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VOLUME XX SPELMAN SPOTLIGHT SPELMAN COLLEGE, ATLANTA, GEORGIA, TUESDAY, APRIL 27, 1965 NUMBER 2 RELIGIOUS EMPHASIS WEEK - A SUCCESS? Dr. Manley and Dr. George Kelsey WHAT HAPPENED ? ? There was an extensively planned program of activities in the A. U. Center during the week of March 7, under the chairmanship of Dr. Rufus E. Clement, president of Atlanta University. Approximately 5,000 students were possible participantsyet total crowds composed not too much more than a fifth of that number. Some students even claim to have heard nothing about it. What was the problem? It was not lack of good speakers. Dr. George Kelsey, University Center speaker who is professor of Christian Ethics at Drew University, received commendation from many of those who heard him. Rev. J. Claude Evans, Clark: Rev. William V. Guy, Morehouse: Dr. James H. Cone, Morris Brown; and Rev. Kelley Miller Smith, Spelman, all reported good responses from their audiences. It could not either have been lack of diversity. In addition to a Sunday afternoon service and two evening services, there was the evening Communion service. Meditation and organ music were available on the different campuses at varying hours. Informal discussions were also programmed as well as a color slide presentation of Artists Concepts of Jesus in Various Media. Even in the evening services, the music was varied. Featured were the Clark College Choir, the Spelman Glee Club, and the A-M-S Chorus. With so many different times and localities to choose from, those activities should have been available to all of the students in the system. Was lack of publicity the problem? Perhaps yet announcements were made in all of the school assemblies and posters of some activities were placed. The weekly calendar, evidently unread by many, also carried these events. With a speaker imported especially for an occasion, it seems difficult •not to know that the occasion does exist. It can not be said that the week did not involve student participation. It was found on planning committees, in the music, among the ushers, in the prayers and scripture reading! and the preparers and offerers of Communionin fact in almost every possible phase. What, then, caused the poor attendance of Religious Week? It would seem to be the consensus that lack of student interest and knowledge was responsible. Committees may plan, speakers may speak, but religion can be emphasized only so far as the students of the A. U. Center will emphasize it. Only the yardstick of student interest can measure the success of non- compulsory activities. Andrea Williams RELIGIOUS EMPHASIS AT SPELMAN During the week of March 7 Spelman College carried out its annual Religious Emphasis Week program. The speaker was Rev. Kelley Miller Smith, the pastor of the First Baptist Church, Nashville, Tennessee. Miss Geraldine Lyons, President, Miss Michael Purify, Miss Ann Go- lar, and Miss Alice Hines were the officers of the Religious Emphasis Committee which was composed of a representative number of students with Reverend N. M. Rates acting as advisor. From the time of his arrival in Atlanta at six a. m. Monday until his departure on Friday, Rev. Smith was involved in the activities of Spelman and the center. Many girls have stated that Rev. Smith captured their interest as soon as he appeared on the platform in Sisters Chapel or when he first began to speak. He had many attentive listeners at all the morning services, as well as at the luncheons and dinners he attended. These included the Student Teachersdinner on Tuesday and the Faculty luncheon on Thursday. Quite a number of students expressed special appreciation of the House Conferences on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday evenings at Packard, Morehouse South, Abby, and Manley Halls respectively. In fact, Rev. Smith seemed to be a hit with many Spelman students and he certainly felt the same way about Spelman. He explored the campus, questioned various aspects of life on campus, and even suggested that he be invited to return. Although the speaker was a central focus, another important feature of this week was the Seminar on Wednesday morning which involved approximately twenty seminar groups led by students and resource persons from several religious groups. It afforded a chance for discussion of such topics as Sex and Religion, Cumpulsory Chapel Attendance, and many others. It is difficult to assess the value of an observance of this kind. Some appreciated it while others did not. Yet, to all it offered an opportunity, an opportunity of which many took advantage. Andrea Jeanne Williams AULA ORGANIZES A BEGINNING: On Saturday, February 13, 1965, the student assistants of Atlanta Universitys Trevor Arnett Library organized themselves into an association known as the Atlanta University Library Assistants (AULA). At the first meeting of AULA, Mr. Miles Jackson, Chief Librarian of Trevor Arnett, talked to the student assistants about the historical development, function, and current progress of Trevor Arnett as a central library for the Atlanta University Center. Mr. Jackson also reminded the student assistants of their responsibility for Memorial services for Mrs. Dorothy Shepard Manley were held on Sunday, March 14, 1965 at 3:00 P. M. in Sisters Chapel. Memorial tributes were given by Mrs. Elizabeth Macomson on behalf of the faculty, Miss Judy Tillman on behalf of the student body, and Mrs. Richard Hacking on behalf of the Womens International League for the provision of prompt and efficient service to the students and faculty members of the Atlanta University Center. Following Mr. Jacksons comments, officers were elected: President - Terry Dawkins, Morehouse, Vice-President - Geraldine Benton, Morris Brown; Secretary - Joette Y. Baker, Atlanta University; Assistant Secretary - Thomas Frazier, Morehouse; and Treasurer - Deloris Davis, Morris Brown. The members of the AULA represent the five institutions of the Atlanta University Center: Atlanta University, Morris Brown, Spelman, Clark and Morehouse. The primary functions of the AULA are both social and educational. The social aspect of the AULA will concern the gathering of the members and their friends for fun and relaxation. The educational function takes in four broad areas: (1) utilization of the membersexperience as library assistants to provide maximum service to the Atlanta University Center, (2) presentation of lectures and forums by outstanding intellects, (Cont. on page 6) Peace and Freedom. The Spel man College Glee Club provided music by singing an adaptation of Psalm 27 which was written by Dr. W. L. James in memory of Mrs. Manley. After the service, the congregation travelled to the Dorothy Shepard Manley Hall to witness the unveiling of the building's lettering.

