Sooke News Mirror, September 19, 2012

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September 19, 2012 edition of the Sooke News Mirror

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  • 250.642.6361 www.ShellyDavis.ca Shelly Davis

    Its a Great Time To Buy

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    RECONSIDER Fibres & Beyond members hold retrospective show.

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    ZOOM ZOOMSiblings race to first place

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    Page 28

    Your community, your classifi eds P26 75Wednesday, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012

    Editorial Page 8 Entertainment Page 19Sports/stats Page 28

    Agreement#40110541

    SOOKESOOKE NEWS 2010 WINNERM I R R O R

    Young entrepreneursLinda, left, and Shale, both 11 years old, set up a lemonade stand at the kiosk in the centre of Sooke. They were doing it for something to do on the Pro-D day, Sept. 17.

    Pirjo Raits photo

    Education will reduce bear/human conflictsSharron HoSooke News Mirror

    Sooke is now a part of the province-wide Bear Aware program, which has a man-date to educate the pub-lic on how to co-exist with bears.

    We do live in a commu-nity where bears are here, so what are we going to do? We have to learn to live in conjunction with bears because we just cant shoot them all, and we cant just move them all, said Debbie Read, volunteer Bear Aware co-ordinator.

    Since becoming estab-lished this spring, through Reads initiative, the local program has worked with BC Parks, local camp sites, resort establishments and the conservation service.

    The operation works as an educational service, distribut-ing material like flyers, pam-phlets and bookmarks con-taining information on how to manage bear attractants.

    She hopes to speak at schools and build a larger presence though commu-nity partnerships.

    Were looking for addi-tional partnerships with community groups, local businesses and non-profit organizations, she said. We really want to get this out in the community.

    According to the Bear Aware manual, the mandate of the program is to reduce the number of human-bear conflicts in communities through education, inno-vation and co-operation. It is an educational program

    based on the premise that the reactive destruction of bears entering our commu-nities in search of food is not a sustainable or viable solution to the problem.

    Prior to the Bear Aware program, Sooke did not have resources available to local residents who come into contact with a bear.

    Theres at least 20 other communities that have lesser problems than we do here in Sooke, that already had Bear Aware co-ordina-tors, so we were long over-due, said Peter Pauwels, conservation officer.

    Its going to be very, very helpful for us for the educa-tional piece because were so busy that its difficult for us to reach people. So were very glad and we hope its going to be a continuing thing.

    Pauwels said since April 1, the conservation service has received 246 bear com-plaints in the Sooke area.

    He said over the last three to four years, bear reports have increased significantly due to development.

    Theres more people liv-ing in areas that used to be bear habitat especially in a place like Sooke. Youve got a combination of more

    bears, more people, and less available habitat for them.

    This year, about eight bears in the CRD region -- which stretches from up the Malahat to Port Renfrew -- have been terminated.

    According to Pauwels, bears will be particularly active through the months of September and October as they fatten up on gar-bage, ripe berries and fruit for winter hibernation. The main attractants are gar-bage, chickens and fallen fruit.

    He hopes residents will take the necessary precau-tions to manage attractants around their properties to prevent human-bear conflicts as there is no quick solution to a habituated bear.

    People have to take responsibility to prevent problems from arising, thats the message every-body needs to understand, he said. Most people have the expectation that we can come and move the bear and that will be the end of their problem -- they wont have to change their behav-iour. Even if we did move the bear, theres going to be another one thats going to come right back if theres a food source available.

    Pauwels added that bear relocations have a low suc-cess rate, with the Sooke Hills, Jordan River and Port Renfrew as the only viable options.

    We have a challenge here, were on the tip of an island, theres not a lot of places

    Continued on page 3

  • 2 www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012- SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

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    4/300Island FarmsSour Cream 250 ml ..........................

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    Fresh, Great Tasting Meat

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    FreshSnapperFillets

    Northridge Farms AAA Bottom

    RoundSteak8.80 kg ...............

    $399/lbFletchers Farmers Cut

    Dry CuredBacon500 g .................

    $499Johnsonville Smoked

    Bratwurst & Cheddar Sausage375 - 500 g ..........

    $399

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    Bushs Best Baked Beans 398 ml ....................... 4/500

    Maxwellhouse Caf International Coffee 125 - 283 g ........... $349

    Texana Long Grain White or Brown Rice 907 g .....$199

    Heinz White Vinegar 4 L ........................$369

    Special K Cracker Chips 113 g ...................2/500

    Gallo Extra Virgin Olive Oil 500 ml .................$399

    Folgers Instant Coffee 200 g .......................... $449

    Kraft Flanker Dinners 200 g ............................... 2/300

    All Varieties Dads Cookies 350 g .................... $299

    Mr Noodle Flat Pack Noodles 85 g ................... 4/100

    Crystal Light Drink Crystals Various Sizes .......... 2/500

    Christie Red Oval Stoned Wheat Thins 600 g .......... $349

    Quaker Regular Muffets 375 g ........................... $299

    Lumberjack 12 Grain or Sun ower Flax Bread 680 g ..... 2/400

    Silver Hills Alis Alpine Bread 600 g ...................... $299

    Oroweat Extra Crisp English Muf ns 6s ............ $219

    Dempsters Original Bagels 6s ............................ 2/500

    All Varieties Friskies Cat Food 368 g ...................99

    Purina Dog Chow 8 kg .......................................$1699

    Puff N Soft Bathroom Tissue 12s ..................... $349

    Bounty Select A Size Paper Towels 2s .................... $249

    Sunlight Lemon Liquid Dishwashing Detergent 950 ml ... $299

    Glad Medium or Large Zipper Freezer Bags 15 - 20s ...... $169

    Regular

    Ground Beef

    Locally Owned & Operated Since 1974Locally Owned & Operated Since 1974

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    FROZEN FOODSFROZEN FOODSFROZEN FOODS

    Northridge Farms AAA Bottom

    Round Roast8.80 kg ..............................

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    NATURAL FOODSNATURAL FOODSNATURAL FOODS

    Wisecrackers Natural

    Crackers 114 g ..........................$219

    Yama Moto Teriyaki

    Seaweed Snacks 20 g .................... 2/400

    Everland Organic Virgin

    Coconut Oil 375 ml ............... $999

    Whole Alternatives Organic

    Microwave Popcorn 3/85 g .........$229

    Monkey Toast

    Fruit Crisps 180 g .........................$499

    Echoclean Natural

    Spray Cleaners 740 ml ..........$229

    $139

    6s

    BulkBulkFoodsFoodsBulkFoodsJelly Beans

    100g ...................................59Sour Soothers

    100g ......................................69Deluxe Treat Mix

    100g ......................................99Thompson Raisins

    100g .......................................89

    BAKERYBAKERYBAKERY

    5.05 kg ..........................................

    Per 100 g

    McCain Rising CrustPizza 770 - 900 g .......................................

    $569McCain Extra CrispSuperfries 600 - 900 g ..................

    $349Wong Wing Vegetable or Chicken

    Egg Rolls 680 g ............................. $399

    Island Farms Family PackIce Cream 4 L ...............................

    $499

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    170 g

    Fresh Steelhead

    SalmonFillets

    $199

    $229

    Butter Flake Buns6s $189

    Carrot Muf ns Greek Pita$399 $259

    LANGFORD772 Goldstream Ave.Open 7 Days a Week7:30 am to 10:00 pm

    We reserve the right to limit quantities

    lb/lb

    Traditional Potato Salad

    Beanitos Bean and FlaxChips

    Go GreenGo Greenuse

    Western Foods Cloth Bags

    Butter Crust Bread$189

    6s

    $199540 ml

    1 L

    99Sunrype Fruit RiversCocktail

    375 - 400 g

    Nabob TraditionCoffee

    $649

    2/400 250 - 320 g

    Old Dutch RestauranteTortilla Chips

    1.5 - 2 L

    All VarietiesCoca Cola

    Campbells ClassicSoup

    Lays XLPotato Chips

    890 ml

    $399Kraft Miracle WhipSalad Dressing

    200 g

    2/500

    Costa RicaPineapples

    B.C. Red or Golden DeliciousApples

    OrganicCelery Hearts

    2/500

    69California Minneolas

    Tangerines2.18 kg ............................ 99B.C. Red or Yellow

    Potatoes5 lb bag ...............................

    2/400B.C. Assorted

    Hard Squash1.52 kg ................................ 69River Ranch

    Romaine Hearts3s .....................................

    2/400OrganicRaspberries

    B.C. Grown

    Nectarines1.96 kg ...................................................................

    OrganicCherry Tomato

    2/600

    89B.C. GrownBartlett Pears

    Spinach Dip

    Corn DogsFrom Our Hotcase

    Plain or GarlicNaan Bread Pecan Caramel

    Cheesecake $899600 g 4s

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    100g

    B.C. GreenCabbage

    $499 FreshClams

    Knudsen Just BlackCherry Juice

    946 ml2/500

    6 oz

    1.52 kg

    Ea

    1 lb bag Pint

    Per 100 g

    Island Farms Light

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    2/600

    Per 100 g 250 g

    Minute MaidMinute Maid

    OrangeOrangeJuiceJuice295 ml

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    Bicks Hot Dog, Hamburger or Sweet GreenRelish375 ml

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    $349Molson ExelLow Alcohol Beer

    540 ml

    99 All Varieties UnicoBeans

    Uncle Lukes #1Maple Syrup250 ml

    $479

    375 ml

    $229Heinz Easy SqueezeKetchup

    454 g

    /ea

    2/500 39 0.86 kg/ea

    11.00 kg

    + dep

    /lb

    /lb

    284 ml

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  • HELPING PEOPLE LIVE BETTER LIVES

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    Ron KumarPharmacist/Owner

    Living Sooke....Loving Sooke...Selling Sooke

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    I have been talking to a lot of our local realtors and they all say the same thing.. It is a complicated market out there right now, but most of us realtors are very busy. Open houses are starting to get action. People are looking at listingstrying to nd the right house at the right price. Sharp pricing and smart marketing will get you the results you want!

    Buying or sellingcall me!

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    LARGE FAMILY HOME (5 BEDROOMS)LARGE FAMILY HOME (5 BEDROOMS)SUITE READY $389,900SUITE READY $389,900

    OPEN HOUSE SUN 11:30-1:30 OPEN HOUSE SUN 11:30-1:30 Did You Know?

    At the regular District of Sooke council meet-ing of Sept. 10, the fol-lowing decisions were made:

    Live video stream-ing is now available for residents. They can go to the District of Sooke website and click on Popular Top-ics and then on Council and Committee Video. The posted agenda will allow users to select the portion of the meet-ing they wish to view.

    A Development Variance Permit for 6215 Marilyn Road was not issued by coun-cil. The permit was to allow the property owner to vary the set-back distance from 15 metres to 0.9 metres. The property is being used as a recycling depot for Styrofoam, plastics and other com-modities. Council sent the item back to staff for a legal opinion.

    Bylaw No. 542 Del-egation Amendment Bylaw and Policy No. 5.2 Purchasing and Dis-posal of Assets Policy.

    Council gave first, second and third read-ing and Notice of Bylaw 542 and adopted Policy No. 5.2.The bylaw and policy will outline what purchasing approval

    limits are for various staff and council and how acquisitions are to be made. Written quotations, tenders and RFPs now all have specific guidelines. The CAO will have a pur-chasing approval limit of $75,000, up from the $7,500 most recently granted the CAO. All purchases over $25,000 will be included in a quarterly report to the Finance and Admin-istration Committee. Preference will be given to local suppliers where all things are equal.

    Bylaw No. 544:Council enacted a fee

    for service for the public boat launch. It will cost $10 to launch one boat and parking one vehicle with trailer for the day.

    Bylaw No. 548:Council introduced

    and gave first and sec-ond reading to the bylaw which would amend the OCP to allow cluster dwelling units (detached town-houses). A public hear-ing will be scheduled.

    Bylaw 550:Council gave first,

    second and third read-ing to Bylaw 550 and Section 227 CC Notice.

    Permissive tax exemptions came under discussion by council,

    mainly in reference to four applications. Two applications met the legal requirements. They were for the Juan de Fuca Salmon Resto-ration Society (Char-ters River Salmon Inter-pretive Centre); and the church located at 2191 Townsend Road. Coun-cil gave first, second and third reading to Bylaw 550, and Bylaw 551. Council did not allow tax exemptions for two applications as they did not meet the regulations. They were the RCL Sooke Seniors Housing and the Sooke Pentecostal Housing Society. The reasoning was that both appli-

    cants receive provincial funding and do not ben-efit the entire commu-nity but rather specific groups of people. Staff determined that both organizations receive significant senior gov-ernment funding and have an ability to pay property taxes without serious impairment to the services provided.

    Councillor Rick Kasper stated that most municipalities do not grant tax exemptions for housing projects.

    It sets a very dan-gerous precedent, said Kasper.

    It was mentioned that the Legion seniors housing does receive

    grants from the district, the most recent was for $10,000 to replace blinds in the units.

    Councillors Bev Berger and Maja Tait were opposed.

    We should have a second look at this pol-icy, said Mayor Wendal Milne.

    District of Sooke council accepted the draft form of the Agri-cultural Plan for Sooke. Staff will initiate a dis-cussion with staff from the Agricultural Land Commission to resolve conflicts between the OCP and ALR require-ments.

    Mai Mais Bistro made an application for

    a Food-Primary enter-tainment endorsement after making an appli-cation to the Liquor Control and Licensing Branch for an enter-tainment endorsement. Council supported the application.

    Council issued a Development Permit to allow construction of a 52-unit multi-family development at 6402 and 6418 Sooke Road. The development will be in seven clusters on 2.7 hectares of land. This DP application represents a commit-ment by the district to process and finalize a settlement to a legal challenge.

    SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 www.sookenewsmirror.com NEWS 3

    I can take a bear, he said, adding bears that are relocated are only about a days walk back to human civilization.

    He stressed that habituated sows raise cubs that are food conditioned, creating generations of bears that seek out human sources of food.

    Theyre pretty adapt-able. They dont mind living in and amongst people. They overcome their fear and they raise their cubs here, and the cubs learn and thats all they know, is living in

    a human environment. How to stay Bear

    Aware: Store garbage in

    secure bins and keep indoors until the collec-tion day.

    Be sure to pick ber-ries and fruit as they ripen. Contact the Food Community Health Ini-tiative (CHI) at: info@sookefoodchi.ca to have your fruit trees gleaned by volunteers.

    Keep chickens in at night, and young ani-mals close to home. Keep feed secured.

    Feed your pet

    indoors, or clean up pet food after feeding outdoors.

    Clean barbecues by burning the grill entirely, and remove and clean grease trap after every use.

    Layer your com-post kitchen scraps with no more than 10 cm of yard waste like dried leaves, grasses and newspaper. Do not add fish, meat, fat, oils, unrinsed eggshells or cooked food.

    For more information visit: www.bearaware.bc.ca

    Save bears by being aware

    Thumbs Up!

    Up Sooke

    LOGGER IDENTIFIED

    THE BC CORONERS Service has confirmed the identity of a man who died while working on a logging site on Vancouver Island on Sept. 13, 2012.

    THE DECEASED IS Toby Lee Childs, aged 38, from Sooke.

    MR. CHILDS WAS part of a logging crew working in the remote northwest corner of Vancouver Island. He was felling trees on a steep uphill slope when something went wrong. He was found by co-workers within a few minutes of the incident, and was pronounced deceased at the scene.

    THE BC CORONERS Service and WorkSafeBC are continuing to investigate this death.

    AWARDSTHE 2012 CARE

    Awards (Construction Achievements and Renovations of Excellence) presented an Award for Excellence in Creating Housing Affordability

    TO SMALL MODERN Living and Westco Construction Ltd.

    WEATHERSUNSHINE IS

    FORECAST for the next week, with highs to 23 today and lows of 18 on Saturday with cloudy periods.

    Steve Arnett photo

    Wild and freeSteve Arnett captured this beautiful elk in his camera lens.

    COUNCIL BRIEFS

    TO THE DISTRICT of Sooke for providing live video streaming of council and committee meetings.

  • 4 www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012- SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

    NOW OPEN UNTIL 10 PM EVERY DAY!NOW OPEN UNTIL 10 PM EVERY DAY!

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    B.C. Transit Bus Passes, Lottery Centre, Gift Certificates and Canada Postage Stamps We reserve the right to limit quantities Proud member of Sooke Region Chamber of Commerce

    VVillage Foodillage Food MarMarkketsets

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    Black Forest

    Ham.......................................

    $129Made from Scratch Cheese & Onion

    Pull Apart454g...........................

    $399

    McCain Country Style

    Hash Browns1kg........

    2/$500

    Dairyland Stirred or Fat Free

    Yogurt

    650g...........2/$500

    Flax for Nutrition Milled

    Flax Seed900g................

    $499

    B.C. Grown!

    Corn on the Cob 10/$398

    Kraft

    DinnerCase of 12x225g.....

    $899Armstrong Melts

    CheeseSlices1kg...................

    $599Campbells Mushroom/Chicken Noodle or

    Tomato Soup12x284ml................

    $599

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    Beans with Pork9 Pack..............

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    Vegetable Oil3L.......................

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    Paper Towels6 Roll.................

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    $599Folgers Classic Roast

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    $999Quaker Chewy Dipps

    Granola Bars30s.................

    $799

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    Mini WheatsCereal1.6kg...............

    $799 Sun-Rype Blue Label

    Apple JuiceCase of 12x1L...

    $1199 Heinz Big Red

    Ketchup1.5L....................

    $499

    Chef Boyardee

    Mini Ravioli8 Pack...............

    $799Premium Plus

    SodaCrackers900g....................

    $399Grannys Laundry

    Detergent 10kg............

    $1199

    Family Size Meat or Vegetable

    Lasagna...................................$1999Family Size

    Vegetables & Dip..................$899

    Poppers Stuffed

    Jalapenos 1.47kg...... $1599Bassilis Best 4 Cheese

    Lasagna 2.27kg......... $1099

    Dairyland Light/Creamo or

    Table Cream 500ml.. 2/$300Kraft Tex Mex

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    Island Bakery Organic

    12 Grain Bread 680g 2/$600Blue Monkey

    Coconut Water 520ml 2/$400

    Ben & Jerrys Premium

    Ice Cream 500ml...... 2/$800Dole Frozen

    Blueberries 2kg..... $1399

    International Delight

    Coffee Cream 946ml... $449Capri

    Margarine 3kg............. $799

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    Rice 454g.......................... $299Thai Kitchen Instant

    Rice Noodles 45g... 4/$300

    Made in Store Baked

    Apple Square Crumble 8x8.... $449Blackberry

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    Beer Sausage ....................................... $119

    German Salami................................. $119 California Turkey .............................$239

    Greek Style

    Pita Bread 5 Pack ............................$249Made from Scratch Chocolate Chip

    Oatmeal Cookies 12 Pack.......... $399

    Australian Large Navel

    Oranges

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    Peppers $4.37/kg.......... $198B.C. Grown! Red & Yellow

    Potatoes 5 lb bag............ $248Costa Rica

    Pineapples.................. $298

    B.C. Grown!

    Blue Grapes2 lb Clamshell...

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    Onions 3 lb bag................ 98B.C. Grown!

    Carrots 5 lb bag................. $248Organic! Earth Bound Farms

    Salads 1 lb bag................. $598 Paci c Caught

    Sole Fillets... $132

    Frozen Pink

    Salmon Fillets... 99Highliner Frozen Breaded

    Fish Cakes............66

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    Sesame Snaps 360g, Both Gluten Free

    $559White Chocolate Dipping

    Wafers ...79

    Dark Chocolate GingerDark Chocolate Cranberries

    330g................ $579

    Chocolate Covered

    Cashews 330g$429

    18 Bean

    Soup Mix 29Texas

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    Sirloin Tip

    OvenRoast$8.80/kg............

    $399Frozen Boneless Skinless

    Chicken Breasts 4kg box $2899Maple Leaf Natural Selections

    Sliced Meats 175g... 20%offBreaded Frozen

    Chicken Breast Pieces $8.80/kg $399

    Lean

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    Marinating Steak $8.80/kg$399Maple Leaf Natural Selections 375g or

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  • SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 www.sookenewsmirror.com NEWS 5

    Feral cats a little safer thanks to SAFARSSharron HoSooke News Mirror

    The Sooke Ani-mal Food and Rescue Food Society recently obtained a barn to serve as an animal rehabilitation centre for feral cats and kittens.

