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  • Successful Interventions for Underachieving Students

    A Synthesis of Research on What Works In High-Performing/High-Poverty Schools

    Roots to Roadmaps Castleton Center for Schools

    Castleton, VT

    July 13, 2010

    William H. Parrett Director

    Center for School Improvement & Policy Studies Boise State University

    E-mail: wparret@boisestate.edu

    mailto:wparret@boisestate.edu

  • 1

    Successful Interventions for Underachieving

    Students

    How Are W

    Validate

    WeDoing?

    Challenge to Improve

    Who Are You?

    Teachers

    Principals

    i l h / h l b dInstructional Coaches/School-based Support

    District Office/Superintendents/School Boards

    State Dept./Regional Offices/Universities/Consultants

    Participant Outcomes

    Emerge with a substantially enhanced knowledge of what works for underachieving students living in poverty.

    Be compelled to take informed action to better meet th d f th i d hi i t d t the needs of their underachieving students.

    Network with colleagues engaged in improvement of high poverty schools

    Develop an awareness of high performing/high poverty (HP/HP) schools that demographically compare with their own setting.

  • 2

    Research on High Poverty /High Performing Schools

    18 Studies / Reports / Data Analyses

    Representing Thousands of Schools Nationwide

    What They Did

    How They Sustain Remarkable Results

    SPHERESOFINFLUENCE

    CaringRelationships

    HighExpectationsandSupport

    CommitmenttoEquity

    Community

    District

    Family

    SchoolClassroom

    HighPerforming/HighPovertySchools:CommonCharacteristics

    Parrett,W&Budge,K.(inpress)EquallyWorthy,

    ACTIONS

    NORMS,VALUES&BELIEFS

    CourageandWilltotakeAction

    Worthy,EquitablyServed: HowLeaders,Teachers,Schools&CommunitiesReverseTrendsofUnderachievementforChildrenofPoverty

    ProfessionalAccountabilityforLearning

    Leading Cultural Change

    When Im 50 I will be married and I will have two kids and I will make it a point not to be like the other men I know. I will help my wife raise my kids and I will be a

    good Daddy. I will get myself a good job and buy my kids

    When I Turn 50

    everything that they need. I am going to work at a store and be the manager. I am going to be very nice to people

    and help people who need help. I am only going to be married once. I am going to have a nice life.

    Victor R., Grade 4

    Glenn W. McGee, Closing the Achievement Gap: Lessons from Illinois Golden Spike High-Poverty High-Performing Schools, 2004.

    Closing the Achievement Gap

    Lessons from Illinois' Golden Spike High Performing Schools

    McGee, Glenn W. Journal of Education for Students Placed At Risk, 2004

    Source: Education Trust analysis of data from National School-Level State Assessment Score Database(www.schooldata.org).

    Poverty vs. Achievement in Illinois Elementary Schools

    50

    60

    70

    80

    90

    100

    ing

    Stan

    dard

    in M

    ath

    Data are from 2002.

    0

    10

    20

    30

    40

    50

    0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100

    Percent Low-Income Students

    Perc

    ent 5

    th G

    rade

    rs M

    eet

  • 3

    www.edtrust.org/edtrust

    Daytons Bluff Achievement PlusElementary School

    SaintPaul,MN

    2005 Dispelling the Myth Award Winner

    SchoolDemographics

    StudentPopulation:TotalStudentPopulation(PK6th):375Students

    40%AfricanAmerican25%Hispanic20%SoutheastAsian13%Caucasian2%AmericanIndian

    40%MobilityIndex*(StudentswhoenrolledorleftDaytonsBluffafterOctober1st)

    91%FreeandReducedLunchStatus*(IncomeeligibilitybaseduponFederalPovertyguidelines)

    35%EnglishLanguageLearnerStudents

    12%SpecialEducationStudents

    *Note=Statisticstakenfrom200809SchoolYear

    Daytons Bluff Achievement Plus Elementary

    Daytons Bluff Achievement Plus Elementary

    Daytons Bluff ElementaryImprovement Over Time, Grade

    5 Math

    71 7480

    100

    or A

    bove

    21

    0

    20

    40

    60

    Perc

    ent a

    t Lev

    el 3

    o

    2002 2004 2008

    Source: Minnesota Department of Education School Report Card, http://education.state.mn.us/ReportCard2008/

  • 4

    Lapwai ElementaryLapwai,ID

    2005 Dispelling the Myth Award Winner

    Lapwai Elementary

    312 Students K-6 79% Low-income 84% Native American Outperformed the state in 4th grade reading and Outperformed the state in 4th grade reading and

    math 2003 2006 Native American students outperformed the state

    in 4th grade reading and math 2003 2006

    Idaho Department of Education: http://www.sde.state.id.us/Dept/, 2008

    Making Gains at LapwaiGrade 4

    85%

    97%

    60%

    70%

    80%

    90%

    100%

    Source: Idaho Department of Education: http://www.sde.state.id.us/Dept/, 2008.

