Sooke News Mirror, April 25, 2012

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April 25, 2012 edition of the Sooke News Mirror

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  • ART ON THE OTHER SIDE East Sooke artists hold fine

    arts show.

    Page 13

    ROUGH AND READY Local rugby players getting

    serious.

    Page 27

    Your community, your classi eds P23 75Wednesday, APRIL 25, 2012

    Editorial Page 8 Entertainment Page 13Sports/stats Page 26

    Agreement#40110541

    SOOKESOOKE NEWS 2010 WINNERM I R R O R

    25-year-old salmon derby cancelledLocal economy will sufferSharron HoSooke News Mirror

    Sookes largest derby will be cancelled for the first time in 25 years due to late notification from the Department of Fisheries and Oceans on fishery restrictions in the Juan de Fuca Strait.

    George Wetherell, president of the Juan deFuca Invitational Salmon Championship Society, saidthis years derby, scheduled for Fathers Day weekend on July 17-18, has been cancelled due to a lack of time and uncertainty.

    Unfortunately, we had to cancel our event because were running out of time to get everything organized, Wetherell said.

    He said the society could not produce $20,000 worth of hats, shirts, regulation books, and tickets for the derby without knowing the chinook fishery status for the summer.

    Theres just so many things to do that I cant leave all those businesses and people involved with the event to the last minute, he said.

    And with ticket sales slated for May 14, Wetherell said the society needed to know whether or not the retention of large chinook salmon would be permitted by mid-April at the latest.

    He met with DFO on a few occasions and sent letters

    regarding the chinook fishery, but received noupdates.

    Ive waited and waitedand agonized over it (the derby), he said, but added an event of that magnitude could not be planned within a few weeks time.

    This derby is a first class event, always has been. And if we cant do it right, wecant do it at all.

    In prior years, the DFOhas opened fishing for large salmon at midnight on the

    day of the derby. A move that may still happen, but announced too late.

    Chances are they could do the same, Wetherell said, but he added a decision on the chinook fishery should have been made in January.

    I cant throw my business, and my family life into chaos and try to slam together an event this huge because of time appropriated to me by the DFO.

    Last year the derby saw 700 entrants come into town from all over the province, Washington State and Ontario, bringing in $400,000

    to the local economy. The invitational has had

    such steady attendance, that the waiting list was thrown out, after no spaces opened up over the past 10 years.

    Seven hundred people will be really disappointed when they hear the news, and theyll have to find something else to do forFathers Day after 25 years, Wetherell said.

    Over the years, approximately $200,000 from

    the derby have been donatedto salmon enhancement and restoration, with the main b e n e f a c t o r being The Pacific Salmon Foundation.

    We put way more fish backin the streams than were taking

    out, he said.Wetherell, 62, is a

    co-founder for the event and has maintained his position as president since the derbys institution 25 years ago.

    Its kind of been my little baby watching it grow, he said. Im still working, I run a construction company, and I have a family life. You dont want to let the baby go, but sometimes you dont have control over things.

    According to Wetherell, there may be a derby next year.

    This derby is a first class event, always has been. And if we cant do it right, we cant do it at all.

    --George WetherellPresident JdF Invitational

    Salmon Championship Society

    Sharron Ho photos

    A young, male cyclist, above,was struck on the corner of Anna Maria Road in front of Home Hardware around 2 p.m. Monday afternoon. According to a witness, the 18-year-old cyclist was coasting against traffic on Sooke Road and turned right on Anna Maria Road, where he was struck by a mid-sized truck. The witness said the vehicle was stopped and was about to turn onto Sooke Road. The cyclist was attended by paramedics, and taken into an ambulance. Sooke Fire Chief Steve Sorensen said the cyclist suffered from a severely cut up hand and was still conscious, but Sorensen did not know the full extent of his injuries. The bike and truck on scene did not appear to be damaged. Below, a vehicle sheared off a telephone pole on Otter Point Road on Monday resulting in a power outage which lasted a number of hours.

    Cyclist injured

    Hydro pole taken out

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  • 2 www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2012 - SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

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  • Different depart-ments at the District of Sooke provided quar-terly reports from Janu-ary to March, 2012.

    Sooke Fire Depart-ment

    Fire Chief Steve Sorensen reports that the department cur-rently has five full time members, 31 volunteer firefighters and six in public education for a total of 42 members. There are five applica-tions on file.

    The fire department will be taking on a cadet firefighter training pro-gram. Presentations were made to all Grade 10 students with the idea of taking on stu-dents as volunteer fire-fighter cadets. The first class began on April 13 with four students. They attend training sessions every second Friday from 2:30 to 4:30 p.m.

    Call volumes are down slightly from 2011 for the same time. There is a sizeable drop in the number of chim-ney fires, false alarms and motor vehicle crashes.

    The department responded to: five structure fires (three were mutual aid); four chimney fires; one brush fire; eight motor vehicle incidents; one rescue; 10 hazardous conditions; 13 public assists; 13 alarm bells; 90 first responder inci-dents and 49 burning complaints.

    The department completed 120 inspec-tions and there were two 1 EOC activations. Volunteers with the Sooke Emergency Pro-gram put in 337 volun-teer hours for the first quarter.

    Planning DepartmentStaff was busy prepar-

    ing reports on Second-ary and Small Suites, background research on the Sooke Agricul-tural Plan and making a presentation on the districts new zoning bylaw to southern Van-couver Island planners.

    The district collected a total of $8,635 in per-mit, public hearing and application fees which represents a 12 per cent increase over the same quarter last year. There were 15 applica-tions submitted.

    The Approving Office approved 34 new lots in five fee simple sub-division plans, two new subdivision applica-

    tions were received. It was noted that inter-est in developing in the community is on the upswing.

    Engineering reports officially opening the public boat launch; final design work on the first phase of the Grant Road Connector and the Highway14/Water-view Street round-about is underway; The Townsend Road inter-section and cross walk realignment is com-plete and road work on Maple Avenue from Grant Road to Highway 14 will be completed as weather permits.

    Parks and Envi-

    ronmental Services reports they are work-ing to complete 75 per cent design drawing for the Sooke River Pedes-trian Crossing at Soule Road. They completed the design of the revi-talization of Pineridge Park and 50 metres of trail; installed one bear resistant garbage recep-tacle at the public boat launch; responded to seven hazardous tree enquiries and 22 mis-cellaneous park and environment calls; they issued one highway use and park use per-mit. The department planted spring colour and 38 street trees to

    the urban forest at Lau-ras Lane, Church Hill Meadows, Stoneridge Estates and Mariners Village.

    Building DepartmentThe department

    reports slightly lower building permit fee activity early in the year but a significant increase in March.

    From January to March the depart-ment issued 33 resi-dential permits; 23 other (decks, com-mercial, woodstoves, suites, etc.) creating a total of 30 new units for a revenue figure of $109,625.86 down $14,904 from 2011.

    SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2012 www.sookenewsmirror.com NEWS 3

    Up Sooke

    Thumbs Up!

    SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITYSUNDAY, MAY 6, SOOKE

    Transition Town Cafe 2 to 4 p.m., Reading Room Cafe.

    VOLUNTEERS ARE ONE of the most basic ingredients in any recipe for community resilience, and increasing Sookes resilience is what our local Transition Town society is all about.

    DROP IN ON the first Sunday of each month to talk about anything related to community resilience and find out about the new regional volunteer centre. All welcome.

    TORCH AWARD FINALIST

    THE FOLLOWING BUSINESS is in the running to win a 2012 Torch Award for ethical practices in the marketplace, says said Rosalind Scott, Executive Director of BBB Vancouver Island.

    OUTSTANDING ETHICAL BUSINESS Practices

    GOOD NEIGHBORS FENCING (Sooke).

    TO ALL THOSE folks who remained patient when the power went out in Sooke on Monday and to the emergency (fire, police, ambulance)crews kept busy with numerous incidents.

    Sharron Ho photo

    EVERYTHING IS JUST DUCKY!

    (Right) Sooke Harbourside Lions Nancy Reinders, Ev Bowers and Joanne Phillips wearing a plush duck suit, sell tickets for the Duck Race outside the BC Liquor Store on April 21.

    The popular duck race is scheduled for May 12, and proceeds will be donated to juvenile diabetes.

    For tickets ask any Harbourside Lions or call Lorna Danylhuck at 250-642-7353.

    Conte trial adjournedAlex Conte, accused

    of second degree murder, will have his trial adjourned until May 30.

    Conte, 21, is charged with the murder of his mother Sarah Nickerson

    at her mobile home on January 8.

    Conte has undergone two assessments to determine his ability to stand trial and has appeared in court via video conferencing.

    Quarterly reports: District departments kept busy

    HELPING PEOPLE LIVE BETTER LIVES

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    F L A X S E E D O I LFlaxseed is just what it sounds like...the seed of the ax plant. Flaxseed is high in Omega-3 oil, an essential fatty acid, which may be protective against cardiovascular disease because they help to maintain healthy triglyceride and cholesterol levels. Studies have shown that axseed oil consumption improves the ratio of omega-3 to omega-6 fatty acids which may offer protection from plaque build up on arteries and relief from in ammatory conditions.

    Talk to your Peoples Pharmacist to see if Omega-3 supplements can help with your health and wellness.

    Ron KumarPharmacist/Owner

  • 4 www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2012 - SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

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  • SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2012 www.sookenewsmirror.com NEWS 5

    Sooke celebrates 75th anniversary of community hallOver the past 75

    years the Sooke Com-munity Hall has seen a lot of people and events within its walls.

    Volunteer organiza-tions use it for their monthly meetings. Kids have gone there for sports, and celebrated their success in annual banquets. Thousands of people have gath-ered over the years, for dances, festive events, or to mourn a dear departed friend.

    The construction of the hall more than 75 years ago is testa-ment to the volunteer

    and community spirit that still thrives in the community today, said Karl Linell, Sooke Com-munity Association president.

    It was the need for a community hall that spurred the creation of the Sooke Commu-nity Association in 1935. Early members of the association took on the task of organiz-ing All Sooke Day to bring the community together in celebration every year, and to raise funds to build and oper-ate a community hall.

    Volunteers began

    constructing the hall in 1936, and the com-pleted hall opened its doors in 1937.

    Today the hall is used by many local non-profit groups for meetings, storage and events. Every year, for example, the Lions Club sponsors a hard times dance. The Contact Loan Cupboard houses a stock of medi-cal equipment that can be borrowed if needed. Meals on Wheels volun-teers prepare meals in the kitchen and deliver to Sooke residents three times a week. The Sooke Fall Fair, which has

    grown into a weekend-long event in Septem-ber, is held in the hall and the neighbouring Legion hall every year.

    In celebration of the 75th anniversary, the Sooke Community Association is holding a day long Open Hall on Saturday, April 28, from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. That night, the Sooke Lions Club is holding a dance beginning at 8 p.m.

    The Open Hall will feature salmon BBQ samples and a Mini Logging Show. There will also be kids games, demonstrations by

    local sports groups, and displays by the many groups who use the hall.

    Were really excited about welcoming the Sooke community and visitors to see how the community hall plays such a central role here, and also to have some fun and enjoy the day, Linell said.

    There is no charge for the Open Hall events and logging show. Dance tickets are $7.50 each and available at Shoppers or Peoples drugs.

    Paying it forward helps drivers in needKyle WellsBlack Press

    Two women now have cars they des-perately needed, and another says that she has never felt better in her life after sparking a outpouring of generos-ity.

    Mickey Cherneski, from Sooke, recently bought a 2012 Honda Civic to replace her 2003 Chevrolet Cavalier. She asked about trad-ing in the Cavalier, but the dealership couldnt offer her much money.

    Rather than go through the hassle of selling the car, Cherneski decided to see if she could give it away to someone who needed a vehicle but couldnt afford one.

    In late March she cre-ated a Facebook page titled Im giving away a car through which she asked people to either submit their own sto-ries or write on behalf of someone they knew who could really use a car.

    Within days Cherneski

    had received more than 60 responses.

    It was just amazing, Cherneski said. Going through all the sto-ries, it was really over-whelming.

    Cherneski narrowed it down to two peo-ple who she felt could really use the vehicle.

    She made the hard decision to give her car to a mother in Cour-tenay who has three children, two of which are special needs and need to attend special-ist appointments in Vic-

    toria once a month. Without a car, the

    woman would take the bus, which would turn one day of appoint-ments into a three day ordeal.

    Campus Honda, where Cherneski bought her new Civic, agreed to detail the Cavalier for free for the new owner.

    Still wanting to help the other person, Cherneski went to Gal-axy Motors in Colwood to see if they could come up with a solution. Sure

    enough, they did. After some discus-

    sion, Galaxys owners decided to donate the companys courtesy car, a 1998 Oldsmobile Delta 88, to the second applicant.

    Vicki Farmere is a 63-year-old Sooke resi-dent living on disability who must travel fre-quently to Oak Bay for medical appointments.

    She had a car but it broke down and her daughter had been driv-ing her to her appoint-ments. Her daughter found out about the Facebook page and applied on her behalf

    (I felt) like it was an April Fools joke. Im serious. Until she picked me up I didnt believe it, Farmere said. My stress level has gone so much down because Ive been so stressed about not hav-ing a vehicle.

    David King, general manager of Galaxy Motors, called his com-panys contribution a matter of paying it forward after being inspired by Cherneskis

    generosity. The dealership sup-

    ports causes on the West Shore and saw this is another oppor-tunity to help out.

    We saw what (Cherneski) did and were moved by it so we said lets make it easier on you, youre stuck trying to decide between two, well just help you support both, King said.

    Fighting back tears, Cherneski said that the feeling of being able to help these two women has been overwhelm-ing. Its been the best experience of my life. Ive gotten far more out of this than either one of these women have, far more.

    To keep the giving going, Farmere donated her old car to the Sooke fire department to prac-tice with.

    I would recommend anybody, if you ever have the opportunity to do something like this, dont even hesi-tate, Cherneski said. The reward for me has been great.

    Kyle Wells photo

    Vicki Farmere sits behind the wheel of her new 1998 Oldsmobile with Mickey Cherneski, the woman who helped get Colwoods Galaxy Motors to donate the car.

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  • Climbing the steps to Sooke Community Halls foyer, you see the remarkable black wrought iron hinges that connect the heavy planked doors to the wall. They are the work of blacksmith Lyall Sheilds. This 1937 view shows the broad shoul-dered blacksmith with his youngest daughter Elaine at the entrance to his rustic blacksmith shop.

    His shop stood at the roadway (now called Belvista) between the harbour and the slough that borders the museum. Until 1940 this was the main Sooke Road route leading west from the river. Later the swamp was dissected by a built up berm road-way that allows a good view of the brilliant yel-low skunk cabbages that currently dot the many shades of green wetland vegetation.

    The extensive prop-erty was held by the Charters family, and their nearby sawmill on the waterfront meant work for the black-smith. Watching the

    blacksmith hammer-ing white hot steel to shape it, marveling at the ringing of the ham-mer on the anvil, eyes alert for flying sparks, were experiences trea-sured by children walk-ing home from school. Some days it would be a horse standing on three legs while being shod.

    One of the inventions fabricated by Lyall was

    a hand-pedaled tricy-cle, used to patrol for leaks, which ran atop the 27-mile long flow-line that carried water from Sooke Lake to Humpback Reservoir at Goldstream. He also built the salmon barbe-cuing racks for the first All Sooke Day in 1934.

    Early maps show James Sheilds taking up Crown land way up Sooke River in the

    1880s. Son William Sheilds who sailed on sealing schooners to the Bering Sea, was also a farmer, raising cattle and sheep in an attrac-tive valley west of Sooke River (later farmed by Rex Kendrew). Hik-ers venturing up Phil-lips Road in early days brought back tales of being chased by the Sheilds roaming bull.