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SPELMAN SPOTLIGHT SPELMAN COLLEGE, ATLANTA, GEORGIA, TUESDAY, APRIL 27, 1965 NUMBER 2
RELIGIOUS EMPHASIS WEEK - A SUCCESS?
Dr. Manley and Dr. George Kelsey
WHAT HAPPENED ? ?
There was an extensively planned program of activities in the A. U. Center during the week of March 7, under the chairmanship of Dr. Rufus E. Clement, president of Atlanta University. Approximately 5,000 students were possible partici­ pants—yet total crowds com­ posed not too much more than a fifth of that number. Some students even claim to have heard nothing about it. What was the problem?
It was not lack of good speak­ ers. Dr. George Kelsey, Univer­ sity Center speaker who is pro­ fessor of Christian Ethics at Drew University, received com­ mendation from many of those who heard him. Rev. J. Claude Evans, Clark: Rev. William V. Guy, Morehouse: Dr. James H. Cone, Morris Brown; and Rev. Kelley Miller Smith, Spelman, all reported good responses from their audiences.
It could not either have been lack of diversity. In addition to a Sunday afternoon service and two evening services, there was the evening Communion service. Meditation and organ music were available on the different campuses at varying hours. In­ formal discussions were also programmed as well as a color slide presentation of “Artists Concepts of Jesus in Various
Media”. Even in the evening services, the music was varied. Featured were the Clark College Choir, the Spelman Glee Club, and the A-M-S Chorus. With so many different times and local­ ities to choose from, those ac­ tivities should have been avail­ able to all of the students in the system.
Was lack of publicity the problem? Perhaps — yet an­ nouncements were made in all of the school assemblies and posters of some activities were placed. The weekly calendar, evidently unread by many, also carried these events. With a speaker imported especially for an occasion, it seems difficult •not to know that the occasion does exist.
It can not be said that the week did not involve student participation. It was found on planning committees, in the mu­ sic, among the ushers, in the prayers and scripture reading! and the preparers and offerers of Communion—in fact in al­ most every possible phase.
What, then, caused the poor attendance of Religious Week? It would seem to be the con­ sensus that lack of student in­ terest and knowledge was re­ sponsible. Committees may plan, speakers may speak, but relig­ ion can be emphasized only so
far as the students of the A. U. Center will emphasize it. Only the yardstick of student interest can measure the success of non- compulsory activities.
—Andrea Williams
SPELMAN During the week of March 7
Spelman College carried out its annual Religious Emphasis Week program. The speaker was Rev. Kelley Miller Smith, the pastor of the First Baptist Church, Nashville, Tennessee. Miss Ger­ aldine Lyons, President, Miss Michael Purify, Miss Ann Go- lar, and Miss Alice Hines were the officers of the Religious Em­ phasis Committee which was composed of a representative number of students with Rever­ end N. M. Rates acting as ad­ visor.
From the time of his arrival in Atlanta at six a. m. Monday until his departure on Friday, Rev. Smith was involved in the activities of Spelman and the center. Many girls have stated that Rev. Smith captured their interest as soon as he appeared on the platform in Sisters Chap­ el or when he first began to speak. He had many attentive listeners at all the morning ser­ vices, as well as at the luncheons and dinners he attended. These included the Student Teachers’ dinner on Tuesday and the Fac­ ulty luncheon on Thursday. Quite a number of students ex­ pressed special appreciation of the House Conferences on Mon­ day, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday evenings at Packard, Morehouse South, Abby, and Manley Halls respectively. In fact, Rev. Smith seemed to be a hit with many Spelman students —and he certainly felt the same way about Spelman. He explor­ ed the campus, questioned var­ ious aspects of life on campus, and even suggested that he be invited to return.
Although the speaker was a central focus, another important feature of this week was the Seminar on Wednesday morning which involved approximately twenty seminar groups led by students and resource persons
from several religious groups. It afforded a chance for discussion of such topics as Sex and Relig­ ion, Cumpulsory Chapel Atten­ dance, and many others.
It is difficult to assess the value of an observance of this kind. Some appreciated it while others did not. Yet, to all it offered an opportunity, an op­ portunity of which many took advantage.
Andrea Jeanne Williams
AULA ORGANIZES A BEGINNING: On Satur­
day, February 13, 1965, the stu­ dent assistants of Atlanta Uni­ versity’s Trevor Arnett Library organized themselves into an as­ sociation known as the Atlanta University Library Assistants (AULA). At the first meeting of AULA, Mr. Miles Jackson, Chief Librarian of Trevor Ar­ nett, talked to the student assis­ tants about the historical devel­ opment, function, and current progress of Trevor Arnett as a central library for the Atlanta University Center. Mr. Jackson also reminded the student assis­ tants of their responsibility for
Memorial services for Mrs. Dorothy Shepard Manley were held on Sunday, March 14, 1965 at 3:00 P. M. in Sisters Cha­ pel.
Memorial tributes were given by Mrs. Elizabeth Macomson on behalf of the faculty, Miss Judy Tillman on behalf of the stu­ dent body, and Mrs. Richard Hacking on behalf of the Wo­ men’s International League for
the provision of prompt and ef­ ficient service to the students and faculty members of the At­ lanta University Center. Follow­ ing Mr. Jackson’s comments, officers were elected: President - Terry Dawkins, Morehouse, Vice-President - Geraldine Ben­ ton, Morris Brown; Secretary - Joette Y. Baker, Atlanta Uni­ versity; Assistant Secretary - Thomas Frazier, Morehouse; and Treasurer - Deloris Davis, Morris Brown. The members of the AULA represent the five institutions of the Atlanta Uni­ versity Center: Atlanta Univer­ sity, Morris Brown, Spelman, Clark and Morehouse.