    27%

    32%

    0%

    10%

    20%

    30%

    40%

    50%

    Reading Math

    1999

    2008

    If it can happen at Lapwaiit can happen

    anywhere anywhere.

    Brenna TerryLapwai School Board Member

    2006

    Taft Elementary SchoolBoise,ID

    2003 Blue Ribbon Award Recipient

  • 5

    William H. Taft Elementary

    330 Students Grades k-6

    72% Low Income

    18% ELL/Refugee

    9% Hispanic

    Idaho State Department of Education, 2008

    Reading Scores 3-6th Grade

    William H. Taft ElementaryBoise, ID

    William H. Taft Elementary

    Reading Scores, 3rd Grade

    Source: Idaho State Department of Education, 2008 Idaho State Department of Education, 2008

    Making Refugee Students Welcome

    When 58 refugee students speaking little English were transferred to this urban elementary urban elementary school, the principal set up a team-building summer camp.

    Kathleen Budge and William Parrett

    April 2009

    Osmond A. Church SchoolPS/MS 124

    Queens,NewYork

    2004 Dispelling the Myth Award Winner

    Osmond A. Church SchoolPS / MS 124

    1,141 students in grades PK-8

    97% Low-Income

    41% Asian

    35% African American

    21% Latino

    Source: New York Department of Education, https://www.nystart.gov/publicweb/2008

    Osmond A. Church SchoolPS / MS 124

    English Language Arts Scores 2009

    83% 84%90%

    96% 93%

    82%76% 77%

    82% 81% 80%

    69%80%

    100%

    Source: New York Department of Education, https://www.nystart.gov/publicweb/2009

    0%

    20%

    40%

    60%

    Grade3 Grade4 Grade5 Grade6 Grade7 Grade8

    P.S.124 NewYork

  • 6

    Port Chester Middle SchoolPortChester,NY

    2006 Dispelling the Myth Award Winner

    Port Chester Middle School

    759 students in grades 5-8

    65% Latino

    12% African-American

    64% Low-Income

    New York Department of Education, 2008

    Port Chester Middle School

    English Language Arts 2009

    85% 84%

    75%81% 80%

    69%

    80%

    100%

    New York Department of Education, 2009

    0%

    20%

    40%

    60%

    Grade6 Grade7 Grade8

    PortChester NewYork

    Granger High SchoolGranger,WA

    Granger High School

    390 Student Grades 9-12 84% Hispanic 92% Low Income92% Low Income 100% Parent Attendance / Student Led

    Conferences 91% Graduation Rate

    Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction, 2008

    Granger High School

    61%

    69%

    60%

    80%

    100%

    geM

    eeting

    Standards

    Grade10Reading

    20%

    38%

    0%

    20%

    40%

    20002001 2002 2003 20042005 2008 2009

    Percentag

    Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction, 2009

  • 7

    Granger High SchoolImprovement Over Time

    2001 Graduation Rate

    30% 10th Grade Reading

    Proficiency 20%

    2007 Graduation Rate 91% 10th Grade Reading

    Proficiency 80%Proficiency 20% 10th Grade Writing

    Proficiency 8% 10th Grade Math

    Proficiency 6% Parent Conference

    Participation 10%

    10th Grade Writing Proficiency 74%

    10th Grade Math Proficiency 46%

    Parent Conference Participation 100%

    to be persuaded of the educability of poorchildren? If your answer is more than one, then Isubmit that you have reasons of your own forpreferring to believe that basic pupil performanced i f f il b k d i d f h l

    How many effective schools would you have to see

    derives from family background instead of schoolresponse to family background

    We can, whenever and wherever we choose, successfully teach all children whose schooling is of interest to us.

    Ron Edmonds... 1979

    WE KNOW WHAT WORKS IN EDUCATION. THE RESEARCH IS

    PROLIFIC

    Amazingly, then, the question

    Todayin 2010

    today is not about what works, but about why we do not implement what we know works in all schools for all kids?

    Karin Chenoweth. Its Being Done: Academic Success in Unexpected Schools. 2007. Pg. 227.

    How Are WWeDoing?

    Self Evaluation Rubric: Eight Components of High Performing, High Poverty Schools

  • 8

    SPHERESOFINFLUENCE

    CaringRelationships

    HighExpectationsandSupport

    CommitmenttoEquity

    Community

    District

    Family

    SchoolClassroom

    HighPerforming/HighPovertySchools:CommonCharacteristics

    Parrett,W&Budge,K.(inpress)EquallyWorthy,

    ACTIONS

    NORMS,VALUES&BELIEFS

    CourageandWilltotakeAction

    Worthy,EquitablyServed: HowLeaders,Teachers,Schools&CommunitiesR

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