants from

    these seeds! So as

    was seen with the

    legal highs loophole, smart

    or head shops (as

    well as their

    internet equivalents) are making a fortune

    selling a wide variety of legal marijuana seeds bearing the warning:

    Another worrying development is the rise in

    popularity and availability of skunk which

    can also be partly attributed to the trend in

    home grown cannabis. Strong cannabis is

    grown through processes that can include se-

    lective breeding (with seeds being carefully

    cultivated so that they will produce plants of

    steadily higher potency), use of hydroponics

    and special heating and lighting systems. The

    smart shops often sell the hydroponic equip-

    ment required as well as the seeds and some

    have even opened up retail outlets as

    hydroponic stores.

    According to Drugscope skunk is in fact only

    one of 100 or so varieties of cannabis plant

    which have high levels of tetrahydrocannabi-

    nol (THC). The skunk and other similar va-

    rieties are often grown indoors the more intensive the cultivation and nurture the

    higher the THC content which can often be

    seen on the buds as crystal or liquid. They

    report that traditional' herbal cannabis can range from between two and four per cent

    THC content with more potent varieties aver-

    aging between 10 and 14 per cent whereas some of the skunk varieties can reach up to 20 per cent.

    Messages

    Police are asking communities to be vigilant

    and to look out for strange activity/comings

    and goings at abandoned buildings.

    For those who use cannabis be aware of the type of cannabis you are using, try to avoid

    the stronger forms such as skunk or if using

    reduce your dosage.

    WARNING: MISUSE OF DRUGS ACT 1971 By section 6 of the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 it is an offence to cultivate any plant of the genus Cannabis in the UK without a license from the Secretary of State. Anyone commit-ting an offence contrary to this section may be imprisoned or fined, or both. Potential custom-ers are advised against breaking the law.

    Green-fingered dealers!

    Police in North Down are alerting local

    residents to beware of a powerful fake

    drug that is currently flooding the area.

    The tablets in a distinctive blue shade

    with a heart shaped hole in the middle

    are being sold as 10mg doses of diaze-

    pam.

    However the blues , the street name for diazepam, are about 5 times stronger than

    the usual variety of the drug.

    Page

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  • 5

    Top

    STATISTICS

    The 11th annual re-

    port on drug related

    deaths in the UK has

    been released by , pre-

    senting information

    on drug related deaths

    that occurred during

    2009. the main purpose of the Annual Report

    from the national programme on Substance

    Abuse Deaths is to inform the Governments monitoring of this important public health

    issue, and to detect and identify emerging

    trends and issues in respect of this phenome-

    non. It contributes to the reduction and pre-

    vention of drug-related deaths in the UK due

    to the misuse of both licit and illicit drugs.

    The key findings from the report indicated

    that across the UK there were 2182 notifica-

    tions of drug related deaths occurring in

    2009, which represents an increase of 230

    (11.8%) over the same

    reporting period in

    2008.

    The highest rates of

    drug-related deaths

    were in the 1645 white male categories.

    In Northern Ireland, the most prevalent drugs

    leading to drug related deaths were sedatives

    (such as anti-depressants), opiates (heroin/

    methadone) and alcohol, and in many cases a

    combination of these drugs were found to be

    contributing factors to the cause of death.

    To read this report in full or for further statis-

    tics click here

    Drug Related Deaths in Northern Ireland

    Alcohol fuelled house parties that spiral into

    violent assaults have contributed to North

    Downs recent crime rise. Alcohol was also a major factor in the in-

    creased number of local people seriously in-

    jured on local roads, according to the latest

    police statistics.

    Juveniles becoming involved in the end of

    exam assaults and a spate of high profile bur-

    glaries have also given local police cause for

    concern.

    Speaking at a North Down District Policing

    Partnership (DPP)

    meeting, Bangor

    police chief Mark

    McEwan said we have taken steps to

    counteract this in-

    crease. Crime figures for the first quarter for the fi-

    nancial year (AprilJune 2010) show total crime has risen by 3.6 % from 908 incidents

    recorded last year, to 941.

