Teach Smarter, Not Harder

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<ul><li> 1. Seven Strategiesfor Formative AssessmentHAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12</li></ul><p> 2. HousekeepingRestroomBreaksUse of the libraryLunchQuestionsHAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12 3. Poll Take out your cellphones!HAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12 4. http://www.todaysmeet.com/TSNH Access from a laptop, iPad, smartphone, or other wired device. Use this site to ask questions and make comments. The site will be up for one year.HAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12 5. Learning TargetI can recognize formative assessmenttechniques and plan for their use ineffective classroom instruction.HAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12 6. IntroductionHAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12 7. Formative Assessment Formal and informal processes teachers and students use to gather evidence for the purpose of improving learning.HAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12 8. Summative Assessment Assessments that provide evidence of student achievement for the purpose of making a judgement about student competence or program effectiveness.HAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12 9. Conditions Required of Formative AssessmentAligns directly with the content standards to belearned.Tasks match what has been or will be taught.Provides information of sufficient detail to pinpointspecific problems, such as misunderstandings, sothat teachers can make good decisions about whatactions to take, and with whom.The results are available in time to take action withthe students who generated them.Teachers and students do indeed take actionbased on the results.HAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12 10. Activity 1: Is It Formative Assessment?HAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12 11. Benefits of Formative AssessmentWho is and is not understanding the lesson.What are this students strengths and needs?What misconceptions do I need to address?What feedback should I give students?What adjustments do I need to make to instruction?How should I group students?What differentiation do I need to prepare?Student becomes self-directed.Students develop the capacity to monitor the quality oftheir own work during production.HAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12 12. Seven Strategies of Assessment for LearningWhere Am I Going?Strategy 1: Provide students with a clear and understandable vision of the learningtarget.Strategy 2: Use examples and models of strong and weak work.Where Am I Now?Strategy 3: Offer regular descriptive feedback.Strategy 4: Teach students to self-assess and set goals.How Can I Close the Gap?Strategy 5: Design lessons to focus on learning target or aspect of quality at a time.Strategy 6: Teach students focused revision.Strategy 7: Engage students in self-reflection, and let them keep track of and sharetheir learningHAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12 13. Strategies Provide students with a clear and understandable vision of the learning target. Use examples and models of strong and weak work.HAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12 14. Poll ResultsHAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12 15. Where am I Going?Strategy 1: Clear Learning TargetsHAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12 16. VideoHAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12 17. Learning TargetsBy the end of this section I want you tobe able to understand: How to give students a clear vision of what you want them to know at the end of the lesson. How to use examples and models of strong and weak work.HAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12 18. Performance Goals that focus on taskcompletion.Learning goals - goals that describe theintended learning.HAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12 19. Learning GoalsResearch by Black and Wiliam shows thatwhen students are given learning goals,goals that describe the intended learning,they perform significantly better thanstudents who are given performancegoals, goals that focus on task completion.HAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12 20. I Can!We want to make sure our learning goalsare written so the students understandthem!! It is best to put them in I Canstatements, or My goal is. or We arelearning toHAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12 21. How to Make Target Clear to StudentsIdentify the word(s) an/or phrase(s) needing clarification. Which terms will studentsstruggle with? Imagine stating the target in its original form to your class. Thenenvision the degree of understanding reflected on faces throughout the room. Atwhich word did they lose meaning?Define the term(s) you have identified. Use a dictionary, your textbook, your statecontent standards document, or other reference materials specific to your subject.If you are working with a colleague, come to agreement on definitions.Convert the definition(s) into language your students are likely to understand.Turn the student-friendly definition into an I or a We statement: I am learning to_________; or We are learning to ________. Run it by a colleague for feedback.Try the definition out with students. Note their response. Refine as needed.Let students have a go at this procedure occasionally, using learning targets youthink they could successfully define and paraphrase. Make sure the definition theyconcoct is congruent with your vision of the target.HAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12 22. Student-Friendly Language: InferenceHAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12 23. Student-Friendly Language: Inference 1. Learning target: Make inferences from informational/ expository and literary/narrative text (Grade 2)HAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12 24. Student-Friendly Language: Inference 1. Learning target: Make inferences from informational/ expository and literary/narrative text (Grade 2) 2. Word to be defined: inferenceHAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12 25. Student-Friendly Language: Inference 1. Learning target: Make inferences from informational/ expository and literary/narrative text (Grade 2) 2. Word to be defined: inference 3. Definition: conclusion drawn based on evidence and logicHAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12 26. Student-Friendly Language: Inference 1. Learning target: Make inferences from informational/ expository and literary/narrative text (Grade 2) 2. Word to be defined: inference 3. Definition: conclusion drawn based on evidence and logic 4. Student-friendly definition: a guess based on cluesHAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12 27. Student-Friendly Language: Inference 1. Learning target: Make inferences from informational/ expository and literary/narrative text (Grade 2) 2. Word to be defined: inference 3. Definition: conclusion drawn based on evidence and logic 4. Student-friendly definition: a guess based on clues 5. Student-friendly target: I can make inferences from