    Another son Ed, also a sealer, married a neighbour girl, Lou-ise Charters, and it was their youngest son Lyall who grew up to become the blacksmith. While good-natured Lyall, his wife Lizzie, son Will and daughters Helen and Elaine joined in the happy celebra-tions when the hall was opened in 1937, he had little time to enjoy it all. A level crossing acci-dent in 1941 between a truck on Woodlands Road and a coal-fired steam locomotive on the CNR line cut his life short.

    Organizers of the 75th anniversary event next Saturday, April 28th at Sooke Commu-

    nity Hall are hoping that Sheilds and Charters family connections will be among the crowds coming together to visit.

    Elida Peers,Historian

    Sooke Region Museum

    6 NEWS www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2012 - SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

    Sookes legendary blacksmith

    Our Forests, Our Future forum set for May 1Celebrate May Day by attend-

    ing a community forum on the future of forests in the Capital Regional District resource lands. Panelists are Rosie Betsworth, Bill Bourgeois, and Vicky Hus-band.

    Rosie Betsworth, president of the Port Renfrew Chamber of Commerce, will highlight the benefits of sustainable forest management and eco-tourism and the diversification of the economy for the future.

    Bill Bourgeois is a Registered

    Professional Forester with 35 years experience in the forest industry and land use planning with CORE. He is the founder of the Healthy Forests Healthy Communities initiative which brings consultation into local communities.

    Vicky Husband is a long time conservationist, involved in land use planning, protection and better management of forests and lands Her effective action to educate the public and con-vince politicians of the wisdom

    of conservation in all its forms has been recognized with the Order of Canada and the Order of B.C.

    The first forum will be at Edward Milne Community School on Tuesday, 1 May, start-ing at 7 p.m. A second forum will be at the Ambrosia Centre in Victoria, on May 3, at 7 p.m.

    The forums are intended to provide a realistic assessment of how we can get the best out of the CRD regional resource lands.

    CHANNELS ARE CHANGINGFOR MORE ENHANCED ENTERTAINMENT.

    On April 24, 2012, some of your channels will be moving to a new location so we can continue to provide you with the ultimate TV experience. This will allow us to introduce new channels, even more in HD and continue to deliver the most movies and TV shows with Shaw Exo On Demand.

    Visit SHAW.CA/BULLETINS for a complete list of channel moves.And as always, you can reach us at 1.866.619.5786

    Date and lineup may be subject to change.

    2205 Otter Point Road, SookePhone: 250-642-1634

    Fax: 250-642-0541email: info@sooke.ca

    website: www.sooke.ca

    NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGA Public Hearing will be held in the Sooke Council Chambers at 2225 Otter Point Road, Sooke, BC on Monday, April 30, 2012 at 7:00 pm to hear presentations on:

    Bylaw No. 524, Zoning Amendment Bylaw (500-5)The intent and purpose of Bylaw No 524, Zoning Amendment Bylaw (500-5) is to is to delete the minimum lot size requirement for secondary suites from the Small Lot Residential (R3) zone and to add a small suite on a lot with a single family dwelling as an accessory use in the Small Scale Agriculture (RU3) zone providing the land is not in the Agricultural Land Reserve.

    All persons who believe their interests in property are affected by this proposed bylaw shall be afforded an opportunity to be heard or to present written submissions before Council on the matters contained in the proposed bylaw at the above time and place. If you are unable to attend the hearing, we ask that written submissions be provided prior to the close of the public hearing. Please be advised that submissions to Council will become part of the public record.

    Copies of the proposed bylaw, and relevant background documents, may be inspected at the of ces of the District of Sooke Planning Department, 2205 Otter Point Road, Sooke, BC, between the hours of 8:30 am and 4:30 pm, Monday to Friday (excluding statutory holidays), commencing from April 18, 2012 to and including April 30, 2012.

    If you have any questions regarding this application, please contact the Planning Department at 250-642-1634.

    NOW OPEN! Alanna BrooksCerti ed all breed groomer

    778-425-1757Call for your appointment today!

    Dtails@live.ca www.dtailgrooming.com 1757 Marathon Lane, Sooke BC V9Z 0S5

  • SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2012 www.sookenewsmirror.com NEWS 7

    LOOKING BACKA trip through the

    Sooke News Mirror time machine:

    Martin mace-s his point

    April 24, 2002The Member of Par-

    liament who dared to hoist above his head the five-foot, gold-en-crusted mace and then turn to the Liberal front bench and declare that we are no longer live a democracy, is faced with a not-so-liberal penalty.

    On Monday, Esquimalt-Juan de Fuca MP Dr. Keith Martin was hit with a motion asking him to apologize at the bar (a location in the House) to Speaker Peter Milliken.

    The apology was requested because of last Wednesdays incident when Martin picked up the mace which sits on the clerks table right in front of the Speakers chair. The object is a symbol of democracy and MPs are forbidden to even touch it.

    HIs fellow Alliance members followed him out of the House after the somewhat calcu-lated outburst, with two NDP members in tow (Svend Robinson and Libby Davies).

    Martin apologized the same day, which is what he told the speaker on April 22 when the issue arose in

    the House. Sooke man reels in

    231.6 pounderApril 23, 2003Des Hatchard already

    was having a pretty good week catching halibut when he took to the waters last Wednes-day morning.

    On Monday, he reeled in two halis over 80 pounds and followed that up the next day with one weighing 55 pounds and another at 35. But those catches were small fry when compared to the 231.6-pound monster he pulled in mid-week.

    Ive caught fish over 150, but nothing like 200, Hatchard said in a Monday interview.

    He said he was fish-ing off Jordan River, though he declined to reveal the exact loca-tion of his fishing hot

    spot.

    APC sparks commu-nity interest

    April 25, 2007In an effort to sim-

    plify and speed up the rezoning process, CAO Evan Parliament and director of planning Marlaina Elliott came up with a draft bylaw and brought it before District of Sooke com-mittee of the whole on April 16.

    We would like to have the process understood by all three sides, staff, developers and the public, said Parliament.

    He said they were seeking direction to start the process and different ideas on how to move forward in the development permit process.

    A new wave of plan-

    ning will do better than the old conventional way, he said.

    Developer puts pub-lic in plans

    April 23, 2008Despite a lot of deci-

    sions which still have to be made, devel-oper Ender Ilkay has released his vision for 5,450 acres of land between Sooke and Jor-dan River.

    Typically I wouldnt be releasing plans prior to public input, said Ilkay. But the door is closing fast on any opportunity for such a discussion, I felt that its important to get this out there to answer some questions.

    Ilkay, founder and principal of Ilkay Devel-opment Corporation, has a contract to pur-chase the land.

    His concept for Jor-dan River would rein-state the town site in a location that once had a thriving commu-nity in the last century. The new town would be home to over 10,000 residents over the next 20 years.

    He said he sees a village concept which would be very walkable with restaurants and shops and a neat village core. He would need a critical mass to create the green community which would include full sewage and water systems. Forty-eight

    per cent of the land would be greenspace and six per cent as golf/greenspace.

    A variety of housing from townhouses to estate lots could exist creating a very green community, said Ilkay.

    File photo

    The standing chop at one of the All Sooke Days.

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  • 8 EDITORIAL www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2012 - SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

    EDITORIAL Rod Sluggett PublisherPirjo Raits EditorSharron Ho ReporterThe Sooke News Mirror is published every Wednesday by Black Press Ltd. | 112-6660 Sooke Road, Sooke, B.C. V9Z 0A5 | Phone: 250-642-5752 WEB: WWW.SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM

    Mr. Fletchers article (or should I say right wing political rant) last week Environmentalism for dum-mies seems truly to miss whatever point he was feebly trying to make against David Suzuki. His interpreta-tion of a Globe and Mail article leaves him wondering why Dr. Suzuki is, by many, seen as a saint, and that the Conservative government is seen as a front for Big Oil.

    He also has trouble digesting the fact that Dr. Suzuki is a scientist, and that his personal views of the world are incorporated into his founda-tion. Why wouldnt they be, he is a man of conviction, not a two-faced politician who has his/her hands deep in the cookie jars.

    Theres some easy answers Mr. Fletcher. First off, many people see Suzuki as a saint because they rec-ognize the non-partisan visions he has made public, the fact that he has devoted his life to the education of people in general and the better-ment of our understanding of our planet and a whole, and they believe in the observations he has scientifi-cally endorsed. But more than any-thing, they see the conviction, and courage he has shown in the face of those opposed to his views all his life.

    There is no doubt that those opposed are indeed powerful corpo-rations who have much at stake in growing their empires with impunity and arrogance. They have pulled out all the stops for many years trying to silence and discredit Dr. Suzuki but the more they try the more obvi-ous it becomes that he is absolutely right. Many other saints have similar stories; seeing things in a greater per-spective, going against human injus-tices, speaking their mind, and in the end being seen as correct all along.

    Im sure had he folded his tent

    and joined the forces so against him he would be a much richer and less harassed man.

    Suzuki had little to gain in express-ing his findings and observations of life in the early years. He is a man of science yes, but even more impor-tantly he has always remained a human being and speaks from the heart. His interpretation and under-standing of this planet both as a scientist and human being forces him to speak out against processes and economies that are detrimental to life. Those who control the pro-cesses and economies hate Suzuki and have spent billions, changed and introduced laws, and have hired their own scientists in trying to debunk him. Yet, as each year goes by we see most of Suzukis warnings and predictions come true. Gener-ally, the diversification, gene pools, and number of species on planet Earth has diminished and most of it has happened in the last 250 years due to human activities driven by manmade economic systems.

    Yet Suzuki is always the first to say, there is hope, we can change, economy and environmentalism need not be at opposite ends, we just need to change what be base our economies on, (which is basi-cally economic based vs. resource based). His main mantra is simple. In order to support a growing popula-tion we can no longer survive on an out dated economic system that has no accountability, and is based on pure money profit.

    Fletcher also touches on the envi-ro-scare industry? and calls the tar sands an exaggerated horror. Wow, I guess when your head is deep in the sand (or someplace else) you could call whats happening in the tar sands exaggerated but if your eyes are open and untainted by the

    spoils of mega profits you will be left with nothing but horror and a blatant disregard for nature and all those dependant on her.

    As far as fear mongering goes I would say Mr. Harper takes first place on that category. His entire campaign last election was based on nothing else but political fear, say-ing if we vote for anyone but him the whole economic system would simply fold up and only he could keep the wheels on the track. He is truly a legend in his own mind and a master of propaganda and fear. Now he is introducing laws that will speed up the introduction of mega projects by disposing of any environmental impact studies.

    If this is not behaviour that exem-plifies a government that fronts Big Oil I dont know what is.

    Im guessing thats what all the new prisons are for... once we finally get fed up enough and take to the streets there will be plenty of places to put all those arrested.

    Seems to me in a few short years Harper has turned a once respected country that used to choose its busi-ness partners based on character and human rights into one that is no longer respected and is stripping its citizens of the rights so hard fought for.

    As far as where monies come from supporting environmental organiza-tions, Id say most of it comes from ordinary citizens and businesses who donate their hard earned cash to help fight the fight against pollu-tion, climate change, industrial injus-tice, and political meddling. I would suggest that monies acquired by political parties should be far more scrutinized.

    Tom EberhardtSooke

    Dr. Suzuki is a saint says writer

    Smart talk about meters

    OUR VIEW

    At council on Monday night a representative from BC Hydro was there to provide information on and explain the reason why the corporation has turned to smart meters.

    He presented the information in lack lustre fashion and then sat back to listen to the comments from the public.

    Smart meters are a political football no doubt about it. Some fear they are invasive, unsafe and the beginning of the downhill slide to skyrocketing energy costs.

    Ted Olynyk from BC Hydro said the meters are only for collecting data, they are not connected to the Internet and they are not spying on consumers.

    This opened up a flood gate of comments from a

    number of residents. Most felt they had no choice about the installation of the meters and that did not sit well with them. They wanted a personal guarantee of safety and security, which of course, BC Hydro could not give them. Reams of data, studies and reports seem to point to health risks for some.

    The point is, people should have a choice as to whether they wish to switch to the smart meter or retain the meter they already have. People also resent the fact that this is foisted on them and no amount of protest seems to work with the Crown corporation. People are once again feeling disenfranchised, unheard and disregarded. It is the consumer who pays and it should be the consumer who has a choice. Hats off to council for bringing this forward and for sending BC Hydro the message that they want a moratorium and an independent study and review on the not-so-smart meters.

    It is the consumer who pays...

    How to reach us:Phone 250-642-5752; fax 250-642-4767

    Rod Sluggett publisher@sookenewsmirror.com

    Harla Eve office@sookenewsmirror.com

    Pirjo Raits editor@sookenewsmirror.com

    Sharron Ho news@sookenewsmirror.com

    Rod Sluggett, Joan Gamache sales@sookenewsmirror.com

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    Harla Eve, office@sookenewsmirror.comVicky Sluggett

    General:

    Publisher:

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    Agreement #40110541

  • Public assists important

    In response to the reader who submitted the picture of the fire department water tan-ker assisting EPCOR in flushing a sewer line, I would like to point fire departments respond to more than just fires. Does the police depart-ment only respond to murders or bank rob-beries? Does the ambu-lance only respond to heart attacks or stro-kes? Does search and rescue only respond when someone is missing or lost?

    The answer is no. These are routinely called public assists and, for fire depart-ments, can range any-where from turning off someones water because they had a pipe burst; to the ico-nic rescuing of cats out of trees.

    I find it sad that bet-ween April 8 and April 12 the volunteers fire-fighters contributed over 350 hours of their personal time ser-ving the community at structure fires, multiple car accidents and more medical assistances than we care to remem-ber. Was their any men-tion of that? The answer, sadly, is also no. To put that into prospec-tive, since the mayor and council are still working on their bud-get: Using the District of Sookes CUPE rates for casual workers, that amounts to almost $10,000 worth of wages saved in one week, or

    nearly $500,000 a year. Perhaps in the future

    people will consider just how important volunteers are to the community and exac-tly what a fire depart-ment does before they start making ignorant assumptions.

    Jason DixonSooke

    Concern and caring shown

    On April 19 at 9 a.m., our dog Jasper, a black shepherd cross, broke free while in the care of Sooke Vet Hospital and escaped. By the time my wife and I arrived, he was gone. We began searching and asking people if theyd seen a lost dog. Without exception, everyone we spoke to showed concern and offered to spread the word and contact us if they saw him. One lady said shed seen him running down the middle of Sooke Road in a panic, but noticed that all cars had immediately lowe-red their speed.

    At 3 p.m., wonde-ring if wed lost him for good, we returned to our home on Cald-well Rd for a third time to check if hed come home on his own. There he was in the backyard, soaking wet and tangled in a chain but otherwise without a scratch on him. Need-

    less to say, we were all relieved.

    The event made us appreciate what a great community this is. A special thanks to one woman wearing a black cycling jacket who gave her time to help us search. In my state of distress, I didnt get your name or even say thank you.

    David LabergeSooke

    On global warming

    Hey Grade six stu-dents if you take some basic facts that are readily available, you will find from the maximum of ice in the Ice Age, at 23,000 years before Christ, to the agreed upon end of the Ice Age at 8,000 years before Christ, the glaciers retreated about 1,500 kms in 15,000 years.

    This is 100 metres of ice a year, melting; thats about 300 feet a year; almost a foot of glacier melting back in one day, every day for 15,000 years.

    Well kids; in this, the age of reason the Iro-nic Age, public thin-kers are announcing warnings in the mass media, that modern gla-ciers are now retreating at the unsettling rate, the alarming rate of 1.5 feet per year.

    Does this sound like global warming to you?

    No This is hyste-ria; where nobody can think.

    N.E. MacNabShirley

    Grinch-style comments

    It was heartening to read in the Sooke News Mirror about the local youth who are organi-zing a Love Your Pla-net awareness event and all of the school kids preparing an assortment of Earth Day activities over the week.