    However Mark McEwan said it is encourag-ing to note that in four major areas we are

    succeeding significantly; anti-social behav-

    iour; seizures of alcohol, criminal damage

    and drug seizures Mark McEwan credits this to strong partner-

    ship working in the area, with organisations

    such as FASA, and projects they are involved

    in such as Street Safe and Street Kyds. These

    projects have helped reduce anti-social be-

    haviour by 133 incidents.

    In a bid to tackle this issue, the Police have

    also made 166 alco-

    hol seizures, equal-

    ling 745 alcohol

    units, made 372 and

    made 12 referrals to

    the council for breach

    of council-alcohol for

    breach of council-

    alcohol bye laws. Chief Inspector McEwen

    said police were also on target to increase the

    number of illegal drug seizures by 5% in or-

    der to dismantle drug gangs within North

    Down He highlighted there had been nine

    more seizures compared to the same period

    last year.

    To read the full article click here

    Alcohol fuels rise in Violence

    TEXT 82111 0800 77 66 00 Page

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

  • 6

    Top

    Local Events

    The PHA Drug and Alcohol Community

    Support Service and the leaders of Millisle

    Youth Forum joined forces recently to pro-

    vide local young people some alternatives to

    substance abuse.

    Millisle is a small

    rural seaside com-

    munity in County

    Down but the risks

    of alcohol and drug

    use is as relevant

    here as in more ur-

    ban area. Commu-

    nity workers in Millisle have been concerned

    about substance misuse and specifically the

    increase in legal highs. Anti-social behav-iour has been increasing in the area and some

    young people are now finding themselves

    being threatened by paramilitary action be-

    cause of alleged drug use.

    The programme combined substance misuse

    education with a series of physical activities.

    Jo Scott, volunteer Youth Leader with the

    Millisle Youth Forum says, It was impor-tant that anything we would do with the

    group would be delivering serious messages

    but through fun activity. It had to be different

    to what they would be getting in school, or

    they would just turn off. Aislinn Quinn, Drug and Alcohol Commu-

    nity Support Worker said, In the mornings we provided interactive sessions focussed on

    the risks from substance misuse and using so

    called legal highs, then each afternoon was spent participating in an adrenaline raising

    diversionary activity, to promote the idea that

    a natural high, caused by challenging your-

    self and leaving your comfort zones, can be

    more thrilling than a chemically induced high

    you might get from drugs. The physical ac-

    tivities were designed taster sessions, high-

    lighting other activities that are available

    within the Down area, which the young peo-

    ple could engage in

    on a longer term ba-

    sis, such as skills

    training from Bel-

    fast Community Cir-

    cus, circuit training

    and boxing. The youth leaders

    are keen to continue to build on this work

    recognising that the young people are keen to

    build on the knowledge they gained and to

    continue to work towards addressing the drug

    and alcohol related issues n the community

    with the support of local agencies and ser-

    vices.

    The group are keen to continue to engage at-

    risk young people in the local area with pro-

    grammes that can give them positive alterna-

    tives to substance misuse.

    Millisle Summer Project.

    A crisis can be an emotionally stressful event

    or traumatic change in a persons life that will

    have an impact or effect on their everyday

    living.

    A crisis can provoke suicidal thoughts or self

    harm. Many factors can cause a person to

    feel in suicidal crisis, these range from men-

    tal health problems, drug and substance mis-

    use, relationship breakdowns, loss of job or

    bereavement, anything which makes the per-

    son feel that they cannot cope or continue

    living.

    FASA offer

    Walk in service

    9am - 5pm Monday to

    Friday at FASAs cen-

    tres

    Safe and Confidential

    surroundings

    Talk to someone who wants to under-

    stand

    Listening Ear sessions someone to talk to in your time of need, someone to listen

    Support and Guidance

    Befriending

    Advocacy

    Links to therapeutic services counsel-

    FASA Crisis Response Service

    Page

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  • 7

    Top

    Substance in Focus

    Anabolic Steroids

    What are anabolic steroids? Anabolic steroids are a group of hormones which occur naturally in the body.

