Students Who are they? What do they need? What do they do?

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Marzano 5 Levels 1. Safe & Orderly environment 2. Effective Instruction in every classroom 3. Guaranteed & viable curriculum 4. Standardized reporting of student progress 5. System to ensure mastery

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<p>Students Who are they? What do they need? What do they do? What makes a good school? If you were getting ready to move, how do you know what to look for to ensure you get your kids in the right school? What do YOU think? Consider the text book (Ch. 2 p ) Marzano 5 Levels 1. Safe &amp; Orderly environment 2. Effective Instruction in every classroom 3. Guaranteed &amp; viable curriculum 4. Standardized reporting of student progress 5. System to ensure mastery 9 Characteristics of High Performing Schools 1. Clear &amp; shared focus 2. High standards &amp; expectations 3. Effective school leadership 4. High levels of collaboration &amp; communication 5. Aligned curriculum &amp; assessment 6. Frequent monitoring of teaching &amp; learning 7. Focused professional learning 8. Supportive learning environment 9. High levels of parent &amp; community involvement Compare the Marzano information, the 9 Characteristics of High Performing Schools to the textbook section, What is a Good School? (p ) 2 small groups share your conclusions Be prepared to justify your responses Take NOTES!!! Keep your notes out from the last activity and whatever notes you have from the last class or the reading. Put away all other materials. Quiz over Chapter 2 You may use your notes. If you didnt take notes, so sorry! 30 minutes When you are finished: Take a break (quietly) Go to an open computer and take the Multiple Intelligence test (link on class wiki or below) Round-Robin Brainstorming session on sources of diversity that impact teaching and learning How does this type of diversity impact teaching and learning? School response School requirements (laws) What is the difference between ethnicity and race? How does ethnicity affect learning or school? What are the school issues regarding race? What are school issues regarding culture? Multicultural English Language Learners (ELL) Learning Styles how do you learn best? Multiple Intelligences (quiz results) Learning Disabilities range and scope (p. 74) Learning Delays: Pre-School Gifted/Talented enrichment/acceleration ELL IDEA (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act) Impacts how we deal with disabilities in schools Details specific requirements in terms of education Do NOT have to be SPED to have a 504 plan 6 principles P. 75 ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) Used in all aspects of life outside of education to ensure fair treatment of people with disabilities The Need for ControlThe Need to Belong Why are choices important? Glassers Choice Theory How do we give students choices? What happens when one doesnt feel in control or have power? Adolescent subcultures What do they look like in schools? What labels do we give them? What makes each group unique? Membership why &amp; how? Chapter 4: Recognizing Risk Factors &amp; Responding Child not living with 2 parents Head of the household is a HS dropout Family income below poverty line Child is living with parent(s) who dont have steady, full-time employment Family is receiving welfare benefits Child has no health insurance Concerns: Problems tend to cluster Compounding Effect: The more at-risk factors the less likely students will succeed. Student is at greater risk of academic issues or failure Look at the previous list where can you see the effects of poverty? How does poverty lead to compounding of at-risk factors? Bullying is a conscious, willful, and deliberate hostile activity intended to harm, induce fear through the threat of further aggression, and create terror (cited in Coloroso, 2003, 13 ). Imbalance of power. The bully can be older, bigger, stronger, more verbally adept, higher up on the social ladder, of a different race, or of the opposite sex. Intent to harm. The bully means to inflict emotional and/or physical pain, expects the action to hurt, and takes pleasure in witnessing the hurt. Threat of further aggression: Both the bully and the bullied know that the bullying can and probably will occur again. Terror: Bullying is systematic violence used to intimidate and maintain dominance Bullying does not include normal childhood behaviors such as sibling rivalry one-on-one fighting of siblings or peers with competing claims. acts of impulsive aggression in other words, aggression that is spontaneous, indiscriminate striking out, with no intended target. (cited in Coloroso, 2003, 39) Explore this site look for Bullying Laws as it pertains to school in Kansas Types of Bullying and their definitions Effects of Bullying Why? Who is affected? What can we do? Read &amp; Discuss Kids Health Handout Week 2 Reflection due 9/23/13 via No Class next week (9/25/13) Conduct 1 st Classroom observation Use 7 Cs of Effective Teaching as your guide Observation Reflection due viaSept. 30 th Quiz over Ch. 3, 4, 6 on Oct. 2 open notes What do we do at school Look over/read Ch. 5 &amp; 7 for next class discussion What do we do at school? School Board meeting/interview Make a plan.</p>