    One cannot help but wonder, though, what effect the strategically prominenced piece in the same paper by Tom Fletcher titled Environmentalism for Dummies might have had on their enthusi-asm to save the planet. Mr. Fletcher, in perfect Earth Day grinch style, attempts to decon-struct a bevy of Evil-Doer environmental groups while sugges-ting that farmed salmon are healthier than wild salmon, that the tar sands (creating tailing ponds the size of Eng-land and growing) have been unfairly maligned and that protecting the Great Bear Rainforest was the work of a U.S. based eco-scare indu-stry conspiracy. That ought to nip all that pesky environmental awareness in the bud.

    If Mr. Fletcher would like to pursue his appa-

    rent interest in discove-ring the truth behind environmental tall tales, perhaps he should do his next book report on Andrew Nikiforuks Tar Sands: Dirty Oil and the Future of a Continent or investigative jour-nalist Greg Palasts fun read Vultures Picnic.

    Jo PhillipsSooke

    Fletcher rant

    Although Tom Fletcher occupies a position of power in Black Press (and direct dissection of elements of his latest rant Envi-ronmentalism for dum-mies can wait for now), dont you think youd have a better newspaper if you didnt juxtapose his rabid dis-tortions with reports of Earth Day activities in Sooke?

    This reader finds this combination ridiculous; it makes your publica-tion look silly - although as irony it could admit-tedly have entertain-ment value (is that the intention?)

    George McFetridge, Burnaby, B.C.

    Deliver by mail or hand to our office, or e-mail editor@sooke-newsmirror.com.

    Letters should be 300 words or less, and we may edit for length, tone and accuracy. Please include contact information.

    Letters

    LETTERS

    SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2012 www.sookenewsmirror.com LETTERS 9

    iWe asked: What would you like to see more of in the Sooke News Mirror?

    Perhaps if anything, an expanded sports section to

    entail say, outside sports rather than just community

    sports.

    Brian MacNeillSooke

    Oh gosh, I think its doing great to be quite honest

    with you.

    Colleen MacLennanSooke

    I guess more comics in the Sooke News Mirror, more

    funnies and stuff in it.

    Ryan Fuhr, 12Sooke

    No, I just like reading it for the local news. As long as its got local and relevant

    news its good.

    Steve BosenceSooke

    Feature listing

    SELLING SOOKE SINCE 1985

    Easy Living - $329,900 3 bedroom rancher on a cozy crawlspace. Conven-ient to schools, shops and bus. Mature fruit trees & Gazebo in the private back yard. 12 x 30 Sundeck, Airtight woodstove in the 11 x 15 Living Room. Drive by 2112 Henlyn Drive or call me for de-tails at 250-642-6056.

  • 10 www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2012 - SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

    Philanthropy The Victoria Foundation & Black Press

    Business and environmental groups bothplay a part in environmental philanthropy

    Respondents to the Victoria Foundations 2011 Vital Signs survey ranked our natural environment as number one of the 10 best things about Greater Victoria. The following is a sample of 2012 environmental projects sup-ported by the foundation.

    The Garry Oak Ecosystems Recovery Team coordinates efforts to protect and restore these dwindling ecosystems and the more than 100 at-risk species that make their homes in these environments.

    The team will use a $4,000 grant from the Vic-toria Foundation to deliver a series of regional workshops on its revised National Recovery Strategy for Garry Oak and Associated Ecosys-tems and Associated Species at Risk.

    We believe everyone can have an impact on this work, so our idea was to develop a strategy that outlines something everyone can do, said executive director Shyanne Smith. In addition to outlining the progress made to date, the new strategy will identify activities for individuals, local government planners, researchers and oth-ers. Homeowners, for example, are encouraged to use the tools and resources the team has devel-oped to restore lawns or yards to Garry Oak meadows.

    The workshop schedule will be finalized in May. Check www.goert.ca for updated informa-tion.

    The Georgia Strait Alliance is using its $11,000 grant from the Victoria Foundation to

    expand its Clean Marine B.C. program in the Capital Regional District, supporting area mari-nas to achieve eco-certification. Certification is based on environmental best practices including using environmentally friendly marine products and construction, developing waste management and recycling strategies, and optimizing energy and water conservation.

    Benefits include a cleaner marine environ-ment, a more environmentally conscious boating community, increased business for participating marinas, cost savings and improved commu-nity values in the CRD and beyond, said Clean Marine program coordinator Michelle Young.

    The Georgia Strait Alliance is also publish-ing a green boating tips sheet to highlight how the boating community can reduce its environ-mental footprint. See www.GeorgiaStrait.org for more information.

    The SeaChangeMarine Conservation Society is using a $8,200 grant from the Victoria Founda-tion to help restore Tod Inlet. Executive Director Nikki Wright describes the area as a cultural and ecological treasure on the Saanich Peninsula.

    SeaChange is working in partnership with BC Parks, local First Nations communities and vol-unteers to bring back eelgrass and native terres-trial plant ecosystems by transplanting eelgrass plots, removing invasive plants species on the upper reaches of the inlet, planting native plants and offering ethno-botanical tours and cultural events. The project is called Connecting Cultures

    to Place because Wright says it is about cultural and ecological restoration.

    This inlet brings together cultures with deep roots in this place, she said. The Coast Salish hunt, fish, gather and practice sacred ceremonies here. Sikh and Chinese labourers worked in the former cement plant now known as Butchart Gardens. People of all ages and backgrounds are drawn to the tranquility. Restoring the inlet is restoring our spirits.

    Upcoming opportunities to volunteer with invasive species removal will take place April 28, May 12 and May 26. Email seachange@shaw.ca for more information.

    1% for the Planet is an international move-ment to engage local businesses in environmen-tal philanthropy. The Victoria Foundation is one of Canadas community foundations that is committed to promoting the 1% program. 1% members recognize their responsibility to and dependence on a healthy environment by donating a minimum of one per cent of their revenues or sales annually to environmental organizations. The Victoria Foundations part-ners in 1% for the Planet are: Eagle Wing Tours, the Good Planet Company, Hemp and Company, and Horne Coupar Barristers and Solicitors.

    At Eagle Wing we believe that being a responsible steward means being active, posi-tive contributors to the ecosystem we love and are able to make our living from, said Brett Soberg, co-owner with Don Stewart of Eagle

    Wing Tours, the newest 1% member in Victo-ria. Our customers can take pride in knowing that their tourism dollars are leaving a positive impact on the whales and the marine environ-ment we all depend on.

    For more information see www.victoriafoun-dation.ca under Leadership Projects.

    By land and sea:

    Working Together how philanthropy shapes our community

    Arts & Culture

    Belonging & Leadership

    EconomyEnvironment

    Getting Started

    Health & Wellness

    HousingLearningSafetyStandard of Living

    Transportation

    CHECKLIST

    Eagle Wing Tours is the most recent business to join the Victoria Foundations 1% for the Planet partners. Note: this photo was taken with a telephoto lens, therefore visual compression makes it seem that the whales are closer to the boats than is really the case. Eagle Wing adheres to 100 metre and 183 metre viewing guidelines for Canadian and U.S. waters respectively.

    Volunteers with SeaChange Marine ConservationSociety work on habitat restoration along Tod Inlet on the Saanich Peninsula.

    Donors can follow their hearts and think creatively when working with the Victoria Foundation.We offer an amazing range of funds and causes you may support including any registered charity in Canada. We also offer many options for making your gift now or through your estate plan.

    Learn more at www.victoriafoundation.bc.ca or call 250 381-5532

    Enjoy the creativity of choice.

    Photo: Paul Destrooper, Artistic Director of Ballet Victoria a recipient of grants from the Victoria Foundation.Tickets are now on sale for A Midsummer Nights Dream & other works, May 26 June 1

  • Enforcing foolish laws

    Last weeks front page story, RCMP pay raise will affect budget.

    If the RCMP would stop enforcing fool-ish marijuana laws it should free up money for the budget. Four decades ago a federally- appointed Royal Com-mission recommended that marijuana should be de-criminalized.

    How much money has been wasted by this issue?

    Why does our govern-ment not deal with this issue as they deal with so many others:ignore it and pretend it has gone away?

    K.L. SmithShirley

    Fletcher exaggerates horrors

    Mr. T. Fletcher with his piece Environmen-talism for dummies, (April 18, Sooke News Mirror) would poke his pen at Patrick Moore once heading up Green-peace and at David Suzuki.

    Moore and his organi-zation at that time hav-ing brought world atten-tion and stoppage to Great Britain and Franc dumping nuclear waste into the north Atlantic. Suzuki having brought the workings of nature into homes of millions of adults and children the world over.

    Mr. Fletcher speaks of Suzuki and his left wing rants, ie: salmon farming and Alberta tar sands as exaggerated horrors. Mr. Fletcher evidently preferring the right wings throw-ing the environment under a bus tin order to exploit and export finite oil and toxic min-erals as quickly as pos-sible.

    Personally, I am swayed in favour of the recipient of the Order of Canada, over those who have so little soul even offering asbestos for sale.

    Barry WhitingSooke

    Local forestrysolutions needed

    Our Forests, Our Future: What does it mean for Sooke and the

    South Island? Staff in forestry were

    so horrified last week they leaked a memo that said Cabinet could create special legis-lation to prevent the provinces chief for-ester from refusing per-mission or taking them to court if politicians allow logging of forest reserves, scenic set-backs and wildlife cor-ridors in the Interior.

    Failure to diversify the economy or to man-age the timber supply led to this bizarre plan which would sacrifice more of our future for short term, limited preservation of jobs.

    Bruce Fraser, former chair of British Colum-bias independent For-est Practices Board said, if Cabinet goes there, politicians have reached the burn the furniture stage.

    The Our Forests, Our Future forums tak-ing place on May 1 at Edward Milne Commu-nity School and May 3 at the Ambrosia Events Centre are exactly intended for people from Port Renfrew, from the Sooke Region and from Greater Vic-toria to learn whats going on with our for-ests. It is for us to talk about diversifying our economy and keeping what we value. A forest is more than a potential field of stumps.

    Although it may be where you pay least attention, you have the most strength to cre-ate change at the local government level. With good information we can properly identify local problems and offer practical solutions. We can also identify what needs changing at the provincial level, and ask for the changes.

    Heather PhillipsOtter Point

    Budget made a mockery

    The photo Mutual Aid on page 9 of the April 18 edition of the Sooke News Mirror is thought provoking. Do we, as taxpayers, not pay EPCOR enough through the five-year contract, for it to do its own sewer flushing?

    Using the fire depart-ment seems like EPCOR is subsidizing its oper-ations on the backs of taxpayers.

    It would appear that the fire department, specifically its leader-ship, may be operating in its own reality.

    Recently a mem-ber of the fire depart-ment is alleged to have attended a movie in Langford and used a

    departmental vehicle for transport which gives rise to a number of questions, such as:

    Is there a policy which spells out appro-priate use of vehicles and does it allow for private use?

    What are the implica-tions had there been an accident?

    Does the insurance policy allow for private use of fire department vehicles?

    Has the member com-pensated the district for use of the vehicle?

    The member might be moved to claim that he was on call but one has to won-der about his response time and judgement in that event.

    Issues like these make a mockery of the councils efforts to deliver a budget that reflects the current fis-cal realities and clearly demonstrate that some people do not get it.

    D. R. MatlandSooke

    SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2012 www.sookenewsmirror.com OPINION 11

    LETTERS

    Pirjo Raits photo

    Time lineThe Sooke bluffs are a geologists dream. University students often come to check out the strata.

    Deliver by mail or hand to our office, or e-mail editor@sooke-newsmirror.com.

    Letters should be 300 words or less, and we may edit for length, tone and accuracy. Please include contact information.

    Letters

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  • 12 NEWS www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2012 - SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

    Michael Nyikes photo

    Readers Photo of the WeekA couple of young people enjoy lunch under a make-shift lean-to of driftwood on Billing Spit the other day. Readers Photo of the Week is sponsored by Ellen Bergerud. Send your good quality jpegs to: editor@sookenewsmirror.com

    Ancient grove named after Premier Clark

    In honour of Earth Day, the Ancient For-est Alliance is naming a recently found grove of unprotected, near record-size old-growth trees on Vancouver Island the Christy Clark Grove after B.C.s pre-mier. The group hopes the new name will moti-vate Premier Clark to protect the grove and develop a plan to pro-tect endangered old-growth forests across BC instead of support-ing their continued

    destruction. Were hoping that

    Christy Clark wont let the Christy Clark Grove get cut down, and will show some leadership by creating a plan to protect B.C.s endan-gered old-growth for-ests, stated TJ Watt, Ancient Forest Alliance photographer and campaigner, and dis-coverer of the Christy Clark Grove. Already 75 per cent of Vancou-ver Islands productive old-growth forests have been logged, including 90 per cent of the big-gest trees in the valley bottoms. Why go to the end of an ecosystem when there is an exten-sive second-growth alternative now to sus-tain the forest indus-try?

    The newly found grove is on unprotected public (Crown) lands not far from Port Ren-frew, just a half an hour drive from the famous Avatar Grove.

    TJ Watt photo

    The newly-named Christy Clark Grove

    Read the Sooke News Mirror online at: www.sookenews-mirror.com. Click on the e-edition (top of web page) to see the advertisers specials and the paper as it appears in print.

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  • Pirjo RaitsSooke News Mirror

    East Sooke has long been the haven of artists who draw their inspiration from the tranquil forests, mossy outcroppings, temperamental ocean and sultry skies out their windows. Nature is the backdrop for almost all who live amongst that rural oasis.

    They are like sailors who have succumbed to the sirens call and been lured to the rocks and forests to create and make art.

    Frescoes, mosaics, fabrics, paintings, pottery and sculptures are just some of the mediums of artistic expression from a group of creative souls in East Sooke.

    Twelve women have joined forces to hold the first East Sooke Fine Art Show the weekend before Mothers Day, May 4, 5 and 6.

    It started with the m o t h e r / d a u g h t e r connection of Bonnie Coulter and Angela Menzies along with Valerie and Leslie Speed and grew to include eight others.

    Joining them are Peg Heywood (guest artist), K T Johannesson, Kay Lovett, Alice McLean, Jacquetta Nisbet, Bev Petow, Norene Schmuk and Trinita Waller. Each of these women are accomplished and acclaimed artists with large bodies of work. From bright acrylic paintings of nudes to raku pottery, kelp baskets to lino cuts, its all there for the viewing and purchase. Works range in price from as low as a few dollars for art cards to $2,000 for more complex art pieces.

    Most of the artists are involved in the Stinking Fish Studio Tour and many of them have had their work selected for the Sooke Fine Arts Show.

    The best part is the collective intelligence and impact of these 12 artists, says Coulter.

    Of interest may be Coulters Canned Salmon series. She uses antique boat parts and lids from canning to create the scales of salmon which are then

    backed by maps. Her studio, outdoor spaces and dining room will be packed with art, hers as well as others.

    Guest artist Margaret Heywood (Peg) lives and practices art in North Vancouver.

    Mediums include oils, acrylics, watercolour, printmaking, and digital photography. Peg derives much of her inspiration from nature using thick layers of paint and vibrant complementary

    colours to translate her unique view. Subjects range from landscapes, still-life, flora/fauna and some figurative work.

    The show and sale takes place in two locations in East Sooke. The first location is Wren House at 5701 East Sooke Road and the second is Boars Bristle Studio, Bonnie Counters studio at 1509 Woodcock Road.

    The studios will be open from 12 to 7 p.m. Angela Menzies two sons, Matty and Mason, will be holding a bake sale with half of the proceeds to go to WildArc. Menzies says the boys want to adopt an otter at WildArc.

    There will be coffee and tea as well. The Boars Bristle is handicapped accessible.

    For more information and a map, go to: www.eastsookefineart.com.

    SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2012 www.sookenewsmirror.com NEWS 13

    ARTS & ENTERTAINMENTArtists emerge with fine art show

    Submitted photo

    Angela Menzies will show her paintings at the East Sooke Fine Arts Show taking place May 4-6. Right, Norene Schmuks mosaic Jewel in the Lotus.

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  • For its spring concert, Ekoos Vocal Ensemble will present two major works: Mass for Four Voices by William Byrd and the Gartenlieder by Fanny Hensel (ne Mendelssohn).