    They are responsible for growth, physical development and functioning of repro-

    ductive organs. In men the main hormone is testosterone which is also responsi-

    ble for masculine features such as the growth of body hair and the deeper voice.

    Anabolic steroids also have a building effect on the body and increase muscle

    tissue. Steroids have a limited medical use in the UK, mainly in the treatment of anaemia.

    Prevalence

    Steroids have been used in competitive sport since the 50s, however in recent years, anabolic steroids have increasingly been used for non medicinal purposes by body builders, athletes and

    other sports people and door men and security guards.

    Although it is difficult to be accurate in the precise number of people using steroids, some sur-

    veys show that between 20 and 40 per cent of those attending some gyms have used steroids.

    Alongside those using anabolic steroids to enhance a sporting performance, young men are in-

    creasingly getting involved in taking steroids to improve their body image, leading many re-

    searchers to conclude that this could be considered as reverse anorexia, with people thinking they are not big enough.

    What can we do?

    In response to the growing usage of steroids, the government has changed the law to increase the

    penalties for supplying steroids, but possession for personal use is still not an offence. In sports,

    the use of steroids and other performance enhancing drugs has led to widespread drug testing, bt

    this will only combat the problem at a competitive level, and is unlikely to affect those who are

    at most risk of unmonitored side effects and infections due to injecting.

    Risks

    Although medical experts disagree, on balance it seems that taking anabolic steroids combined

    with intensive training and a high protein diet builds body weight and increases the size of mus-

    cles. They also often make users feel more aggressive and competitive and better able to perform

    strenuous physical activity.

    There are reports of regular users becoming physically violent and sexually abusive, in a fit of so

    called 'roid rage'. But whether those involved had violent tendencies in the first place is unclear.

    Users often take steroids in multiple combinations and at much higher doses than would be pre-

    scribed medically. Some of the main risks include:

    Liver abnormalities and a rare form of hepatitis

    Hypertension steroids encourage the body to retain water and raise blood pressure HIV and other blood borne viruss if the users inject and share injecting equipment Stunted growth in young people

    Changes in male reproductive system. Sperm output and quality is reduced and can

    take 8 months to return to normal. Sex drive may at first increase but then be lowered.

    Some men have also experienced over development of their breast tissue.

    Changes in the female body include increased sex drive and menstrual problems.

    There have also been reports of the development of male features, such as the growth of facial and body hair and the deepening of the voice. Once these symptoms

    happen they are usually irreversible, even when steroid use stops.

    Both males and females experience other problems, such as sleep disor-

    ders, confusion, depression and paranoia. Users can also experience skin

    problems, usually manifesting in acne.

    Counterfeit steroids pose additional risks. Many are made without the

    controls of legitimate drugs, and as a result, vary in purity and safety.

    Experts are agreed that although the use of steroids does not result in

    physical dependence, regular use can lead to a psychological dependence when the user is con-

    vinced they cannot perform well without being on drugs.

    Page

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  • 8

    Service Profile

    Mulholland After Care Service.

    Vision

    All young people will be supported in relationships to ex-

    press choice, to embrace opportunities, grow safely and ful-

    fil their potential

    Mission

    Macs provide services adapted to young people promoting opportunities and access to

    housing, education, health, employment, leisure and citizenship.

    History of MACS

    MACS was established in 1990 to provide a range of services for vulnerable young people

    aged 16-25 years. In the last 20 years MACS has succeeded in developing an approach

    which is effective and sustainable. The values and model of the organisation, particularly its

    approach to user involvement, are at the centre of this success.

    The organisation was known as Friends Of Willowfield Association until 1996 when its

    name was changed to Mulholland After Care Services (MACS) in memory of Phil Mulhol-

    land, who pioneered after care services for young people in Belfast in the 1980s. Following

    the introduction of the Children (Northern Ireland) Order (1995) the legislative context in

    which we had been working changed with fewer young people going into the care system,

    and therefore fewer care leavers. MACS responded to this change by widening its remit to

    incorporate vulnerable young people as potential service users.