    According to Margar-ita Dominguez, SAFARS president, volunteers have been working over the past four months to repair and clean the old barn, clear surrounding land and build fencing.

    When we went inside there was cables and there were things that people have thrown inside for years, all mixed up together, she said.

    Although more work still needs to be done, SAFARS has moved in and started up a mod-est operation, fitting the barn with kennels for adult feral cats and a nursery for kittens. More housing in the form of cat condos -- two story, four by two foot structures -- are expected to be built in

    and around the barn. Dominguez said the

    barn, which is rented for an undisclosed amount, has given SAFARS the ability to launch services for ani-mals in need in Sooke.

    Its a start that we will start a rehabilita-tion centre, she said. We are very happy that we have the oppor-tunity of this barn.

    The objective of SAFARS is to help maintain Sookes grow-

    ing population of feral cats in a humane manner through the catch, spay, neuter and release program.

    Its to stop the over-population, its a humane alterna-tive to euthanasia, Dominguez said.

    Joel Hanson, SAFARS vice-president, agreed.

    Were not like the SPCA... we dont take care of peoples unwanted pets or stray animals. We take

    care of wild creatures and like I say, prevent the population boom from happening the humane way, he said.

    If left to grow on their own, then they run into issues like starvation and over-population.

    Before going out and trapping cats, SAFARS volunteers contact the landown-ers to seek permission.

    If the person doesnt want us on the prop-erty, we cannot go. We cannot touch an animal that is not ours, only with the owners per-mission, Dominguez said. We want to work together, not against.

    Adult feral cats are then neutered or spayed and kept in ken-nels, covered with a blanket, for about two weeks until they are released in the loca-tions they were found.

    SAFARS erects a dog house on top of cement blocks to provide the cats with shelter. The landowner works together with the soci-ety to feed the cats regu-

    larly with food supplied by SAFARS if needed.

    Captured kittens are kept inside of an enclosed nursery. Volunteers regularly socialize the animals for about two to three weeks until they are ready to be adopted.

    In a couple of weeks they are ready to be adopted, without a facility like this we wouldnt be able to do this, Dominguez said.

    So far, SAFARS has released four cats from its catch, neu-ter, spay and release program, and found homes for about six abandoned cats.

    For information on SAFARS on how to donate, adopt or volunteer, visit: w w w . s a f a r s . o r g

    SAFARS will be hold-ing a garage sale on Oct. 6 from 10 a..m to 4 p.m. at 2075 Otter Point Rd.

    All proceeds will be used for the catch, spay, neuter and release program.

    Sharron Ho photo

    SAFARS volunteer, Jacob Hanson carefully pets a feral kitten.

    Numerous fires are keeping firefighters busyCarelessness cause of fires

    Sooke Fire Rescue Ser-vice responded to three fires on Sept.16. The first was to a brush fire on a small island near Goodridge Penin-sula. An area about 20 x 50 was on fire when crews arrived.

    Due to location, all equipment had to be packed in by hand. The fire was caused by a campfire not prop-erly extinguished.

    Twelve firefight-

    ers worked on this for about two hours. Due to the rising tide, the access was cut off and the Sooke Coast Guard Auxiliary had to be called in to retrieve the firefighters and their gear. (FF Bob Bennett in the photo).

    Call came in around 1:15 pm.

    While still at this call, another grass fire was reported on Townsend Road (2:48 pm). This was caused by a carelessly dis-carded cigarette. Crews soaked down the area,

    but thanks to work of a neighbour with a long garden hose, the fire was controlled before FD arrival.

    Then at 11:50 pm, 16 firefighters responded to a vehicle fire at the end of Goodridge Road.

    The SUV was fully involved on arrival and is deemed suspicious as the RCMP reported the vehicle as stolen.

    The investigation on this continues.

    Steven SorensenFire Chief / Emer-gency Operations

    Coordinator

    Submitted photo

    Sooke firefighter Bob Bennett waters down a fire on Goodridge Peninsula.

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  • Locals recall what happened

    Working at the Char-ters River Salmon Inter-pretive Centre when I experienced the rum-bling, shaking and explosion of the recent 3.1 earthquake in the Sooke hills, it took my nerves a while to settle down. Located where I was, perhaps the valley formation channelled the reverberations, as the explosion was so strong it scared me out of my wits.

    This recent experi-ence, strangely, was more dramatic for me than the 1946 earth-quake which shook Van-couver Island on June 23 that year. A 7.3 mag-nitude quake, its epi-centre was in the For-bidden Plateau region. This event is listed as the largest magnitude quake to occur on land in Canada.

    Strathcona Park and the Forbidden Plateau experienced changes in land mass and new can-yons opened up. Consid-erable damage was done throughout Courtenay and Comox, as shown in the attached photos.

    Fortunately it was a Sun-day and the children werent in school as there was much struc-tural damage and many fallen chimneys. Roads gave way. In Vancouver and Victoria chimneys fell as well.

    As a young girl, I was at home with my par-ents in Saseenos when rumbling began, the house shook, china fell from shelves and we all ran outdoors. My brother Maywell Wick-heim was in a lower meadow scything grass when he experienced the hayfield rolling in ripples in front of him.

    Ray Vowles, at home on Maple Avenue in Sooke, recalls how the shaking was scary for everyone as they hadnt felt an earth-

    quake before.Across the harbour

    in Becher Bay, Louise Paterson (then Lou-ise Wright) gives this account: When the shuddering started, we really felt the move-ment. Nothing stayed on the walls and the entire pantry shelving and its contents lay in shambles on the floor. We were all wide-eyed in shock.

    At the south end of Greens sandy beach, a large gaping crevasse had opened up and created a gulley that extended deep into the forest. The opening is

    still visible today, as the separated embank-ments slid onto the beach, bringing trees out as well. Today the wave action continues to erode the opening.

    At Parkers beach, the damage was more extreme. The Parker boathouse, trees, debris and rocks slid into the sea, scalp-ing the land and liter-ally wiping out all that was in their path. The gulley now has grown some underbrush, but the beach has never

    recovered.Victoria, as a more

    populated centre, expe-rienced more building damage than Sooke. The tall laundry smoke-stack at the St. Josephs Hospital collapsed.

    Liz Johnson (then Liz Norton) recalls, My baby brother John was just seven months old. When the earthquake hit, my mother grabbed him, ran outside and put him in his lovely English pram. She then

    6 www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012- SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

    File photos

    Damage was evident on buildings on Vancouver Island after 1946 earthquake.

    Contd on page 7

    CommunityWhat was that? An earthquake?

    2205 Otter Point Road, SookePhone: 642-1634

    Fax: 642-0541NOTICE OF TAX SALE

    Take notice that, pursuant to Section 403 of the Local Government Act, the following properties will be sold by public auction in the Council Chambers, 2225 Otter Point Road, Sooke, BC at 10:00 a.m. on September 24, 2012, if any delinquent taxes along with accrued interest remain unpaid prior to that time.

    Prospective purchasers are hereby noti ed that these properties are subject to tax under the Property Purchase Tax Act on the fair market value of the property. Additional information regarding the tax sale may be obtained from the Municipal Of ce during regular business hours, Monday through Friday 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

    Dated at Sooke, BC at 10 a.m. this 17th day of September 2012.

    Michael Dillabaugh, CADirector of Finance

    010478.040 023-982-519 6230 MARILYN RD $ 16,262.78 LOT 4, SOOKE LAND DISTRICT, PLAN VIP65834 SECTION 45&46

    010724.916 027-542-092 1662 CONNIE RD $ 10,598.03LOT B, SECTION 122, SOOKE LAND DISTRICT, PLAN VIP85114 EXCEPT PLAN VIS6734 (PHASE 1)

    010724.917 027-775-062 1658 CONNIE RD $ 12,621.48 LOT 1, SECTION 122, SOOKE LAND DISTRICT, PLAN VIS6734 080601.110 000-718-602 103 2057 KALTASIN RD $ 2,688.42 LOT 11, SECTION 7, SOOKE LAND DISTRICT, PLAN VIS601

    Folio PID Civic Address Upset Price Legal Description009615.000 005-983-886 2076 OTTER POINT RD $ 37,354.83 LOT 1, SECTION 3, DISTRICT OF SOOKE, PLAN 5692009679.022 027-906-256 102 - 2015 SHIELDS RD $ 11,984.30 LOT 2, SECTION 3, SOOKE LAND DISTRICT, PLAN EPS88009679.023 027-906-264 103 - 2015 SHIELDS RD $ 14,718.95 LOT 3, SECTION 3, SOOKE LAND DISTRICT, PLAN EPS88009679.024 027-906-272 201 - 2015 SHIELDS RD $ 16,959.69 LOT 4, SECTION 3, SOOKE LAND DISTRICT, PLAN EPS88009679.025 027-906-281 202 - 2015 SHIELDS RD $ 9,574.54 LOT 5, SECTION 3, SOOKE LAND DISTRICT, PLAN EPS88009679.027 027-906-302 301 - 2015 SHIELDS RD $ 17,167.92 LOT 7, SECTION 3, SOOKE LAND DISTRICT, PLAN EPS88009679.029 027-906-329 303 - 2015 SHIELDS RD $ 10,073.24 LOT 9, SECTION 3, SOOKE LAND DISTRICT, PLAN EPS88009703.000 007-130-821 1 - 6918 WEST COAST RD $ 8,530.30 SECTION 4, DISTRICT OF SOOKE, PLAN VIP1282009830.030 003-063-241 1975 KALTASIN RD $ 6,737.30 LOT A, SECTION 7, DISTRICT OF SOOKE, PLAN 23194009831.034 000-330-035 114 - 1987 KALTASIN RD $ 1,683.89 LOT 14, BLOCK 4, SECTION 7, SOOKE LAND DISTRICT, PLAN VIS202

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    LOT 4, BLOCK B, SECTION 66, DISTRICT OF SOOKE, PLAN VIP2774 LOT 5, BLOCK B, PLAN VIP2774, SECTION 66, SOOKE LAND DISTRICT, LOT 3, BLOCK B, PLAN VIP2774, SECTION 66, SOOKE LAND DISTRICT

    010344.304 028-002-903 107 - 6838 GRANT RD W $ 8,971.62 LOT 4, SECTION 23, SOOKE LAND DISTRICT, PLAN VIS6844010398.051 026-639-645 6480 RIVERSTONE DR $ 9,213.58 LOT 51, SECTION 32, DISTRICT OF SOOKE, PLAN VIP80698

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    Capital Regional District

    Regular MeetingJuan de Fuca Electoral Area Ofce#2 6868 West Coast RoadTuesday, September 25, 2012 at 5 pm.

    Public Welcome to AttendFor meeting conrmation or for further information, please contact the JdFEA Planning Services Ofce at 250.642.1500.

    Notice ofJuan de Fuca Electoral Area Parks and Recreation Advisory Commission

  • SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 www.sookenewsmirror.com 7

    ran back in the house and fetched his best hand crocheted shawl after all, if we were all killed, those who found our remains would be impressed by how great he looked.

    David McClimon says It takes something fairly substantial to get the attention of a busy 10-year old guy but I do remember there was a lot of shaking going on for a few minutes. We were living on Fort

    Street in Victoria when our house began to qui-ver, shiver and shudder. No real damage was done as far as I can recall but there were lots of excited people running around the neighbour-hood. Coincidentally our family moved to the fine town of Sooke a few weeks later and since then there has not been much going on in the way of serious seismic activity. But if my calculations are correct, the BIG ONE is likely to arrive during

    the winter of 2022.Three years later in

    1949, an earthquake of even greater magni-tude, 8.1, occurred not on land but in the ocean floor west of the Queen Charlotte Islands (Haida Gwaii). This event still lives in the memory of Audrey Wilson (then Audrey Sullivan).

    She says: John and I had only been married a few months and he and his brother were building a house just up the street from the little house we were renting

    in Langford. It was near noon and I was waiting for John to come home for lunch when I felt rumbling and looked up the street to see wires whipping around. When the shaking star-ted I tried to go outside but the door frame was leaning to the left and then to the right. A few things fell out of cup-boards but there was no real damage done.

    Elida Peers, Historian

    Sooke Region Museum

    Contd from page 6

    Seven kids in Sooke heard the Sooke Crisis Centre needed food and went door to door and collected food and money. They want to put out a challenge to other neighbourhood kids to do the same and said if everyone in Sooke donated just one non-perishable item, the Sooke Crisis Centre would have lots of food to help everyone in need.

    Lesley Baker photo

    Kids help out

    From left to right: Josh, Kenna, Kole, Dylan, Jason, Ben, Bre.

    Community

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  • 8 EDITORIAL www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012- SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

    EDITORIAL Rod Sluggett PublisherPirjo Raits EditorSharron Ho ReporterThe Sooke News Mirror is published every Wednesday by Black Press Ltd. | 112-6660 Sooke Road, Sooke, B.C. V9Z 0A5 | Phone: 250-642-5752 WEB: WWW.SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM

    B.C. Views Mike de Jongs debut as B.C.

    finance minister was a grim one. The first financial update for this election year projects a $1.4 billion decline in natural resource revenues from Kevin Falcons one and only budget in February.

    Most of that is from declining natural gas revenues in the next three years. And its not just the price of gas thats lower than the finance ministrys array of private sector experts had forecast.

    The volume of B.C. gas sold is down as well, as abundant new sources of shale gas come on-stream in the U.S. As with oil, thats currently the only market Canada has.

    And it wasnt long ago that the energy ministry was trumpeting its monthly totals for bonus bids paid by gas companies for drilling rights in northeastern B.C. That gold rush has wound down as shale deposits are staked and the price falls.

    De Jongs response shows how serious this problem is for any B.C. government. He inherits Falcons political commitment to present a balanced budget next spring. How he will do that, and be believed in a heated post-HST election campaign, remains a mystery.

    De Jong announced a hiring freeze for government staff, and a management salary freeze

    across health care, universities and Crown corporations as well as government operations. He hinted at an even harder line with unions, as the governments largest employee group continued selective strike action.

    This, and the familiar vow to rein in travel and other discretionary spending, wont come close to replacing the lost gas revenues. Asset sales, which Falcon came up with in a desperate effort to dig the government out of its huge sales tax hole, wont show up on the books until next year, if they go ahead at all. Raising taxes or fees? Forget it. Its either cut programs or run another deficit.

    The one glimmer of hope in what de Jong called the ugly resource revenue picture is that natural gas revenues dont have much farther to fall. And then there is the light at the far end of the tunnel, exports to Asia where the price remains much higher.

    That project took two important steps forward last week. Spectra Energy and British multinational BG Group unveiled plans for a third major pipeline to bring northeast gas to the coast, this one to a site near Prince Rupert proposed for a liquefied natural gas facility.

    And on Friday, the Haisla Nation and the B.C. government announced a land use agreement to develop another LNG export facility on the

    Douglas Channel near Kitimat. Two proposals in that area have already received federal export permits and financing from global energy players, including Chinese, Japanese and Korean companies.

    One of the bills jammed through by the B.C. Liberals in the hectic legislative session this spring was to do away with another of those federal-provincial overlaps that make industrial development so slow and difficult. Ottawa has sole authority to regulate reserve lands, but agreed to delegate that to B.C. and the Haisla, allowing them to pioneer the latest agreement.

    This is a major breakthrough, not just in the industrial development of northern B.C. but in dismantling the century-old logjam of aboriginal resource claims.

    At the centre of Premier Christy Clarks much-promoted jobs plan is the target of having three LNG export terminals and associated pipelines in production by 2020.

    That now looks like a more realistic target. But the jobs and revenues wont arrive in time to save the B.C. Liberals from their current predicament.

    Tom Fletcher is legislative reporter and columnist for Black Press and BCLocalnews.com

    tfletcher@blackpress.caFletcher col-umn

    Stakes go up in B.C. gas gamble

    Speaking out is democratic

    OUR VIEW

    It seems the gloves are off.There are those who vehemently oppose a car

    wash in the town centre and there are those who think it is a good idea.

    Sooke is one of those places where people are vocal, opinionated and not afraid to speak out on issues important to them. Nothing wrong with that. In fact, it is an important part of any democratic process. We each have our own vision of Sooke and where we want it to grow. The Official Community Plan is not written in

    stone. It is meant to be a guideline, a vision of where Sooke is headed. From the document itself, It is important to note that an OCP is a living document that may change over time to more accurately reflect conditions in the community that could not be foreseen at the time it was drafted.

    Each and every time an issue comes up that doesnt sit well with people, the OCP is either quoted chapter and verse or it is amended. Lets face it, most residents do not want any development in their neighbourhood. They want the status quo and who can blame them. But, the needs and wants of the majority of the residents should be taken into consideration as well. Sooke is going to grow and where the town centre is now is not the vision set forth in the OCP. It is supposed to be by the water and if that is the case, then the location of the car wash would be on the outskirts of the core. Five car wash bays will not mean traffic jams and line ups. It is complementary to the laundromat and the same waste water system will be used for both. But, it is each persons right to state their opinion and argue for what they want. It works both ways.

    The Official Community Plan is not written in stone.

    How to reach us:Phone 250-642-5752; fax 250-642-4767

    Rod Sluggett publisher@sookenewsmirror.com

    Harla Eve office@sookenewsmirror.com

    Pirjo Raits editor@sookenewsmirror.com

    Sharron Ho news@sookenewsmirror.com

    Rod Sluggett, Joan Gamache sales@sookenewsmirror.com

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    Harla Eve, office@sookenewsmirror.comVicky Sluggett

    General:

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    Agreement #40110541

    OTHER VIEWS

  • )HDWXUHOLVWLQJ)HDWXUHOLVWLQJ)HDWXUHOLVWLQJ)HDWXUHOLVWLQJ

    SELLING SOOKE SINCE 1985

    Family Friendly - $49,9003 bedroom home in a quiet & well managed park. 1150 sq. ft. with woodstove, Office/Den, fire pit, raised bed gardens, & more! Easy walk to elementary school, shops & bus stop. Fully fenced treed lot with Raised Bed Gardens, Garden Shed, Fire pit and more. Very private. Call Michael & 250-642-6056 for details.

    Coaches week

    As someone who competed in sport for decades, I know that coaches are an integral part of the experience. In B.C., our govern-ment is recognizing the immense contributions of coaches in every ath-letes personal and pro-fessional development by proclaiming the week from Sept. 15 to 22 as B.C. Coaches Week.

    Coaches are men-tors for kids and adults alike. They are power-ful influences with the potential to change lives. The Coaches Association of B.C. rep-resents some 40,000 coaches, of which 98 per cent are volunteers.

    It is coaches who teach the youngest ath-letes the essential skills of their sports; coaches who inspire and moti-vate athletes of all ages; and coaches who spot excellence in an ath-lete and work hard to develop it. Coaches also teach ethics and fair play-critical les-sons for young ath-letes that last a lifetime.

    At the recent Olym-pic and Paralympic Games in London, Brit-ish Columbias athletes experienced great suc-cess, bringing home medals and achieving personal bests. In the process, they positively influenced younger athletes and elevated the stature of their sports. These are won-derful achievements that have made us all proud, and we need to recognize the crucial role coaches played

    in those successes.Our collective goal

    is to ensure that every coach receives the training he or she needs to provide effective leadership. With that in mind, we will invest more than $2 million in coach development over the next year.

    Since last year, more than $100,000 has been directly targeted to develop coaches in northern British Colum-bia in the lead-up to the 2015 Canada Win-ter Games in Prince George. In addition, the Coaches Associa-tion of B.C. is offering free National Coaching Certification Programs in many locations around the province.

    I call on all British Columbians to recog-nize the critical role played by coaches as valued contribu-tors to the health and social develop-ment of children and youth in this province.

    Bill BennettMinister of Commu-nity, Sport and Cul-tural Development

    Business deserves support

    As a frequent user of Sooke Disposals drop off site, I was disturbed to hear of the site closure.

    My first thought?