    William Byrd hardly needs introduction to classical music lovers. Fanny Hensel, how-ever, is fairly unknown, and certainly less well-known than her brother, Felix Mendelssohn.

    The Gartenlieder -- six garden songs -- exem-plify Fannys love for her Gartenhaus, where her choir rehearsed. They were published in 1846, just one year before her death. The lyrics are based on poems by German romantic poets, includ-ing one written by her husband, Wilhelm (No. 4).

    The cycle of the sea-sons, forests, water, and the natural world provided the beauti-ful images and philo-sophical symbols in her songs. She used text painting to illumi-nate the mood of each poets words through harmonic progressions and melodic figures.

    It is a pleasure for Ekoos to present the Gartenlieder, by a woman whose artistic achievement is superb and deserves much broader musical expo-sure.

    Regarding the Mass by Byrd, conductor Peter Dent points out that the choirs perfor-mance, May 6 in Sooke, will feature some of the members singing in solo voices.

    I have taken the edi-torial advice of Henry Washington in desig-nating several sections to be sung by solo voices. It is a pleasure to work with a choir with the vocal ability to perform these sections that way, said Dent.

    Ekoos is pleased to welcome three new singers this season: Dianne Copeland, Deb-orah Lambert, and Svetlana Prissick, all of whom are singing alto! Lambert has sung with many choirs on the Island but when she recently moved to Sooke to join a veteri-nary practice, she was drawn to Ekoos.

    I like that the reper-toire is challenging and that its wide ranging, not limited to sacred and early music, she said.

    Our only lament is that we havent

    attracted more men. The womens sections are now well balanced, but we would love to have more tenors and basses, added alto Merle Fulton.

    Besides choral pieces, the concert will feature guitar and flute duets by the choirs own Fred Andrew and Warren Moore. The duo will perform pieces by Sanz and Bach as well as traditional folk songs.

    Peter Dent provided the following additional notes about Byrd and Hensel.

    William Byrd (1540-1623) is generally rec-ognized as the great-est English composer of the 16th century. A

    14 ARTS www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2012 - SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

    Songs in the key of Spring

    Submitted photo

    Ekoos members at a recent weekend workshop. Conductor Peter Dent is at front right. Contd on page 15

    SOOKE BAPTIST CHURCH7110 West Coast Road | 250-642-3424

    SUNDAY SERVICE 10:00 am Children, youth & adult ministries

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    ST. ROSE OF LIMA Roman Catholic Parish6221 Sooke Rd. | 250-642-3945 | Fax: 778-425-3945

    Saturday Mass 5pm | Sunday Mass, 10 amThursday Mass 10:30 am

    Childrens Religious Ed: Sat. 3:45pm Of ce Hours: Tue-Wed 10-2, Thurs 2pm-4pm

    Rev. Fr. Michael Favero

    KNOX PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH2110 Church Rd | 250-642-4124

    SUNDAY SERVICE10:15 am Pre-Service Singing

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    Parents Room and well equipped Nursery

    HOLY TRINITY Anglican Church1962 Murray Road | 250-642-3172HOLY COMMUNION SERVICES

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    Larry RumsbySt. Rose of Lima

    An exciting time for all of us at St Rose of Lima Catholic Church in Sooke, the culmination of many years of planning & dreaming, of hoping & praying, of seemingly endless meetings leading up to this moment. Now we are down to the last couple of weeks & all seems to be chaos, workers all over the new building, parishioners all over the old building packing up for the move, just a bee hive of activity!

    The business of the moment tends to keep the memories at bay but they come ooding in as I write this column. We are about to leave a piece of ground we have had the use of for almost 100yrs thanks to the graciousness of our native people. We are leaving a building, much loved, that we have worshiped in for almost 70yrs, one that I helped build, probably my rst paying job. The memories, good & bad, joyful & sad, all those times that make up our lives are the real human side of any change such as this. The many stages of life that we can share in a loving community; baptism, con rmation, marriage, birthdays, we just celebrated a 95th last week (she had recently renewed her driving license!) anniversaries, funerals & memorials. So many memories, up lifting funeral services for Native seniors, sad ones for their young who all too often meet an untimely end.

    Moving is also a very positive time, we take our memories with us & we continue making new ones with an enhanced sense of community, which grows out of times like this. Looking forward to many of you joining with us in blessing our new building & location.

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  • SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2012 www.sookenewsmirror.com ARTS 15

    measure of his stature was that in the volatile world of the English Reformation he was able to write music for both the English and the Catholic Church. Queen Elizabeth granted him royal pro-tection in spite of his Catholic sympathies.

    Byrd wrote three masses, for three, four and five voices. The Mass for Four Voices, which was probably the first to be com-posed, is partly mod-elled on John Tavern-ers Mean Mass, a highly regarded early Tudor setting which Byrd would probably have sung as a choirboy. Taverners influence

    is particularly clear in the scale figures rising successively through a fifth, a sixth and a sev-enth in Byrds setting of the Sanctus.

    Fanny Hensel (1805-1847) was born Fanny Mendelssohn. She was a superb pianist and also composed almost 500 pieces of music, although very few were published during her lifetime. A number of her songs were origi-nally published under her brother, Felixs name in his opus 8 and 9 collections.

    She was limited by prevailing attitudes of the time toward women, attitudes apparently shared by her father, who was tolerant, rather

    than supportive of her activities as a composer. Her father wrote to her in 1820, Music will per-haps become his (i.e. Felixs) profession, while for you it can and must be only an ornament.

    On May 14, 1847, a reviewer of her work, the Gartenlieder, stated, The harmonic treat-ment is quite refined and makes one aware of an artistically taste-ful hand. Above all of the songs hangs a gen-tle, poetic sentiment.

    Sadly, Fanny Hen-sel died the same day as these words were written, the victim of a stroke.

    Ekoos will do its best to convey her artistry. The choir will also per-

    form music by the early Flemish composer Jacob Obrecht, Cana-dians Dr. Healey Willan and Stephen Chatman, and the 19th century Irish Composer Sir Charles Villiers Stan-ford.

    Concert Times and Venues

    The program will first performed in North Saanich on Saturday May 5 at 7:30 p.m., at the Holy Trinity Church, 1319 Mills Road.

    It will be performed in Sooke on Sunday May 6th at 7:30 p.m. at Holy Trinity Church, 1962 Murray Road.

    Tickets available at the Reading Room Bookstore and at the door.

    Contd from page 14

    Celebrate at 75th

    Anniversary dance

    The Sooke Commu-nity Association and the Sooke Lions Club are holding a dance to celebrate the 75th anni-versary of the Sooke Community Hall.

    Back in 1937 on April 6, 1,000 people filled the hall to kick up their heels. People came from all over as

    the population of Sooke was only about 500. The Sooke Community Hall was, at one time, the biggest uninterrupted floor space on Vancou-ver Island.

    On April 28, Phoenix will play for a dance. For the price of $7.50, dancers also get chili and a bun. The price is

    reflective of the num-ber of years the hall has been the hub of the community.

    Advance tickets are available at Shop-pers and Peoples Drug Marts.

    Come out, dance a little, visit a little and have a whole lot of fun.

    Community HallCommunity Hall 75th Anniversary75th AnniversaryCome Celebrate with us

    SSooke ooke CCommunity ommunity AAssociation ssociation and and SSooke ooke LLions ions CClublub

    AANNIVERSARY NNIVERSARY DDANCEANCE

    April 28 2012Sooke Community Hall

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    His high quality cabinets are available at fair and affordable prices and the design service and estimates are free.

    Installing a new kitchen and refreshing or updating the look throughout is one of the best ways to maximize your homes potential for sale. Kitchens and bathrooms are the two areas in a home that see the most bene t from an uplift.

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    Darryl and his team build to the clients speci cations and are there from start to nish, always working with what the customers wants in mind.

    Hand Craft Woodworks offers very competitive pricing and Darryl is available anytime. Call 250-589-9663 to set up an appointment. The showroom, located at 5871 Sooke Road is open Monday to Friday from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

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  • 16 www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2012 - SOOKE NEWS MIRROR SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2012 www.sookenewsmirror.com 17

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  • 16 www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2012 - SOOKE NEWS MIRROR SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2012 www.sookenewsmirror.com 17

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  • 18 ARTS www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2012 - SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

    Submitted photos

    The East Sooke Fine Arts Show will feature Jacquetta Nisbets TSou-ke Harbour, left, Alice McLeans pottery and Bonnie Coulters Canned Salmon top, along with Above the Wave by Trinita Waller.

    Brendan Herlihy Time for a move?

    BRAND NEW 3 BED/3 BATH HOMEEXCELLENT LOCATION & VALUE!

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    Featuring 1433 sq. ft., 3 beds & 3 baths. The main floor features 9ft. ceilings, a beautiful kitchen with granite counter tops & formal dining with slider out to private covered patio & rear yard. Large living room with electric fireplace. The upper floor features 3 beds, master with full ensuite & walk in closet, main bath & laundry room. Smooth ceilings throughout. Single car garage, fenced rear yard. Appliances included & 10 yr. warranty. Price incl. HST. Qualifies for 1st time buyer $10,000 bonus!

    Redeemable at participating BC Casinos locations. Present this to restaurant staff upon seating. Guests can only redeem one Meal & Deal offer per day. 1 coupon per couple required. Cannot be combined with BcGold Encore discounts and/or any other offer. Discounts exclude tax, tips and/or alcohol where applicable. Some restrictions may apply. Free play offer valid for slot play or blackjack match play only. Offer is subject to change. Non-transferable and no cash value. While supplies last. No copies or facsimiles accepted. Offer valid from April 26May 31, 2012. If you gamble, use your GameSense. Must be 19+ to play.

    Cut out this coupon or download it and find participating locations at Facebook.com/BCCasinos

    Bring a friend to a participating BC Casino and get 2 for 1 entrees and free play. Just show this coupon to your server before your meal, then take your dining receipt and this coupon to Guest Services to get your free play. Get ready to feel the thrills!

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    PRICE REDUCED!!Exceptional value in this fabulous 4 bedroom immaculately maintained home with a gourmet kitchen. Located in the popular Foreman Heights area this home is a must see. Priced to sell at

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  • SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2012 www.sookenewsmirror.com ARTS 19

    Lumber Lions: Filming the pastFilmmaker takes a look at Sookes lumber baronPirjo RaitsSooke News Mirror

    When Davis Gray was growing up in Vic-toria his family kept a boat in Tod Inlet and as a kid he discovered an old Chinese and Sikh workers village at the old cement plant. He unearthed artifacts and in the overgrown for-ests he found Chinese pots, whiskey bottles, pigs teeth, you name it.

    I was curious about who these people were and who lived there, said Gray.

    He discovered that about 40 of the 150 workers were Sikhs and this opened up dis-cussions among people who knew the men who worked there. Gray was there to record the early history and immi-gration stories of Brit-ish Columbias early Sikhs.

    Gray chose to research and film the Sikh angle and has spent the last 50 years doing so.

    Singh translates to Lion in Punjabi, hence the title Lumber Lions, the film Gray is produc-ing for OMNI Television tracing the involvement of the Sikhs in the B.C. lumber industry. This will be the fifth film on Sikh stories docu-mented by Gray. One of his films, Beyond the Gardens Wall was shown at the Victoria Film Festival.

    David and Sally Gary have formed their own film and production company from their home base in Ottawa. David spent 21 years as a museum scientist and Sally is a writer and edi-tor.

    Davids a fact per-son, Im a story per-son, said Sally.

    Sooke has a Sikh connection through the old Kapoor lumber mill which was located at the southern end of Sooke Lake. It skirts the Galloping Goose Trail and the Sooke River. It was located where the old CNR tracks cross Council Creek which is in the Capital Regional District watershed.

    Gray and his wife Sally were in Sooke last week to trek up to the old mill site and record it on film, and they were at the Sooke Region Museum to scour the archives for photos of the mill, which oper-ated from 1928 to 1940.

    Gray and an entou-rage hiked up to the mill site which no lon-ger has any buildings or structures, just cement foundations and bits of metal sticking out of the ground.

    It was a wonderful gathering, said Gray.

    The sentiment was

    echoed by Elida Peers who said, it was abso-lutely great and that the CRD had every asset poured in to this tour.

    The main thread of the story/film follows three lumber lions who started in the lumber industry in the early 1900s. Kapoor, Mayo and Doman Singh all started as labourers in the mills of the day and went on to start their own. The Kapoor fam-ily still owns property and logs in the area of the old mill.

    The project began in January and will finish in July. Gray has spent a lot of time in the pro-vincial archives search-ing for moving images of Sikhs.

    Its not easy, said Gray. Theres treasure in the archives as well as on the ground.

    The hour long film will first be shown on OMNI television and there is a possibility it will then be screened in Sooke.

    For more information on the Grays and their work, go to: www.arc-ticgrayhound.ca.

    Pirjo Raits photo

    David Gray and his wife Sally, were at the Sooke Region Museum looking at old photographs of the Kapoor Mills. Historian Elida Peers, right, provides some history.

    Vancouver Island Owned and Operated for 64 YearsVancouver Islandndddd OOOOOwnwnwned aaaaand Opepepeperaratetedddd fofofoforrr 64646464 Yearswww.slegglumber.com

    SLEGG LUMBER DOOR PRODUCTION SHOPLANGFORD LOCATION ONLY!!!Wide Selection of interior, exterior,

    pre-hung and french doors. Overstocked, scratched, dented and cut-down

    doors Framed thermal glass inserts All items purchased must be removed

    on the day of the sale.

    SaveSaveup toup to

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    Minors must be accompanied by an adult at all times.

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    HOW TO GET HERE...

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    2205 Otter Point Road, SookePhone: 250-642-1634

    Fax: 250-642-0541email: info@sooke.ca

    website: www.sooke.ca

    Upcoming Public MeetingsPublic Hearing

    Secondary/Small SuitesMonday, April 30, 2012 at 7:00 p.m.Committee of the WholeTuesday, May 1, 2012 at 6:30 p.m.

    Special Council Financial Plan and Tax Rate Bylaw

    Tuesday, May 1, 2012 at 7:30 p.m.

    This schedule is subject to change. Please call 250-642-1634 to con rm meetings.

    Council meeting agendas may be viewed at www.sooke.ca

    WHATS NEW AT THE DISTRICTCHECK IT OUT! at www.sooke.ca

    Lions 9th Annual 32 Km Galloping Goose WalkLions 9th Annual 32 Km Galloping Goose Walkin support of Easter Seal Camp Shawnigan

    Saturday, May 5, 2011Contact: Dave Nash 250-642-4515

    gglinearwalk@hotmail.comRegistration and pledge forms at

    http://www.sookedistrictlioness.org/2012_32_km_reg_form.pdf

    OUR FORESTSOUR FUTURE

    Please attend this Community Forum to lend your voice to the discussion about the future of the Juan de Fuca forest lands in the CRD.

    Tuesday, 1 May, 7:00 p.m.at Edward Milne Community School, SookeRosie Betsworth, President of the Port Renfrew Chamber of Commerce and leader on sustainability plus ecotourism issues.Bill Bourgeois, founder of the community forums, Healthy Forests, Healthy Communities initiative, Registered Professional Forester.Vicky Husband, 30 year honoured advocate for better forest management and protection.

    For more information please contact Ana Simeon at ana@sierraclub.bc.ca

    COMMUNITY HALL75TH ANNIVERSARYDANCESaturday, April 28, 2012

    Sooke Community HallMusic by Pheonix$7.50 per ticket

    on sale atShoppers Drug & Peoples

  • 20 www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2012 - SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

    1

    0

    2

    3

    4

    5

    6

    1990 2012 2030**Source: 9th Actuarial Report on the Old Age Security Program

    The number of working-age Canadians for every senior is decreasing**

    54 or older as of March 31, 2012 You may still obtain OAS/GIS at age 65

    The age of eligibility for OAS/GIS will change graduallybetween 2023 and 2029

    Starting in July 2013, Canadians who are eligible for, but not yet receiving OAS will have the flexibility to delay receiving it in exchange for a higher monthly amount at a later date.