The primary functions of the AULA are both social and edu­ cational. The social aspect of the AULA will concern the ga­ thering of the members and their friends for fun and relax­ ation. The educational function takes in four broad areas: (1) utilization of the members’ ex­ perience as library assistants to provide maximum service to the Atlanta University Center, (2) presentation of lectures and for­ ums by outstanding intellects,
(Cont. on page 6)
Peace and Freedom. The Spel­ man College Glee Club provided music by singing an adaptation of Psalm 27 which was written by Dr. W. L. James in memory of Mrs. Manley.
After the service, the congre­ gation travelled to the Dorothy Shepard Manley Hall to witness the unveiling of the building's lettering.
Tuesday, April 27, 1965 SPELMAN SPOTLIGHT Page 2
SPELMAN SPOTLIGHT Editor-in-Chief ........................................................... Leila Potts Co-Editor .............................................................. Lrieda Williams
Associate Editor ........ ......................................... Andrea Williams Secretary ................................................................... Carolyn Clark Business Manager .................................................... Helen Coleman Cartoonist .......................................................... Carolyn Simmons Reporters ................................................................... Judy Tillman, Anna Belle Porter, Phoebe Bailey, Yvette Savwoir, Carolyn Camp­ bell, Joyce Young, Melba Davis, Anne Carroll, Patsy Stevens, Carol King, Jane Smith, Ruth Batey, Clara Prioleau, Alexis Walker, Beverly Smith.
Leila Potts
WHO’S NEXT??
Webster defines a rumor as “a story current but not au­ thenticated.” The key word here is “authenticated" which is sy­ nonymous with truth and valid­ ity - something which a rumor has not! Anything that is not sy­ nonymous with truth and valid­ ity has no place in an academic situation - a. situation that we entered to find the truth, not to reject it. Unfortunately, however, the evils of untruth prevail, rearing their ugly heads when­ ever they get a chance, often leaving indelible marks upon the lives of the people they touch.
Rumors are usually concoct­ ed by narrow, idle minds. It is bad enough to have a narrow mind, but to have an idle mind is the devil’s workshop. After their beginning rumors pass from mouth to mouth as gossip and inevitably gain new “Facts” and become more “Juicy”. The in­ teresting thing about this is that rumors are all right until the> are about you, then they are dirty, vicious lies.
Most females have what is known as feminine intuition. Unfortunately, most of us also have a pettiness about us - a “quality” which when exercis­ ed can do wonders for rumors,
especially with regard to the length of time they stay alive and the “facts” that are con­ tinually being added. I ven­ ture to say here that that is one quality all of us could do without.
Here is an hypothetical ru­ mor that can illustrate what I'm talking about: Eva Jones had just recently become en­ gaged. After a while she be­ gan teasing about getting mar­ ried secretely, though never saying concrete. Spring break came and she went home. Her fiance visited her but they did not get married. About a week after she got back, the rumor was started that she had got­ ten married during the break. The rumor stayed in circula­ tion quite a long time, gained new “Facts” as to the date and reasons, and eventually came to the attention of the adminis­ tration who promptly called her in. In order to prove her in­ nocence Eva had to answer a host of questions and to take a medical examination. Her par­ ents were called and they be­ came excited. However, no ac­
tions were taken by the admin­ istration because the rumor was not true. But, Eva still suf­ fered. She was thoroughly hu­ miliated and hurt. Was the ru­ mor worth the agony it put her through? NO!
Rumors serve no sane, prac­ tical, aesthetic, ethical, or moral purpose. In other words they have no use, except! for those small-minded, jealous humans who use them for revenge. If you are in doubt about some­ thing, or if you “saw some­ thing”, get the facts straight be­ fore you pass it on, if you must. If you can’t get the facts straight then keep quiet. A rumor is not worth the humiliation it can put an individual through. Would you like to be a subject? Would you like to be the next one? I think not.
To paraphrase an old saying,
A WORD OF THANKS
Once in a while, some of us experience something which is so meaningful that mere words will not suffice to express the beauty of that experience; we stand naked in the face of exalt­ ed beauty because it strips us to the essence of pure art. Yet we know, in the end, that we must say something in gratitude —something fitting, something proper. So, this is to thank those responsible for the presentation of the Branoho Kromanavich Chorus of Y ugoslavia on March 31, 1965 in Sisters Cha­ pel.
The art we experienced is called music. Because we heard it in the purity of its rendition it becomes essence. And so goes another rare experience ... we may not talk much about it, or even think of it — but we can never forget . . .
To say more, outside of a critical analysis, is nothing short of giving vent to an impulse.
—Venitia Sharpe
WHAT IS COAHR A few years ago, when dem­
onstrations were at their peak, students in the Atlanta Univer­ sity Center formed the Commit­ tee on Appeal for Human Rights in order that they might initiate desegregation efforts in down­ town Atlanta through their own organization. After all most of the students would be making Atlanta their home for the next four years. Sometimes their hav­ ing to go downtown would mean that they would want comfort­ able seats on the city bus, rest for their tired feet while eating their lunch, and restrooms to go to as their bodies signaled the necessity. Although Negroes, they were still human beings with human desires of rest, food and excretion.
Things were not easy in those days. The results of many dem-
Great minds talk about ideas, medium minds talk about events, but small minds talk about people.
Leila Potts
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onstrations were mass arrests of many students. This, of course, entailed financial difficulties on the part of the parents and schools and meant academic sacrifices on the part of the in­ carcerated students. In spite of all of this, those were the good old days when the students felt really free to express, for the first time, their dissatisfaction and discontentment toward an unfair society in the form of chanting freedom songs, partici­ pating in mass marchings and in­ dulging in passive resistance.
Today things have changed - but only a little. Certain tangi­ ble results are obvious - Negroes can sit anywhere on buses, eat at lunch counters and even use the restrooms at almost any pub­ lic concern. Still the problem is far from being solved.