    I am glad there is a locked gate on Butler Mainline. Hopefully the Winters family can find a new spot soon.They have provided a much needed ser-vice to the Sooke area for a long time and deserve local support.

    Richard BensonSooke

    Save JPM park for everyone

    I am a resident of Sooke and have been for the past three years.

    I own a house that backs on to John Phil-lips Memorial Park. I received a notice in

    the mail informing me of future development of this green space into a bike skills park and fenced -off leash dog run.

    I do not wish to have this in my backyard and plan to try to stop this for the negative environmental impact and also the potential decrease in my prop-erty value and for many other reasons.

    What I find unaccept-able is that my neigh-bours who live across the street and do not back on to the park did not receive the same notice. And there is no notice in your paper. Or any kind of notices around the park that is going to be destroyed.

    A better use for Sookes favourite tobog-gan hill and a very beautiful park would be as place where all ages could enjoy walks and picnics. It has the potential of being our Beacon Hill.

    What concerns me the most is the limited amount of time that was given to respond to this potential devel-opment. The town hall

    Deliver by mail or hand to our office, or e-mail editor@sooke newsmirror.com.

    Letters should be 300 words or less, and we may edit for length, tone and accuracy. Please include contact information.

    Letters

    LETTERS

    SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 www.sookenewsmirror.com LETTERS 9

    iWe asked: Are you in favour of a car wash behind Village Food Markets?

    Yeah, I am. I definitely think theres a need for a car

    wash.

    Anna CampbellSooke

    I guess so. It wouldnt be a bad thing, so why not?

    Meghan McKenzie Sooke

    I think it would be a good idea if they used recycled

    water, I think Id be in favour of that.

    Deborah CarelloSooke

    Yeah. Why not? It beats the hell out of going into Lang-

    ford or whatever all the time.

    Leonard RideoutSooke

    Contd on page 10

    Three cubs and a sow

    Paul Hawryluk photo

    This mother bear and three cubs were spotted along a beach trail near Whiffin Spit. Be bear aware and do not leave ripe fruit on the ground or garbage within reach.

  • 10 OPINION www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012- SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

    meeting is on Monday, Sept. 17. We received the letter on Sept 13.

    I ask that your paper report on this issue.

    Shari-Lynne FairallSooke

    Road closure not favoured

    Open letter to:Dave, Bob, Paul

    After a great deal of feedback from my con-stituents and the gen-eral public, I am sorry to inform you that I can no longer support the closure of West Coast Road for the Sub-aru Sooke Triathlon.

    Many reasons such as; community safety, inconvenience for travellers and incon-venience for residents were relayed to me and although there is tremendous support for the triathlon, there is none for the closure of Highway 14. Quite simply the Pacific Marine Circle Route has become too busy.

    On behalf of the Juan de Fuca residents, I want to sincerely thank you, Paul, for organiz-ing this huge event in

    our region. I am truly sorry to relay this message but I want to tell you early in the game so you may alter your plans well in advance of next season.

    Thank you so much, Dave and Bob, for your support, not only of the event but your sup-port of our community.

    S i n c e r e l y ,Mike Hicks

    Regional DirectorJuan de Fuca

    Hydro responds

    Re: Clarification on smart meters, Sooke News Mirror, Sep 12.

    Smart meters com-municate using radio frequency signals that are similar to what has been used for decades in televisions, radios and other common house-hold devices. B.C.s Provincial Health Offi-cer, Health Canada and the World Health Orga-nization all confirm the wireless meters pose no known health risks.

    Planetworks Consult-ing, a certified engi-neering firm located in North Vancouver,

    has conducted inde-pendent testing on the meters that isolated the smart meter from other sources of radio frequency common to our everyday lives. The testing confirmed that a BC Hydro smart meter communicates for about 1.4 seconds per day and has a power density of 2 micro-watts per square cen-timeter. These results have been signed, sealed and certified by a professional engineer.

    These signals are far below Canadian guide-lines and are even below the strictest precaution-ary limits in the world, set out by Switzerland.

    We investigate every customer billing com-plaint thoroughly. In the vast majority of cases over 99 per cent we are able to sort it out by looking at the cus-tomers consumption history. In some cases, we make mistakes such as data inputting errors and inaccurate bill estimates. Once the new smarter sys-tem is in place these problems will be elimi-nated as there will be no more routinely esti-

    mated bills or man-ual meter misreads.

    The accuracy of our meters is also overseen by Measurement Can-ada, a federal consumer protection agency.

    Further, we are responsible for ensur-ing the safety of all our electrical grid equip-ment, including meters. We are accountable to the BC Safety Author-ity and all meters are regulated by the Ameri-can National Standards Institute, the Institute of Electrical and Electron-ics Engineers and the International Electro-technical Commission.

    Smart meters are an important part of upgrading and mod-ernizing the electric-ity grid which delivers power to almost 1.9 million customers and supports our economy. They will also get the lights back on faster during power outages and provide customers with tools to conserve energy and save money.

    Upgrading the elec-trical metering system and grid will deliver $1.6 billion in savings to British Columbians over the next 20 years and help keep our rates among the low-

    Contd from page 9 LETTERS

    Contd on page 11

    All Community events which purchase a display ad will now appear in our current community event calendar at no charge. All FREE EVENTS will be listed at no charge. Space permitting.

    Whats Up in SookeWhats Up in Sooke This WeekThis Week

    COMMUNITY CALENDAR DEADLINE: THURSDAY @ 3PMItems for Community Calendar must be non-commercial

    and free to the public. Please limit to 25 words.

    SHOPPERSDRUG MART 250-642-5229

    Wed.Wed.September 19September 19ROYAL CANADIAN LEGIONROYAL CANADIAN LEGION Nascar 7:30 p.m.Nascar 7:30 p.m.Euchre - 7 p.m. Euchre - 7 p.m. Darts - 7:30 p.m. Darts - 7:30 p.m. Ladies darts - 12 p.m.Ladies darts - 12 p.m. TOASTMASTERS TOASTMASTERS Meeting upstairs at Meeting upstairs at Village Market Foods Village Market Foods starting at 7 p.m. starting at 7 p.m. For more info, contact For more info, contact Allan at 250-642-7520. Allan at 250-642-7520.

    Thurs.Thurs. September 20September 20ROYAL CANADIAN

    LEGIONCribbage at 7 p.m. SOOKE PUBLIC LIBRARYPreschool Storytime, register at 250-642-3022.

    Sat.Sat.September 22September 22ROYAL CANADIAN ROYAL CANADIAN LEGIONLEGIONMeat draw at 3 p.m. Meat draw at 3 p.m. COPS FOR CANCER COPS FOR CANCER DINNERDINNERCome out and enjoy Come out and enjoy great food, entertainment great food, entertainment and a silent auction at and a silent auction at the Sooke Legion on the Sooke Legion on Eustace Road, beginning Eustace Road, beginning at 7 p.m. Tickets can be at 7 p.m. Tickets can be purchased at Shoppers purchased at Shoppers Drug Mart in Sooke or Drug Mart in Sooke or RCMP detachment on RCMP detachment on Sooke Road. Sooke Road. SOOKE FOOD 4 THE SOOKE FOOD 4 THE SOUL COMMUNITY SOUL COMMUNITY MEAL DAYSMEAL DAYSGourmet sandwiches Gourmet sandwiches from 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. from 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. at 2110 Church Rd, Knox at 2110 Church Rd, Knox Church Church

    Mon.Mon.September 24September 24

    Sun.Sun.September 23September 23SHIRLEY FARMERS

    MARKET From 10: 30 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Pioneer ParkKITCHEN PARTY MUSIC JAMAt Kemp Lake Cafe from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Bring an instrument or just relax & enjoy the music and great food. Call 250-642-7875 to reserve. SOOKE FOOD CHI HARVEST DINNERAt Sunriver Community Garden from 5 p.m. Tickets at Shoppers Drug Mart, Stick in the Mud.

    Canada Day pie eating contestCanada Day pie eating contest

    Tues.Tues.September 25September 25BABY TALK 2012BABY TALK 2012BREAST FEEDINGBREAST FEEDINGAt the Sooke Child, Youth At the Sooke Child, Youth and and Family Centre (CASA building) Family Centre (CASA building) 2145 Townsend Road from 2145 Townsend Road from 10-11:30 a.m. 10-11:30 a.m. YOUTH CLINICYOUTH CLINICWest Coast Family Medical West Coast Family Medical Clinic from 4 to 7 p.m. for ages Clinic from 4 to 7 p.m. for ages 13 to 25. 13 to 25. SOOKE FOOD 4 THE SOOKE FOOD 4 THE SOUL COMMUNITY SOUL COMMUNITY MEAL DAYS MEAL DAYS Pizza Party from 4:30 Pizza Party from 4:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. at 2110 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. at 2110 Church Rd, Knox ChurchChurch Rd, Knox Church

    Fri.Fri.September 21September 21ROYAL CANADIAN ROYAL CANADIAN LEGIONLEGIONSteak night 6-7:30 p.m. Steak night 6-7:30 p.m. Drop-in darts at 8 p.m. Drop-in darts at 8 p.m. VITAL VITTLESVITAL VITTLESFree lunch from 11:30 Free lunch from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Holy a.m. to 1 p.m. at Holy Trinity Church on Murray Trinity Church on Murray Road. Road. Everyone welcome. Everyone welcome. SOOKE PUBLIC SOOKE PUBLIC LIBRARYLIBRARYBabytime at 10:30 a.m., Babytime at 10:30 a.m., register at 250-642-3022register at 250-642-3022

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  • est in North America.Gary Murphy

    Chief Project Offi-cer, Smart Metering and Infrastructure

    BC Hydro

    Fellow dog owners pay heed

    Thank you for being diligent and responsi-ble for picking up your dogs doo. To all the inconsiderate and irre-sponsible dog own-ers, shame on you! In my neighbourhood, on Whiffen Spit and else where, there are ever increasing piles of dog poop on the sidewalks, on peoples lawns as well as in parks and other public areas.

    Have you, even once, thought of your fam-ily, friends, neighbours and the workers who maintain our public spaces that have to step around or over (hopefully not in) these landmines? Clearly not. Your dog will also undoubtedly step into these piles as well, then track it into your own home.

    As for the owners who pick up after their dog then leave the bag for someone else to deal with, please have the decency to go back, pick it up and dispose of it properly. Forgot a bag? Then mark the spot and please return to clean it up.

    We should all strive for a clean and healthy community for every-one, including our pets. Its the right thing to doo!

    T. KlosSooke

    Canada is the best

    Im an 80-year-old fifth generation Cana-dian and I am bewil-dered.

    Our confederation in the 1860s certainly started with enthusi-asm and optimism. Sir. John A. MacDonald stated, Everything is to be gained by union and everything to be lost by disunion.

    Georges Cartier from Lower Canada echoed similar statements.

    Since then, we have become a magnificent country and we have enjoyed a number of distinguished French Canadian prime minis-ters.

    According to a recent U.N. survey, we live in the best country in the world. So, my question is, Why would any-one, who helped build the best country in the world want to leave it?

    In many families there are differences, but if there is respect for all the members, dif-ferences can be gener-ally managed satisfac-torily. But there must be mutual respect or nothing meaningful will happen.

    If our glorious country is seriously weakened by internal, destructive bickering, it may prove to be a strong tempta-tion for our powerful neighbour, the U.S.A. to intervene, which could result in the U.S. from the Rio Grande to the North Pole, all of which is bad for Canada and Quebec.

    So. Lets try and return to our original enthusiasm and remain the best country in the world.

    George MillerShirley

    Perceptions abound

    First, I would like to say I support a laun-dromat but do not sup-port a car wash at the Village Foods location for many reasons that others have already outlined. My larger con-cerns are the processes council is following to make this decision.

    On Monday, Sept. 10 a Public Hearing was held regarding modi-fication of zoning and releasing of covenants to allow the car wash. Mayor Milne chaired the hearing. I have a problem with Mr. Milne being present because he is in a potential conflict of interest. According to the pub-lic record of entities that contributed to Mr. Milnes election campaign, he received

    $2,000 from the Logan Group and an addi-tional $2,000 from JCB Holdings. Essentially he received one-third of his total campaign contributions from enti-ties that will receive a clear benefit if the car wash zoning modifica-tion is approved. I do not know if Mr. Milne legally has to step out, but the optics are terrible. The percep-tion of bias is strong.

    In my opinion, staff did an excellent job preparing the package for this hearing. Yet many council members appeared confused by what the hearing cov-ered, even though it was clearly laid out in the package. A resident then questioned the legality of the process,

    and council voted to go back to staff and get a legal opinion. Shouldnt we trust that our dis-trict staff actually knew what they were doing when they recom-mended this zoning modification? For the first five months of 2012, the district has already spent $118,446.53 on legal fees. Assuming that the district did not spend a penny more on legal fees for the rest of 2012, we are

    already $28,446.53 over budget for the year. This is alarming. We simply cannot afford to keep requesting a legal opinion every time someone ques-tions staff or council.

    Council needs to start actually making deci-sions about key issues rather than referring back to staff or getting a legal opinion every time someone ques-tions them. Mayor Milne and some councillors

    also need to use bet-ter judgement in deter-mining whether they could be potentially in a conflict of interest.

    I almost forgot some-thing. Council did make a key decision I am sure the Sooke taxpayers are over the moon about. We can now watch all of this from the comfort of our homes on our com-puters. With the looming

    SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 www.sookenewsmirror.com OPINION 11

    Contd from page 10 LETTERS

    Contd on page 12

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  • threat of a NHL lock-out, Im glad I will be able to watch council meetings instead.

    Tom Myrick Sooke

    Shame on garbage dumpers

    The morning of Sept. 8 we found a pile of bags and boxes of what appeared to be pos-sibly some leftovers from a garage sale or maybe just some no longer needed stuff. It actually was mostly garbage and it was dropped over the fence at the entrance to Fran-ces Gardens Co-op and left strewn about for our members to look at and have to clean up.

    It was mostly chil-drens items such as books, blankets and stuffed animals and other miscellaneous household things. While we appreciate that you no longer have a need for these things,

    there are places you can drop them off where they may be shared with others who could use them. There is also a garbage and recycling depot right here in Sooke so perhaps you could find out where these are located and next time you feel the need to get rid of things, you could take them to

    the appro -priate places.

    It is really a sad thing to see when you are driving around and see piles of garbage just dumped on the side of the road and very frus-trating when you find it dumped basically at your front door. It is also sad that your chil-drens belongings mean so little to you that rather than pass them on to another child you would choose to dump them for some-one else to take care of.

    A word of advice: when you take the time to sneak around and do this, you had best make sure there is nothing in the bags and boxes which may

    indicate who you are. Also, at the very

    least, make sure there is nothing in there that could possibly harm children or animals.

    Last but not least, shame on you.

    G. SadlerSooke

    Wrong location for car wash

    Congratulations to the District of Sooke for introducing user-friendly video cover-age on its website. Now interested citizens can follow up on sto-ries in the press to see exactly what was said

    in the council chamber. Regarding last weeks

    Public Hearing on the Murray Rd. car wash, we regret that the Sooke News Mirror reporter quoted one of the signers of this let-ter as appearing to sup-port the environmen-tally sound car wash. In fact, he was say-ing that the proposed site in the CTC2 zone is the wrong location.

    For the record, here is what we submitted to the Public Hearing:

    As advocates for a more livable town cen-tre and a more sustain-able community, we wish to record our oppo-sition to amending the Zoning Bylaw to allow for a car wash in CTC 2.

    Amending the zon-ing bylaw to allow a car wash in CTC 2 runs counter to the Offi-cial Community Plan (OCP). The OCP (p. 78) calls for a reduc-tion of the dominance of the automobile in the Town Centre.

    The logic of the Zon-ing Bylaw itself is con-sistent with the OCP, and the distinction between CTC1 and 2 is crucial: commercial activities to do with cars fueling, repairing, servicing and washing them belongs in CTC 1, north of Hwy 14.

    CTC2 the town cen-tre between the high-way and the waterfront is zoned for mixed resi-dential and commer-cial, which means more pedestrian activities, more tourists, and more

    12 OPINION www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012- SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

    LETTERSContd from page 11

    Contd on page 20

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  • 14 www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012- SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

    Armin Sielopp photo

    Readers Photo of the Week

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    Readers Photo of the Week is sponsored by Ellen Begerud.

    Send your good quality jpegs to: editor@sookenewsmirror.com

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  • SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 www.sookenewsmirror.com 15

    Our Community

    Doni Eve photo

    Staff Sargeant Steve Wright keep the prisoners in line at the Cops for Cancer Jailathon held on Saturday, Sept. 15. Among the prisoners are Councillor Rick Kasper, Councillor Herb Haldane and Lorne Christensen.

    Pirjo Raits photo

    Above, golfers get ready for the annual Sooke Region Chamber of Commerce golf tournament at DeMamiel Creek Golf Course last Thursday. Below, left to right, Steve Knowles, Jason Zailco, Andrew Zuyderduyn, Kari Stauble, Rebecca Armitage and Blair Nicks took part.

    Sharron Ho photo

    Judge Lynch M High also known as Al Beddows, held a firm court at the Cops for Cancer Jailathon on Sept. 15 outside of Coast Capital Savings.

    Pirjo Raits photos

    Above, Melinda Blake sells 50/50 tickets at the golf tournament. Above right, Lori Wood, Marlene Walker and Arden Markham joke about the trophy they won for worst score.

    Sharron Ho photo

    David Evans, owner of The Stick, goes up against Judge Lynch M High also known as Al Beddows, during the Cops for Cancer Jailathon.

    Jails and golf fuel fundraisers

    Sharron Ho photo

    Below, Shelley Godin, of Curves, rattles a can for a donation from seven-year-old Jodie Markin at the Cops for Cancer Jailathon.

  • 16 www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012- SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

    Is there a future for B.C. pensioners andseniors (O.A.P.O) Br.#88 in Sooke?

    Sooke Branch #88 was formed in 1964 byMrs. Phyliss Johnson and a group of indu-strious volunteers who spearheaded the manyservices we have today.

    Sooke Historian ElidaPeers remembers, The branch was star-ted in different times and it was the begin-ning of services to seniors such as seni-ors housing, Meals on Wheels, seniors bus,Contact Cupboard, hos-pice, the Seniors Drop-in Center and more. Volunteers have keptthese services vibrant and available. The com-

    munity hall was built by resident volunteers.

    The local branch provides the opportu-nity for Sooke residents to voice concerns andre c o m m e n d a t i o n s directly to municipal, provincial and fede-ral governments. Thecurrent issues presen-ted to governmentsby the O.A.P.O are the urgent need of more/affordable long term beds, better home support, ensure that the Canadian Institute for Health Research in medical drug trials bemade available to the public, as well as manymore. An important success was persua-ding the government to cover the cost of soft

    lens for cataract sur-gery as of June 4, 2012.

    Branch #88 has conti-nued to provide a plat-form for sharing ideas and participating in thecommunity for 48 years. The branch is suppor-ted through member-ships of $12/ year. A strong membership has more opportunity to beheard. We must conti-nue to support strong seniors organizations to keep our rights, pen-sions, the health care that we have - intact and improved - and to protect each otherfrom scams and abuse.

    An article in theTimes Colonist Seni-ors Contribute GreatlyTo Canadian Society - questions, How do

    we provide supports in communities to makethem more age friendly? Acknowledging seniorscontributions to family, friends, the local eco-nomy and community by getting involvedand sharing expertise creates a strong organi-zation and community.

    Br. #88 welcomesnew members 55 plus to carry on the tradition of suppor-ting the community.

    Please plan to attend Sooke Br.#88 Annual General Mee-ting on Sept. 27 at 1 p.m. downstairs at the Sooke Community Hall,speakers, meet and greet, Sooke serviceorganizations. cof-fee and refreshments.

    O.A.P.O. worries over future

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  • SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 www.sookenewsmirror.com 17

    Prices are in effect until Thursday, September 20, 2012 or while stock lasts.

