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  • General Information

    Description

    A group of American soldiers led by Ethan Allen captures Fort Ticonderoga on Lake Champlain in New

    York. This is one of the first military victories of the Americans in the American Revolution.

    Keywords

    Fort Ticonderoga, Siege of Boston, American Revolution, Battle of Concord, Battle of Bunker Hill,

    Ethan Allen, General George Washington, Henry Knox, Royal Navy, Halifax, Continental Army,

    Continental Congress, Independence, Liberty

    Citation

    MLA

    "The Capture of Fort Ticonderoga and the Siege of Boston." Albert Hibbs, correspondent. NBC News.

    The Capture of Fort Ticonderoga and the Siege of Bostonhttps://highered.nbclearn.com/portal/site/HigherEd/browse/?cuecard=1801

    Source: NBC News Resource Type: Video News ReportCreator: Dr. Albert Hibbs Copyright: NBCUniversal Media,

    LLC.Event Date: 1775 - 1776 Copyright Date: 1965Air/Publish Date: 11/06/1965 Clip Length 00:04:41

    Page 1 of 3 2008-2015 NBCUniversal Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

    https://highered.nbclearn.comhttps://highered.nbclearn.com/portal/site/HigherEd/browse/?cuecard=1801https://highered.nbclearn.com/portal/site/HigherEd/browse/?cuecard=1801https://highered.nbclearn.com/portal/site/HigherEd/browse/?cuecard=1801https://highered.nbclearn.com/portal/site/HigherEd/search?terms=Fort+Ticonderogahttps://highered.nbclearn.com/portal/site/HigherEd/search?terms=Siege+of+Bostonhttps://highered.nbclearn.com/portal/site/HigherEd/search?terms=American+Revolutionhttps://highered.nbclearn.com/portal/site/HigherEd/search?terms=Battle+of+Concordhttps://highered.nbclearn.com/portal/site/HigherEd/search?terms=Battle+of+Bunker+Hillhttps://highered.nbclearn.com/portal/site/HigherEd/search?terms=Ethan+Allenhttps://highered.nbclearn.com/portal/site/HigherEd/search?terms=General+George+Washingtonhttps://highered.nbclearn.com/portal/site/HigherEd/search?terms=Henry+Knoxhttps://highered.nbclearn.com/portal/site/HigherEd/search?terms=Royal+Navyhttps://highered.nbclearn.com/portal/site/HigherEd/search?terms=Halifaxhttps://highered.nbclearn.com/portal/site/HigherEd/search?terms=Continental+Armyhttps://highered.nbclearn.com/portal/site/HigherEd/search?terms=Continental+Congresshttps://highered.nbclearn.com/portal/site/HigherEd/search?terms=Independencehttps://highered.nbclearn.com/portal/site/HigherEd/search?terms=Liberty

  • NBCUniversal Media. 6 Nov. 1965. NBC Learn. Web. 19 March 2015

    APA

    Hibbs, A. (Reporter). 1965, November 6. The Capture of Fort Ticonderoga and the Siege of Boston.

    [Television series episode]. NBC News. Retrieved from

    https://highered.nbclearn.com/portal/site/HigherEd/browse/?cuecard=1801

    CHICAGO MANUAL OF STYLE

    "The Capture of Fort Ticonderoga and the Siege of Boston" NBC News, New York, NY: NBC Universal,

    11/06/1965. Accessed Thu Mar 19 2015 from NBC Learn:

    https://highered.nbclearn.com/portal/site/HigherEd/browse/?cuecard=1801

    Transcript

    The Capture of Fort Ticonderoga and the Siege of Boston

    Dr. ALBERT HIBBS (historian): Many revolutions pick up speed slowly, perhaps because the

    revolutionaries take a while to admit theyre in one. It was three weeks before the next major engagement

    and that at Ticonderoga. If Concord was only a moral victory, Ticonderoga was definitely a military one.

    This great stone fort situated at the neck of Lake Champlain was often referred to as the Gibraltar of the

    Champlain. It had been built by the French in 1755 and captured by the British four years later. It was a

    prize not only defensively but because of these magnificent artillery pieces. It was taken without a shot.

    Here at dawn on the 10

    th

    of May, Ethan Allen and about eighty men came swarming up from the shore yelling wildly. Guards

    were quickly overwhelmed. Confronting the commander of the forty-two-man garrison, Allen demanded

    their surrender in the name of Jehovah and the Continental Congress. The Americans occupied the fort

    and found the structure in a sad state of ruin. But now the royal colors were taken down, though the

    Americans were not sure yet what flag to run up.

    In June, 1775, Boston was occupied by some 12,000 British troops. Or, depending on your point of view,

    the 12,000 troops were surrounded in Boston. For most of the Massachusetts countryside was held by

    American guerilla bands slowly being formed into an army. On the night of June 16, the Americans held

    two hills, Breed and Bunker, overlooking Boston, and they dug in. When the British discovered them at

    dawn, General Howe was sent out with 2,000 men to dislodge them. The Americans waited here, behind

    their earthworks, many with not more than three or four rounds of ammunition for their rifles.

    In classic 18

    th

    -century style, the British, in waves, bayonets advanced, moved steadily up the hill. The Americans were

    expected to fire back too soon, waste one ragged volley and then flee before those gleaming bayonets.

    Instead they waited. The first wave of redcoats was within fifteen paces before the colonials opened fire.

    Page 2 of 3 2008-2015 NBCUniversal Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

  • Twice more the redcoats would have to wade through that wall of fire before the Americans ran out of

    ammunition and fled.

    The British took the two hills but at a cost of over a thousand casualties in one day. One of the important

    factors in that battle on Breeds Hill was the courage of the colonials. But another was the accuracy of

    their long-barreled muskets. The superiority of these weapons over those of the British would often do

    much to balance the odds in battle. The British now had these hills and the Americans had an army, and a

    commander-in-chief, General George Washington of Virginia. Washington, appointed by the Continental

    Congress, had set up his headquarters in Cambridge. He had the British army in a trap but he lacked the

    strength to close it. That vital strength would soon come and come from Ticonderoga.

    Page 3 of 3 2008-2015 NBCUniversal Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

    Cue Card-1801TitleGeneral InformationDescriptionKeywordsCitationTranscript

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