A group of Spelman and Morehouse students met in Sep­ tember of this academic year in order to completely reorganize the Committee on Appeal for Human Rights. A new constitu­ tion was drawn up and endorsed by the Council of Presidents of the Atlanta University Cen­ ter making this a legitimately approved organization in which the entire student bodies could participate without reluctance.
The organization's Executive Committee is composed of an executive chairman and two rep­ resentatives from each respec­ tive center institution. Sherryl Moss, who is secretary of COA­ HR, and Dorothea Morton are the two Spelman representatives who were appointed by the stu­ dent body president. The Coun­ cil of Presidents and the respec­ tive student body presidents com­ pose the Board of Advisors.
In view of the passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Bill and in conjunction with public senti­ ment, the committee decided to redirect its course from the streets, and to revise its efforts into programmed p r oj e c t s . Among the slated projects were the Abolition of Capitol Punish­ ment in Georgia, the initiation of a book drive for the inmate library at Reid Federal Prison, the initiation of meal sacrificing for the poor people in places
like Mississippi, the creation of assistance in the NASH project tutorial program and making provision for entertaining the culturally and socially deprived children in Vine City, a slum in the Atlanta University Cen­ ter backyard.
None of these projects ma­ terialized where there were con­ crete results. The only projects so far where there was center­ wide participation and cooper­ ation was the impromptu call for picketeers on behalf of the Selma situation. This does not mean necessarily, however, that the students are only interested in demonstrating, but it does mean that the students see a need for more and more dem­ onstrations.
While the social problem seems to be well on its way to­ ward being solved, there is still room for much improvement in that area as well as in all other areas. Students seemed to have done a tremendous job toward solving certain racial problems in their own way. In what way will you, as a student, solve the other unsolved problems? The future is in your hands.
-—Gloria Wise
SHORT EXCHANGE PROGRAMS
Spelman has just witnessed one of its most successful ex­ periments in the history of the short term exchange program of two weeks. The girls from Ce­ dar Crest College in Allentown, Pennsylvania made a definite and pleasant impression on the Spelman Student body from their first day here to their last. The participants in the program from Cedar Crest were Gail Griffiths, Cheryl Buttendorf, Sue Miller, Patti Braens, Joyce Gill, and Marcia Rodriguez.
When the roommates and dormitory mates of these girls were asked to what did they at­ tribute the enthusiastic accep­ tance of these girls, they gen­ erally replied that it was be­ cause they were “real” girls, just like us. All of the students
(Cont. on page 3)
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Elizabeth Jordan Bernice Dowdy
Every year through the gene­ rosity of Mr. Charles Merrill, a member of the Board of Trus­ tees, Spelman selects Merrill Scholars. These students are awarded $3,000 which they use for study and travel abroad dur­ ing a period of fourteen months. They leave during the month of June of one year and return the August of the following year. This year’s Merrill Schol­ ars are Misses Elizabeth Jor­ dan, Bernice Dowdy, Mary Mc­ Mullen, and JoAnn Whatley. The following is a resume of each girl’s plans during her stay.
Miss Elizabeth Jordan, a jun­ ior, who is from Houston, Tex­ as is a mathematics major. After two weeks of travel through England, Scotland, Holland, France, and Switzerland she will enter the Vienna Summer School in Vienna, Austria which is sponsored by Hope College. There she will undertake inten­ sive study of German in pre­ paration for the winter semes­ ter when she plans to study with the Institute of European Studies in Freiburg, Germany. During the intersemester break of March and April her plans are to travel to Italy, Spain, and Northern Africa. Upon the completion of the summer se­ mester in July she plans to travel to Russia and to revisit many Scandinavian countries and places of interest.
SPELMAN NAMES MERRILL SCHOLARS
Miss Bernice Dowdy, a jun­ ior, is an English major and an Atlantan. She plans to spend the month of July at L’Ecole Pratique de L’Alliance Fran­ çaise at Paris, France taking in­ tensive courses in intermediate French and French civilization (including history, geography and classical and modern litera­ ture). During August and Sep­ tember she plans to tour Switz­ erland, Germany, England and Italy. For the winter and spring sessions she plans to enroll at the Institut de Langue et Civil­ ization Française at Besancon, France. After school she hopes to attend a workshop in Swit­ zerland and do further traveling to such countries as Russia, Austria and those in Scandina­ via.
Mary McMullen
Miss Mary McMullen, a Spa­ nish major, is a junior from At­ lanta. Upon arriving in Europe, Miss McMullen plans to visit England, Ireland, and France before going to summer school in Spain. After summer school she plans to take a trip to Por­ tugal and Africa. Her studies will take place at the Univer­ sity of Valencia under a pro­ gram sponsored by the Univer­ sity of San Francisco. Other countries she plans to visit are Italy, West Germany, Austria, and Switzerland.
JoAnn Whatley
Miss JoAnn Whatley, an At­ lantan is a junior majoring in art. She will spend her first summer and the winter semes­ ter studying the fine arts and French civilization at the Sor- bonne in Paris, France, under a project sponsored by Central College in Iowa. Through this program trips will be sponsored to Germany and England. Dur­ ing her last summer she plans to travel to Greece, Italy, North­ ern Africa, the United Arab Republic and Russia.
All of the Merrill Scholars will sail to Europe on the M/S Aurelia on which they will par­ ticipate in the program of orien­ tation for overseas study. The program is designed to help stu­ dents make the transition to a different culture and academic situation. A team of educators and area specialists will coordi­
nate orientation activities. For­ ums and discussions on national and international political and cultural issues will be completed by a series of art lectures, daily language classes and foreign films. All of this is under the sponsorship of the Council on Student Travel. Incidently, our last year’s Merrill Scholars, Mis­ ses Josephine Dunbar, Marilyn Holt, and Ruth Davis will re­ turn from Europe on ships with programs sponsored by the Council on Student Travel.