    53 or younger as of March 31, 2012

    What does this mean for you?

    Canadians are living longer and costs for the Old Age Security (OAS) are rising.

    On April 1, 2023 the Government of Canada plans to start raising the age of eligibility for OAS and the Guaranteed Income Supplement (GIS) from 65 to 67.*

    The number of working-age Canadians per senior is decreasing, placing additional pressure on the OAS program.

    For a free brochure or more information visit www.ServiceCanada.gc.ca/retirement

    or call 1 800 O-Canada (TTY 1-800-926-9105) *Subject to parliamentary approval

  • Sharron HoSooke News Mirror

    The Sooke Family Resource Society will be holding a six-week program for parents oftweens starting on April 26.

    Teresa Norquay, Fam-ily Resource programco-ordinator, said the My Tween and Me pro-gram will be catered to parents of children

    aged between 7-12 -- thetransition period from childhood to teenageyears.

    Some of the topicscovered include: healthy development, develop-ing good family relation-ships, developing goodpeer relationships, look-ing at media and chil-dren, and building a sense of community.

    Theres a lot of focus on the concept

    of reducing risk factorsin a childs life by cre-ating good attachmentrelationships with the tweens, Norquay said.

    Good attachment is defined as the con-nection between par-ent and child, where a child feels comfortable talking to their parentwithout fear of being punished.

    The program, which is in its third year, will

    operate as a small dis-cussion group, where parents will be able toshare their own experi-ences with tween par-enting.

    The other part of theprogram is that parents

    will be learning fromeach other as well, so strategies for parentingfrom each other.

    She said the tweenperiod is a phase where children are developingtheir own identities,

    while retaining the needfor engaged parenting.

    Quite often thesekids, because they are striving to developtheir sense of self, it may appear they dontwant closeness, but

    research shows... thatthe kids that do well in life were more con-nected to their parents at that age.

    Interested partici-pants can register at250-642-5152.

    After delivering newspapers to SookeFamily Resource Society (SFRS), Danika Joslin realized she wanted to embracethe world of volunteering and saw opportunity at thissocial service agency in her community. She knew shewanted to work with young children and offered to vol-unteer in the Children and Family programming atSFRS.

    For the last four years, Danika has volunteered at least once a week help-ing in the Monday Parent and Child drop-in group as well as Wednesdays in the early learning component of the Par-ent Discussion group. Over the years she has met many families from thecommunity, watching toddlers grow and head off to kindergarten andwelcoming new babies to the pro-grams. Working with these children

    has illustrated for Danika the impor-tance of being aware of their needs and has helped her recognize the dif-

    ferent stages of child devel-opment. Danikas favouritepart of working with the chil-dren is how funny they are,especially the things they say, and getting to know theirparents. Danika has been exposed to various transfer-able skills while volunteering at SFRS and she sees that vol-unteering is a good way to learn about a field of work.

    As well as dedicating her time every week, Danika has been studying English at

    Camosun College and works part-time in our community. She values the experience gained from her rolein the Children and Family drop-in groups and is a dedicated and valuedmember of the SFRS team.

    SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2012 www.sookenewsmirror.com LIFESTYLES 21

    Just tween you and me: program for parents and teens

    feroppadressapaexabatunleDanika Joslin

    Volunteer

    Extraordinary volunteer: Danika Joslin

    All Community events which purchase a display ad will now appear in our current community event calendar at no charge. All FREE EVENTS will be listed at no charge. Space permitting.

    Whats Up in SookeWhats Up in Sooke This WeekThis Week

    COMMUNITY CALENDAR DEADLINE: THURSDAY @ 3PMItems for Community Calendar must be non-commercial

    and free to the public. Please limit to 25 words.

    SHOPPERSDRUG MART 250-642-5229

    Wed.Wed.April 25 April 25 ROYAL CANADIAN LEGIONROYAL CANADIAN LEGION Drop-in ladies darts - 1 p.m. Drop-in ladies darts - 1 p.m. Shuf eboard - 6:30 p.m.Shuf eboard - 6:30 p.m.Nascar Meet and PickNascar Meet and Pick

    SOOKE HARBOUR SOOKE HARBOUR TOASTMASTERS TOASTMASTERS MEETINGMEETINGLocated at Village Foods Located at Village Foods meeting room, from meeting room, from 7-8:30 p.m. 7-8:30 p.m. SOOKE GARDEN CLUBSOOKE GARDEN CLUBBegins at 7:30 p.m. Begins at 7:30 p.m. upstairs in the Sooke upstairs in the Sooke Legion. Legion.

    Thurs.Thurs. April 26April 26UNDER THE IUNDER THE IRegular bingo games Regular bingo games are scheduled in the are scheduled in the remens lounge at the remens lounge at the municipal hall today from municipal hall today from 12:45 to 3 p.m. 12:45 to 3 p.m. SOOKE LIBRARYSOOKE LIBRARYPreschool story time Preschool story time at 10:30 a.m. Stories, at 10:30 a.m. Stories, songs, rhymes, songs, rhymes, ngerplays and more will ngerplays and more will be held for children aged be held for children aged 3-5. Register at 250-642-3-5. Register at 250-642-3022. 3022.

    Sat.Sat.April 28April 28ROYAL CANADIAN ROYAL CANADIAN

    LEGIONLEGIONMMeat draweat draw 3:00 P.M.3:00 P.M.SOOKE COMMUNITY SOOKE COMMUNITY HALLHALL75th anniversary of the 75th anniversary of the Sooke Community Hall Sooke Community Hall from 8 p.m. - 1 a.m. from 8 p.m. - 1 a.m. Tickets available at Tickets available at Peoples Drug Mart and Peoples Drug Mart and Shoppers Drug Mart. Shoppers Drug Mart. FAMILY FAIR FAMILY FAIR Begins at SEAPARC Begins at SEAPARC from 9-1 p.m. from 9-1 p.m. SKATEBOARD SKATEBOARD COMPETITIONCOMPETITIONAt the Sooke Skatepark. At the Sooke Skatepark. 11 a.m. registration, with 11 a.m. registration, with a fee of $5. a fee of $5.

    Mon.Mon.April 30April 30ROYAL CANADIAN ROYAL CANADIAN LEGIONLEGION Euchre - 7 p.m. Darts - 7:30Euchre - 7 p.m. Darts - 7:30..

    Sun.Sun.April 29 April 29

    ELVIS ELITE TRIBUTE ELVIS ELITE TRIBUTE

    SHOWSHOWDinner at 6 p.m and Dinner at 6 p.m and Show at 7 p.m. at the Show at 7 p.m. at the Royal Canadian Legion. Royal Canadian Legion. Tickets available at the Tickets available at the Legion. Legion.

    Tues.Tues.May 1May 1YOUTH CLINICYOUTH CLINICWest Coast Family West Coast Family Medical Clinic 4-7 p.m. Medical Clinic 4-7 p.m. 642-4233.642-4233. VISION DEVELOPMENTVISION DEVELOPMENTAt the Sooke Child, Youth At the Sooke Child, Youth and Family Centre (CASA and Family Centre (CASA building) 2145 Townsend building) 2145 Townsend Road from 10-11:30 a.m. Road from 10-11:30 a.m. Contact 250.642.5464 for more Contact 250.642.5464 for more information.information.

    ROYAL CANADIAN LEGIONROYAL CANADIAN LEGION Texas Holdem - 6 p.m., Texas Holdem - 6 p.m., darts - 7:30darts - 7:30

    Fri.Fri.April 27April 27VITAL VITTLES FREE VITAL VITTLES FREE LUNCHLUNCH 11:30-1:00 p.m. Holy 11:30-1:00 p.m. Holy Trinity Church on Murray Trinity Church on Murray Rd. Everyone welcome. Rd. Everyone welcome.

    FAMILY LITERACY DAYFAMILY LITERACY DAY Join us for family story Join us for family story time from 11:00 a.m. to time from 11:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. For more info 11:30 a.m. For more info or to register call 250-or to register call 250-642-3022.642-3022.

    BABYTIME FRIDAYS: BABYTIME FRIDAYS: 10:30-11:00 A.M.10:30-11:00 A.M.Fun-based program Fun-based program for babies aged 0-18 for babies aged 0-18 months. Register at 250-months. Register at 250-642-3022.642-3022.ROYAL CANADIAN ROYAL CANADIAN LEGIONLEGIONSteak Night from 6-7 p.m. Steak Night from 6-7 p.m.

    Port San JuanPort San Juan

    Stellar JayStellar Jay

    Mark IVMark IV

    HaliHali

    250-642-6112info@sookereg ionchamber. com

    Chamber Mixer TONIGHTTugwell Creek Honey Farm and Meadery

    co-hosted by Little Vienna Bakery shared with:

    The Sooke Region Chamber Member Meeting scheduled for

    Tues May 1 has been RESCHEDULED to Wed May 2 12:00, The Mix by Rics at the

    Prestige Hotel. RSVP to the CHamber offcie by Monday April 30 for attendance.

    April 22nd and how will you help?April 22nd and how will you help?

    Sooke Philharmonic Society

    Presents the

    Finalists of the 7th Annual

    Don Chrysler Concerto

    Competition for Young Musicians

    Ethan Allers Cello Nathan Bomans Violin Alice Haekyo Lee Violin Andrew Kang Piano Eehjoon Kwon Violin

    Sat. April 28, 7:00 PM Phillip T. Young Recital Hall

    University of Victoria

    Admission by donation

    Info: 250-642-5760 / 250-386-5760 www.sookephil.ca

    COMMUNITY HALL75TH ANNIVERSARYDANCESaturday, April 28, 2012

    Sooke Community HallMusic by Pheonix$7.50 per ticket

    on sale atShoppers Drug & Peoples

  • 22 LIFESTYLES www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2012 - SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

    ALM saves and shares seeds and offers adviceALM Organic Farm has

    been a strong force in the growing community for over 20 years. The farm was first started by Jan and Mary Alice Johnson and since its inception many others have added their skills and passion to make the farm a vibrant and beautiful hub of food production in the community. On the farm they practice sustainability by growing, harvesting, preserving, and marketing food and teaching others how to do the same.

    The farm was first cultivated in about 1910 when the Harris family bought the land as a turnip farm and built a two storey

    salt block home on 20 acres. It acted as a spill over for the Scarf house which was the stagecoach stop when Otter Point Road was the main route to Jordan River, Shirley and other points north of Sooke. The farm has been owned by a number of families since then but was bought by Jan and Mary Alice Johnson in 1986. At that time the land was covered with Scotch broom, the house was in disrepair and the barn listed to the north. Jan and Mary Alice restored the farm house with the help of friends.

    We began producing food commercially in 1990 using organic methods and were

    certified organic in 1994. Immediately restaurants and individuals sought out the organic fruit and vegetables grown on the farm and folks interested in learning how to farm organically started to visit and volunteer on the farm, says the farm website.

    To date, over 1,000 volunteers have spent from a day to several years at the farm learning how to grow food. At the farm they teach such skills as growing, collecting and drying medicinal herbs, building temporary and permanent shelters using natural materials around us, baking bread, making baskets,

    welding, animal husbandry, plant propagation, orcharding, bee-keeping, seed saving.

    In 1990 they began saving seeds for their own use and this practice grew into a thriving retail and wholesale business. To that end, on April 28 the gates will be open at the farm and people can come out and purchase seeds and plants.

    Planting guide:April Weeks 1 & 2Seed in trays:+lettuces

    (every two weeks to one month to Sept.), bok choi, chard, scallions, fennel

    Direct Seed (outside): +potatoes, peas, spinach, salad brassicas etc. 1st-

    radish, carrots, beets*, herbs, kale, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, runner beans, parsnips (W), kohlrabi

    Weeks 3 & 4 Seed in trays/pots:

    +lettuces, cukes, basil. first- summer squash

    Direct seed (outside): +peas

    The second annual ALM Organic Farm Plant & Seed Sale is around the corner- just in time for spring planting. The sale will take place on the farm at 3680 Otter Point Road in Sooke on Saturday, April 28 from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m.

    The sale will feature a wide variety of vegetables,

    herbs and flowers both annual and perennial perfect for gardens big or small as well as a full offering of the Full Circle Seeds collection. All seeds and plants are certified organic and grown on site. Farm staff will be available to answer your questions. Bring the whole family to come see the farm and purchase plants directly from the growers.

    ALM Farm and Full Circle seeds can also be found weekly, in season, at the Moss Street Community Market and Sooke Country Market.

    www.almfarms.orgwww.fullcircleseeds.com

    Wh

    On April 11, 2012, the FortisBC Energy Utilities applied to the British Columbia Utilities Commission to amalgamate their natural gas utilities across the province and to implement common rates and services across their service areas starting January 1, 2014. Currently, FortisBC Energy Utilities is made up of three separate natural gas companies, operating in six service areas. The companies have their own services, service agreements (tariffs) and rates. If approved, the application would combine the three companies into one, under a single tariff, with com-mon rates for the various regions.

    This Application has different implications for customers in each service area. If approved, customers in the Vancouver Island and Whistler service areas will see rate decreases, while customers in the Lower Mainland, Columbia, Inland, and Fort Nelson service areas will see an overall rate increase.

    PUBLIC REVIEW PROCESSThe Commission is initiating a review of FortisBC Energy Utilities Application. To view the timetable for this hearing and the Application go to www.bcuc.com select Current Applications under Quick Links and scroll to FEU Common Rates, Amalgamation and Rate Design.

    HOW TO GET INVOLVEDIf you wish to participate actively in the review process, you may register as an Intervener or an Interested Party with the Commission Secretary in writing, using the contact information at the end of this notice. All submissions and/or correspondence received from active participants or the general public relating to the Application will be placed on the public record and posted to the Commissions website.

    If you wish to attend the Public Workshop or the Procedural Conference please register with the Commission Secretary using the contact information at the end of this Notice.

    WORKSHOPFortisBC Energy will explain the Application and answer questions.Date Time LocationMonday, April 30, 2012

    9:00 am Commission Hearing Room12th Floor, 1125 Howe StreetVancouver, BC

    PROCEDURAL CONFERENCEThe Commission will consider the regulatory process to review the Application.Date Time LocationFriday, June 15, 2012

    9:00 am Commission Hearing Room12th Floor, 1125 Howe StreetVancouver, BC

    VIEW THE APPLICATION The Application and all supporting documentation are available on the Commissions website on the Current Applications page (www.bcuc.com) and on the FortisBC website (www.fortisbc.com).

    If you would like to review the material in hard copy, it is available at the locations below:

    FORTISBC ENERGY UTILITIES INTEND TO AMALGAMATE NATURAL GAS SERVICE IN B.C. AND IMPLEMENT COMMON RATES

    FortisBC Energy Utilities Inc. Head Office16705 Fraser HighwaySurrey, BC V4N 0E8

    FortisBC Energy Utilities Inc. Victoria Office320 Garbally RoadVictoria, BC V8T 2K1

    FortisBC Energy Utilities Inc. Kelowna Office1975 Springfield RoadKelowna, BC V1Y 7V7

    FortisBC Energy Utilities Inc. Fort Nelson Office3901 Nahanni DriveFort Nelson, BC V0C 1R0

    FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO REGISTERFor more information please contact Ms. Alanna Gillis, Acting Commission Secretary at Commission.Secretary@bcuc.com or using the Commission contact information.

    British Columbia Utilities CommissionSixth Floor, 900 Howe StreetVancouver, BC V6Z 2N3Fax: 604-660-1102

  • SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2012 www.sookenewsmirror.com CLASSIFIEDS 23

    STUDY.WORK.SUCCEES U .

    D.

    SprottShhawCOMMUNITY COLLEGES i n c e 1 9 0 3

    TRAIN TO BE AN ACCOUNTING & PAYROLL ADMINISTRATOR IN VICTORIA TODAY!