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    We Match Prices!*Look for the symbol in store. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITES (note that our major supermarket competitors may not). Due to the fact that product is ordered prior to the time of our Ad Match checks, quantities may be limited. We match select items in our major supermarket competitors yers throughout the week. Major supermarket competitors are determined solely by us based on a number of factors which can vary by store location. We match identical items (de ned as same brand, size, and attributes) and for fresh produce, meat and bakers, we match a comparable item (as determined solely by us).

    Guaranteed Lowest Prices*Applies only to our major supermarket competitors print advertisements (i.e. yer, newspaper). We will match the competitors advertised price only during the effective date of the competitors print advertisement. Our major supermarket competitors are determined solely by us and are based on a number of factors which can change from time to time. Identical items are de ned as same brand, item type (in the case of produce, meat and bakery), size and attributes and carried at this store location. We will not match competitors multi-buys (eg. 2 for $4), spend x get x, Free, clearance, discounts obtained through loyalty programs, or offers related to our third party operations (post of ce, gas bars, dry cleaners etc.). We reserve the right to cancel or change the terms of this promise at any time.

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  • As summer comes to a close, gardens that rely on perennials for colour tend to lose the wow factor cre-ated by vivid hues of spring and early sum-mer flowers. Enter the dahlia big, bold and beautiful. Okay, theyre not always big. They range widely in both plant and flower size, but they always deliver big when it comes to impact. Their colours and colour combina-tions are simply stun-ning. Most excel in

    vases and arrange-ments (if youve been to the Saanich or Sooke Fall Fair, you know this firsthand), but for me its the vibrancy they bring to the gar-den at this time of the year that makes them so worthwhile.

    Like many other gar-deners in our area, I grow dahlias but bring no particular knowl-edge or expertise to the undertaking. I got started a few years ago at the urging of a friend who knew I was looking

    for a late season flower of substance that was low on, if not off, the increasingly long list of plants consumed by the local deer. To date I claim only mixed suc-cess, with failures due, I suspect, more to my shortcomings than to the dahlias. Fortu-nately, apart from the odd nibble, our four-hoofed friends have indeed ignored the dahlias, giving us a

    range of good options for adding flower power to the unfenced landscape from late summer to frost.

    It was therefore with considerable surprise that I learned what prompted Victoria-based family matri-arch Jean Vantreight to finally get serious about growing dahlias: the deer were start-ing to eat hers. This was some 10 years

    ago, and she has since become recognized for her knowledge of all things dahlia, her expertise as a grower, and her talent as a prize-winning exhibitor.

    Jean will be sharing that expertise at this months meeting of the Sooke Garden Club with her presentation on Dazzling Dahlias. Using photos and cut flow-ers for illustration pur-poses, Jean will focus

    on the various types of dahlias and some vari-eties within those types. She will also discuss the life cycle of these plants and provide helpful tips for grow-ing them successfully. Members are invited to bring questions.

    Please note: This months meeting will be held on Wednesday, Sept. 26, 7:30 p.m., at St. Rose of Lima Catholic Church on Townsend

    Road. Also on the schedule: fall parlour show, Potato Contest results, and submission of entries for the annual photo contest. New members are welcome. Membership is $15 for the calendar year and can be purchased at the door. For more information, e-mail: sookegardenclub@yahoo.caor phone Jane at 250-646-2573.

    18 COMMUNITY www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012- SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

    Sooke Garden Club: Time for dahlias to dazzle

    Submitted photo

    Jean Vantreight with a display of many and sundry smaller dahlias. Jean is this months guest speaker for the Sooke Garden Club.

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  • SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 www.sookenewsmirror.com 19

    Arts &EntertainmentFibres & Beyond: Reconsider the Lilies10 Year Retrospective show for 15 fibre artists

    Pirjo RaitsSooke News Mirror

    Fibre artist Gail Erick-son combines her day-dreaming with reality. Colours, textures and stitches swirl through her mind as she pieces together another care-fully sewn jacket. Erick-son uses recycled fine woolens to create a collage, which looked at from a distance can be the beautiful red of an arbutus on a shore-line or a flower set among bright swatches of colour. She pieces together garments that are elegant, wear-able and one-of-a-kind.

    Erickson is one of 15 women fibre artists who are banding together for a 10 year retrospec-tive show and sale at the Coast Collective gallery in Colwood. The women are members of Fibres & Beyond, a textile co-operative formed to support and challenge these artists working with surface design, fibre, fabric and mixed media. Its all about cloth in one form or another. The tactile and the fragile are all represented by one or more of the women. Each year they gather their latest creations and band together for the annual Consider the Lilies shows amongst

    the lilies in Metcho-sins Old St. Marys Church churchyard.

    The artists involved in the retrospective are Linda Danielson, Gail Erickson, Joy Gar-nett, Irm Houle, Phyllis Lysionek, Judy Seeley, Elizabeth Tanner, Joan Taylor, Jessie Taylor-Dodd, Isabel Tipton, Mary Wolfe with Ria Bos, Patrician Carley, Gloria S. Daly and Alison Kobylnyk. The women are all from through-out the Victoria area.

    Some of the work is decorative, some is functional but each piece is a unique. The artists applique, stitich, sew, embroider, weave, dye, piece and manip-

    ulate fibre into wall hangings, garments, dolls and soft sculp-tures. The pieces are bright and colourful and showcase the intri-cate work fashioned by those creative hands.

    ReConsider the Lil-ies opens on Sept. 20 and runs to Sept. 30 at the Coast Collec-tive at 3321 Heather-bell Road in Colwood.

    An artists reception is scheduled for Satur-day, Sept. 22 from 2 to 4 p.m. Hours are Wednes-day through Sunday from noon to 5 p.m.

    Submitted photo

    Gail Ericksons fibre work will be shown at ReConsider the Lilies at the Coast Collective.

    OFFICIAL FUEL SPONSOR

    Cops for Cancer Dinner ~ Saturday, September 22nd7:00pm at the Sooke legion located on Eustace Rd. Come out and enjoy great food and entertainment.$40/ ticket, available at the Shoppers Drug Mart & the RCMP Detachment in Sooke

    Tour de Rock: 15 Years and Counting Celebration ~ Wednesday Oct. 3rd6:30pm at the Ballroom in the Westin Bear Mountain Golf Resort & SpaJoin the Tour de Rock team at this beautiful dinner.$75 per ticket or $500 for a table of 8, contact Donna for tickets: 250.532.1359

    Contact South Vancouver Island Community Fundraising Co-ordinator,Linda Tesser Cell: 250.893.4757 ~ Email: ltesser@bc.cancer.caVisit us on facebook: facebook.com/CopsforCancerBC OR follow us on twitter: @cancersocietybc and mention #CopsforCancerBC

    2205 Otter Point Road, SookePhone: 250-642-1634

    Fax: 250-642-0541email: info@sooke.ca

    website: www.sooke.ca

    Upcoming Public MeetingsSooke Economic Development Commission

    Wednesday, September 19, 2012 at 7:00 pm

    Board of VarianceThursday, September 20, 2012 at 5:00 pm

    Municipal Meeting Room

    Property Tax SalePursuant to Section 403, Local Government Act Monday,

    September 24, 2012 at 10:00 am

    Emergency Planning CommitteeTuesday, September 25, 2012 at 9:00 am

    Nominate an Outstanding VolunteerRecognize Sooke Regions outstanding volunteers by nominating a

    citizen for a Sooke Volunteer Award.Nomination forms are available at the District of Sooke Municipal

    Hall, on our website, and the Sooke Region Museum. Nominations will be accepted until October 31st, 2012 at the Museum.

    This schedule is subject to change. Please call 250-642-1634 to con rm meetings.

    Council meeting agendas may be viewed at www.sooke.ca

    WHATS NEW AT THE DISTRICT- CHECK IT OUT! At www.sooke.ca

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  • residents. Integration of working, shopping, and living spaces defines the vision for our town cen-tre in CTC2. You cant integrate retail shops, office space, or resi-dential with a car wash.

    Opposition to the car wash location does not mean opposition to the proposed laun-dromat. Laundromats encourage sustainabil-ity and community. They share access to resources, reduce car-bon footprints, and bring people together. They can be important places for social inter-action and encourage users to spend time in the town centre.

    The OCP and Zon-ing Bylaw provide an excellent framework for our town cen-tre. Lets not weaken them. The requested exception may be site-specific but it sets a dangerous precedent for further car related development, under-mining both the OCP and the Zoning Bylaw.

    Margaret Critch-low, John Boquist,

    Jeff Bateman, Caro-lyn Bateman, Michael

    TaconSooke

    Editors note: Jeff Batemans comments were not quotes, they

    were paraphrased.

    Illegal dumping will increase

    Re: Sooke Dis-posals closing of their drop-off yard:

    Although the clos-ing of SDLs dump site is reportedly tempo-rary, subject to finding

    a new location, I really dont think that all of Sookes drop-off resi-dents are going to find this situation palatable.

    While most of us are responsible residents who can make alternate arrangements without much hassle during the dumping void, there are those in Sooke, just

    as in any other outlying community - that wont really warm to the idea of driving into Langford with their weekly gar-bage bags. As for driv-ing to Hartland Avenue Landfill from Sooke, well

    thats not even realistic. Just a heads-up

    to local (especially secluded) property owners here in Sooke, and to Sooke council: be on your guard for a possible increase in

    illegal dumping while SDL is in limbo. (By the way, Im not a drop-off customer myself - I have weekly pickup.

    G.R. SaundersSooke

    Editorial strikes

    chord with many

    Ms. Pirjo Raits, you hit it right on with your editorial, (Expos-ing the stuffed shirts, Victoria News, Sept. 14) your thoughts are the thoughts of many thousands.

    You should have a col-umn in one of the major papers so that your mes-sage is spread further.

    The Sooke News Mir-ror is lucky to have such a editor. Thank you.

    Ivan Crossett Victoria

    20 OPINION www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012- SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

    Contd from page 12 LETTERS

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  • SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 www.sookenewsmirror.com 21

    Invitational show of First Nations and Metis artPirjo RaitsSooke News Mirror

    Charlene Georges wall hangings and fibre art speaks of ancient stories and legends, people and animal spirits. Its a way of retaining and honour-ing her culture through creative expression.

    G e o r g e (kQwatstnot) is a TSou-ke artist work-ing primarily in textiles. She manipulates and transforms the tex-tiles through applique, embroidery, paint and weaving.

    From Sept. 28 to Oct. 21 she will be taking part in the third annual 2012 First Nations and Metis Art Show and Sale in Sidney. She is helping organize the show and thinks it is very cool to have so many First Nations and Metis art-ists in the same show.

    George is Salish and Nuu-Chah-Nulth on her fathers side and French and English

    on her mothers side. She bridges both cul-tures and uses the his-tory of both to influ-

    ence her designs. For the show she will have some of her signature pieces recycled and

    vintage textiles trans-formed into scarves, shawls and clothing.

    I try hard to reuse things and give them a new life, she said. There are cool vin-tage pieces I get to cut up and remake.

    She will also have a series of scarves, which are always popular with people.

    The 2012 First Nations and Metis Invitational Show will have a broad range of art presented by artists from across Canada. The whole gal-lery, at the Sidney Com-munity Arts Centre, Tulista Park at 5th and Weiler, will be displayed to reflect the intent and spirit of the event. Sto-ries and music will add to the ambiance of the ever-changing show.

    Two returning art-ists Virgil Sampson and Tobias Tomlinson are working together with the Sidney arts coun-cil to produce an out-standing quality arts show which promises to include an outstand-ing collection of work from both traditional and emerging artists. The diversity of art includes carving, weav-ing, prints, fabric art,

    drums, rattles, pot-ter, beading, leather-work, painting, jewelry and some surprises.

    Each of the artists finds inspiration from their culture and their ancestors. They strive to present work which educates and influences present and future gen-erations while defin-ing their artistic spirit.

    North West Coast First Nations repre-sented: Debbie Hunt: Kwaguilth, Charlene George: TSou-ke, Rande Cooke: Kwagu-ilth, Carolyn Memnook: Cree/Nuu-cha-nulth, Charles Elliott: Tarslip.

    Metis: Victoria Pruden, Seleca Aurica, Kevin Brophy, Lynn Henry and Carol Grenier.

    Other First Nations: Jessica Bekker: Black-foot, Gloria Valencia: Navajo, Stephanie Papil: Inuit, Lindsay Delaronde: Mohawk, Tobias Tomlinson: Chicksaw-Cherokee.

    The 2012 First Nations and Metis Art Show and Sale, sponsored by the Community Arts Coun-cil of the Saanich Pen-insula, will be open Tuesday to Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

    Bridging Canadas cultures through artArts & Entertainment

    File photoFile photo

    Above, one of Charlene Georges scarves Above, one of Charlene Georges scarves from a previous fashion show. Rght, Georges from a previous fashion show. Rght, Georges Salish Lady.Salish Lady.

    A Quilt of Valour made by Shirley quilters groupPirjo RaitsSooke News Mirror

    The Shirley Quilters allowed MLA John Hor-gan to touch one of the untouchables at the Sooke Fall Fair.

    The Shirley Quilters do not normally make a group quilt, but this year each made a few squares and entered the Quilt of Valour, Canadian Autumn, at the Sooke Fall Fair.

    Quilts of Valour are made by quilters across the country and they are given to injured soldiers who have returned home. Quilts, such as these, are show in quilt shows across Canada and the U.S. to raise awareness of the need for comfort for injured soldiers.

    As of December 2010, the Quilts of Valour organization has been able to deliver over 1,300 quilts to Cana-das injured service members and to vet-erans. They make no

    statement of the poli-tics involved in Cana-das military deploy-ment. Their mission is to ensure that our injured Canadian sol-diers are recognized fortheir bravery and commitment of their true patriotism to our country.

    They have quilts going out to armed forces bases, reha-bilitation hospitals and veterans homes right across the coun-try. Long arm quilters have registered their participation in B.C. and Alberta, and Ontario.

    They do not know who will receive the quilts, as that informa-tion is private. How-ever, Quilts of Valour are hearing back from the soldiers and we know they are being received and treasured.

    The Shirley Quilters meet every Thurs-day from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m at the Shir-ley Community Hall.

    Submitted photo

    MLA John Horgan gets to touch the quilt made by the Shirley quilters. They got together to make a Quilt of Valour for injured members of the armed forces returning home to Canada.Quilts of Valour has a website at: www.quiltsofvalour.ca

  • 22 NEWS www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012- SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

    MIKE WILLIAMS

    250-642-3240 mikelw@shaw.ca www.mikesellssooke.com

    THINKING OF WESTSHORE?101-2669 DEVILLE RD

    $389,900First Class Townhouse !!! Stainless Steel Applianc-es. Gourmet Kitchen, 3 Bdrm, 3 Bath Close to all amenities in the heart of Langford.

    304-383 WALE RD

    $231,000SPACIOUS TOP FLOOR CONDO, 2 Beds/1 Bath. Walk-ing distance to Colwood Corners. 5 minute stroll to Victoria Grizzlies Hockey! Immediate Possession.

    621B KILDEW RD

    $430,000HUGE 2 BEDROOM LEGAL SUITE is included with in this 5 Bdrm / 3 Bath. This well kept house is centrally located in a great family neighbourhood in the West Shore.

    Black Press is proud to be an official sponsor for the 2012 Canadian Cancer Society Cops for Cancer Tour de Rock, with news reporter Kyle Slavin on the 18-member tour team as a media rider. To follow Kyle Slavins Twitter updates from the final weeks of training and throughout the ride, follow @TDRKyle. ON TOUR: This years Tour de Rock begins in Port Alice on Sunday, Sept. 23 and ends Friday, Oct. 5 in Victoria. Tour de Rock raises funds and awareness for pediatric cancer research and programs.

    HELP OUT: Donations can be made at www.copsforcancer.ca

    FIND OUT: To catch up on all the Tour de Rock news, photos and videos, go online to: www.bclocalnews.com/

    tour-de-rock

    Edward HillBrittany LeeBlack Press

    The Canadian Cancer Society Cops for Cancer Tour de Rock teams two guest riders this year both have deep connections to the cause. Bob McDonald has helped train riders

    for the past four years. Matt Webb is a childhood cancer survivor who has been a junior team member for 15 years.

    Both have found themselves on an emotional and physical journey in the fight against pediatric cancer.

    Bob McDonaldHaving helped train Tour de Rock riders

    since 2008, McDonald knows how challenging the 1,000-plus kilometre cycle down the length of Vancouver Island can be. But, he said, its nothing compared to what some kids go through every day of their lives.

    McDonalds motivation to help raise funds for pediatric cancer research comes from close to home.

    His granddaughter, Lochlyn, was born with Costello syndrome, a genetic disorder that delays growth. Having the syndrome makes five-year-old Lochlyn more susceptible to cancerous tumours.

    She was in the hospital for the first 98 days of her life and we werent sure she was going to make it, the 67-year-old Sidney resident said.

    Shes now just turned five ... and so far, so good. Shes doing really well.

    McDonald, known as Bobfather to

    teammates, isnt new to the Tour de Rock circuit. His son, Saanich police Const. Rob McDonald, was a rider in 2007. And for the past four years, the father-son team has worked with the riders, preparing them for the two-week trek.

    Being asked to ride with this years team was just a way for McDonald to stay involved and contribute more to the cause, he said.

    Its just so exciting, he said.

    Matt WebbWebbs memories of his childhood cancer

    come in flashes. Three months before his fourth birthday he was diagnosed with Burkitts lymphoma.

    For two years he was in and out of B.C.

    Childrens Hospital in Vancouver in a cycle of chemotherapy and recovery. The Easter Seals House was his home away from home, but hes thankful his memories of the time are dim.

    Its a half-dozen single frame images in my mind. Nothing more, said Webb, 20, now 15 years cancer free. That in itself is a blessing.

    Indeed, the gruelling regime of chemotherapy was almost fatal. By chance, his doctors realized the chemicals had eaten a hole in his large intestine. That outcome helped doctors establish new protocols for treating kids with chemotherapy.

    They had to stop the treatment early. It would have killed me for sure, even if the cancer didnt.

    Born and raised in Saanich, and in the same house his great-great grandfather built 110 years ago, Webb is one of the few people to directly experience both sides of Tour de Rock as a childhood survivor and junior team member. When Tour de Rock offered the invitation last Christmas, he eagerly jumped onboard.

    As a 15-year junior rider a child who has cancer or cancer in remission Webb has lived Tour de Rock as long as he can remember.

    Webb said hes looking forward to experiencing Tour de Rock in the 27 stops that dot the Island.

    Im used to the overwhelming response in Victoria each year, he said. But up Island, (riders) are blown away. Little communities give so much, some give more than bigger communities. Ive heard so much about it Im eager to see it myself.

    The toursSpecial Guests

    Bob McDonald and Matt Webb may not be cops, but they understand the reason for Tour de Rock

    Edward Hill/Black Press

    Matt Webb, left, and Bob McDonald have a connection to Tour de Rock.

  • SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 www.sookenewsmirror.com 23

    The results: 2012 Sooke Fall FairMost points in pre-

    school - Liam Gilbert-Bernard; Best theme entry in collage - Liam Gilbert-Bernard; Most points in Growing Things - Erin Phillips; Most outstanding entry in Growing Things - Hunter Nicks; Best Mr. Potato Head - Chloe Clarkston;

    Most points in Fruit & Vegetable classes - Peter Wilford; Most points In Vegetable classes - Peter Wilford; Most outstanding exhibit of veg - Peter Wilford; Best collection of vegetables - Emily Moreland; Best showmanship display - Emily Moreland; Best display of garden herbs - Keeley Nixon; Best community garden dis-play - Sunriver;

    Most points in Jr. Flow-ers - Desiree Cumming; Best flower arrange-ment - Desiree Cum-ming; Most points in Flowers (Adults) - Jean Vantreight; Best potted plant - Bob Deryk; Best bloom in show - Jean Vantreight; Best African violet - Martha Moore; Most points in decora-tive classes - Jennifer Bell; Most outstanding arrangement - Pamela Day; Most outstanding single rose - Shirley Sto-rey; Best theme entry - Pamela Day;

    Most points in Kitch-encraft - Megan Fergu-son;

    Most points in Jr. can-ning - Mitchell Vowles;

    Most points in Youth kitchencraft - Maryna Ell and Fred Assmund-son;

    Most points in Bak-ing - Pat Kennedy; Most points in Diabetic bak-ing - Amy Chwojka;

    Most points in Kitch-encraft - Pat Kennedy;

    Most points in smoked fish - Hunter Nicks;

    Most outstanding entry in Jr. Fibre Arts - Regan Armatige-Smith;

    Most points in Jr. sewing - Sara Gilbert-Bernard; Best knitted or crocheted article in Jr. - Maryna Ell; Best sewn stuffed animal in Jr. - Jessie Nicks;

    Most points in Adult Needlecraft - Margaret Sherwood; Best sewn article - Margaret Sher-wood; Best quilt overall - Sharon Hanslip; Best knitted childs sweater - Pat Kennedy; Most points in Embroidery - Margaret Sherwood; Best quilt displaying theme - Paula Wesley;

    Most points in Jr. Hobbies - Josh Gilbert-Bernard; Best useful item from recycled material (Jr.)- Sara Gil-bert-Bernard; Most cre-ative design in Lego - Aidan Wrigley;

    Most points in Adult Hobbies - Jennifer Bell; best useful item from salvaged material - David Court; Peoples choice favourite hobby entry - Pauline Hutchin-son;

    Most points in Youth Hobbies - Maryna Ell; Most outstanding Novice Hobby entry - Maryna Ell; Most points in Jr. Photogra-phy - Loganne Bell; Best photo in show - Doug McDonald; Most points in Photography - Kyle Dunn; Best collage - Janet Bauer;

    Most outstanding entry in Jr. Art - Mitch-ell Vowles; Most points in Jr Art - Josh Gilbert-Bernard; Best theme poster in Jr. Art - Hailey Hull;

    Most points in Native Theme - Josh Gilbert-Bernard; most out-standing entry in Native Theme - Noah Threlfall;

    Most points in Adult Art - Kyle Dunn; best watercolour - David Court;

    Most points in Jr. writing - Katrina Gil-bert-Bernard; Most

    outstanding entry in Jr. writing - Mariah Madill; best theme entry - Mad-ison Carnegie; Most points in Literary Art - Carolyn Cassar; best entry relating to theme - Maryna Ell;

    Most points in Wine - Gillian Kadiri; Most points in Beer - Darcey Dennis;

    Most points in Honey/ beeswax and Novice Classes - Taylor Davis;

    Animal Section/Best purebred bird - Brad Walker; Best backyard bird - Ryan Raymond; Best purebred rabbit/cavy - Celina Holder; Judges Choice most interesting animal - Finn Unger;

    Most points in Pet Parade- Quin Threlfall; Best theme entry in Pet Parade - Gilbert-Ber-nard Family;

    Great Sookeini Race - Jamie Sinclair; Presi-dents Choice Award - Pet Parade;

    Best Window Dress-ing promoting the Fair - The Reading Room Bookstore/Caf;

    Best Scarecrow - Katrina Gilbert-Ber-nard;

    Most outstanding entry in the Jr. Section - Noah Threlfall; Run-ner-up to Most points in Jr. Section - Josh Gil-bert-Bernard;

    Most points in Jr. Section- Katrina Gilbert Bernard

    Most points in Adult Section/Grand Aggre-gate Winner - Pat Ken-nedy

    Raffle Prize Winners

    - 1st prize (thanks to Sooke Quilters) - Diane Morton; 2nd prize - $300 Home Hardware G.C. - F. Kirby; 3rd prize - Gift basket - K. Dus-seault; 4th prize - West-ern /Village Foods G.C. - Bonnie

    Pirjo Raits photo

    Taichi, 5 and Ella, 4, check out the Lego entries at the Sooke Fall Fair.

    Sooke Says Just for YouHappy 20thHappy 20th

    AnniversaryAnniversaryDoni & Rick Doni & Rick

    and Many Moreand Many More

    From all who know and Love You

    Capital Regional District

    Notice ofApplications for Membership Juan de Fuca Board of VarianceThe Juan de Fuca Electoral Area, in accordance with CRD Bylaw No. 3839, has three (3) vacant positions on the Juan de Fuca Board of Variance (BoV).The Capital Regional District (CRD) invites applications from residents (East Sooke, Otter Point, Shirley, Jordan River and the Rural Resource Lands) interested in sitting on the Board of Variance. Appointments will be for a three (3) year term commencing October 10, 2012. Send us a summary telling about yourself, your area of knowledge and why you would like to serve on the Board. Deadline for receipt of applications is October 1, 2012.

    Mail, fax or email your application to:Juan de Fuca Electoral Area Planning Services PO Box 283, #2 6868 West Coast Road Sooke, BC V9Z 0S9 E: wmiller@crd.bc.ca T: 250.642.1500 ext. 208 F: 250.642.5274

    SOOKE BAPTIST CHURCH7110 West Coast Road | 250-642-3424

    SUNDAY SERVICE 10:00 am Children, youth & adult ministries

    Pastor Dwight GeigerEmail sookebaptistchurch@telus.net

    ST. ROSE OF LIMA Roman Catholic Parish2191 Townsend Rd. | 250-642-3945 | Fax: 778-425-3945

    Saturday Mass 5pm | Sunday Mass, 10 amThursday Mass 10:30 am

    Childrens Religious Ed: Sat. 3:45pm Of ce Hours: Tue 12-3 Wed 10-2 Thurs 1-3

    Rev. Fr. Michael Favero

    KNOX PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH2110 Church Rd | 250-642-4124

    SUNDAY SERVICE10:15 am Pre-Service Singing

    10:30 am Family worshipRev. Dr Gordon Kouwenberg

    Parents Room and well equipped Nursery

    HOLY TRINITY Anglican Church1962 Murray Road | 250-642-3172HOLY COMMUNION SERVICES

    Sunday & Wednesday 10amSaturday 5pm

    Revs Dr. Alex and Nancy Nagywww.holytrinitysookebc.org

    TThe he PPastor's astor's PPenenBells of Gold

    In many towns and cities for many years church bells could be heard, calling the faithful to worship on Sunday mornings. In the traditional Roman Catholic mass the gentle ringing of altar bells invites parishioners to prepare their hearts for the Lord's table. Here in Sooke the resounding toll of a one-hundred-year-

    old cast-iron bell can be heard throughout the community each Sunday as a symbol of faith in our community.

    According to the Bible bells were associated with worship in ancient Judaism as bells of gold were sewn on the hem of the priestly garments. (Exodus 39:24-26) The ringing of bells could be heard as the priests went about their daily responsibilities.

    Interestingly, last year, a tiny golden bell was found in an archaeological dig in the old city of Jerusalem. This rare nd was in close proximity to where the temple once stood. The ancient bell, dating back to Jesus' day, has a loop which appears to have been sewn on a piece of clothing similar to the biblical description, indicating that it may have fallen off the robe of a temple priest. Even today, this bell still works. One commentator said that each of those priestly bells had a distinct mellow ring, yet amazingly, they were in full harmony with one another.

    These harmonious bells of gold were a symbolic reminder that God is present and active at all times working through people to show love and care.

    Knowing this, each time you hear a bell, remember that God is an active presence desiring to work in harmony with you in your daily responsibilities.

    Pastor Gordon Kouwenberg

    We would like to welcome Dr. Lisa Meister to our practices in the West Shore and Sooke. While experiencing an externship in Australia, Dr. Meister developed an appreciation for the science of contact lenses and takes pleasure in fi tting patients with the newest contact lens technology. Dr. Meister delights in providing eyecare for people of all ages and is currently accepting new patients.

    Did you know that 80% of a childs learning is based on their vision? With school now in session, a comprehensive full health eye examination is necessary to detect early issues which may hinder your childs learning.

    Dr. Louise Morin, Dr. Brian Joslin & AssociatesOPTOMETRISTS

    #105-814 Goldstream Ave., LangfordPhone: (250) 474-4567www.Langfordoptometrists.com

    #5-6726 West Coast Rd., SookePhone: (250) 642-4311

    www.Sookeoptometrists.com

    Doing It Right withDoing It Right with

    250-642-3646 or 250-883-2087250-642-3646 or 250-883-2087

  • 24 www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012- SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

    Prices effective at all British Columbia Safeway stores Friday, September 21, 2012. We reserve the right to limit sales to retail quantities. Some items may not be available at all stores. All items while stocks last. Actual items may vary slightly from illustrations. Some illustrations are serving suggestions only. Advertised prices do not include GST. Trademarks of AIR MILES International Trading B.V. Used under license by LoyaltyOne, Inc. and Canada Safeway Limited. Extreme Specials are prices that are so low they are limited to a one time purchase to Safeway Club Card Members within a household. Each household can purchase the limited items one time during the effective dates. A household is de ned by all Safeway Club Cards that are linked by the same address and phone number. Each household can purchase the EXTREME SPECIALS during the speci ed advertisement dates. For purchases over the household limits, regular pricing applies to overlimit purchases. On BUY ONE GET ONE FREE items, both items must be purchased. Lowest priced item is then free. Online and in-store prices, discounts, and offers may differ.

    99lb. TURKEYSGRADE AGrade A Turkey

    99Under 7 kg. Frozen.

    WEEKLY HOUSEHOLD LIMIT ONEValid Sept. 19 to Sept. 27.

    While supplies last.

    Club Price

    /lb2.18/kg

    This Friday, Sept. 21st Only!

    Safeway Liquid Hand Soap

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    Select varieties. 240 mL.

    Coast to Coast Italian Style Bread

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    Signature CAFE Pizza

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    Assorted varieties.12 Inch. 500 to 690 g.Take and Bake!

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    Kraft Singles Cheese SlicesSelect varieties.Process Cheese Product.500 g.

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    Assorted varieties. 915 to 930 g. HOUSEHOLD LIMIT TWO - Combined varieties.

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    1DAYSALE FRIDAYSEPTEMBER21

  • SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 www.sookenewsmirror.com CLASSIFIEDS 25

    NYBERGStig Olov William

    September 20, 1923-

    September 7, 2012

    Dad was born in the parish of Lngsele in the province of Vsternorrland, Sweden. He came to Canada in October of 1925 with his mother Margareta to homestead in the Shuswap area with his father, Anders Verner Nyberg, who had arrived previously. They worked hard to suurvive the depression years.Stig learned tree-falling from his father when he was big enough to hold up the other endof the cross-cut saw. It was his trade of choice throughout his wage-earning years. Dads experience in hand-fallinng and bucking, and later falling and bucking with the very rst power saws, earned him a reputation as a top notch west coast faller and a good man to work with.Mon and Dad married in 1949, lived in Jordan River until 1963, and then settled in Sooke until his death. Dads passion for hunting and shing provided excellent food for the family table. Dad taught us all to hunt and sh and to respect our harvest, by using it the best we could.Stig loved his family, and the pets were family too. Dad loved all our pets but had a special soft spot in his heart for cats. It seemed that his chickens had a special spot in their hearts for him too.Dad is survived by his wife of 63 years, Irene; three sisters, June, Anna and Helen; three sons, Arne, Vern, and Rodney; 10 grandchildren and 7 great grandchildren. There were many other family members and friends who also came in touch with his quiet kindness and boisterous strength who passed away before him, and we miss them all.A memorial will be held to celebrate Stigs life on Septem-ber 22, 2012 at 1 pm. at Camp Barnard in Sooke. If direc-tions are required, please call 250-642-5592 or 250-642-4786. An open house will be held at Stig and Irenes place in Sooke after the service.

    COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

    COMING EVENTS

    EditorGoldstream News Gazette

    www.blackpress.ca

    GOLDSTREAM NEWSGAZETTE

    The Goldstream News Gazette has an immediate opening for a full-time editor. The News Gazette covers the West Shore area of Greater Victoria.

    Reporting to the editorial director, the Editor is part of the management team and will be instrumental in helping guide the overall strategic direction of the News Gazette.

    The successful candidate will possess above average leadership skills, will be a strong communicator, pay attention to detail and can manage and work under pressure in a deadline driven environment.

    Previous editing experience would be considered an asset.

    As well as editing copy and paginating pages, the successful candidate can expect to produce news copy and editorials, take photographs, attend events and generate story ideas.

    The ability to organize copy and supervise the production of special supplements is also required.

    In addition, the successful candidate will have a passion for all aspects of multimedia journalism, including a track record of turning around well-written, fact-based, concise, well-produced content quickly for posting online that day. In addition, you have skills in search-engine optimization of all content, social media (Facebook, Twitter) as both research tools and traffic generators.

    The News Gazette offers a great working environment with a competitive remuneration plan coupled with a strong benefits package.

    The News Gazette is owned by Black Press Ltd., Canadas largest independent newspaper company, with more than 180 community, daily and urban newspapers and extensive online operations with over 250 websites.

    Interested candidates should send resume, clippings and cover letter by Sept. 14, 2012 to:

    Kevin LairdEditorial Director, Black Press-South Island818 Broughton St.Victoria, B.C. V8W 1E4or email: klaird@blackpress.ca

    Thank you for your interest. Only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

    FUNDRAISING MADE EASY, by Worlds Finest Chocolate. Four easy steps. Pick Product, Order, Do Your Fundraising. Then after Fundraiser is com-pleted pay invoice. View prod-ucts at www.worlds nest.ca, then call 1-250-419-1151.

    DEATHS

    COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

    COMING EVENTS

    KITCHEN PARTY Music Jam at Kemp Lake Cafe, 2-4pm, Sunday Sept. 23. Bring an in-strument or just relax & enjoy the music and great food. Call 250-642-7875 to reserveTIRED OF The same old Hol-lywood Schlock? Rent Aware-ness Film Night documentar-ies at Sooke Video To Go. 6660 Sooke Rd. 10-10 daily. FilmList:awareness lmnight.ca

    INFORMATION

    CONTACT LOAN Cupboard call 250-389-4607. Need a ride? Call 250-389-4661.SOOKE MEALS on Wheels, Box 109, Sooke, BC V9Z 0E5. Alma Anslow 250-642-2184.

    DEATHS

    ALL YOU NEED IN PRINT AND ONLINE www.bcclassi ed.com

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    PAIR OF Ladies glasses, bronze colored. Lost on Whiff-en spit, Sept.12/12

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    HELP WANTED

    An Alberta Construction Com-pany is hiring Dozer and Exca-vator Operators. Preference will be given to operators that are experienced in oil eld road and lease construction. Lodg-ing and meals provided. The work is in the vicinity of Edson, Alberta. Alcohol & Drug testing required. Call Contour Con-struction at 780-723-5051.

    CARRIERS REQUIRED

    Sooke News Mirror Requires

    Carriers forWednesday and Friday

    Delivery

    Call Joan 250-642-5752For more Info

    EDITOR. THE Sundre Round-Up, a 2,000 circulation weekly, requires an experienced edi-tor. Sundre is 110 km north-west of Calgary. Full bene t package. Apply: Lea Smal-don, 5013 - 51 Street, Olds, AB, T4H 1P6. 403-556-7510; lsmaldon@olds.greatwest.ca

    LOOKING FOR Experienced Care-giver in the Sooke area for a younger male with ac-quired brain injury. Assisting with personal care. Meal prep & general supervision re-quired. 250-634-0997

    ON-CALL WORKERS re-quired for newspaper yer in-sertion Tuesday, Wednesday and/or Thursdays. $10.25 per hour. Evenings 5pm to 1am. Also occasional 9am to 5pm shifts available. No experience required. Please apply in per-son between 8am to 4pm Monday to Friday at Gold-stream Press (Island Publish-ers). #200-770 Enterprise Crescent.

    Required for an Alberta Trucking Company. One Class 1 Driver. Must have a mini-mum of 5 years experience pulling low boys and driving off road. Candidate must be able to pass a drug test and be willing to relocate to Edson, Alberta. Scheduled Days Off. Call Lloyd 780-723-5051

    THE LEMARE GROUP is accepting resumes for the following positions: Grapple Yarder Operators Hooktenders Chasers 2nd Loader/Buckers Hydraulic Log Loader/Hoe Forward Operators Off Highway Logging Truck Drivers (Paci c) Heavy Duty Mechanics. Full time with union rates and bene ts. Please send resumes by fax to 250-956-4888 or email: of ce@lemare.ca.

    THE SOOKE NEWS Mirror cautions readers about send-ing money to obtain informa-tion about any employment opportunities

    OINCOME PPORTUNITY

    EARN EXTRA Cash! - P/T, F/T Immediate openings. Easy computer work, other positions are available. Can be done from home. No experience needed. www.HWC-BC.com

    PICKERS

    WE BUY GREENS CEDAR. 27/lb PINE/FIR .32/lb Robbins Wreaths 1060 Spider Lake Qualicum Phone 250-757-9661 email: robbinswreaths@yahoo.com

    TRADES, TECHNICAL

    JOURNEYMAN HEAVY Equipment Technicians. Due to a steady growth in our in-dustry we currently have multi-ple positions open for our eld service division. Mining and large construction equipment experience is an asset. We of-fer very competitive wages and bene ts. Apply:of ce@dutchmen.caHEAVY EQUIPMENT Repair Ltd. currently has full-time po-sitions available: H/D Truck and Transport Mechanic and Parts Counter Person. Contact Herb 780-849-3768; cell 780-849-0416. Fax 780-849-4453. Email: herb@hheltd.com

    HELP WANTED

    TRADES, TECHNICAL

    AUTOMATED TANK Manu-facturing Inc. is looking forwelders, due to a huge expan-sion to our plant located in Kit-scoty, Alberta, 20 km west ofLloydminster. We have open-ings for ten 3rd Year Appren-tices or Journeyperson weld-ers. We offer best wage inindustry. 3rd Year Apprentice$28-$30/hour, Journeyperson$32-$35/hour, higher with tankexperience. Pro t sharing bo-nus plus manufacturing bonusincentive. Full insurance pack-age 100% paid by company.Good working environment.Join a winning team. Call Basilor Blaine at of ce: 780-846-2231; fax: 780-846-2241 orsend resume to:blaine@autotanks.cap roduc t i on@au to tanks . caKeep your feet on the groundin a safe welding environmentthrough inhole manufacturingprocess. No scaffolding or ele-vated work platform.

    JOURNEYMAN AUTOBODYposition available immediatelyat brand new modern dealer-ship. Lots of work, great pay,bene ts, great Northern Sas-katchewan community. Applyto Rob Dron atadmin@shellbrookchev.ca or call 1-800-667-0511.