    Ethos

    For the last 20 years MACS has kept central to its practice, the ethos of interdependence.

    Interdependence is a realisation that we are all mutually dependent on each other. It incorpo-

    rates a view of people being able to step outside the prevalent culture of self-sufficiency and

    independence. We believe that dependence is disabling but independence is isolating. We

    value the interconnectedness of all people. This has been, and will remain the focal point to

    project work undertaken with young people. Therefore, the core values of recognising young

    people as experts, young people as individuals and young people who can work together to

    realise potential, this lies at the heart of the work we do.

    Services

    Supported Housing Move in to Move on The Supported Housing Service is funded in partnership with the NIHE Supporting People

    and Belfast & South Eastern Trusts. It aims to support young people leaving care aged 16 -

    21 to make the transition to interdependence and their own tenancy. There are 12 place-

    ments across 2 sites: 6 placements in single unit self contained flats in South Belfast and 6

    placements in single unit self contained flats in East Belfast. Move in to move on is the mission, 30 young people between 2009-2010 have been supported in placements.

    Mentoring Service Dare to Dream

    MACS Mentoring Service is currently funded by Children in Need, Wellnet, Lloyds TSB,

    Awards for all and Victoria Homes Trust. Mentoring provides a voluntary relationship with

    a mentor for young people when they feel they are most vulnerable, typically in evenings

    and weekends. The mentoring relationship focuses purely on the needs and goals set by the

    young person and volunteer mentor.

    Page

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

  • 9

    Together they enter into a year long commitment to achieve

    these goals and most importantly enjoy building a positive rela-

    tionship together and have fun. MACS mentoring aims to re-

    duce loneliness and isolation and seeks to improve confidence,

    self esteem and social networks. Dare to dream is the mis-

    sion, between 2009 and 2010 58 young people have been supported across Belfast, Colin

    and Downpatrick areas.

    Floating Support Service Building futures together

    The Floating Support Service is funded through the Housing Executives Supporting People

    Programme and Wellnet. This service offers flexible, person centred holistic services to vul-

    nerable or at risk young people aged 16-25 to enable them to maintain interdependent living

    in the community. Each young person will have a tailored support plan that addresses indi-

    vidually assessed needs. Our support focuses on ten priority areas: managing tenancy and

    accommodation, motivation and taking responsibility, emotional and mental health, and

    physical health, managing money, social networks and relationships, drug and alcohol use,

    self care and living skills, meaningful use of time and offending. Building futures together

    is the mission, between 2009-2010 180 young people were successfully supported across

    Belfast, Colin and Downpatrick areas.

    Contact Us

    Registered Office: Mulholland After Care Services

    4 Lower Crescent

    Belfast

    BT7 1NR

    Tel: 028 9031 3163

    Fax: 028 9033 2214

    Registered Office: Mulholland After Care Services

    17b English Street

    Downpatrick

    BT30 6AB

    Tel: 028 4461 5155

    Fax: 028 4461 6551

    For more information visit www.macsni.org

    Email : [email protected]

    Local Drug and Alcohol Forum.

    NORDAGNorth Down and Ards Drug and Alcohol Awareness Group is an interagency group made up of service providers and

    community representatives who meet on a regular basis developing

    a drug and alcohol strategy at a more local level, mapping local pro-

    vision, identifying gaps and priorities for action and working in re-

    sponse to local need. If you would like to be involved in NORDAG and be kept up to dates

    with group developments, please click here to email the Community Support Worker for the

    local area Page

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

  • 10

    SUBSTANCE MISUSE TRAINING PROGRAMMES FOR THE VOLUNTARY AND

    COMMUNITY SECTOR

    A wide range of training programmes are available FREE to the staff and volunteers of

    community and voluntary sector organisations. This can be training developed to meet

    your very specific needs or accredited training courses at levels 1 to 3.

    This training is provided by the Eastern Drug and Alcohol Consortium which comprises

    ASCERT, FASA and The Falls Community Council. For more information you can

    contact any of these organisations directly or visit www.ascert.biz.