what I read. This means that I can make guesses based on clues when reading.HAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12 28. Student-Friendly Language: Inference 1. Learning target: Make inferences from informational/ expository and literary/narrative text (Grade 2) 2. Word to be defined: inference 3. Definition: conclusion drawn based on evidence and logic 4. Student-friendly definition: a guess based on clues 5. Student-friendly target: I can make inferences from what I read. This means that I can make guesses based on clues when reading. Notice that for second graders, you may not want to define informational/expository and literary/narrative text in the statement. If you want to define those terms, you may want to create separate statements, e.g., I can read informational text. This means I can read books and articles that tell me facts. And, I can read literary text. That means that I can read stories.HAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12 29. ACTIVITY 2: CREATING A CLEAR LEARNINGTARGETHAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12 30. Activity 2: Create a Learning Target Now we are going to do one. Using the standards I have provided, pick one and make a clear learning target as a group. Record the standard and learning target on the chart paper.HAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12 31. RubricsHAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12 32. Formative AssessmentStudies Black and Wiliam (1998) cite asevidence of the impact of formativeassessment on student achievementinclude the practice of teaching studentsthe criteria by which their work would bejudged.HAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12 33. A good assessment for learning rubricanswers for students the question, Wheream I going?HAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12 34. Student-Friendly RubricArter and Chappuis, 2006 suggest this process for developing astudent-friendly rubric:1. Identify the words and phrases in the adult version that your students might not understand.2. Look these words up in the dictionary or in textbooks. Discuss with colleagues the best phrasing choices for your students.3. Convert the definitions into wording your students will understand. Sometimes you need to convert one word into one or more phrases or sentences.4. Phrase the student-friendly version in the first person.5. Try the rubric out with students. Ask for their feedback.6. Revise as needed.HAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12 35. Match to TargetsThe content of your rubric should matchyour learning targets. When you areconsidering a rubric for possible use, askyourself if it includes the dimensions youwill be teaching. If not, revise the rubric orfind a different one that matches theelements of quality you and your district orstate believe are important.HAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12 36. HAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12 37. Student WorkThe features of excellent work should beso transparent that students can learn toevaluate their own work in the same waythat their teachers would.Frederikksen &amp; Collins, 1989, quoted inShepard, 2001, p 1092HAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12 38. Examples and Models of Strong and Weak WorkSamples should be: Anonymous Find on state or provincial websites Ask students for permission to use their work as a teaching example and save it for the next year. Create your own example, inserting errors students typically make.HAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12 39. Table Protocol for Analyzing Sample PapersStudents working in small groups can follow this protocol to work through the process ofanalyzing samples for one or more criteria (traits) on the scoring rubric. They can taketurns around the table acting as moderator.1. Everyone reads the scoring guide for __________ (specify trait) in this order:The highest level, the lowest level, and then the middle level or levels.2. The moderator reads the sample paper aloud.3. Everyone else thinks, Strong or weak for _____________ (specified trait)/4. Everyone (including the moderator) silently and independently reads the high orlow level of the rubric corresponding to their own judgments of strong or weak. Ifthe high or low level doesnt describe the sample well, then read the middle level(or progressing toward the middle) until you find the phrases that accuratelydescribe the quality of the sample. Everyone writes down his or her score.5. When all are ready, the moderator conducts the vote and tallies the scores.6. The moderator conducts the discussion- What did you give it and why? encouraging the use of the scoring rubrics language and concepts.HAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12 40. Table Talk: Reflecting on Strategies 1 and 2How do you plan on communicating theintended learning of a lesson, activity, task,project, or unit to students?How would you explain the difference betweena learning goal and a performance goal?HAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12 41. ConclusionBy making the learning targets or goalsclear to students from the outset, webuild student confidence and increasethe chances that students will reach thetarget.HAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12 42. By the end of this section I wanted you tobe able to understand: How to give students a clear vision of what you want them to know at the end of the lesson. How to use examples and models of strong and weak work. Did we achieve our goal?HAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12 43. BreakWhen you return from break, nd a partner from adifferent grade level and a different school.HAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12 44. Break Activity: Think, Pair, SharePlease find a partner from a differentschool and different grade level that youteach and discuss the following questions: When do students in my class receivefeedback on their progress? What forms does feedback take in myclassroom? What do I expect students to do withfeedback information?HAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12 45. Effective Feedback Where am I now?HAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12 46. Feedback is effective when it consists of information about progress, and/or about how to proceed. Hattie and Timperley, 2007, p. 89HAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12 47. The presence of feedback does not improvelearning. It is the quality that determines itseffectiveness.HAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12 48. Characteristics of Effective FeedbackHAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12 49. What is the purpose of intervention feedback?HAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12 50. Intervention feedbackIdentifying areas in need of improvementand providing enough information so thatthe student understands what to do nextHAMBLEN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SUMMER 2012Monday, May 21, 12 51. Although many students enjoy praise, if thepraise is directed to characteristics of the learnerrather than t...</p>