    HELP WANTED

    !'2%%-%.4)Tx ISx AGREEDx BYx ANYx $ISPLAYx ORx#LASSIEDx !DVERTISERx REQUESTINGxSPACEx THATx THEx LIABILITYx OFx THExPAPERx INx THEx EVENTx OFx FAILUREx TOxPUBLISHx ANx ADVERTISEMENTx SHALLxBExLIMITEDxTOxTHExAMOUNTxPAIDxBYxTHExADVERTISERx FORx THATx PORTIONx OFxTHEx ADVERTISINGx OCCUPIEDx BYx THExINCORRECTxITEMxONLYxANDxTHATxTHERExSHALLx BEx NOx LIABILITYx INx ANYx EVENTxBEYONDxTHExAMOUNTxPAIDxFORxSUCHxADVERTISEMENTx 4HEx PUBLISHERxSHALLx NOTx BEx LIABLEx FORx SLIGHTxCHANGESx ORx TYPOGRAPHICALx ERRORSxTHATxDOxNOTxLESSENxTHExVALUExOFxANxADVERTISEMENTBCCLASSIEDCOMx CANNOTx BExRESPONSIBLEx FORx ERRORSx AFTERx THExRSTx DAYx OFx PUBLICATIONx OFx ANYxADVERTISEMENTx.OTICExOFxERRORSxONxTHEx RSTx DAYx SHOULDx IMMEDIATELYxBEx CALLEDx TOx THEx ATTENTIONx OFxTHEx #LASSIEDx $EPARTMENTx TOxBEx CORRECTEDx FORx THEx FOLLOWINGxEDITIONBCCLASSIEDCOMxRESERVESxTHExRIGHTxTOxREVISExEDITxCLASSIFYxORxREJECTx ANYx ADVERTISEMENTx ANDxTOx RETAINx ANYx ANSWERSx DIRECTEDxTOx THEx BCCLASSIEDCOMx "OXx2EPLYx 3ERVICEx ANDx TOx REPAYx THExCUSTOMERxFORxTHExSUMxPAIDxFORxTHExADVERTISEMENTxANDxBOXxRENTAL$)3#2)-).!4/29,%')3,!4)/.!DVERTISERSx AREx REMINDEDx THATx0ROVINCIALx LEGISLATIONx FORBIDSx THExPUBLICATIONxOFxANYxADVERTISEMENTxWHICHx DISCRIMINATESx AGAINSTx ANYxPERSONxBECAUSExOFxRACExRELIGIONxSEXx COLOURx NATIONALITYx ANCESTRYxORxPLACExOFxORIGINxORxAGExUNLESSxTHEx CONDITIONx ISx JUSTIEDx BYx AxBONAx DEx REQUIREMENTx FORx THExWORKxINVOLVED#/092)'(4#OPYRIGHTx ANDORx PROPERTIESxSUBSISTx INx ALLx ADVERTISEMENTx ANDxINx ALLx OTHERx MATERIALx APPEARINGxINx THISx EDITIONx OFx BCCLASSIEDCOMx 0ERMISSIONx TOx REPRODUCExWHOLLYxORxINxPARTxANDxINxANYxFORMxWHATSOEVERx PARTICULARLYx BYx AxPHOTOGRAPHICx ORx OFFSETx PROCESSxINxAxPUBLICATIONxMUSTxBExOBTAINEDxINxWRITINGxFROMxTHExxPUBLISHERx!NYxUNAUTHORIZEDxREPRODUCTIONxWILLxBExSUBJECTxTOxRECOURSExINxLAW!DVERTISEACROSS6ANCOUVER)SLANDINTHEBESTREADCOMMUNITYNEWSPAPERS/.4(%7%"

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    3OOKE.EWS-IRROR7EDNESDAY%DITION$EADLINES8PSE"ET-ONDAYxxAM%JTQMBZ"ET&RIDAYxxAM

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    FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTSFAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS

  • 26 CLASSIFIEDS www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012- SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

    *Not all programs available in all campuses. Formerly known as Sprott-Shaw Community College.

    RELEVANT SKILLS.MEANINGFULJOBS.Underpinning everything we do is our unwavering belief that each of our students has the potential and ability to create a brighter future for themselves. We believe anything is possible when you have the focus and drive to accomplish your goals.

    LEARNINGWITH PURPOSESINCE 1903

    OR VISIT SPROTTSHAW.COMCALL VICTORIA CAMPUS: 250-384-8121

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    EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

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    PAINTING

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    250-812-8781

    TRADES, TECHNICAL

    LOCAL ROCKY Mountain House company looking for day rate and hourly Vacuum Truck Operator. Must have current oil eld tickets, up-to-date drivers abstract. Bene t package. Fax 403-845-3903.

    SECHELT WASTE Company seeks Heavy Duty Mechanic to manage shop operations and the maintenance of all equipment. Submit resume to 604-885-4247 or directdisposal@dccnet.com

    PERSONAL SERVICES

    ART/MUSIC/DANCING

    MY MUSIC ROOM is offering a FREE Trial Lesson in piano, voice, theory or history. Expe-rienced teacher with sterling credentials, unfailing good hu-mor and buckets of patience. 778-977-5584 mymusicroom.ca

    ESTHETIC SERVICES

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    HEALTH PRODUCTS

    CASH BACK - $10 for every pound you lose. Lose weight quickly and safely and keep it off, results guaranteed! Call Herbal Magic today! 1-800-854-5176.

    INSURANCE

    FINANCIAL SERVICES

    DROWNING IN Debt? Helping Canadians 25 years. Lower payments by 30%, or cut debts 70% thru settlements. Avoid bankruptcy! Free con-sultation. Toll Free 1 877-556-3500 www.mydebtsolution.comGET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877-987-1420.

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    EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

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    FINANCIAL SERVICES

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    HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

    BUSINESS SERVICES

    WE WILL design a sleek profes-sional website for your business. Call us at 604-307-6489. YOU NEED IT!

    COMPUTER SERVICES

    DRYWALL

    HANDYPERSONS

    LARRY THE HANDY GUY. Renos, elec., plumb.

    All your household needs. 250-580-7777

    HAULING AND SALVAGE

    EDS HAULINGCheap disposal of

    furniture, appliances, junk and what have you?

    U&I type moving with covered pick-up truck.

    Ed & Faye250-642-2398

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    HOME IMPROVEMENTS

    NEW HOME WARRANTY WCB LICENSED

    RESIDENTIAL BUILDER

    A&R HOMESGENERAL CONTRACTING

    & CUSTOM FINISHING27 YEARS EXPERIENCENEW CONSTRUCTION

    FOUNDATIONS FRAMINGKITCHEN BATHROOMFENCES SUNDECKS

    ADDITIONS BASEMENTSBOBCAT

    RICHARD FOSTER250-888-5436 250-642-5923

    IRRIGATION/SPRINKLER SYSTEMS

    SOOKE IRRIGATION SERVICES Sprinkler

    Installations, RepairsRenovationsMaintenance

    Back- ow TestingCall Ben

    250-818-7279sookeirrigation@gmail.com

    & MOVING STORAGE

    DONE RIGHT MOVING $80/hr. Senior and student dis-count. No travel time before or after. SMOOTH MOVES. Call Tyler 250-418-1747.

    SOOKE MOVING ANDSTORAGE

    Heated indoor storage, self contained, various sizes, 24 hr. security. outdoor storage available. Public access 9-5pm. Mon.- Sat. 2018 Idle-more Rd. 250- 642-6577www.sookemovingandstorage.com

    PLASTERING

    PATCHES,Drywall, skimming, old world texturing, coves, re-places. Bob, 250-642-5178.

    STUCCO/SIDING

    PATCHES, ADDITIONS, re-stucco, renos, chimney, water-proo ng. Bob, 250-642-5178.

    WELDING

    DRIVER ENT. LTD.

    WELDINGMobile Units +++ Steel

    Sales250-642-0666

    MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

    FREE ITEMS

    FREE, KIDS computer desk, 2 tier. 778-352-2236

    FUEL/FIREWOOD

    FIREWOOD - - $200/cord, seasoned r. Super dry, bone dry r, $200/cord, + delivery . Free delivery in Sooke. Yellow Cedar, $250 cord. Call Mike at 778-679-7687 or 250-642-6647.

    SEASONED FIREWOOD Vancouver Islands largest re-wood producer offers rewood legally obtained during forest restoration, large cords. Help restore your forest, Burndrywood.com 1-877-902-WOOD.

    MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE

    HOT TUB (SPA) COVERS. Best price. Best quality. All shapes & colours available. 1-866-652-6837 www.thecoverguy.com/news-paper?

    SAWMILLS FROM only $3997. Make money and save money with your own bandmill. Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free Info and DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com/ 400OT 1-800-566-6899 Ext:400OT.

    REAL ESTATE

    FOR SALE BY OWNER

    CAYCUSEVery rare 5 acre treed

    park-like Property with well-maintained furnished home - 1500 sq.ft, 3-bdrm, 2 bath. Extremely close to Pristine Cowichan Lake. Perfect for recreational

    property or full time living. Reduced to sell $378,800.

    Exceptionally low yearly cost. Not leased land.Call 250-745-3387 or

    250-478-2648

    SOOKE RANCHERBeautiful, immaculate,

    1,649 sq ft executive rancher located in Whiffen Spit Estates, Sooke, BC.

    10,000+ sq ft lot. Asking price $429,900.

    250-686-5372

    BUYING - RENTING- SELLING

    REAL ESTATE

    HOMES WANTED

    WE BUY HOUSESDamaged House?

    Pretty House? Moving? Divorcing? Estate Sale?

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    and Buy it Later!

    Call: 1-250-616-9053www.webuyhomesbc.com

    RECREATIONAL PROPERTY

    Sun Peaks Duplex For Sale

    Each side: $449,000 5 bdrms.3 bath, front & back decks. Exc. revenue opportunity We work

    with agents! 604-626-7100 www. northrockhomes.ca/peak-2-creek

    OTHER AREAS

    FREE BROCHURE. Kings County Land of Orchards, Vineyards and Tides. Nova Scotias beautiful Annapolis Valley. Live! Work! Start a business! Toll-Free: 1-888-865-4647, www.kingsrda.ca

    RENTALS

    APARTMENT/CONDO

    GRANT MANOR Newly renovated

    suites, Starting at

    $675 per moTo view call 250-642-1900

    COTTAGES

    4 - 1.2 BR Waterfront Cottag-es. Kitchen, Hot Tubs, gas F/P, furnished or unfurnished, Phillips Rd, near arena. 250-642-2155

    HOMES FOR RENT

    2 BR house Whiffen Spit area, $875/m + utils and water, n/s, n/p. 250-642-7791

    CHARMING 40s house, com-mercially zoned in town core, ideal business location, avail. now. 250-642-5003

    COLWOOD: 3 or 4 bdrm + hot tub avail Sept. 1. Great family home located on quiet a cul de sac in the desirable Wishart area. $1900/mo inclds water, garbage pickup. You are re-sponsible for 2/3 hydro (you have your own heat thermo-stat). Private laundry, D/W. Will consider pet (not a fenced yard). Pet deposit reqd, refs, Absolutely NO smoking. Call 250-478-4606.

    SHARED ACCOMMODATION

    COLWOOD, UNFURND room available, incls all utils, $450. (Avail immed). 250-858-6930.FURNISHED RM, large house, $600/int, sat, phone, 250-642-4452

    STORAGE

    SHIPPING CONTAINERS 20 or 40. Buy or Rent. Safe and secure. Easymove Container Services. Serving Vancouver Island. 1-(888)331-3279

    SUITES, LOWER

    1 BDR, 2 bath suite at French Beach, 1 1/4 acre shared property, fully renod, new ap-pliances, woodstove, $850. Everything Inc, except phone and rewood. 250-646-2617 250-480-6720

    AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY! 2 bdrm. Huge LR w/FP. all new appliances. Separate laundry. $975 all inclusive. N/P & N/S. Very close to amenities. Call today to apply and book viewing. 250-661-1152; references required.

    RENTALS

    SUITES, LOWER

    SOOKE CORE, 2 bed, 1 bathlower, insuite laundry, N/S,N/P. Refs required. . Familyorient, $825. + Hydro.AvailNow. 250-642-1823 250-883-7327

    SUITES, UPPER

    IMMACULATE 3 BR, shared yard, deck, garden, in-suitelaundry,quiet, close to,shops,N/S, Pets possible, $1000 +utilities, Avail now. 250-589-4019 enable@shaw.ca

    TOWNHOUSES

    AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY. Sparkling 3 bdrm w/oceanview. Mst bdrm w/ensuite.Huge Lr; DR separate fromkitchen. Large LR. Own Laun-dry. New appliances. Veryclose to all amenities. $1300all inclusive. N/P & N/S. Calltoday to apply and book view-ing 250-661-1152; referencesrequired.

    TRANSPORTATION

    AUTO FINANCING

    DreamCatcher Auto Loans0 Down, Bankruptcy OK -

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    WANT A Vehicle but stressed about your credit? Christmasin September $500 cash back.We fund your future not yourpast. All credit situations ac-cepted. www.creditdrivers.ca1-888-593-6095.

    CARS

    2007 CUSTOM Chev HHR.Excellent condition. Loaded.White. 119,000 km, mostlyhwy driven. On-Star. $11,900 rm. 250-755-5191.

    99 SUNFIRE, Painted & in-spected, $2500. 778-425-360250-532-0751

    MARINE

    BOATS

    - BUYING -- RENTING - - SELLING -

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  • Non-Kennel BoardingProfessional Petcare

    Home SecurityInsured, Canine First Aid

    250-642-0458 Cell 250-744-0134 www.walksitandstay.caLoving Care for your Treasured Pets

    SOOKE BUSINESS BILLBOARDSOOKE BUSINESS BILLBOARD

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    shtaxi@shaw.ca

    250-642-7900250-642-7900Sooke Glass Ltd.

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    Your Moving & Storage Solution

    Sooke Moving & Storage We take care of all details...

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    FRESH & DELICIOUS

    A trip through the Sooke News Mirrors archives.

    Sept. 20, 1995Concert rocks

    despite bylawPromoters of an

    Aug. 26 outdoor rock concert in East Sooke that attracted more than 2,000 patrons were given permis-sion to hold the event by regional director Bob Clark and issued a liquor permit for a beer garden by the RCMP --- even though the event violated zoning bylaws.

    This information was contained in a staff report presented to a meeting of the General Municipal Services Committee of the CRD last week.

    CRD directors were further informed that the promoters Bruce and Brian Henson have now been told that outdoor music con-certs are not permit-ted on their Llanilar Road property and any future concert would be subjected to bylaw enforcement action.

    Neither Henson was available for comment.

    The nine-hour event, dubbed the East Sooke Fest, was held on three acres of fenced-off land zoned rural residential 3.

    Sept. 17, 1997Pool proposal resur-

    facesSookes regional

    director moved one step closer last Mon-day to making good on a campaign prom-ise to hold a swim-ming pool referendum.

    Diane Bernard told Sooke Electoral Area Parks and Recreation Commissioners to include the cost of a pool referendum in their upcoming budget.

    I would like the commission to gear up for the referendum in 1998, she said.

    Bernard asked the commission to look into what the refer-endum would cost and the details associ-ated with holding one.

    Its time that that question was clearly answered in the Sooke Electoral Area, Bernard said.

    A referendum that would have allowed residents to vote on whether they would pay $1.24-million in local taxes to build a $3.75-million swimming pool, was cancelled in February 1995 despite support from local parks commissioners.

    The referendum, scheduled for March 11, 1995, was cancelled by then regional direc-tor Bob Clark after he learned an application for a grant under the Canada/British Colum-bia Infrastructure Works Program was refused.

    Sept. 21, 2005Infant fights rare

    form of cancerLong before

    her daughter was born, Emma Irwin dreamt of a baby girl called Daisy Gail.

    On June 15, 2005, the day Emmas girl was born -- the daisies were growing in vast profusion along the side of the road and the nurses were hum-ming Daisy, Daisy.

    When the baby arrived she was fair-skinned, with large blue eyes and a little up-turned nose. She is a happy baby, normal in every way... except for the biphenotypic leukaemia that has invaded her system.

    Her cancer is rare

    and the treatment in many ways is experi-mental, as there is no known protocol for the combination leukae-mia Daisy has. She is one of three patients in Canada with this par-ticular type of cancer.

    Daisy is in treatment at Vancouver Chil-drens Hospital and her parents Emma and Patrick are there with her to help ease her dis-comfort and suffering.

    She is a little per-son and thats what is so awful about cancer, these are regular chil-dren with very bad luck. They go through way more than anyone should ever be expected to, says Emma in her

    online weblog the fam-ily has to keep family and friends updated on Daisys health.

    Sept. 22, 2010 Port Renfrew phones

    a go The residents in Port

    Renfrew will soon be able to rely on secure phone system dur-ing the stormy winter months. The commu-nity has been without a reliable phone system and residents worried about consequences if an emergency arose.

    Thanks to an infu-sion of capital funds from Capital Regional Emergency Service Telecommunications INc. (CREST), the

    Province of B.C., and Telus, the emergency phone system is a go.

    Juan de Fuca Area Director Mike Hicks had been seeking fund-ing earlier this year and a July 1 deadline had come and gone without a secure fund-ing source for the $100,000 price tag.

    Hicks did not stop there though, he con-tinued to pursue options and success came on Sept. 15 when he announced the funding was in place for the phone system.

    Somehow, the cost had been reduced to $50,000 making it a feasible project.

    SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 www.sookenewsmirror.com CLASSIFIEDS 27

    LOOKING BACKTwo years ago

    Filephoto

    Al Jones, Fire Chief Steve Sorensen, Mayor Janet Evans, Wally Vowles and Capital Regional Districts Juan de Fuca Regional Director Mike Hicks and Ray Vowles in front of the The Juan de Fuca Salmon Restoration Society Charters River Salmon Interpretive Centre in September, 2010.

    Put your garden on displaySharron HoSooke News Mirror

    The Sooke Philhar-monic Society is at it again -- searching the region for beds of green treasures for the upcoming Secret Gar-den Tour.

    We have exhausted our own sources at this point, so we were just hoping there are peo-ple in the community who have a garden that theyd like to share or let us consider, said Sue Hyslop, Sooke Phil-harmonic member.

    What we like to do is to go around in Sep-tember and look at as many as we can and

    then make our selec-tion from that list so that we have a compre-hensive tour that repre-sents different kinds of gardens.

    Hyslop said all sorts of gardens are wel-come for consideration including city gardens, vegetable gardens, and gardens that focus on native plants or water features.

    We certainly want to have some very showy ones, but we also like new gardens to show people.

    The next Secret Gar-den Tour will be held on June 2, 2013 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Viewers will travel through 10

    gardens in the commu-nity, and all proceeds will go to the Sooke Philharmonic Society.

    The submission deadline is in mid-Octo-ber to ensure a proper viewing of gardens before the winter frost takes over.

    We like to see their potential, and we have a better idea at this time of year than if we waited too much lon-ger.

    To submit a garden for consideration, con-tact Hyslop at bshy@shaw.ca or 250-642-1397.

    For more informa-tion, visit: www.sookes-ecretgardens.com

    TOO LATE TO TOO LATE TO CLASSIFYCLASSIFYYard Sale

    Saturday and Sunday September 22nd and 23rd 2212 French Road South 9:00 am - 2:00 pm. Planter boxes, shing gear,

    tools, power tools, clothing, video games, toys, miscellanious. Cancelled if rain. NO EARLY BIRDS.

    For RentLarge, bright 2 BR ground level, 4 piece bath, laundry, N/S, N/P Util. Incl. clo to bus, avail. Oct 1st or earlier, refs., $90000

    250-642-5995

    For RentOct 1, bright, modern, upper studio on 2 acres in Sooke, large

    deck, $800/mth, includes hydro, water, W/D, garbage. NS, small dog neg, mature tenant. On bus route. 250-642-1802

  • SEAPARC STAR SEAPARC STAR of theof the WEEK WEEKCongratulations to this weeks SEAPARC Star; four year old Jack Lauzon. Jack is a familiar face at SEAPARC, having participated in many of our programs. He is quite the little sports enthusiast and has been in Lacrosse, Soccer, Skating, Swimming and Taekwondo. He hasnt played hockey yet, but says he wants to someday. He is in the second level of Taekwondo and plans on continuing in the sport. Jack was happy to announce that he can now ride his bike without training wheels and likes spending time on his trampoline and playing on his big outdoor play set. He likes helping his Dad cut the grass (and has his own mini John Deere Tractor). When we asked Jack what things he is good at doing; he told us that he is very good at driving an excavator and his Mom con rmed that he really can do it. Jack has been watching his Dad drive the big machine so long that when his Dad let him try, he was surprised to see that Jack had been paying attention and could actually use the controls and dig holes just like a pro! Jack also loves helping his with baking and cooking adding that making chocolate cookies is his favourite. He is a smart little guy who is described as being compassionate, active and very thoughtful towards others. Jack plans on being an ice cream guy when he grows up, but added that business will slow down during some seasons so he will only do that during the summer and plans on running a restaurant in the winter and will build houses in the fall. Thats a well thought out career plan Jack! We know that a fellow like you will do well at anything he tries, thank you for being our SEAPARC Star of the Week!

    JACK LAUZON

    FOR REGISTRATIONS AND INFORMATION, PLEASE CALL: 250-642-8000

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    TOONIE Skate Times For All Ages!Tuesdays 11:15am-1:00pm

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    ALSO: Adult drop in hockey is back! Tuesday nights and Thursday mornings,

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    28 www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012- SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

    Sports & Leisure Please send sports tips to Sharron Ho at: news@sookenewsmirror.comYoung racers place first in age categories Sooke residents, Gary Isacson Jr., 9, and sister Jackie, 7, are Skagit Midget Quarter racing champions

    Sharron HoSooke News Mirror

    Two Sooke young-sters claimed cham-pionship titles in their respective classes at the Skagit Quarter Midget Racing series in Washington on Sept. 1.