    FASA 178 - 180 Shankill Road

    Belfast BT13 2BH

    Tel: (028) 90803040

    Fax: (028) 90323231

    Email:

    [email protected]

    Web:www.fasaonline.or

    g

    ASCERT 23 Bridge Street

    Lisburn BT281X

    Tel: (028) 92604422 Fax: (028) 92608974

    Email: train-

    [email protected]

    Web: www.ascert.biz

    Falls Community

    Council 275-277 Falls Road

    Belfast BT12 6FD

    Tel: (028) 90202030

    Fax: (028) 90202031 Email

    [email protected]

    Web:www.fallscouncil.c

    Top

    Training

    Dates Course Title Venue Time

    03.11.1010.11.10

    Drugs Alcohol and Mental

    Health

    Link Centre, Newtow-

    nards

    7pm9pm

    01.12.10 Drugs Alcohol and Mental

    Health

    Downpatrick 10am4 pm

    27.01.2011 Drugs Alcohol and Mental

    Health

    ASCERT Lisburn 10am4pm

    Taking the Lid Off.

    Up to 40000 children in Northern Ireland are living in families where there is parental

    substance misuse.

    The Taking The Lid Off training course is a FREE 2 day workshop to enhance the capacity

    of those working with families affected by parental substance misuse.

    This training is provided by the Taking The Lid Off Partnership (ASCERT, SEHSCT and Barnardos) on behalf

    of the Eastern Drug and Alcohol Co-ordination Team through t he Public Health Agency.

    TTLO-A2-4 10th & 11th November 2010

    TTLO-A2-5 15th & 16th December 2010

    TTLO-A2-6 12th & 13th January 2011

    TTLO-A2-7 9th & 10th February 2011

    To register for any of these courses, please call Siobhan McIlroy on (028) 92604422 , register online at

    www.ascert.biz, or contact the Community Support Worker in your area.

    Page

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

    Upcoming Courses for the general public and voluntary sector.

  • 11

    Community Support New Recruits!

    The Drug and Alcohol Community Support Service are pleased to welcome two new recruits

    to the team.

    Viv Thompson and Fergal McCann will now be the community support workers for South

    Down and Lisburn, covering the Colin area, right down to Downpatrick. We are including a

    brief profile in this months edition of both the new workers. Please feel free to get in touch

    with them or if you see them at events or in your community go up and say hi!

    Name: Fergal McCann

    Contact:

    [email protected]

    07545928222

    Fergal will be the Com-

    munity Support Worker

    for the Colin area and

    for South Down work-

    ing 19 hours a week

    and will be based be-

    tween ASCERTs main office in Lisburn and sub office in Downpa-

    trick..

    He lives in Belfast, is married and has seven

    children (and a new puppy).

    He has a vast amount of experience in com-

    munity development dating back to 1990.

    Fergal is also currently in his second year of

    a BSc Hons Degree in Community Develop-

    ment through the University of Ulster.

    Fergal has worked in a variety of community

    settings across Belfast and beyond including:

    Voluntary youth work in Poleglass and

    Lenadoon

    A voluntary development worker, com-

    munity secretary and later chair person

    of the Poleglass Residents Association

    Youth development worker in Ander-

    sonstown

    Community Development worker in

    Andersonstown

    A development worker for the Ard

    Eoin Fleadh Cheoil

    Co-ordinator of the Ligoniel Commu-

    nity Empowerment Partnership and

    later the Greater Ballysillan and Ligo-

    niel CEP

    And Community Engagement Officer

    for the National Trust.

    Fergal also currently works part time in the

    Southern Board for the Probation Board.

    He is looking forward to meeting the groups

    within Colin and South Down and assisting

    them in tackling drugs and alcohol issues.

    Name:

    Viv Thompson

    Contact:

    [email protected]

    Viv will be taking

    over as the Com-

    munity Support

    Worker for Lis-

    burn working 16 hours a week, and will be

    based in ASCERTs head office in Lisburn. Viv has recently moved from Edinburgh to

    Newtownards. She has two children.