SPELMAN PARTICIPATES IN CHALLENGE ’65
More than a year of planning went in the first CHALLENGE convention-symposium presented by the students of Wake For­ est College (North Carolina), March 11-14. The Symposium which explored the theme “The Emerging World of the Ameri­ can Negro,” brought to the cam­ pus at least a dozen prominent speakers and approximately 600 delegates from Eastern Colleges and Universities.
In eight seminars, a major lecture and two panel discus­ sions CHALLENGE explored such major areas of the current Civil Rights Movement, as “The Negro Ghetto,” “The Negro and Justice,” and “The Negro and Academics”.
Change-of-pace highlights in- eluded a banquet featuring James Farmer, National Direc­ tor of CORE as after-dinner speaker. The delegates were en­ tertained and inspired by the in­ comparable folk singer, Joan Baez. Her audience was impress­ ed not only by the rare quality of her artistry, but also by her intense dedication to the princi­ ples of peace and brotherhood.
In the group discussion opin­ ions ranged from the conserva­ tism of Russell Kirk to the lib­ eralism of Henry Ashmore, Tho­ mas Pettigrew, and Nat Hen- toff.
The approach is yet another impressive facet of the sympo­ sium. CHALLENGE attempted to examine the problems of the
American Negro from the orien­ tation of the institutions in which he seeks full participation such as church, school, govern­ ment, politics, etc. The thinking was that prejudice is only a part of the race problem. The problem for the Negro says Harold Rhodes of Wake Forest, is ultimately a failure of this country’s major institutions. The church has failed to provide an­ swers and leadership, schools have not functioned to educate equally, and the government has failed to participate fully in meeting this American problem.
Out of this symposium much enthusiasm has been generated among Spelman participants. Is this not the type of awareness and seeking that we as students hope to achieve on our campus? Do we not want to “come alive” to the major problems of our age? It is hoped that in the coming school year Spelman students will initiate an equally “Challenging” consideration of the social isues of interest to the college generation. Certainly this is another constructive way to demonstrate our ability to as­ sume responsibility for influenc­ ing a society we are so often ready to criticize and blame.
Janice S. Joyner
SHORT EXCHANGE (Cont. from page 2)
from Cedar Crest really fell in­ to the routine here at Spelman with little or no effort.
The participants from Spel­ man were Geraldine Davis, Au­ drey Harrison, Jane Sampson, Charlotte McConnell, Ruth Bae- ty, and Alice Graham. Most of them seemed to enjoy the ex­ change. However, they did not particularly like the way the classes were carried on for the most part, since there were only lectures and very little if any class participation.
Another exchange experiment was carried on with Agnes Scott College. This exchange lasted only three days. It is very hard to evaluate just how successful it turned out to be because of its brevity.
Phoebe Bailey
''Many said he looked fine in his gray Suit end thatr we looked //*« cue cuere on Cloud Nine. "
up ¡with the dancing, but ¡when he. Mài idd Eddie ojh is pared m my ear the tu hole euer/hg, he tuas crushed?
I Uiouldhi ivorry about it Euerythiny. will clear up. It cuas ¡usi a little lie.1
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Page 4 SPELMAN SPOTLIGHT Tuesday, April 27, 1965
FOR THE
ART EXHIBITS AT SPELMAN
(Based on a portion of “The Dress Doctor” by Edith Head, fashion chief for Paramount Pictures)
There are ever so many things that clothes can do for you. They have to do with hap­ piness, poise and how you feel. Clothes are the way you present yourself to the world; they af­ fect the way the world feels and thinks about you; subcon­ sciously they affect the way you feel and think about yourself.
You lose the essential impor­ tance of all gropming if you are not appropriately dressed. The importance is the feeling of be­ ing comfortable and feeling as­ sured. And for every moment of any college girl’s life, feeling comfortable and assured are ex­ actly what she needs to feel. It places the dividing line between poise and inferiority complex.
Good clothes are not a mat­ ter of good luck. They are the out-come of a thorough know­ ledge of the person you are dressing. They can either play up or down a girl’s personality. So—each woman's task is to know herself.
The questions to ask yourself are;
1. Who Am I? This involves analyzing your figure, keeping in mind that height and mea-
AQUATIC SPLENDOR
The swimming pool of Read Hall was transformed into a tropical resort on the 26th and 27th of February, as Les Mad­ emoiselles of Spelman. allied themselves with Les Monsieurs of Morehouse in presenting “Les Dames”, this year’s water show. The spectators were guided to this tropic paradise by Florence Bohman’s beautiful shoreside in­ terpretation of “I Enjoy Being a Girl”. The aquatic splendor which followed set a string of different moods for the spec­ tator—moods which only his fellow spectator could fully un­ derstand. For, only a person who witnessed the beauty of the performance could really under­ stand the romantic mood set by Angela Robinson, Howard Hen­ derson, and Hermans Louis’ presentation of “Gigi”, by Ei­ leen Watts, and James Welch’s rendition of “Ruby”, or the na­ tive tropical mood set by San­ dra Johnson and Elizabeth Jor­ dan’s “Sweet Leilani” and the performance of “Have You Seen Miss Jones" given by Mil- liccnt Gamble with other mem­
suremerrts not weight—deter­ mine your figure type. And re­ member; figures do not lie!
2. Short? Tall? Fat? Thin? Average? Well Proportioned? If you are too heavy, please do not fit your clothes too tight because the tighter the fit the more apparent the bulk. Your clothes should be of darker col­ ors and stay away from prints and horizontal. For the too thin person emphasis should here again be put on the fit—not too tight but this time with bright colors and bold patterns.
The tall girl is hardly a prob­ lem, however, if you wish to look shorter, do not wear high heels. A two tone color scheme is im­ portant if used correctly. Al­ ways place the darker color at the heavier area.