    Gary Isacson Jr., 9, won the Seniors 120 championship tro-phy, with a six point lead going into the final race. The young racer earned second place in the final event to take home the top standing in his class.

    Meanwhile, younger sister, Jackie, 7, won the Juniors 120 cham-pionship trophy with an impressive 18 point lead head-ing into the final race.

    She didnt even have to run in it, she did really good this year, said father, Gary Isac-son. Shes kind of a nat-ural, theyre all saying.

    There were 11 sepa-rate racing events in total, with about eight kids competing per class. The small, novelty sized quarter midget cars ran on a quarter of a mile clay track.

    For both kids, it was their first year racing in each class. Due to Jackies outstanding performance, she will

    be bumped up into the Seniors 120 class.

    She dominated her class in her first year, so theyll pretty much make us move up, Gary Sr. said.

    When asked what they liked most about racing, the brother and

    sister duo, who both started race car driv-ing at the young age of five, said, Going fast.

    The kids also play in the Sooke Minor Hockey league in rep teams -- Jackie with the Novice 3 team, and Gary Jr. with the Atom

    development team. Theyre just both

    really competitive, said Gary Sr., add-ing a majority of that stems from the racing.

    Their need for speed and gift for racing seems to have been passed down from

    their father, who raced sprint cars on both pavement and dirt tracks for over 20 years.

    The sport, which is a family activity in the Isacson household, is also considered a privi-lege, as the kids have to earn good grades in

    order to race -- a restric-tion enforced by dad.

    Thats in their heads -- if they dont do good in school, they dont get to race.

    Clearly passionate about their craft, both children said they hope to continue racing into

    the future, with Jackie holding the aspiration to become a World of Outlaws driver -- a multi-million dollar sprint car racing team.

    Sharron Ho photo

    Nine-year-old Gary Isacson Jr., left, and sister, Jackie, 7, showcase their trophies earned for the year in their quarter midget cars.

  • SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 www.sookenewsmirror.com 29

    Sports & LeisureSports & Leisure

    Pride of all B.C. guests

    Submitted photo

    The Sooke Seahawks players and coaches were invited to B.C. Place field for a pre-game practice. The team were guests of the Pride of All B.C. Lions football team. There were 20 parents and players in Vancouver in total. From left, Alex Campbell, Caleb and Andy Carrier, Malik Youla, Connor Elliott, Jared Steele, Kieran Franklin, Sion Cyr, L.P. Gagnon, Coach Kent Cross and Mikey Allman. In front, Ethan Agar.

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  • 30 www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012- SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

    Sports & Leisure

    Sharron HoSooke News Mirror

    Beads of sweat in Odyssey Health & Fit-ness will now fall in a bigger and brighter space, following the completion of a year-long renovation.

    The gym, located on 6625 Sooke Road, has doubled in size from 3,000 to 6,000 sq. feet. The cost was approxi-mately $110,000.

    According to Rachel Dyer, one of the owners, the change rooms were completely redone, new cardio and weight room equipment was added, a proper recep-tion desk was set up and laminate flooring

    was installed. Located downstairs

    is the weight room and fitness room, where group classes are held.

    We did quite a major renovation, Dyer said.

    Aside from complet-ing finishing touches like adding trimming, the renovation was completed in August.

    The expansion occurred after a neigh-bouring business left the building.

    We took over the spot next door and just took part of the wall down. It was great that they were right next to us, so that when the time came we were able to do all this, Dyer said.

    Although the cost of renovations went over-budget due to unforeseen problems with plumbing and a wall on the lower level, Dyer said the new and improved atmosphere was, worth every sin-gle penny.

    Its so much better, its so much brighter. Obviously theres a lot more room, which is a big, big thing, she said.

    Its been just posi-tive feedback from members and people who have come into join who may have come in and looked at the club before.

    The revamped gym will be accompanied with a name change to Sooke Health and Fit-ness.

    Dyer said the name change -- which is actu-ally a reversion to the gyms legal name -- was prompted by a change in ownership and desire to have Sooke in the brand.

    Members will still have access to the Odyssey Health & Fit-ness in Victoria and

    vice versa. To introduce the

    improved facility, there will be a Grand Reopen-ing and Members Appreciation event on Sept. 22 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. There will be kids activities, contests and prizes and free food and refreshments.

    Sharron Ho photo

    A Grand Re-opening has been slated for Sept. 22.

    Local gym doubles in size A year-long renovation has improved the clubs atmosphere and amenities

    Sooke Says Just for You!

    HAPPY 19TH BIRTHDAY

    September 22To that cute guy in produce

    With Love!

    CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER

    The District of Sooke requires an individual with strong administrative and management skills to ll the position of Chief Administrative Of cer.

    Natural mentoring ability and skills to nurture and develop an excellent staff, strong communication skills, and demonstrated ability to work effectively at the local, provincial, and federal level, all are

    vital to the success of an applicant for this position.

    More information, including the opportunity to discuss the position, and obtain the job description and details of the competitive compensation and

    bene ts can be obtained from:

    Jim Craven,James R. Craven and Associates Ltd

    250 -744-9455craven@telus.netwww.jrcraven.ca

    This Competition closes October 15th, 2012 at 5:00 pm.

    Additional details are available on the District of Sookes website at www.sooke.ca.

    Please note that only those applicants selected for an interview will be contacted.

    The Mirror Cover-to-Cover ~ anywhere!Now available in an easy to read, downloadable and printable format.Just visit our home page at: www.sookenewsmirror.com

    scroll down to the bottom, and click on our paper icon!

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    FOLK SOCIETY CONCERTStacey Earle and Mark Stuart

    perfom on July 30.Page 18

    SOOKE ON TSN

    The Subaru Triathlon gets TV coverage -- at a cost.

    Page 27

    Your community, your classi EDS0s75Wednesday, JULY 27, 2011

    Editorial Page 8 Entertainment Page 18Sports/stats Page 27

    Agreement#40110541

    SOOKE NEWS 2010 WINNERM I R R O R

    Pirjo RaitsSooke News Mirror

    The 25th Sooke Fine Arts Show opened on Thursday night with purchasers waiting in line to get into the show and see the latest works from the 275 artists who submitted entries.

    The adjudicators chose 375 pieces from the 551 art-ists who responded to the call for entries to the juried art show and sale.

    The 10-day show was once again staged in the SEA-PARC Leisure Complex where a group of talented and hard working volunteers transformed the cavernous space into an amazing gallery.

    We had a lovely weekend and a lot of people, said Sally Manning, show coordinator. It is a colourful and happy show.

    Many Sooke artists stood out as the winners in the 25th Anniversary Artists Awards. They included Pat-rick Irwin for his acrylic and oil two-dimensional paint-ing Port Alberni, Best Two-Dimensional work.

    The Best Three-Dimensional work award was awarded to Jan Johnson for his Minotaur Overseeing Intake, while Debbie Clarkson took the award for the Best Photography for her La Habana Elegante #3. Dana Sitars When I Do Not Follow the Rules took the award for Best Fibre. Honourable mentions were given to Chuck Minten for his Circle of Friends wood table and Anne Boquists YoYoTokTik gourd and found object piece.

    Other winners include Heather Hamiltons Internal Reflections pendant (Best Jewellery); Jo Ludwigs No Title glass piece (Best Glass); Metchosins Judi Dyelle won Best Ceramic for her White Series #1; and Jeff Molloy for his mixed media piece A Man of the Cloth.

    Other honourable mentions went to Debbie Jansen for her fused glass, Untitled, Eliza Heminways fibre wall piece, The Haberdashers Garden and Leonard Butts Uchi raku sculpture.

    The adjudicators each chose a work for Jurors Choice. Richard White gave full marks to Nicolas Van-dergugtens lino block print Bridgework #3; Grant Leier (substituting for Carol Sabiston) awarded Dee de Wits Still Life with Mango his kudos; and juror Nixie Barton chose Johannes Landmans oil painting Benchwarmer.

    Manning said the attendance was keeping in line with past years as were the sales.

    25 Years of incredible art

    Pirjo Raits photo

    Bonnie Jones takes a close look at Michael MacLeans Ambassador

    The Sooke FolkMusic Society normally cur-tails its activities for the summer, but thisSaturday, July 30, we are delighted to bringback Stacey Earle and Mark Stuart for a spe-cial summer concert at Holy Trinity Anglican Church, as part of their Driver til she dropstour; a reference to their Chevy Suburban,which now has some 465,000 miles on theodometer

    Stacey Earle andMark Stuart met for the first time 1991 ata songwriters night in Nashville TN. Theyknew that night it was one of them things thatare just meant to be. They were married in 1992.

    It would be quite a balancing act at that time raising a family and trying to make a living along with all theother stuff that came with getting by, but wemanaged, Stacey said as she looked back ather first encounter with the world of touring.

    Stacey Earles first show was on an arena stage in Sydney, play-ing rhythm guitar in her brothers band, Steve Earle & the Dukes.

    She spent about a year and a half on tour with her brother, and then returned to Nash-ville to start a career of her own as a country/folk singer/songwriter.

    I was 30-years-old and asking/seeking a recording deal in Nash-ville.At that age it was like asking God to turn back the world clock.

    Mark Stuart went to the finest of music schools, he started his schooling listening and admiring his uncles guitar playing and his dads fiddling. By age 15 he would find himself

    playing in the school ofhonky tonks and beer joints in and around Nashville in his dads band.

    Mark was off the road when he met Sta-cey and that very night he would play the firstnote of her music never leaving her side. Mark

    still somehow foundthe time to work on his own music record-ing his solo record and touring.

    Mark, as well, spent some time in the Dukes in the 1990s. Like Earle, he recalls it as a time ofglamour: appearing on the Tonight Show with

    Jay Leno, and MTV. I had someone tun-

    ing my guitar, strappingon my guitar, he said. Now we carry our stuff three flights up in the Red Roof Inn.

    Over the years Sta-cey and Mark havelearned so much from each other. Their songs are the diaries of their life good times andbad, thereby complet-ing the love they have.Together they share the full load of gettingby day-by-day.

    Theyve gone onto release their duo albums, Never GonnaLet You Go in 2003 and S&M CommunionBread in 2005, and their Gearle Records 2008release Love from Sta-cey and Mark which is available at thehir live shows only.

    While, no doubt, each still remains an individual solo artist with solo releases, suchas the 2008 release of Mark Stuarts Left of

    Nashville and Stacey Earles The Ride also in 2008), it is throughthe respect of each oth-ers work and years ofplaying together that they have created theirunique sound. And that sound allows each indi-vidual to shine through. Stacey and Mark are no doubt together til death do they part.

    Please be sure to join us for what will bea memorable evening with these two very engaging singer/song-writers.

    The gig is on Satur-day, July 30 at Holy Trin-ity Anglican Church, at 1962 Murray Road.Doors open at 7:30 p.m. with show at 8. Ticketsare $15 and are avail-able at the door or in advance at Shoppers Drug Mart.

    18 U ARTS www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, JULY 27, 2011 - SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

    ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

    Back for another round on July 30 are Stacey Earle and Mark Stuart.

    Folk Society puts on a special summer concert

    2945 Jacklin Road, Victoriawww.westshoretowncentre.com

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    Show + Sale Dates

    SOOKE FINE ARTS SHOWCalendar of Events

    Artz4YouthWednesday, July 27, 6-8 pm

    For teens by teens! Text your friends, meet for an evening of performances by local youth.

    Taste of SookeThursday, July 28, 7-9 pm

    Music by The Rhythm MinersA night to explore all the flavours of Sooke!

    Seniors TeasThursday, Friday, July 28-9, 2 - 4

    Tea, fresh-baked scones and an afternoon of art!

    More info and events on our

    website!

    July 23 - Aug 1 SEAPARC Leisure Complex|Sooke, BC

    FUTURE SHOP - CORRECTION NOTICE

    Stinking Fish Studio TourStinking Fish Studio Tour

    July 23-August 110am 5pm

    A free self-guided tour of artist studiosthroughout Metchosin & East Sooke!

    Maps on our website and at studiosw w w . s t i n k i n g f i s h s t u d i o

    Come see the latest works by some of the islands most

    talented artists!

    20112011

    Take Us Take Us With You!With You!

    BREAKING THE LINEBonnie Coulter and Angela Menzies exhibit. Page 18

    HOCKEY SCHOOL Third year for Dapps hockey challenge. Page 21

    Your community, your classi eds P23 75

    Wednesday, SEPTEMBER 5, 2012

    Editorial Page 8 Entertainment Page 15Sports/stats Page 21

    Agreement#40110541

    SOOKESOOKE NEWS2010 WINNERM I R R O R

    1387x2.5

    Pirjo Raits photo

    Community abundanceEmily Moreland waters some of the plants atthe Sunriver Allotment Garden. Moreland is one of the faces behind the gardening mentorshipprogram at the community garden.

    The gardens were reclaimed from 2.5 acres off fallow land along Phillips Road almost three years ago. More than 60 plotsare available for the community to use togrow their own produce.

    Small 3.0 earthquake felt in Sooke and areaPirjo RaitsSooke News Mirror

    At 3:20 p.m. on Aug. 29 a thunderous rumble and a tremor, which could be felt underfoot, signalled a earthquake in the Sooke region.While it was not large, according to the Richter Magnitude Scale, it was large enough to be recorded as 3.0.Shortly after questioning whether others had heard or felt anything, comments on the Sooke

    News Mirrors Facebook page said the quake had been felt in Otter Point, Shirley and everywhere in between. Comments such as, the house shook after a loud explosion; heard the rumble then the house shook; my house actually jumped; felt it so much at Whiffin Spit that my chair moved; and a picture fell of the neighbours mantle. were posted on the site. The earthquake was cen-tered 10 kms. northwest of Colwood toward Sooke Lake, and was 25 kms.

    underground.This was a small quake, but it is also a quake up call.Emergency preparedness is essential if and when a large, more severe earthquake or natural disaster were to occur. While Sooke does not have a full-scale emergency evacuation plan, there are a few things people can do to help themselves.Sooke Fire Chief Steve Sorensen said, the best thing to do to be prepared is to look after your self, home, workplace and

    car. We will have limited resources. If your house collapses we will open up the community hall.Sorensen said there are back-up plans to utilize schools if necessary.He re-emphasized that the first plan of action should be to ensure your family and neighbours are looked after with essentials such as water, food, blankets, portable radio, shelter. Some communities already have a pod system where neighbours look after neighbours.

    Currently there is a group in place, the Local Government Emergency Program Advisory Commission (LG EPAC), a function of the Capital regional District. Sorensen said they are working out how they can help each other out if some natural disaster were to take place.The LG EPAC meets monthly and consists of a representative of the emergency program from each Capital Regional District municipality and electoral area. A representative of

    PEP attends all meetings as a guest of the advisory commission to maintain a strong link between the local government programs and the Province.The LG EPAC is focused on developing initiatives to create strong communication links and increased efficiencies for regional emergency programs. This includes how they can partner together as local governments during planning and response phases of emergencies.

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    BREAKING THE LINE

    Bonnie Coulter and Angela

    Menzies exhibit.

    Page 18

    HOCKEY SCHOOL

    Third year for Dapps hockey

    challenge.

    Page 21

    Your community, your class

    i eds P23 75

    Wednesday, SEPTEM

    BER 5, 2012

    Editorial Page 8

    Entertainment Pa

    ge 15

    Sports/stats Page 21

    Agreement

    #40110541

    SOOKESOOKENEWS 2010 WINNERM I R R O

    R

    1387x2.5

    Pirjo Raits photo

    Community

    abundanceEmily Mor

    eland waters

    some of the plants

    at

    the Sunriver Allotme

    nt

    Garden. Moreland is

    one

    of the faces behind

    the

    gardening mentors

    hip

    program at the commu

    nity

    garden.

    The gardens w

    ere

    reclaimed from 2.5 ac

    res

    off fallow land alo

    ng

    Phillips Road almo

    st

    three years ago.

    More than 60 plo

    ts

    are available for t

    he

    community to use

    to

    grow their own produ

    ce.

    Small 3.0 earthquake felt

    in Sooke and area

    Pirjo Raits

    Sooke News Mirror

    At 3:20 p.m. on Au

    g.

    29 a thunderous rum

    ble

    and a tremor, wh

    ich

    could be felt underf

    oot,

    signalled a earthqu

    ake

    in the Sooke regi

    on.

    While it was not larg

    e,

    according to the Ric

    hter

    Magnitude Scale, it was la

    rge

    enough to be recorded as

    3.0.

    Shortly after questionin

    g

    whether others h

    ad

    heard or felt anythi

    ng,

    comments on the So

    oke

    News Mirrors Faceb

    ook

    page said the quake

    had

    been felt in Otter Po

    int,

    Shirley and everywher

    e in

    between. Comments s

    uch

    as, the house shook

    after

    a loud explosion; he

    ard

    the rumble then the ho

    use

    shook; my house actu

    ally

    jumped; felt it so much

    at

    Whiffin Spit that my c

    hair

    moved; and a picture

    fell

    of the neighbours mant

    le.

    were posted on the s

    ite.

    The earthquake was cen

    -

    tered 10 kms. northw

    est

    of Colwood toward So

    oke

    Lake, and was 25 km

    s.

    underground.

    This was a small quak

    e,

    but it is also a quake up

    call.

    Emergency preparednes

    s

    is essential if and w

    hen

    a large, more sev

    ere

    earthquake or natu

    ral

    disaster were to oc

    cur.

    While Sooke does not h

    ave

    a full-scale emerge

    ncy

    evacuation plan, there

    are

    a few things people

    can

    do to help themsel

    ves.

    Sooke Fire Chief Ste

    ve

    Sorensen said, the b

    est

    thing to do to be prepa

    red

    is to look after your

    self,

    home, workplace a

    nd

    car. We will have lim

    ited

    resources. If your ho

    use

    collapses we will o

    pen

    up the community h

    all.

    Sorensen said there a

    re

    back-up plans to ut

    ilize

    schools if necess

    ary.

    He re-emphasized th

    at

    the first plan of act

    ion

    should be to ensure y

    our

    family and neighbours

    are

    looked after with essen

    tials

    such as water, foo

    d,

    blankets, portable rad

    io,

    shelter. Some communi

    ties

    already have a p

    od

    system where neighbo

    urs

    look after neighbou

    rs.

    Currently there is

    a

    group in place, the L

    ocal

    Government Emerge

    ncy

    Program Advisory

    Commission (LG EP

    AC),

    a function of the Cap

    ital

    regional District. Soren

    sen

    said they are working

    out

    how they can help e

    ach

    other out if some nat

    ural

    disaster were to take pla

    ce.

    The LG EPAC meet

    s

    monthly and consists

    of

    a representative of

    the

    emergency program fr

    om

    each Capital Regional Dis

    trict

    municipality and electo

    ral

    area. A representativ

    e of

    PEP attends all meeti

    ngs

    as a guest of the advis

    ory

    commission to maint

    ain

    a strong link betwe

    en

    the local governm

    ent

    programs and the Provin

    ce.

    The LG EPAC is

    focused on develop

    ing

    initiatives to create st

    rong

    communication links

    and

    increased efficiencie

    s

    for regional emerge

    ncy

    programs. This includes

    how

    they can partner toget

    her

    as local governments dur

    ing

    planning and respo

    nse

    phases of emergenc

    ies.

    250.642.6361

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    Only wide curving boulevar

    ds, mature plantings,

    spacious sidewalks, attract

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    custom home has too

    much to list but some featu

    res include , gourmet

    kitchen with 30 gas range,

    polished concrete

    touches., dramatic views in

    a light drenched interi-

    or. Workshop, games room

    , & study in addition to

    3 BRs + 2BR legal suite. T

    hree garages & spa-

    cious 19,000 sq ft lot with u

    nderground sewer,

    water, natural gas & high s

    peed internet.

    No Small Lots Here!

    Call me for a private viewin

    g.

    NEW PRICE !!!

    2160 Erinan Boulevard

    BREAKING THE LINEBonnie Coulter and Angela Menzies exhibit. Page 18 HOCKEY SCHOOL Third year for Dapps hockey challenge.