    250.384.8121www.sprottshaw.com

    JOIN US ON:

    CALL VICTORIA:

    The future job prospects for this group remain at above average with projected new jobs and openings due to retirements (between 2010 and 2015) remaining high.

    Entry-level positions often provide considerable potential for advancement.

    www.blackpress.ca

    The Victoria News is looking for a skilled advertising designer to join our community newspapers production department.

    This part-time position is for approximately 20 hrs per week and requires the successful applicant to be pro cient in AdobeCS3: InDesign, Photoshop, Illustrator and Acrobat on a Mac platform. Experience in web design would be an asset. The position may require shift and weekend work. Creative design experience in graphic arts is preferred, and a portfolio is required. You are a self-starter, team player and are comfortable working in a fast-paced, deadline driven environment.

    We are a well-established, nationally-recognized community newspaper group with more than 150 community, daily and urban papers located in B.C., Alberta, Washington State, Hawaii and Ohio.

    Those interested in applying should submit their resum by Monday, April 23, 2012 to:

    Janice Marshall, Production Manager818 Broughton St., Victoria, BC V8W 1E4E-mail: creative@vicnews.comFax: (250) 386-2624

    All inquiries and applications will be held in the strictest con dence.We would like to thank in advance all who apply, however only those chosen for an interview will be contacted. No phone calls please.

    Creative ServicesGraphic Designer

    AIRLINES ARE Hiring- Train for high paying Aviation Main-tenance Career. FAA ap-proved program. Financial aid if quali ed- Housing available. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (877)818-0783.

    HOME BASED Business. We need serious and motivated people for expanding health & wellness industry. High speed internet and phone essential. Free online training.www.project4wellness.com

    COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

    COMING EVENTS

    BC ARTS and Culture Week is on until the 28th! Find out whats going on in your com-munity and schools at www.bcartsweek.org/events

    BINGOBonanzas, Cracker

    Jack, Regular games

    Every Tuesday & Thursday

    12:45 - 3:00 pm

    Drop-In Centreacross from Petrocan

    on Sooke Rd in downtown Sooke

    Reasonably priced lunch available

    Must be 19 yrs 250-642-6898

    for more info

    CALL FOR ENTRIES10TH ANNUAL

    Kitty Coleman WoodlandArt & Bloom Festival.

    Fine Art and Quality Crafts Juried Show.

    Presented in a spectacular outdoor setting May 19,20, 21

    Applications for Artisans are available at

    woodlandgardens.ca or phone 250-338-6901

    EKOOSVocal Ensemble

    presents

    Songs in the Key of Spring

    7:30pm SAT, May 5Holy Trinity Church

    1319 Mills Rd, NORTH SAANICH

    (by donation)7:30pm SUN, May 6Holy Trinity Church

    1962 Murray Rd, SOOKE

    Tickets $12 at the Reading Room Bookstore, and at the door.

    250-642-7966

    SOOKE GARDEN CLUB

    Wednesday, April 25 @ 7:30, Upstairs @ Legion

    Gord Hut ChingsBees - Prime Pollinators

    Everyone WelcomeSOOKE RESIDENTS in Need Society A.G.M., May 2nd, 1:15 pm at Seniors Centre in the Fire Hall

    SOOKE SENIOR ACTIVITY SOCIETY

    Chemainus TheatreSun. July 15

    Joseph and the Many Col-oured Dream coat

    Theatre and lunch, $55Bus, $15

    June 250-642-1521

    SOOKE SENIORS ACTIVITY SOCIETY

    (bus)A.G.M.

    May 2, 1 pm Fire ghters lounge

    SPRING/SUMMER SOCCER Paci c Soccer Academy Coach: Harj Nandhra www.paci csoccer.ca

    COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

    INFORMATION.

    CONTACT LOAN Cupboard call 250-389-4607. Need a ride? Call 250-389-4661.SOOKE CRISIS & Referral Centre, 2043 Church Rd. Open 10am-1pm, Mon.-Fri. 250-642-0215.SOOKE MEALS on Wheels, Box 109, Sooke, BC V9Z 0E5. Alma Anslow 250-642-2184.

    LOST AND FOUND

    Found: Digital camera on Sat. or Sun. 778-425-0053Found: Red canoe. 250-642-5959

    HELP WANTED

    TRAVEL

    GETAWAYS

    LONG BEACH - Ucluelet - Deluxe waterfront cabin,

    sleeps 6, BBQ.Spring Special. 2 nights $239 / 3 nights $299.Pets Okay. Rick 604-306-0891

    BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

    ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS

    to Every Hunter in BC! Advertise in The BC Hunting Regulations Synopsis 2012-2014 publication. Increased circulation 250,000 cop-ies! Tremendous Reach, Two Year Edition!

    Contact Annemarie at 1 800 661 6335

    or hunt@blackpress.ca

    CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

    HELP WANTED

    CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

    $294+ DAILY Mailing Post-cards! Easy! Guaranteed Legit Work! www.ThePostcardGuru.com $20-$60/hr Using Your Computer!www.FreeJobPosition.comOvernight Cash To Your Door-step! www.CashGiftingBucks.com More Amazing Opportunities Visit: www.LegitCashJobs.com

    EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

    APPLY NOW: Pennywise Scholarship For Women to at-tend Journalism certi cate course at Langara College in Vancouver. Deadline May 30, 2012. More information: www.bccommunitynews.comTHE ONE and only Harley Davidson Technician Training Program in Canada. GPRC Fairview Campus. 15 week program. Current H-D motor-cycle training aids. Affordable residences. 1-888-999-7882; www.gprc.ab.ca/fairview.

    EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

    Looking for a NEW job?www.bcjobnetwork.com

    EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

    TRAIN TO be an Apart-ment/Condominium Manager at home! We have jobs across Canada. Thousands of gradu-ates working. 31 years of suc-cess! Government certi ed. www.RMTI.ca or 1-800-665-8339, 604-681-5456.

    EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

    HELP WANTED

    Experienced SERVER re-quired. Bring resume to The

    Edge Restaurant. 6686 Sooke Road.

    EXPERIENCED SERVICE Provider for Chrysler dealer-ship in Salmon Arm. Strongcustomer satisfaction skills.Able to work in a fast pacedenvironment. Excellent wage/bene t package. Fax resume1-250-832-4545. E-mail: pat@brabymotors.comHolbrook Dyson Logging Ltd Has vacancies in the followingjob: Heavy Duty Mechanic.Details can be seen athttp://hdlogging.com/ Fax re-sume to 250-287-9259T-MAR INDUSTRIES located in Campbell River is hiring forthe position of a quali ed Ma-chinist. Position comes with acompetitive bene t packageand applicant must possess avalid drivers license. ContactTyson Lambert. Mail: 5791Duncan Bay Road, CampbellRiver BC V9H 1N6 Fax: 250-2 8 6 - 9 5 0 2Email: tysonlambert@tmar.com

    EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

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    7EDNESDAY%DITION$EADLINES8PSE"ET-ONDAYxxAM%JTQMBZ"ET&RIDAYxxAM

    ANDERSON, OlafurDate of death April 18th, 2012

    With great sadness we announce the sudden passing of Oli, Born in Riverton, MB, Oli was predeceased by his parents. Magnus and Vega Anderson; siblings, Rosa, Harold and Magnus and his beloved son, Randall. He is survived by his loving wife of 59 years, Mae Gudrun; daughter, Kristine (Dennis); son, Vincent; daughter, Pamella (Mike); daughter-in-Law, Fran; grandchildren, Cheri (Mike), Jill, Cory (Erin), Eric, Craig, Justin, Nicole (Nathan), Sacha, Brett; Great grandchildren, Kale, Carly, Billy, Gregory, Carissa, Kassia and his faithful companion, Fusi. Oli and Mae were married on April 4th, 1953. They resided in Manitoba until 1970, when they moved to Pincher Creek, AB. From there they moved to Sooke, BC in 1978 and have resided there since. Oli will be remembered for his love and his laughter. Oli loved living near the ocean, where he spent endless hours beachcombing with his grandchildren, shing, walking Fusi on the boardwalk, always taking time to stop and say hello. Our Papa was always there for us. His endless love and devotion to his family, especially his wife, will be a legacy we will always remember. He will be greatly missed by all who knew him, but never forgotten.

    OBITUARY

    Call us for Complimentary

    GIFT BASKET Newcomers to Sooke& Surrounding Area:Judy 250-642-2268

    New Moms: Jackie 250-642-6010

    Bonanzas, Cracker Jack, Regular gamesEvery Tuesday & Thursday12:45 - 3:00 p.m.NEW LOCATIONNEW LOCATION

    SENIORSDROP-IN CENTRE

    Firemans LoungeSooke Municipal Hall2205 Otter Point Rd.

    Reasonably pricedLunch available

    Must be 19 years250-642-6898

    for more info

  • 24 CLASSIFIEDS www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2012 - SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

    Queen Alexandra Foundation for Children is seeking a charitable society providing services supporting children, youth and families to occupy approx. 1,100 square feet in its Child, Youth and Family Centre on Townsend Road. Lease is $1 per year to quali ed tenant plus approx. $1,800 in monthly operating costs. Included are utilities, shared receptionist, shared common space (including washrooms, kitchen, meeting rooms, staff/client parking, community garden, etc).

    Sooke Child, Youth & Family CentreSooke Child, Youth & Family CentreSpace Available May 1stSpace Available May 1st

    Join a group of dedicated service and program providers serving the needs of the Sooke

    community. For more information,contact Peter Fairchild at pfairchild@hayworth.ca

    or call 250-896-4431

    HELP WANTED

    KARATE INSTRUCTOR ( Sensei). Growing club needs a Kimura Karate experi-enced instructor with a mini-mum of 2nd Dan and 10 years experience. Interna-tional training and competing experience a must. Fit4de-fense certi cation and expe-rience a de nite plus. This is full-time position. Salary $15. 250-642-4631

    NEED GRASS cutter. Kemp Lake area. $12/hr using my equipment OR $15/hr using yours. 250-642-3422 after 6 p.m.

    Newcastle Timber Ltd Has vacancies in the following job: experienced Grapple Yarder Operator. Details can be seen at http://hdlogging.com/ Fax resume to 250-287-9259

    TEMPORARY OFA 3 Atten-dant reqd for shutdown at Jor-dan River. May 29-June 28. Not a camp job. Email resume and drivers abstract to Rescue One: raychickite@hotmail.com

    THE SOOKE NEWS Mirror cautions readers about send-ing money to obtain informa-tion about any employment opportunities

    WANTED:Servers, bartenders, barristas & cooks @

    Telegraph Cove Resorts Ltd. Send resume to Box 1,

    Telegraph Cove, BC V0N 3J0. Fax: 250-928-3105 or email: tcrltd@island.net.

    Attn: Taso.

    WANTED:Servers, bartenders, barristas & cooks @

    Telegraph Cove Resorts Ltd. Send resume to Box 1,

    Telegraph Cove, BC V0N 3J0. Fax: 250-928-3105 or email: tcrltd@island.net.

    Attn: Taso.

    MEDICAL/DENTAL

    RNS & LPNSBayshore Home Health

    Bayshore Home Health is currently seeking RNs & LPNs in the Victoria area to work with children with complex care needs who may have a tracheostomy and ventilation, or require peritoneal dialysis care. If you love working with children, we would be delighted to hear from you. Pediatric experience is an asset and we do offer client speci c training, as well as trach/vent courses.

    Please send your resume and cover letter to:

    pedsvancouver@bayshore.ca or

    Fax to 1-866-686-7435

    TRADES, TECHNICAL

    CONCRETE FINISHERS and Form Setters. Edmonton based company seeks experi-enced concrete nishers and form setters for work in Ed-monton and northern Alberta. Subsistence and accommoda-tions provided for out of town work; Cell 780-660-8130. Fax 780-444-7103, john@raidersconcrete.comEXCLUSIVE THINKBIG Mechanic Training. GPRC Fairview Campus. $1000. en-trance scholarship. Paid prac-ticum with Finning. High school diploma and mechani-cal aptitude. Write apprentice-ship exams. 1-888-999-7882; gprc.ab.ca/Fairview.

    LOOKING FOR an automotive paint technician to work F/T in the Comox Valley, that works well with others and is able to maintain and clean their own work space. Must have experi-ence in automotive prep, prim-ing, masking, spraying and polishing car bodies. Must own tools required to perform job. Waterborne experience an as-set but not necessary. Reply with resume to Drawer 4494 c/o Comox Valley Record, 765 McPhee Ave, Courtenay, BC, V9N 2Z7.

    ALL YOU NEED IN PRINT AND ONLINE www.bcclassi ed.com

    TRADES, TECHNICAL

    SERVICE MANAGER - Hanna Chrysler Ltd. (Hanna, Alberta). Opportunity in a perfect family environment. Strong team, competitive wages, bene ts, growth potential. Fax resume: 403-854-2845. Email: chrysler@telusplanet.net.

    PERSONAL SERVICES

    HEALTH PRODUCTS

    HERBAL MAGIC Look great for summer - 1st 9 weeks for $99. Lose weight and keep it off. Results guaranteed! Call now 1-800-854-5176.

    ESTHETIC SERVICES

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    COMMUNITY HALL75TH ANNIVERSARYDANCESaturday, April 28, 2012

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    on sale atShoppers Drug & Peoples

  • New crop of students graduate from D.A.R.E.Sharron HoSooke News Mirror

    Ecole Poirier Elemen-tary Schools Grade 5 students graduatedfrom the Drug Abuse Resistance Education(D.A.R.E.) program on April 18.

    The program was facilitated once a weekfor 10 weeks, where the kids learned about the harmful effects of drugs, alcohol and tobacco.The students also par-ticipated in lessons onhow to deal with peer pressure, what makesa good friend and the medias slanted por-trayal of drug use.

    Cpl. Barb Cotting-ham, D.A.R.E. instruc-tor, said the programwas also a reality check on the prevalence ofdrug use and smoking

    in high schools.I asked them how

    many kids in Grade8 smoke and their guesses were always sohigh -- 80-90 per cent,

    she said. When in factits 12 per cent.

    Along with dispellingmyths, the program encourages open dia-logue between kids and

    parents, which Cotting-ham said is essential to helping kids makehealthy choices.

    (D.A.R.E. is) not a magic pill, its just a small portion of gettingour kids through school safely, she said.

    During the hour-long ceremony, selected stu-dents read out essays written to remind theirfuture selves on the dangerous effects of drugs and alcohol.

    The group also per-formed in a stage skit, depicting the involve-ment of the commu-nity in the preventionof drug and alcohol use in youth.

    For the finale, the kids walked across the gym-nasium floor to proudly receive their D.A.R.E.graduation certificates in front of their peersand parents.

    Im extremely proudof my D.A.R.E. kids, absolutely, Cotting-ham said. Theyre wonderful, wonderfulkids, and I wish them all the best.

    This years class will be Cottinghams lastafter 11 years of facili-tating the program. Thecorporal will be retiring in the fall, and calledthe departure bitter-sweet.

    Its really, really hard for me to say goodbye, she said, adding her dedication to theprogram has developed partnerships with fami-lies, and showed the kids that police officersare approachable.

    Ive got three otherD.A.R.E. officers in Sooke here, that will dojust a great job, if not better, in mentoring ourkids.

    Sharron Ho photo

    RCMP Cpl. Cottingham congratulates the students who graduate in the D.A.R.E.program at Ecole Poirier.

    Like us on Facebook

    Sooke represented by photos in national contestSharron HoSooke News Mirror

    The Sooke Rotary Club represented the local volunteercommunity in Volunteer BCs National VolunteerWeek photo contest.

    The Sooke Rotary Club submitted seven different photos, depicting their volunteers doing community-oriented work like holding Salvation Army Kettle Drives and handing outwater to Subaru Sooke Triathlon runners.

    The Rotary Club of Sooke carries out

    numerous volunteer activities around Sookeand I thought it would be nice to showcasemembers in action, said John Bridal, Rotary club member, through email.