    Before moving to Northern Ireland, Viv was

    a senior support worker in Move On, promot-

    ing tenancy sustainment and working towards

    preventing homelessness and often supported

    people living with addiction and mental

    health issues.

    Previous to this she was senior Mentoring Co

    -ordinator for a project aimed at young peo-

    ple leaving local authority care and delivered

    workshops in mainstream schools as well as

    schools where the young people experience

    social, emotional and behavioural difficulties,

    delivering homelessness prevention advice

    and information across. Her working life be-

    gan with youth worker within the Community

    Education Department in Midlothian.

    In 2007 Viv attended Cardonald College

    Glasgow where she achieved SVQ III in

    health and social care. She has also studied

    conflict management, child protection and

    has an ILM level 3 in Management.

    Before leaving Edinburgh, Viv completed her

    first year in Edinburgh Napier University

    studying Social Science, and hopes to resume

    this when she has settled into Northern Ire-

    land life!

    Viv has over the years raised thousands of

    pounds for various charities from activities

    such as walking the great wall of china,

    jumping out of a plane and jumping off the

    Forth Rail Bridge. She is looking forward to

    her newest challenge of working in Lisburn.

    Page

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

  • 12

    Drug and alcohol issues are areas of

    concern for many groups and most

    communities, and often groups feel

    they are not equipped with skills or

    knowledge to respond to these issues

    confidently.

    ASCERT and FASA have been

    funded by The Public Health Agency

    to provide a Drug and Alcohol

    Community Support Service to local

    communities in the Belfast and South

    Eastern Health & Social Care Trust

    areas.

    There are 5 Community Support

    Workers and they can provide

    mentoring support to local groups to

    develop actions that address

    substance misuse at a community

    level.

    Community Support Workers will work with groups to identify their needs and help groups

    set their own aims and objectives, design an appropriate intervention, implement their

    initiative and evaluate its impact.

    Furthermore the Community Support Worker can provide up to date information on drug and

    alcohol training, trends of use and support in applying for funding etc.

    If drug or alcohol issues are a concern to your group or community and you would like to

    discuss how we can support you to respond to those issues then contact the support worker in

    your area.

    Top

    Drug and Alcohol Community Support Service

    The Community Support Service can:

    Provide accurate information on drug and alcohol issues

    Raise awareness of drug and alcohol services

    Help you assess local need

    Help promote regional drug and alcohol campaigns in your area

    Help you to develop initiatives or local action plans

    Help you access drugs and alcohol training

    Link you to other communities or groups addressing similar issues

    Link you to local drug and alcohol forums in your area

    COMMUNITY SUPPORT WORK-

    ERS IN YOUR AREA

    Lisburn City Viv Thomson

    ASCERT

    23 Bridge Street

    Lisburn, BT28 1XZ

    Tel: (028 92604422 Fax: (028) 92603874

    Email: [email protected]

    Web: www.ascert.biz

    DOWN DISTRICT

    Fergal McCann

    ASCERT

    23 Bridge Street

    Lisburn, BT28 1XZ

    Tel: (028) 92604422

    Fax: (028) 92603874

    Email: [email protected]

    Web: www.ascert.biz

    NORTH DOWN & ARDS

    Aislinn Quinn

    ASCERT 4 Queens Parade,

    Bangor BT20 3B

    Tel: (028) 9127 1322

    Email: [email protected]

    Web: www.ascert.biz

    SOUTH & EAST BELFAST

    James Scott

    FASA

    178 - 180 Shankill Road Belfast.BT13 2BH Tel: (028) 9080 3040

    Fax: (028 9032 313 Email: [email protected]

    Web: www.fasaonline.org

    NORTH & WEST BELFAST

    Diane McMullan

    FASA

    178 - 180 Shankill Road Belfast BT13 2BH Tel: (028) 9080 3040

    Fax: (028 9032 313 Email: [email protected]

    Web: www.fasaonline.org

    ILLUSTRATIONS EDITOR

    Damien McDonagh

    Volunteer

    ASCERT

    [email protected]

    Page

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