The first principle for the small woman is to stick to one color. Do not cut the body line, keep lines vertical, prints small and heels high. Well proportion­ ed? Good! Wear what you want and most of all BE DARLING!
Now, once you have bought your olothes, be kind to them. And girls, here is a hint: why not try dressing for men in­ stead of for women? It is less competitive and a lot safer.
—Jane Smith
bers of the swimming company. The feeling of adoration toward Sandra and Linda Spriggs is pos­ sible from only those who wit­ nessed the precocious skill with which they executed “Thank Heaven For Little Girls”. Envy was evoked in the spectators by the great aquatic skill displayed by Jerome Robinson and James Welch’s comical performance of “Somebody Stole My Gal”. The spectator, the tourist in the tro­ pics, was also struck by the beauty of the duet performance of Johnny Popwell and Gloria Starks and by the solo perform­ ances of Shirley Marks and Elizabeth Jordan.
These, along with other fine performances in Read Hall that night, gave the spectator the feeling of having experienced one of the greatest “Adventures in Paradise”.
Commendation here is given to Miss Gloria Starks who co­ ordinated this fine show.
—Frieda Williamson
HORIUCHI’S ART
Spelman College has been very fortunate this year to have had so many interesting dis­ plays of art on campus. One of the most fascinating ones was the display which appeared in the dining hall as well as in the Fine Arts Building. These paint­ ings were the work of Mr. Paul Horiuchi, a man of Japanese ori­ gin who came to the United States at the age of fifteen. He is now a citizen of this country, and has received many awards. Among the most noted are the Tupper Award which he receiv­ ed in 1953 and the Ford Foun­ dation Purchase in 1950.
Mr. Horiuchi’s style is bold yet sensitive in both his paint­ ings and his collages. They are of such magnitude that it has been possible for Mr. Horiuchi to have many one man shows in the northwestern part of our country, in Arizona, in New York, and in Japan.
The exhibit that was seen here was composed of collages made by pasting Japanese rice paper on canvas with color washes added in carefully con­ sidered patterns to create de­ signs of sensitive interrelations of pace, tonal value, and flat surface textures. The paintings are nonrepresentational — built in imagination without reference to existing forms. They are pro­ ducts of disciplined expression and infinite sensitivity.
Janice Holloway
PAINTING AND SCULPTURE OF NEW GUINEA
The nine examples of primi­ tive painting from New Guinea, now hanging in the short hall of the John D. Rockefeller Fine Arts Building, are part of a larger collection of non-Westem painting and sculpture from New Guinea, Africa and India recently given to Spelman Col­ lege by Mr. and Mrs. Allen Gerdaw of New York City. More of this material, including some unique fired clay sculp­ tures, will be shown in the gal­ leries during April when bet­ ter facilities for their display have been completed.
These objects of art were in­ tended as totem decorations, and are painted with native colors on pieces of palm bark. General­ ly the bare effigy inspired - a free suggestion of the human form - with ritually painted faces surmounted by head dres­ ses; with the mouth, eyes, navel and breasts indicated, pendant necklaces, and a suggestion of a shirt below.
Patterns are always simple and designs are occasionally of geometric forms r,s two of the examples shown in the exhibit. The material is not very per­ manent and hence most known examples are relatively recent.
In addition to the pieces on display in the Fine Arts Build­ ing, exciting pieces are in the Home Economics Office and the Guest Room of Upton Hall. Since these works have been so
graciously given to the Spelman family, we can expect to see these truly exciting pieces of art throughout our campus.
THE DEVELOPMENT
Oscar Florianus Blumner, whose works are shown in two galleries and in the main lobby of the Fine Arts Building, is one of the pioneer American Mod­ erns. Born in 1867 in Germany, he came to this country in 1893 as a young architect of great re­ nown. He continued his archi­ tectural work for two decades before becoming a fulltime pro­ fessional painter.
Each of his seven one-man shows held of his works in the remaining twenty-five years of his life was a sensation.
The number of larger paint­ ings he executed were limited, though he is represented by works in the Metropolitan Mu­ seum of Art, the Brooklyn Museum, the Phillips Gallery, Washington, and other impor­ tant collections.
His small sketches, generally with careful annotations, were unknown until his death in 1938. The collectionof unfram­ ed examples shown here at Spel­ man were selected at that time and remain a remarkable record to show the life time develop­ ment of the twentieth century.
Mrs. Jeannie Holloway had these comments about Mr. Blum- mer’s brilliant works now on display in the Fine Arts Build­ ing:
“This is the most important display that has ever been here at Spelman and in this area.
“These pieces show a transi­ tion of his work from the ear­ liest to the most contemporary artist. It is unusual to find such a complete collection all in one place, for he did very few. These are originals of a truly 20th century ¡».inter. Each work is unique. At a first glance they might seem naive or simple, but after a longer look, we can see the intricate composition of plan. They become more and more fascinating!”
This extraordinary collect­ ion will be on display during the month of April. Each person who wishes to enrich his aesthe­ tic appreciation will not miss this display of brilliance put to canvas.
—Linda Hoursh
Tuesday, April 27, 1965 SPELMAN SPOTLIGHT Page 5
Some of our faculty mem­ bers lead and have led unusually interesting lives full of new and unique experiences, yet they are devoted to a threefold cause where their students are con­ cerned - teaching students, the more challenging task of caus­ ing students to learn, and final­ ly, learning from their students. Actually, there is no simple way to discover these people, but we have done so in the person of Miss Marcia Halvorsen, a social science instructor.