    Volunteers give up their free time to help others in need. They are the glue that holds the community together. Their time and dedication should be honoured, he said.

    Marlene Barry, Sooke Volunteer Centre Committee co-chair, sent out contest information to different non-profit groups in

    Sooke, but the Rotary Club was the only onethat participated.

    The Rotary sort ofpicked up the ball and sent some pictures off to represent Sooke, she said, addingthe competition will give Sooke, already considered volunteer capital of Canada, national recognition.

    This is a national competition, and well see who wins, but people from all over the country are looking atall of the submissions and theres a number of them from Sooke.

    Groups from across

    Canada submitted 80 photos in total, whichwere posted online for viewing during NationalVolunteer Week from April 15-21.

    The top three winners were VolunteerPrince George, Victoria General Hospital, and Lower Mainland Green Team.

    According to the Volunteer BC website, the purpose of the contest was to help tell the story of volunteering in B.C under the themeof passion, action and impact.

    Capital Regional District

    During National Drinking Water WeekMay 7 - 12, 2012The Capital Regional District (CRD) Integrated Water Services department will once again be offering free public tours of the water supply facilities including the Sooke dam and the ultraviolet treatment plant. Learn how naturally clean and clear water is delivered from our local watershed to your tap. Free public bus tours will leave from a new location and at new times on Monday, May 7 to Saturday, May 12, 2012. Advance reservations are required, and can be made by calling 250.940.0201.

    New Location: Thetis Lake Parking Lot - end of Six Mile Rd New Times: 8:30 am (returning at approx. 2:30 pm) 10 am (returning at approximately 4 pm)

    We recommend that you bring a lunch and beverages with you, and please remember to dress for the weather. Also, the tour is not recommended for children under 12. Free parking is available. Visit www.crd.bc.ca for more info.

    Integrated Water ServicesPublic Tours of Water Facilities

    FUTURE SHOP Correction Notice

    On the April 20 flyer, page 22, this product: 250GB Xbox 360 Value Bundle (WebCode: 10182217) was advertised with an incorrect price and bonus offer. Please be advised that the two bonus games (Bioshock/Splinter Cell - WebCodes: 10125651/10125847) are NOT included with this console bundle, and the price of this product is in fact $249.99, Save $50. We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused our valued customers.

    Visit our other Black Press sites

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    The Mirror Cover-to-Cover ~ anywhere!Now available in an easy to read, downloadable and printable format.

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    FOLK SOCIETY CONCERTStacey Earle and Mark Stuart

    perfom on July 30.Page 18

    SOOKE ON TSN

    The Subaru Triathlon gets TV coverage -- at a cost.

    Page 27

    Your community, your classifi EDS0s75Wednesday, JULY 27, 2011

    Editorial Page 8 Entertainment Page 18Sports/stats Page 27

    Agreement#40110541

    SOOKE NEWS 2010 WINNERM I R R O R

    Pirjo RaitsSooke News Mirror

    The 25th Sooke Fine Arts Show opened on Thursday night with purchasers waiting in line to get into the show and see the latest works from the 275 artists who submitted entries.

    The adjudicators chose 375 pieces from the 551 art-ists who responded to the call for entries to the juried art show and sale.

    The 10-day show was once again staged in the SEA-PARC Leisure Complex where a group of talented and hard working volunteers transformed the cavernous space into an amazing gallery.

    We had a lovely weekend and a lot of people, said Sally Manning, show coordinator. It is a colourful and happy show.

    Many Sooke artists stood out as the winners in the 25th Anniversary Artists Awards. They included Pat-rick Irwin for his acrylic and oil two-dimensional paint-ing Port Alberni, Best Two-Dimensional work.

    The Best Three-Dimensional work award was awarded to Jan Johnson for his Minotaur Overseeing Intake, while Debbie Clarkson took the award for the Best Photography for her La Habana Elegante #3. Dana Sitars When I Do Not Follow the Rules took the award for Best Fibre. Honourable mentions were given to Chuck Minten for his Circle of Friends wood table and Anne Boquists YoYoTokTik gourd and found object piece.

    Other winners include Heather Hamiltons Internal Reflections pendant (Best Jewellery); Jo Ludwigs No Title glass piece (Best Glass); Metchosins Judi Dyelle won Best Ceramic for her White Series #1; and Jeff Molloy for his mixed media piece A Man of the Cloth.

    Other honourable mentions went to Debbie Jansen for her fused glass, Untitled, Eliza Heminways fibre wall piece, The Haberdashers Garden and Leonard Butts Uchi raku sculpture.

    The adjudicators each chose a work for Jurors Choice. Richard White gave full marks to Nicolas Van-dergugtens lino block print Bridgework #3; Grant Leier (substituting for Carol Sabiston) awarded Dee de Wits Still Life with Mango his kudos; and juror Nixie Barton chose Johannes Landmans oil painting Benchwarmer.

    Manning said the attendance was keeping in line with past years as were the sales.

    25 Years of incredible art

    Pirjo Raits photo

    Bonnie Jones takes a close look at Michael MacLeans Ambassador

    The Sooke FolkMusic Society normally cur-tails its activities for the summer, but thisSaturday, July 30, we are delighted to bringback Stacey Earle and Mark Stuart for a spe-cial summer concert at Holy Trinity Anglican Church, as part of their Driver til she dropstour; a reference to their Chevy Suburban,which now has some 465,000 miles on theodometer

    Stacey Earle andMark Stuart met for the first time 1991 ata songwriters night in Nashville TN. Theyknew that night it was one of them things thatare just meant to be. They were married in 1992.

    It would be quite a balancing act at that time raising a family and trying to make a living along with all theother stuff that came with getting by, but wemanaged, Stacey said as she looked back ather first encounter with the world of touring.

    Stacey Earles first show was on an arena stage in Sydney, play-ing rhythm guitar in her brothers band, Steve Earle & the Dukes.

    She spent about a year and a half on tour with her brother, and then returned to Nash-ville to start a career of her own as a country/folk singer/songwriter.

    I was 30-years-old and asking/seeking a recording deal in Nash-ville.At that age it was like asking God to turn back the world clock.

    Mark Stuart went to the finest of music schools, he started his schooling listening and admiring his uncles guitar playing and his dads fiddling. By age 15 he would find himself

    playing in the school ofhonky tonks and beer joints in and around Nashville in his dads band.

    Mark was off the road when he met Sta-cey and that very night he would play the firstnote of her music never leaving her side. Mark

    still somehow foundthe time to work on his own music record-ing his solo record and touring.

    Mark, as well, spent some time in the Dukes in the 1990s. Like Earle, he recalls it as a time ofglamour: appearing on the Tonight Show with

    Jay Leno, and MTV. I had someone tun-

    ing my guitar, strappingon my guitar, he said. Now we carry our stuff three flights up in the Red Roof Inn.

    Over the years Sta-cey and Mark havelearned so much from each other. Their songs are the diaries of their life good times andbad, thereby complet-ing the love they have.Together they share the full load of gettingby day-by-day.

    Theyve gone onto release their duo albums, Never GonnaLet You Go in 2003 and S&M CommunionBread in 2005, and their Gearle Records 2008release Love from Sta-cey and Mark which is available at thehir live shows only.

    While, no doubt, each still remains an individual solo artist with solo releases, suchas the 2008 release of Mark Stuarts Left of

    Nashville and Stacey Earles The Ride also in 2008), it is throughthe respect of each oth-ers work and years ofplaying together that they have created theirunique sound. And that sound allows each indi-vidual to shine through. Stacey and Mark are no doubt together til death do they part.

    Please be sure to join us for what will bea memorable evening with these two very engaging singer/song-writers.

    The gig is on Satur-day, July 30 at Holy Trin-ity Anglican Church, at 1962 Murray Road.Doors open at 7:30 p.m. with show at 8. Ticketsare $15 and are avail-able at the door or in advance at Shoppers Drug Mart.

    18 U ARTS www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, JULY 27, 2011 - SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

    ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

    Back for another round on July 30 are Stacey Earle and Mark Stuart.

    Folk Society puts on a special summer concert

    2945 Jacklin Road, Victoriawww.westshoretowncentre.com

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    Show + Sale Dates

    SOOKE FINE ARTS SHOWCalendar of Events

    Artz4YouthWednesday, July 27, 6-8 pm

    For teens by teens! Text your friends, meet for an evening of performances by local youth.

    Taste of SookeThursday, July 28, 7-9 pm

    Music by The Rhythm MinersA night to explore all the flavours of Sooke!

    Seniors TeasThursday, Friday, July 28-9, 2 - 4

    Tea, fresh-baked scones and an afternoon of art!

    More info and events on our

    website!

    July 23 - Aug 1 SEAPARC Leisure Complex|Sooke, BC

    FUTURE SHOP - CORRECTION NOTICE

    Stinking Fish Studio TourStinking Fish Studio Tour

    July 23-August 110am 5pm

    A free self-guided tour of artist studiosthroughout Metchosin & East Sooke!

    Maps on our website and at studiosw w w . s t i n k i n g f i s h s t u d i o

    Come see the latest works by some of the islands most

    talented artists!

    20112011

    Take UsWith You!

    Take UsWith You!Community HallCommunity Hall

    75th Anniversary75th AnniversaryCome Celebrate with us

    SSooke ooke CCommunity ommunity AAssociation ssociation and and SSooke ooke LLions ions CClublub

    AANNIVERSARY NNIVERSARY DDANCEANCE

    April 28 2012Sooke Community Hall

    Doors Open 8:00pmLive Band 9:00pm-1:00am

    -Music By-***PHEONIX***

    -Chili and Bun Included--Chili and Bun Included-----------Tickets on Sale at----------

    Shoppers Drug & Peoples Drug Stores$7.50 per Ticket Minimum Age 19yrs

    DRESS 1930S DRESS 1930S OR COME AS YOU ARE...OR COME AS YOU ARE...

    SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2012 www.sookenewsmirror.com NEWS 25

  • SEAPARC STAR SEAPARC STAR of theof the WEEK WEEKThis week, we are happy to introduce you to four year old Olivia Sutherland. She attends the Sooke Montessori Preschool where she loves re & earthquake drills, doing puzzles, and science. Olivia told us that they are learning about the lifecycle of a frog right now and she nds it very interesting. She is swimming at a Whale level and has nished level 4 in her skating lessons. She was very proud to tell us that she can go off the diving board without a lifejacket! Olivia takes Hip Hop Dance Classes in Sooke and has done so for two years now. She was in her dance troupes production of Alice in Wonderland last year and is looking forward to this years show: The Ugly Duckling. When we asked her what she is good at; Olivia answered that she is very good at sharing, Math, Reading and counting. She is in her second year of playing T-Ball and says that she likes to watch her Mom play ball too. Olivia spends time with her Nana and DD once a week on what she calls Fun Fridays. She says that they plan special things to do together on Fridays and its always fun. Her other Grandparents, Nana Rowe and Poppy Doug live in Newfoundland and she is thrilled that she will be going there to see them this year. She does love family vacations, telling us that she has been to Disneyland, Great Bear Lodge and Parksville where she got a hole in one at the mini golf course. She added that she loved going for lunch with the Disney Princesses in Ariels Grotto while she was in Disneyland. Olivia is described as being a very outgoing, energetic and curious girl who is very smart and is nice to all of her friends. She plans on being a police of cer when she grows up. We would like to thank you Olivia for coming in to talk to us, congratulations on being nominated as our SEAPARC Star of the Week!

    OLIVIA SUTHERLAND

    SEAPARC SharksStarts again May 2nd

    Mon/Wed/Fri 3:45 - 4:30pm 12 classes / $30 6-14 yrs oldThis swim and sports club focuses on endurance, stroke correction

    and aquatic fun and games.THE ICE IS OUT BUT WERE STILL PLAYING!Drop-in Arena Sports For Kids, Teens, Adults & Families

    Floor Hockey 16+ Years Tuesdays 8:40pm

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    Family Floor Hockey All Ages Fridays 7:00pm

    Teen Sports Night 14-18 Wednesdays 8:00pm

    Adult Soccer 16+ Years Thursdays 8:00pm

    Youth Lacrosse 8-12 Years *Saturdays10:45am

    4 Corner Soccer 11-16 *Saturdays 12:00pm

    *No drop-in programs Apr 27-28 & May 4-6 due to Garage Sale and Rotary Auction

    Sharron HoSooke News Mirror

    Hayley Wickenheiser, four-time Olympic med-alist, is holding a nation-wide contest titled Why Girls Hockey Rocks in Your Community.

    W i c k e n h e i s e r launched the contest in celebration of the recent addition of Club Wick to her website. Club Wick is an inter-active platform where kids can receive exclu-sive information and chat with Wickenheiser one-on-one.

    For the contest, entrants are being requested to make a 60-90 second video showing their love for

    the sport, community and girl power.

    Im looking forward to see what comes out of it, Wickenheiser said, adding shes antic-

    ipating interesting and creative work from con-testants.

    The winner will receive a visit from Wickenheiser for a skate on their home ice,

    along with an autograph and picture session, a speaking engagement for all of their minor league peers, and a gift from Wickenheisers

    personal memorabilia collection.

    I enjoy going to com-munities and working with young kids, and you know, just gener-ally being on the ice

    with young players, she said.

    The odds of winning are levelled and fair, as the video with the high-est number of likes will be declared the winner.

    Anyone is eligible, its a national contest. I could end up in the Northwest Territories, and I could end up somewhere in the Mari-times, it really depends on the submissions, Wickenheiser said.

    Similar to many of her admirers today, Wicken-heiser, 33, started play-ing at the young age of five in the small town of Shaunavon, Saskatch-ewan.

    At 15 years old, she was chosen for the Canadian Womens

    National team, where she led the team to six gold and one silver medal at the Womens World Hockey Champi-onship.

    In terms of Olympics, she has earned three gold medals in 2002, 2006 and 2010, and one silver in 1998.

    The hockey legend has been regarded as one of the greatest female hockey players in the world.

    Hockey has really given me everything I have in my life in some way, shape or form, Wickenheiser said. As much as I love to play in the championships and the games, I also try to develop and enjoy the game.

    But just like any other profession, her career has had its highs and lows, which have been navigated through sheer determination.

    Theres been lots of struggles, I mean its never a smooth ride. Theres lots of ups and downs along the way, and lots of hard work and sacrifice as well, she said. Youre fight-ing the fight all the time to keep going, and pro-moting the game.

    W i c k e n h e i s e r advised any young, aspiring hockey play-ers to practice, observe and dream.

    Watch the best players in the world, whether theyre male or female. Get out there

    and practice your skills, and play a lot of sports, dont just do hockey year round, she said. Allow yourself to dream and be creative, dont be afraid to make mistakes.

    Canadas prized hockey player is cur-rently majoring in kine-siology at the Univer-sity of Calgary, with the ambition to attend medical school and become a doctor.

    She currently plays for the universitys hockey team, the Cal-gary Dinos.

    The deadline is July 31, and more informa-tion on the contest is available at: www.hay-leywickenheiser.com

    Hockey legend holds nation-wide contest Hayley Wickenheiser, one of the worlds greatest hockey players, reaches out to young players

    SPORTS

    Allow yourself to dream and be creative, dont be afraid to make mistakes.

    --Hayley WickenheiserThree-time Olympic gold medalist

    Pre-atom Seahawks have 38-6 victory in Langford Its with great pride

    that Village Food Mar-kets-Sooke Seahawks pre-atom football team had a succesful Sunday on the grid-iron in Lang-ford at Bear Mountain Stadium against the Nanimo Bombers.

    The Seahawks earned a victory, with a 38-6 final score.

    Offence took off fast with taking only five plays from junior coach Torin Keoughans marauding offence to score their first touch down of the game

    by fleet-footed L.P. Gagnon.

    His first of two, fol-lowed on the day. Four more touch downs during the next three quarters, led by Spen-cer Take No Prisoners Logan, hauling three or four Nanaimo defend-ers on numerous runs.

    Flying Jared Steele with his second touch down of the campaign and Thomas Tommy Gun Lowerison taking a hand-off from first time.