    Page 21

    Your community, your classi eds P23 75

    Wednesday, SEPTEMBER 5, 2012

    Editorial Page 8 Entertainment Page 15Sports/stats Page 21

    Agreement#40110541

    SOOKESOOKE NEWS 2010 WINNERM I R R O R

    1387x2.5

    Pirjo Raits photo

    Community abundance

    Emily Moreland waters some of the plants atthe Sunriver Allotment Garden. Moreland is one of the faces behind the gardening mentorshipprogram at the community garden.

    The gardens were reclaimed from 2.5 acres off fallow land along Phillips Road almost three years ago.

    More than 60 plotsare available for the community to use togrow their own produce.

    Small 3.0 earthquake felt in Sooke and areaPirjo RaitsSooke News MirrorAt 3:20 p.m. on Aug. 29 a thunderous rumble and a tremor, which could be felt underfoot, signalled a earthquake in the Sooke region.While it was not large, according to the Richter Magnitude Scale, it was large enough to be recorded as 3.0.Shortly after questioning whether others had heard or felt anything, comments on the Sooke

    News Mirrors Facebook page said the quake had been felt in Otter Point, Shirley and everywhere in between. Comments such as, the house shook after a loud explosion; heard the rumble then the house shook; my house actually jumped; felt it so much at Whiffin Spit that my chair moved; and a picture fell of the neighbours mantle. were posted on the site. The earthquake was cen-tered 10 kms. northwest of Colwood toward Sooke Lake, and was 25 kms.

    underground.This was a small quake, but it is also a quake up call.Emergency preparedness is essential if and when a large, more severe earthquake or natural disaster were to occur. While Sooke does not have a full-scale emergency evacuation plan, there are a few things people can do to help themselves.Sooke Fire Chief Steve Sorensen said, the best thing to do to be prepared is to look after your self, home, workplace and

    car. We will have limited resources. If your house collapses we will open up the community hall.Sorensen said there are back-up plans to utilize schools if necessary.He re-emphasized that the first plan of action should be to ensure your family and neighbours are looked after with essentials such as water, food, blankets, portable radio, shelter. Some communities already have a pod system where neighbours look after neighbours.

    Currently there is a group in place, the Local Government Emergency Program Advisory Commission (LG EPAC), a function of the Capital regional District. Sorensen said they are working out how they can help each other out if some natural disaster were to take place.The LG EPAC meets monthly and consists of a representative of the emergency program from each Capital Regional District municipality and electoral area. A representative of

    PEP attends all meetings as a guest of the advisory commission to maintain a strong link between the local government programs and the Province.The LG EPAC is focused on developing initiatives to create strong communication links and increased efficiencies for regional emergency programs. This includes how they can partner together as local governments during planning and response phases of emergencies.

    250.642.6361

    www.ShellyDavis.ca

    Shelly Davis

    Only wide curving boulevards, mature plantings, spacious sidewalks, attractive streetlights & up-scale homes. This superb custom home has too much to list but some features include , gourmet kitchen with 30 gas range, polished concrete touches., dramatic views in a light drenched interi-or. Workshop, games room, & study in addition to 3 BRs + 2BR legal suite. Three garages & spa-cious 19,000 sq ft lot with underground sewer, water, natural gas & high speed internet.

    No Small Lots Here!

    Call me for a private viewing.

    NEW PRICE !!! 2160 Erinan Boulevard

    BREAKING THE LINEBonnie Coulter and Ange

    la Menzies exhibit.

    Page 18

    HOCKEY SCHOOL Third year for Dapps hock

    ey challenge.

    Page 21

    Your community, your classi eds P23 75

    Wednesday, SEPTEMBER 5, 2012

    Editorial Page 8

    Entertainment Page 15

    Sports/stats Page 21

    Agreement

    #40110541

    SOOKESOOKE NEWS 2010 WINNER

    M I R R O R

    1387x2.5

    Pirjo Raits photo

    Community abundance

    Emily Moreland waters

    some of the plants at

    the Sunriver Allotment

    Garden. Moreland is one

    of the faces behind the

    gardening mentorship

    program at the community

    garden.

    The gardens were

    reclaimed from 2.5 acres

    off fallow land along

    Phillips Road almost

    three years ago.

    More than 60 plots

    are available for the

    community to use to

    grow their own produce.

    Small 3.0 earthquake felt in Sooke and area

    Pirjo RaitsSooke News Mirror

    At 3:20 p.m. on Aug.

    29 a thunderous rumble

    and a tremor, which

    could be felt underfoot,

    signalled a earthquake

    in the Sooke region.

    While it was not large,

    according to the Richter

    Magnitude Scale, it was large

    enough to be recorded as 3.0.

    Shortly after questioning

    whether others had

    heard or felt anything,

    comments on the Sooke

    News Mirrors Facebook

    page said the quake had

    been felt in Otter Point,

    Shirley and everywhere in

    between. Comments such

    as, the house shook after

    a loud explosion; heard

    the rumble then the house

    shook; my house actually

    jumped; felt it so much at

    Whiffin Spit that my chair

    moved; and a picture fell

    of the neighbours mantle.

    were posted on the site.

    The earthquake was cen-

    tered 10 kms. northwest

    of Colwood toward Sooke

    Lake, and was 25 kms.

    underground.This was a small q

    uake,

    but it is also a quake up call.

    Emergency preparedness

    is essential if and when

    a large, more severe

    earthquake or natural

    disaster were to occur.

    While Sooke does not have

    a full-scale emergency

    evacuation plan, there are

    a few things people can

    do to help themselves.

    Sooke Fire Chief Steve

    Sorensen said, the best

    thing to do to be prepared

    is to look after your self,

    home, workplace and

    car. We will have limited

    resources. If your house

    collapses we will open

    up the community hall.

    Sorensen said there are

    back-up plans to utilize

    schools if necessary.

    He re-emphasized that

    the first plan of action

    should be to ensure your

    family and neighbours are

    looked after with essentials

    such as water, food,

    blankets, portable radio,

    shelter. Some communities

    already have a pod

    system where neighbours

    look after neighbours.

    Currently there is a

    group in place, the Local

    Government Emergency

    Program Advisory

    Commission (LG EPAC),

    a function of the Capital

    regional District. Sorensen

    said they are working out

    how they can help each

    other out if some natural

    disaster were to take place.

    The LG EPAC meets

    monthly and consists of

    a representative of the

    emergency program from

    each Capital Regional District

    municipality and electoral

    area. A representative of

    PEP attends all meetings

    as a guest of the advisory

    commission to maintain

    a strong link between

    the local government

    programs and the Province.

    The LG EPAC is

    focused on developing

    initiatives to create strong

    communication links and

    increased efficiencies

    for regional emergency

    programs. This includes how

    they can partner together

    as local governments during

    planning and response

    phases of emergencies.

    250.642.6361

    www.ShellyDavis.ca

    Shelly Davis

    Only wide curving boulevards, mature planting

    s,

    spacious sidewalks, attractive streetlights & up

    -

    scale homes. This superb custom home has to

    o

    much to list but some features include , gourme

    t

    kitchen with 30 gas range, polished concrete

    touches., dramatic views in a light drenched int

    eri-

    or. Workshop, games room, & study in additio

    n to

    3 BRs + 2BR legal suite. Three garages & spa-

    cious 19,000 sq ft lot with underground sewer,

    water, natural gas & high speed internet.

    No Small Lots Here!

    Call me for a private viewing.

    NEW PRICE !!! 2160 Erinan Boulev

    ard

    BREAKING THE LINEBonnie Coulter and Angela

    Menzies exhibit.

    Page 18

    HOCKEY SCHOOL Third year for Dapps hockey

    challenge. Page 21

    Your community, your classi eds P23 75Wednesday, SEPTEMBER 5, 2012

    Editorial Page 8 Entertainment Page 15Sports/stats Page 21

    Agreement#40110541

    SOOKESOOKE NEWS 2010 WINNERM I R R O R

    1387x2.5

    Pirjo Raits photo

    Community abundance

    Emily Moreland waters some of the plants atthe Sunriver Allotment Garden. Moreland is one of the faces behind the gardening mentorshipprogram at the community garden.

    The gardens were reclaimed from 2.5 acres off fallow land along Phillips Road almost three years ago.

    More than 60 plotsare available for the community to use togrow their own produce.

    Small 3.0 earthquake felt in Sooke and areaPirjo RaitsSooke News Mirror

    At 3:20 p.m. on Aug. 29 a thunderous rumble and a tremor, which could be felt underfoot, signalled a earthquake in the Sooke region.

    While it was not large, according to the Richter Magnitude Scale, it was large enough to be recorded as 3.0.

    Shortly after questioning whether others had heard or felt anything, comments on the Sooke

    News Mirrors Facebook page said the quake had been felt in Otter Point, Shirley and everywhere in between. Comments such as, the house shook after a loud explosion; heard the rumble then the house shook; my house actually jumped; felt it so much at Whiffin Spit that my chair moved; and a picture fell of the neighbours mantle. were posted on the site.

    The earthquake was cen-tered 10 kms. northwest of Colwood toward Sooke Lake, and was 25 kms.

    underground.This was a small quake,

    but it is also a quake up call.Emergency preparedness

    is essential if and when a large, more severe earthquake or natural disaster were to occur. While Sooke does not have a full-scale emergency evacuation plan, there are a few things people can do to help themselves.

    Sooke Fire Chief Steve Sorensen said, the best thing to do to be prepared is to look after your self, home, workplace and

    car. We will have limited resources. If your house collapses we will open up the community hall.

    Sorensen said there are back-up plans to utilize schools if necessary.

    He re-emphasized that the first plan of action should be to ensure your family and neighbours are looked after with essentials such as water, food, blankets, portable radio, shelter. Some communities already have a pod system where neighbours look after neighbours.

    Currently there is a group in place, the Local Government Emergency Program Advisory Commission (LG EPAC), a function of the Capital regional District. Sorensen said they are working out how they can help each other out if some natural disaster were to take place.

    The LG EPAC meets monthly and consists of a representative of the emergency program from each Capital Regional District municipality and electoral area. A representative of

    PEP attends all meetings as a guest of the advisory commission to maintain a strong link between the local government programs and the Province.

    The LG EPAC is focused on developing initiatives to create strong communication links and increased efficiencies for regional emergency programs. This includes how they can partner together as local governments during planning and response phases of emergencies.

    250.642.6361 www.ShellyDavis.ca Shelly Davis

    Only wide curving boulevards, mature plantings, spacious sidewalks, attractive streetlights & up-scale homes. This superb custom home has too much to list but some features include , gourmet kitchen with 30 gas range, polished concrete touches., dramatic views in a light drenched interi-or. Workshop, games room, & study in addition to 3 BRs + 2BR legal suite. Three garages & spa-cious 19,000 sq ft lot with underground sewer, water, natural gas & high speed internet.

    No Small Lots Here!

    Call me for a private viewing.

    NEW PRICE !!! 2160 Erinan Boulevard

    GRILL FAVOURITE

    BRITISH FISH N CHIPS

    4oz (FRESH)HALIBUT

    only

    $12.95 plus taxes

    NOW SELLING UK FOODS

    Including product from Marks & Spencer, Sainsburys, Tesco

    Store hours:7am-8pm Mon-Fri/9am-8pm Weekends Grill hours:11-7 Mon-Sat/11-6 Sun/Gluten-free menu

    DROP BY 6250 SOOKE ROAD/CALL 250-642-0733/sookeriverstoreandgrill.ca Sooke to Sidney

    380-2662Since 1969

    PromptService

    GUTTER CLEANING WINDOW CLEANING POWER WASHING

    CONCRETE ROOFING MASONRY SEALANTS

    GUTTER REPAIR GUTTER PROTECTION

    CARPET CLEANING ROOF DE-MOSSING

    Window Cleaning, Repair & Installation

  • SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 www.sookenewsmirror.com 31

    Your home is perhaps your most important investment. It costs money to maintain it, and needs energy to run it. By choosing the right energy for the right use, you can maximize energy efficiency and value for your energy dollars.

    Natural gas is a good choice for heating, whether its hot water for a shower or warmth from the furnace or fireplace. Its also great for barbecuing burgers on the patio. And, with the variety of stylish natural gas appliances and rebates available, upgrading your appliances to natural gas is more affordable. Find energy efficiency rebates that meet your needs at fortisbc.com/offers.

    Natural gas makes your summers seem endless A natural gas barbecue never runs out of fuel. If you have a natural gas patio heater or fire pit, you can stay outside long after summers over. And when that blustery storm hits, you can stay warm and well fed with a natural gas fireplace and range. Both will continue working during a power outage.

    For comfort, convenience and value balance your homes energy mix with natural gas. Visit fortisbc.com/gasisgood to watch our video on how natural gas fits into your everyday life.

    Come home to natural gasNatural gas offers comfort, convenience and value

    Choices to fit your lifeStylish, convenient natural gas appliances increase the comfort of your home, indoors and out. Find out more about energy efficient appliances at fortisbc.com/gasappliances.

    Let energy saving start with a rebate

    Program1 RebateFurnace replacement pilot program

    $800 (Hurry, only 2,000 rebates available!)

    ENERGY STAR water heater up to $500

    EnerChoice fireplace $300

    LiveSmart BC (only until March 31, 2013)

    Up to $7,000 in grants available

    1 Terms and conditions apply.

    Visit fortisbc.com/offers or call 1-800-663-8400 for more information.

    Furnaces and boilersHeating systems provide even warmth and comfort throughout the home.

    Cooktops, ovens and rangesChefs prefer natural gas for instant heat, a variable flame and precise temperature control.

    BarbecuesWith a quick connect youll never lift a propane tank or worry about running out of fuel.

    DryersNatural gas dryers heat up instantly and dry your clothes with gentle warmth.

    FireplacesFireplaces provide ambience and cosy warmth. An outdoor fireplace, firepit or patio heater can extend summer evenings.

    Backup powerA natural gas generator can power your lights, electronics and fridge during a power outage.

    Water heatersStorage tanks heat water faster than electric models. Tankless models save space and heat water only as needed.

  • Sooke

    6 6 2 6 S o o k e R o a d 2 5 0 -6 6 2 6 S o o k e R o a d 2 5 0 - 6 4 2 - 6 3 6 6 6 4 2 - 6 3 6 6

    10%10%OFFOFF Do-it-Yourself andDo-it-Yourself and SAVE!SAVE!

    Cellular Shades Roller Shades

    Pleated Shades Woven Woods Roman ShadesSheer Horizontal Shadings

    STYLISH SHADINGS SMART SHADES

    CCUSTOM USTOM WWINDOW INDOW CCOVERINGSOVERINGSNEWNEW

    INTRODUCTORY SPECIAL

    WEVE GOT THE PERFECT SOLUTION

    FOR EVERY WINDOW IN EVERY ROOM IN

    YOUR HOMEWindow Fashions Checklist

    Here are the key things to think about when youre choosing your window coverings.

    Talk to us and well help you meet your needs from our huge selection of beautiful styles, popular colours, magni cent fabrics

    and convenient features.

    ; PRIVACY - How Much privacy does your room need? How much do you want

    to see out or let people see in? Does it change at different times of the day?

    ; LIGHT CONTROL - Is this for a bedroom, TV room or computer room?

    Do you have possessions that should be protected from UV rays?

    ; ENERGY EFFICIENCY - Would you like to increase the insulation factor? Solid fabrics and cellular blinds with air pockets inside

    can help you save on heating and cooling.

    ; FUNCTIONALITY - Consider how your windows open, how easy they will be to

    clean and if humidity will be a concern.

    ; STYLE - How will your choice t in with your furniture, fabrics, carpets and wall colours? Do you want your window

    coverings to be a strong visual element or part of the background?

    250-642-6480 101-2015 SHIELDS ROAD

    Oliver Katz Personal Real Estate Corporation

    Melinda Brake

    www.sookeshometeam.com Sookes Home Team @sookeshometeam Helen Lochore

    Grand Opening & Park Dedication This Sat. 11 am - 4pm

    2012 GOLD CARE AWARDS

    2012 SILVER CARE AWARDS

    Best New Subdivision WOODLAND CREEK

    Built Green Builder of the Year SC SMITH BUILDING CO..

    BEST SPEC HOME under 2000 sq. ft.

    BEST MARKETING

    Stop by Saturday and join the fun-The Ocean FM will be onsite check out our Tot-lot Park, see our NEW show-homes and tour Sookes award-winning built-green development!

    TAKE A KIDTAKE A KID FISHING FISHING

    Local Seafood Bait Tackle Gear Fishing ChartersLocal Seafood Bait Tackle Gear Fishing Charters250-642-4410 6947 Westcoast Rd. @ Jocks Dock250-642-4410 6947 Westcoast Rd. @ Jocks Dock

    WEEKLY TIDE TABLESWEEKLY TIDE TABLES

    Best shing time: 1 hours after high tide.TIMES ARE IN STANDARD TIME, HEIGHTS IN FEET

    Salmon, Crab, Hali:For Charters, CallFor Charters, Call

    250-893-2722250-893-2722 or leave a message ator leave a message at

    250-642-4410250-642-4410

    Day Time HT Time HT Time HT Time HT19 05:24 7.5 10:11 5.6 16:24 9.520 00:04 2.3 06:35 7.2 10:25 6.2 16:59 9.521 00:59 2.3 07:59 6.9 10:42 6.6 17:41 9.522 02:01 2.6 09:30 6.9 11:09 6.9 18:34 9.223 03:06 2.6 10:51 7.2 11:59 7.2 19:38 8.924 04:14 3.0 11:40 7.5 16:19 6.9 20:55 8.525 05:18 3.0 12:15 7.5 17:35 6.6 22:27 8.2 26 06:13 3.3 12:47 7.9 18:34 5.9 23:56 8.2

    Sooke Sustainability Day, Sunday, Sept. 23

    Sooke Transition Town Society, the JDF Cycling Coalition, Slow Food Vancouver Island and Sooke Region Food CHI present three great community events:

    1. Sooke Slow Food Cycle Tour 2012

    Sustainable stayca-tion on two wheels. A 33-km circle tour of Sooke from Edward Milne community school with stops at 16 workshop locations and points of interest around town. Tickets $21 per person/$42 for family groups. Drop-in visitors welcome at each stop by small donation.

    2. Collective Tran-sition: Sustainability Expo & Marketplace at EMCS.

    Come one, come all by small donation to this Transition Town village for the day. Demos, displays, lively debate, music, e-bike and e-car test rides and much more.

    Reskill yourself with tips and techniques on permaculture, solar power, backyard chick-ens, food preservation, distillation, small-space gardening and the strawberry fence;

    Browse 30-plus stands at our harvest marketplace featuring local and regional farm-ers, artisans and ven-dors;

    Talk shop with experts on energy effi-ciency, local currency, food foraging and the Transition Town move-ment;

    Singalong with Sooke musicians (bring an instrument), stretch out with yoga classes, enjoy Tai Chi and mar-

    tial arts demos, watch inspiring films (includ-ing Revenge of the Elec-tric Car) and hang with friends & neighbors who share the green dream

    3. Sunriver Harvest Feast

    A delicious, locally grown multi-course feast with seafood entree at Sookes lovely community garden. Gates open at 4:30. Seat-ing limited to 200; a sep-arately ticketed event at $20 per adult/$10 kids.

    Full details @ http://www.sookeslowfoodcy-cle.com

    Please walk, bike, car pool or take BC Transit! All who do so will be entered into a raffle for cool prizes. A portion of proceeds go to the Sooke Bike Skills Park and the Seedy Saturday heritage seed-saving project.

    p.s. another news-worthy point is that Marlaina Elliot is work-ing with the Prestige Hotel and Sooke Har-bour House to get the towns first electric-car charging stations installed prior to the

    event. Theres a big e-car component to the Collective Transition at EMCS. Victoria Leaf Club will have a dozen new e-cars in the park-ing lot for test rides

    and well have a late-afternoon screening of Revenge of the Electric Car courtesy the Leaf Club and Jo Phillips of Awareness Film Night.

    32 www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012- SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

    Sustaining SookeFile photoFile photo

    Silver Cloud Farm at the Sooke Silver Cloud Farm at the Sooke Country MarketCountry Market