Miss Halvorsen did her un­ dergraduate work and part of her graduate work at the Uni­ versity of Minnesota where she received her degree in econom­ ics. While holding a full time job, she paid her way through college and helped her family at the same time. One of the most valuable aspects of her college work was SPAN, Stu­ dent Project for Amity among Nations, which enabled her to study Italy, not through the per­ ceptions of others, but as she saw it. This took place the sum­ mer after her junior year. The preparation was made the pre­ vious summer and during the year in correlation with regular school work. She did research on Italy’s income tax situation and received additional credit which made it possible for her to graduate in three and a half years. She graduated with hon­ ors and fellowship offers.
and Belgium. When the job was completed, she hitchhiked to Norway. This is evidence of her love for travel. She has driven back and forth over the north­ east coast of the United States and the Appalachian Mountain area. More proof is her skill in flying planes which she develop­ ed indirectly because of that love.
About her experience at Spel­ man, Miss Halvorsen says that it is very interesting; in fact, she may one day write a book about it. Something that really impressed her was the eagerness of the Spelman students to par­ ticipate in Challenge ’65 at Wake Forest College and the abilities they demonstrated at that con­ ference. These things made it a worthwhile experience for her. She believes that there should be more activities like this in which people from different colleges can meet and exchange ideas and gain insight into each oth­ er’s convictions.
—Yvette Savwoir
Still in graduate school, at the age of twenty-two she embarked upon a career in teaching and worked summers in research on problems of poverty for the state of Minnesota. Now, she is in her seventh year of teaching which began at the University of Minnesota and continued at Smith College and Spelman Col­ lege, a school differing from Smith in environment, size, and race. Her studies in economics in relation to public policy aroused her curiosity about the South and a desire to fill in the gaps which no indirect acquain­ tance could fill in about sou­ thern life. Before moving to the South she became involved in the civil rights movement and wanted to contribute to the cause behind it. This led her to a southern Negro institution of higher learning.
A rewarding adventure of her life was a summer job on which she was everything from nurse to bicycle repairlady. Her actual assignment was to lead a group of students on a bicycle tour of Europe. This job took her to England, France, Switzerland,
KNOW YOUR PROF
Very often it is difficult for a member of any type of crea­ tive endeavor to criticize or eval­ uate that endeavor, for he be­ comes so completely submerg­ ed in its total execution that he no longer is able to function objectively or rationally. How­ ever, active participation does offer greater perceptivity, for the participant is aware of the mechanisms involved in the evolution of the final product, able to make a comparative evaluation, and is more aware of and in control of the varia­ bles which cause bis work to be a success or failure. Thus, these reviewers feel adequate in the following eveluation.
On the evenings of March 29 thru April 3, the Atlanta- Morehouse-Spelman Players pre­ sented a superb performance of Rogers and Hammerstein’s “South Pacific”. To quote from another well-known “Hit”, when describing something that is
A DAY AT THE PARK
Of all the daring adventures that I encountered last year, perhaps the most enjoyable one was spent in the “Stadtpark”. I had gotten up early—that is, about 7:30 and I decided that I had to “be like” the Viennese before I left Austria. This meant that I had to pack my lunch, grab a good book, and perch myself on a bench in the park for about eight hours on a sun­ ny Sunday. In advance I knew
even more than stupendous, it was “superk&lifragilisticexpiala- docious.” The cast was a com­ posite of the people from the Atlanta University complex and the community at large. The play was produced and directed by the more than capable Dr. J. Preston Cochran.
Perhaps one of the most in­ teresting aspects of the A-M-S Players’ production was that the play was fully integrated and that the role of Nellie Forbush was played by a Negro. This was done in an attempt to bring forth the universality of the play - to make it fitting and apropos to current social prob­ lems. To take a situation which grew out of one context and place it into another, with equal emphasis was not an easy job. However, it was done success­ fully, and with a high degree of perceptivity.
—Alberta Foster and Roslily Mitchell
I would be bored, but I re­ membered the favorite saying, “Nothing beats a failure but a try.”
I won’t give the name of the book that I carried. You see, I needed time for starting and I only read fourteen pages that day—no insult to the author, of course. The big question is “why.”
When I first arrived in the park, I saw the lovely ladies feeding the many pigeons. 1 stood for a moment trying to choose the perfect spot to sit. I had just made up my mind when one lady walked up to me, spoke, and proceeded to
CROSSWORD PUZZLE ACROSS
1. Short-necked river dock 4. To scrape or drag along 6. Sorfeited 8. French preposition
10. Subway 11. Greek letter 14. Ape-like 15. Virtue 17. Dwelling 18. Commercial propaganda 19. Decoy 20. American Medical
Association 21. Banal 23. Oderration 26. American Athletic
Association 27. Geological time 28. Kindle 30. 120 volts 31. Legendary or historical
story 32. Juveniles 35. Boy’s nickname 36. Are 37. Offense against law 38. To ring or toll
take my choice seat. It was a sunny day and everyone was looking for shade—of course, I got a lovely sunburn that day.
My only choice was to take a seat near the edge where I could watch the policeman in the middle of the street. Even though it was relatively early, he looked dreadfully tired. The comer of “Landstrasser-Haupt- strasse” was filled. There were two women with carts loaded with beautiful flowers, a man selling fruit, a woman selling candy, and naturally a paper stand.
The first thing that happened (Cont. on page 6)
DOWN
4. Towering
5. Languorous
6. Non-conformist
7. Worldly-wise
9. Vagabond
19. A spelling —
24. tattered; shred 25. Foreigner
29. Artist’s canvas holder 30. Marble
33. Type of tree 34. Jug
Page 6 SPELMAN SPOTLIGHT Tuesday, April 27, 1965
AULA ORGANIZES (Cont. from page 1)
(3) provision of continuous and current information pertaining to innovations at Trevor Arnett which are beneficial to the At­ lanta University Center, and (4) to set examples (as students in the Atlanta University Center and library assistants) of proper and full utilization of all the available resources of Trev<5r Arnett Library.
DID YOU KNOW? Each of the institutions com­
prising the Atlanta University Center developed as separate and distinot entities. Their lib­ rary resources developed the same way.