    Quarter back Caleb

    Gun em Carrier ran for his first touch down of his Seahawk career.

    Many huge blocks led to these touch downs including Mighty Mike Lundell in his first Sea-hawk game ever with his mighty seven year old frame, Thomas Lowrison, lineman Quinn Macdonald, Kae-din Rheault, and Hunter Swift, who also ran his first convert point.

    On defence Manny The Man Ratcliffe had three fumble recoveries and two excellent runs

    on offence as well.Defence again was led

    by player nine, Spencer Logan, who had one sack, causing two fum-bles and disrupted the Nanaimo offence con-stantly.

    Super Sian Cyr anchored the offence at center and turned in a good amount of blocks on defence.

    Tye Linquist, Luther White, Jacob Bar-ney and Finn Rogers rounded up an incred-ible day stopping the bombers from bomb-

    ing us. Next game is Sunday

    April 29.

    By Andy Carrier, coach

    Please send sports tips to Sharron Ho at:

    news@sookenews mirror.com

    Submitted photo

    Number nine, Spencer Logan running his first touch down.

    26 SPORTS www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2012 - SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

  • The Compass Elec-tric Sooke Loggers went 2-2 in Vegas and placed fourth out of eight teams.

    In the first game the Loggers played New Image from Wiscon-sin and beat them 3-1. Second basemen Chad Bryden lead the way with two hits.

    Winning pitcher was Rich Haldane.

    Game two saw the Loggers lose to Cal State Builders 5-0.

    Cal State had Cana-dian national pitch Brady Woods.

    Sooke managed only three hits along with five walks with three of the walks coming from Nick Medwedrich.

    Losing pitcher was Scott Lieph.

    Game three the log-gers played a team from Texas El Paso.

    The loggers won that game 5-3 .

    Kyle Cowick and Nick Medwedrich both hom-

    ered and the winning pitcher was Rich Hal-dane.

    In the game that knocked the Loggers out of the tournament they lost to Portland Oregon 5-1.

    Portland had USA national team pitcher

    Travis Price throwing for them.

    Andrew Medwedrich lead the way with two hits.

    Losing pitcher was Scott Lieph.

    The Loggers went to Vegas to get the winter rust off and get ready

    for the coming season and overall they did that.

    Next action for the team will be to travel to

    Vancouver on April 29 to play the Vancouver Meralomas .

    By Len Banner

    SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2012 www.sookenewsmirror.com SPORTS 27

    Local rugby players get serious Sharron HoSooke News Mirror

    The EMCS Wolver-ines senior team have learned a lot over the past few games, after competing with sea-soned players.

    The team lost to Glen-lyon Norfolk School on April 17 with a 23-0 score.

    We didnt play very well, they were defin-tely beating us pretty good, said fullback Chris Morberg. Hope-fully later on in the sea-son well be more pre-pared.

    The players entered the match battered and bruised after com-peting in three heavy games during the Cla-remont Scrum Fest

    on April 12-13, which heralded rugby teams from Alberta, Ontario

    and Australia.You know the guys

    came up against a

    team [GNS] that just knew how to play the game, said coach Matt

    Mortensen.I think it was a good

    eye opener for them. I do think they were very flat and beat up from the Scrum Fest.

    He said with dedica-tion and practice, the Wolverines will be able to up their game.

    I think the games are going to be tighter from here on in.

    The Wolverines played 7 aside rugby games against Pacific Christian School on April 19 for develop-ment.

    Mortensen said the games were close both ways.

    The teams next game will be at Victoria High School on Thursday.

    Sharron Ho photo

    EMCS player Chris Morberg gets tackled and tossed over during a 7 aside rugby game on April 19 against Pacific Christian School.

    Loggers place fourth in Vegas Roadtrip tourney

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    Notice of MeetingEast Sooke, Otter Point and Shirley Board of Variance

  • The Sooke Soccer Club would like thank all their coaches, man-agers, players and many volunteers for another successful season.

    Congratulations to the Division 4 Loggers for winning the league and promotion to Divi-sion 3 for the 2012/13 season.

    The Division 1 Sooke Pumas qualified for pro-vincial competition and the Division 1 Sooke Celtic made it to the semi finals in the Jack-son Cup competition.

    On April 14 the soc-cer season ended with our annual player awards and fundraiser for an artificial turf field. Thanks to a beau-tiful sunny day and the help of many, the club was able to raise over $1,700 that day.

    The past few months have been frustrating for players, coaches and parents alike. Due to unusually wet spring weather practices were cancelled, games post-poned or cancelled because of ponds or mud on our fields.

    Once more the need for an all weather field where teams can play and practice in any condition was demon-strated.

    For the past few years the club has been trying to raise funds for this venture with events like Christmas tree sales, penny drives raffles and 50/50 draws. We enjoyed the support of many but we are still far away from our goal.

    The cost of an all weather field is at the

    $ 1 million range, so we need the help of the whole community to make our dream a real-ity.

    The penny drive is ongoing and drop off locations will be announced on our web-site www.sookesoccer.com.

    On Tuesday May 1, the club will hold a pub-lic information meeting and invite anyone who can help.

    Anyone who wants to be part of a fundrais-ing committee and/or a turf committee.

    Be part of a dream for Sookes youth.

    The meeting will be held at the Prestige Oceanfront Resort in Sooke at 7 p.m.

    The award winners of the 2011-2012 season:

    U 18 girls Most Valuable Player: Jessica MurdochMost Improved

    Player: Emma AndersonMost Sportsmanlike

    Player:

    Madeleine StaffordU 17 boys Player who had the

    most impact on the teams performance:

    Troy Smith Biggest Comeback Pl

    ayer: Troy UrlacherMost Improved

    Player:Chris ShankarU 16 boys Most Valuable Player:

    Taylor Calnan- AshMost Dedicated

    Player:Dakoda WhittenBest New Player: Drew SherlowU 15 girls TsunamisBest Defensive Player:

    Rachael Wiebe Best Offensive Player:

    Cassidy LoganMost Improved

    Player: Morganne OrchardU 15 girls Termina-

    torsMost Valuable Player: Jesse PowersMost Sportsmanlike

    Player:Shaylin WarrenMost Improved

    Player:Riley GeibU 15 boysMost Improved

    Player: Jacob GallantMost Inspirational

    Player : Norris Wass- LittleMost Valuable Player: James MarxU 14 boysMost Valuable Player:

    James LiephMost Improved

    Player: Connor FergusonMost Courageous

    Player: Kyle RoddU 13 girlsMost Valuable Player: Lajah WarrenMost Inspirational

    Player:Nicole OylerBest team Player:Margaret CollinsU 13 boysMost Improved

    Player: Taylor CummingsMost Sportsmanlike

    Player:Chris BerkeleyMost Valuable Player: Matthew Thomson

    by Robin Saxl,

    Sooke Soccer Club president

    Any pennies dropped off at the

    Sooke News Mirror will be donated to the arti-

    ficial turf fund.

    28 SPORTS www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2012 - SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

    Sooke Soccer Club has successful season

    File photo

    The Sooke Soccer Club celebrated this seasons successes on April 14.

    Strong Libraries Strong Communities

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  • 30 SPORTS www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2012 - SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

    Sooke Lions Clubs hold 9th fundraiserSharron HoSooke News Mirror

    The local Lions Clubs will be holding their 9th Annual 32 km Galloping Goose Linear Walk/Run on May 5.

    Over the course of nine years, Sookes Lions Clubs have raised $24,000 for the BC Lions Society for Children with Disabilities to help send kids with disabili-ties to Camp Shawni-gan.

    Throughout the years, the walk has gathered enough funds to send 10 local kids to camp.

    Dave Nash, Sooke Lions Club member and race organizer, said all the profits after expenses would go towards sponsoring the kids.

    We would like to raise enough money to send one kid to camp, Nash said. Thats our goal to start with.

    The walk will begin at 8 a.m. at the Juan De Fuca Recreation Cen-tre in Colwood and will end at the Sooke River

    Road CRD overflow parking lot. Walkers will travel along the Gallop-ing Goose Trail to get from the start and end points.

    The long trek will have seven check points offering snacks, beverages, and porta-ble potties.

    At the end of the race, there will be hot dogs and drinks for entrants. Walkers will also receive draw prizes.

    In addition to col-lecting pledges for the camp fund, participants can use the walk as an opportunity to col-lect pledges for other

    charities dear to their hearts.

    Tax receipts for pledges toward the BC Lions Society for Chil-dren with Disabilities will be issued.

    Pre-registration costs $25 and can be done online at: www.sooke-districtlioness.org.

    Late-comers can reg-ister on the morning of the race at the Juan De Fuca Recreation Centre at 7 a.m., with a fee of $30.

    Children under the age of 14 must be accompanied by an adult.

    Peewee Seahawks have first home loss The Sooke Home

    Hardware Seahawks Peewee football team hosted its first home game of the season, facing the talented Nanaimo Redmen last Sunday.

    This season the Sea-hawks home field is Bear Mountain Sta-dium, home to the Westshore Rebels foot-ball program.

    A skilled Seahawks offence poked away at the Redmens soft defence, but the Red-

    mens kicking teams and trick plays were the advantage.

    Seahawks quarter-back Brady Greenwood connected with run-ningback Jacob Arnaud for a sweet, 56-yard touchdown (a 48-yard run after the catch). Greenwood has com-pleted seven passes in ten attempts with no interceptions over the last two games.

    Aiden Wood, Alex Campbell, and Miguel LaForge stood strong

    on the defensive line and Richard Innes led the linebacker corps, but the Redmens out-side running game was too strong and the Seahawks succumb to their first home loss of the season.

    The Seahawks head to Windsor Park to chal-lenge the Gordon Head Raiders this Sunday at 3 p.m.

    by Tom Billings,

    head coach

    Submitted photos

    Walkers trek along the Galloping Goose Trail in last years 32 km walk on May 7, 2011.

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  • SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2012 www.sookenewsmirror.com 31

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    The Return-It system also ensures BCs unwanted electron-ics are collected and recycled in an environmentally and socially responsible manner by using the Recycler Qualifi cation Program (RQP).

    Since 2007, the EPRA pro-gram, previously run by ESABC, has diverted over 70.6 million kilograms of electronics out of BC landfi lls and illegal export, while recovering precious met-als and other materials for use in future products.

    How Electronics are Recycled: Elec tronics collected in BC are sent to app roved recyclers in North America. The items are broken down using various manual and mechanical pro-cesses. The remaining products are separated into their indi-vidual components for recovery. Through a variety of refi ning and smelting processes, the

    materials re-claimed from unwanted electronics are used as raw materials in the manufac-turing of new products.

    Its the Responsible Thing to Do: Those useless electronics in your base ment contain valuable resources. Steel, leaded glass, copper, aluminum, plastic and precious metals can be extracted and recycled into new products.

    Province Wide Network: More than 125 permanent

    Return-It Electronics Collection Sites cover over 97.4% of the province. Drop-off events are organized and held in convenient locations in the communities where Collection Sites have not yet been established.

    How to Find a Collection Site: There are over 125 convenient locations in BC. Find a Collection Site or drop-off event near you at return-it.ca/electronics/locations return-it.ca/electronics

    ACCEPTABLE PRODUCTSThe following items can be recycled free of charge at any Encorp Return-It Electronics Collection Site:

    Display Devices Desktop Computers Portable Computers Computer Peripherals

    (Keyboards and Mice) Computer Scanners Printers and Fax

    Machines Non-Cellular Phones

    and Answering Machines

    Vehicle Audio and Video Systems (Aftermarket)

    Home Audio and Video Recording/Playback Systems

    Personal or Portable Audio and Video Recording/Playback Systems

    Find a full list of acceptable products at return-it.ca/electronics/acceptable.

    ADVERTORIAL

    Back alleys dont recycle unwanted electronics

    Environmental

    GET READYNew products are being added to the Return-It Electronics Program on July 1st, 2012.

    Those unwanted electronics in your basement contain valuable re sources.

  • 32 FISHING www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2012 - SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

    HowsHowsFishing?Fishing?

    photos Steve Arnett and Island Outfitters

    Even after 40 years of guiding in Sooke, Mark Grant, left, still has a good time on the water. Monday morning he headed out for a little hali fishing and hooked up in a favourite spot to the west. He barely had his coffee poured when the big one hit and the fight was on. The end result was a nice 90-pounder and time to go home. Des Hatchard, right, caught his 162.3-pounder west of Port Renfrew on Saturday, just another large one for his collection.

    Sooke

    6 6 2 6 S o o k e R o a d 2 5 0 -6 6 2 6 S o o k e R o a d 2 5 0 - 6 4 2 - 6 3 6 6 6 4 2 - 6 3 6 6

    CEDAR FENCE BOARDS

    Pick it up and do it yourself and save an aditional $20.00 - only $29997

    NOW

    $31997Reg $36997 6421-1143

    PLUS- FREE DELIVERY- FREE ASSEMBLY- FREE DISPOSAL OF OLD BARBECUE

    * TANK SOLD SEPARATELY

    250-642-6480 101-2015 SHIELDS ROAD

    Oliver Katz Personal Real Estate Corporation

    Melinda Brake

    www.sookeshometeam.com Sookes Home Team @sookeshometeam

    2.5 ac. Oceanfront Estate-inspired views from all principal rooms from the 4445 sq ft West Coast residence that boasts a well thought out floorplan , private cove & pebble beach. Sun-drenched south facing property where superperb landscaping & the rugged west coast entwine. Immacu-lately kept shows very well and is perhaps the best Oceanfront Value on the market!

    Helen Lochore

    Wonderful 3 bedroom home in the highly sought after Sooke Bay Estates area. The fabulously maintained 2004 built home offers great curb appeal,tastefully land-scaped yard and front verandah. Inviting foyer with french doors leading to the for-mal LR wFP & DR w/terrific Kitchen private, sunny back yard boasting a large garden shed and green house. Stop by Woodland Creek see our Show-homes 3 level 3 bath 2 level homes starting at only $389,900 incl. net HST youre sure to be impressed all homes qualify for the just announced $10,000 rebate. Geo-thermal heat/air, spacious rooms, designer colors, complete w/appliances, blinds, landscaped & fencedcome on by & see for your- OOPEN FRI/SAT/SUN 1-4

    Eligible for $10,000 BC Buyer Bonus

    we look after you .

    Happy Happy 4040thth

    Birthday DerekBirthday Derekfrom all the fish in the SEA

    TAKE A KIDTAKE A KID FISHING FISHING

    Local Seafood Bait Tackle Gear Fishing ChartersLocal Seafood Bait Tackle Gear Fishing Charters250-642-4410 6947 Westcoast Rd. @ Jocks Dock250-642-4410 6947 Westcoast Rd. @ Jocks Dock

    WEEKLY TIDE TABLESWEEKLY TIDE TABLES

    Best shing time: 1 hours after high tide.TIMES ARE IN STANDARD TIME, HEIGHTS IN FEET

    Side Stripe ShrimpSide Stripe Shrimp $$15.0015.00 lblb

    Day Time HT Time HT Time HT Time HT25 03:14 8.9 11:56 2.6 19:35 7.2 21:19 7.2 26 03:44 8.9 12:37 2.6 20:36 7.2 21:54 7.227 04:21 8.5 13:20 3.0 21:30 7.2 22:49 7.228 05:10 8.2 14:06 3.3 22:09 7.529 03:01 7.2 06:19 7.5 14:55 3.6 22:40 7.530 04:27 6.6 07:51 7.2 15:44 3.9 23:07 7.931 05:28 5.6 09:43 6.9 16:32 4.3 23:33 8.201 06:20 4.6 11:38 6.9 17:19 4.6 23:58 8.9

    FISHING IS HOT HALIBUT AND SALMONHALIBUT AND SALMON

    Extra Large HerringExtra Large Herring$$5.505.50 packpack

    JUST FOR THE HALIBUTJUST FOR THE HALIBUTDERBY TICKETS $50.00 HEREDERBY TICKETS $50.00 HERE