Atlanta University’s Library serves each of the five institu­ tions in the A. U. Center. The foundation for the book collec­ tion of Trevor Arnett was a gift of 300 volumes in 1870 from the Reverend Giles Pease of Boston. Three years later Mr. Robert Graves of Morristown, New Jersey, gave the Univer­ sity $1,000 for immediate use to buy books and to increase its endowment. Atlanta U niversity designated its library the “Graves Library” until 1970, as a ges­ ture of appreciation for his in­ terest.
Andrew Carnegie gave the University $25,000 in 1906 for the erection of a library build­ ing. By that time the book col­ lection had grown to 13,000 vol­ umes.
In 1929 a merger of the book collections of the other colleges in the Atlanta University Cen­ ter was effected. In 1931, More­ house College contributed ap­ proximately 5,000 volumes and Spelman contributed over 12,- 000. Howwever, both institu­ tions maintained their own read­ ing rooms.
Clark students made little use of this now “Central Library” from 1932 to 1941, for Clark was located in South Atlanta, several miles away. In 1941 Clark moved to its present lo­ cation which gave the students an opportunity to use more of the Central Library’s resources.
Morris Brown College moved to its present location on Hun­ ter Street in 1932. This brought it closer to the Central Library and its resources.
The costs of library services increase each year. The total operation budget for Trevor Ar­ nett Library has moved from $54,410 in 1951 to over $179,- 000 in 1964-65. The book bud­ get alone has increased from $12,000 in 1963-64 to $30,000 in 1964-65.
The Atlanta University Li­ brary, serving as “Central Li­
brary” for the Atlanta Univer­ sity Center, has had, and con­ tinues to have a dynamic im­ pact on the education of the students in the Center. The Tre­ vor Arnett Library is a source of a wealth of knowledge to the students who use it with integ­ rity and skill as a tool for their educational preparation.
A HINT TO THE WISE! Presently, all students of the
Atlanta University Center are permitted to use the stacks at Trevor Arnett Library. The on­ ly requirement for stack permits is the completion of an official application form which takes only two to three minutes!
A DAY AT THE PARK (Cont. from page 3)
which seemed rather peculiar was the appearance of a man and his daughter—waiting, of course, for the rest of the family. I assumed they were at­ tending church and wondered later as the mother and four other children approached. Per­ haps it was a family reunion. Anyhow, I then made my first mistake—I ate my apple. It was my dessert for lunch, but well, I thought, I could get another one later. I had no idea that by eleven my entire lunch would be gone.
Around eleven-thirty the park became somewhat less crowded —what were the people doing? They were preparing for lunch.
APRIL 1965 HgAY---- 1__ TUESDAY I WEDPIESDAy I THURSDflyFRÎpÂ^^S?TÜRDÂÿ
indicates Morehouse * indicates Clark
2 South Pacific
3 South Pacific
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Anniversary Vespers Atlanta University's
Art Exhibit
South Pacific Founder's Day
Formal Founder's Day
~j| IASTH 19 20
A. U. Association of Social Science
Teachers
Teachers
Teachers
Glee Club Concert Blue and White
Banquet Movie:
Some Came Running*
Freshman Class Activity
Everyone leaving gathered their precious possessions — children and dogs—'and proceeded to go to their favorite “Gasthaus” (restaurant). No, it was no hol­ iday but everyone has the right and need to dine out once in a while, even the dogs.
The thing that struck me was that most of the time one dog was not enough—masters and mistresses needed two. Anyhow, lunch hour was over at two and the owner, who knew his reg­ ular customers had made his rounds and left his patrons in peace. The park then lost some of its visitors as some remained to read the various newspa­ pers and magazines provided in the “coffee-houses.” Here it is interesting to note that an or­ dered glass of beer or a cup of coffee was the only fee nec­ essary—in fact, that made you the private owner of any seat for as many hours as you liked. But many Viennese came back to the park again. On the wa> to or while at the restaurant, they had been thoughtful and gathered all kinds of food for the pigeons. This meant making the rounds again to see that these birds were cared for.
There were interesting people there. I met a child with whom I played ball for almost an hour. I met the director of the re­ habilitation center in the neigh­ boring city of Baden. He spoke
four languages fluently, and be­ fore he left, he gave me a few tips as to what I could include in my next letter to Dr. Manley. Dr. Frity was really an interest­ ing person. As we walked through the park, we met some of the people who had the for­ tune of being his patients and whose .faces were living exam­ ples of the peace, thankfulnss, and joy that could exist in our modern world.
There was another thing that shocked me. Toward evening, I met a policeman coming on du­ ty. The lady sitting next to me informed me that he walked the parks during the night in order to protect the modern art statues found there. She further explained that in spite of the wars, they appreciated the “old.”
There are many other small incidents which I could cite, but I have given enough to share with you a glimpse of Viennese “Gemütlichkeit.” Some people call it laziness. But what­ ever it is, it seems to me that man needs it. The above has not been cited to make fun of or stereotype the Viennese. Rather it was my effort to in­ troduce you to a society that is not built on saving time—a society that seeks to enjoy na­ ture, peace, happiness, and the rest of our world.
Clara Prioleau
POETRY CORNER LIFE’S STRUGGLE
Life’s a rugged, rough, angry sea that fights and struggles for existence to be. She is afame with the thirst
for knowledge and truth But discovers not the fountain
of youth. Scientists seek her fountain of
eternal life Through toils and struggles and
misfortune and strife. She engulfs the weak, and up­
lifts the strong, Yet, contradicts the right and
comforts the wrong. She has man as a puppet, pull­
ing him by a string— She knows his destination and
what the future will bring. Life is worth the misfortune, no
matter what hardships lie, For “Life is a continuous strug­
gle, And only the fittest survive.”
—Beverly Smith