Sonata per archiby Hans Werner Henze

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  • Sonata per archi by Hans Werner HenzeReview by: Robert Hall LewisNotes, Second Series, Vol. 17, No. 1 (Dec., 1959), pp. 149-150Published by: Music Library AssociationStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/893899 .Accessed: 15/06/2014 02:25

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  • Leo Weiner: Divertimento No. 2, Op. 24. Hungarian Folk Melodies for String Orchestra. (Pocket Scores, 54.) Budapest: Editio Musica; U. S. A.: Boosey & Hawkes, New York, 1958. [Min. score, 31 p., $1.75]

    Although most of the critical points made above would apply here as well, these four movements show in general a slightly more imaginative handling of the Hungarian melodic material. The Czardas-like first movement is followed by a scherzando second movement of ternary design, in which changing meters add some variety to the otherwise un- deviating rhythmic regularity. A short mixolydian-flavored Andante in Db pre- cedes the Allegro finale, which places considerable emphasis on melodic tritones and minor thirds.

    Perhaps it should be pointed out that, although these pocket scores are new, the works themselves are not. They date respectively from 1933 and 1939. Thus there can be no question here of politi- cally inspired conservatism. Indeed, since they are hardly new and untried works, their present re-publication would seem to indicate a certain amount of accept- ance-at least, in Hungary. Nevertheless, considered as a whole, their rather un- inspired academicism suit them for per- formance only by student organizations or at summer "pops" concerts. Frank Martin: Etudes pour orches- tre a cordes. (UE, 12694.) Wien, Zurich, & London: Universal Edi- tion; U. S. A.; Associated Music Publishers, New York, 1957. [Min. score, 51 p.; $2.50]

    This striking twenty-minute work of Martin's consists of a sharply profiled overture followed by four etudes, each of ;which treats an important aspect of string performance. The first stresses the connecting of short motives distributed among violins, violas, and cellos. A lively pizzicato tour de force constitutes the second etude, while the third, an Adagio for divided violas and cellos, places emphasis on the sosteniLto espressivo. At- tention is given to fugal style in the final etude, which puts two contrasting subjects to work singly and in combina-

    Leo Weiner: Divertimento No. 2, Op. 24. Hungarian Folk Melodies for String Orchestra. (Pocket Scores, 54.) Budapest: Editio Musica; U. S. A.: Boosey & Hawkes, New York, 1958. [Min. score, 31 p., $1.75]

    Although most of the critical points made above would apply here as well, these four movements show in general a slightly more imaginative handling of the Hungarian melodic material. The Czardas-like first movement is followed by a scherzando second movement of ternary design, in which changing meters add some variety to the otherwise un- deviating rhythmic regularity. A short mixolydian-flavored Andante in Db pre- cedes the Allegro finale, which places considerable emphasis on melodic tritones and minor thirds.

    Perhaps it should be pointed out that, although these pocket scores are new, the works themselves are not. They date respectively from 1933 and 1939. Thus there can be no question here of politi- cally inspired conservatism. Indeed, since they are hardly new and untried works, their present re-publication would seem to indicate a certain amount of accept- ance-at least, in Hungary. Nevertheless, considered as a whole, their rather un- inspired academicism suit them for per- formance only by student organizations or at summer "pops" concerts. Frank Martin: Etudes pour orches- tre a cordes. (UE, 12694.) Wien, Zurich, & London: Universal Edi- tion; U. S. A.; Associated Music Publishers, New York, 1957. [Min. score, 51 p.; $2.50]

    This striking twenty-minute work of Martin's consists of a sharply profiled overture followed by four etudes, each of ;which treats an important aspect of string performance. The first stresses the connecting of short motives distributed among violins, violas, and cellos. A lively pizzicato tour de force constitutes the second etude, while the third, an Adagio for divided violas and cellos, places emphasis on the sosteniLto espressivo. At- tention is given to fugal style in the final etude, which puts two contrasting subjects to work singly and in combina-

    Leo Weiner: Divertimento No. 2, Op. 24. Hungarian Folk Melodies for String Orchestra. (Pocket Scores, 54.) Budapest: Editio Musica; U. S. A.: Boosey & Hawkes, New York, 1958. [Min. score, 31 p., $1.75]

    Although most of the critical points made above would apply here as well, these four movements show in general a slightly more imaginative handling of the Hungarian melodic material. The Czardas-like first movement is followed by a scherzando second movement of ternary design, in which changing meters add some variety to the otherwise un- deviating rhythmic regularity. A short mixolydian-flavored Andante in Db pre- cedes the Allegro finale, which places considerable emphasis on melodic tritones and minor thirds.

    Perhaps it should be pointed out that, although these pocket scores are new, the works themselves are not. They date respectively from 1933 and 1939. Thus there can be no question here of politi- cally inspired conservatism. Indeed, since they are hardly new and untried works, their present re-publication would seem to indicate a certain amount of accept- ance-at least, in Hungary. Nevertheless, considered as a whole, their rather un- inspired academicism suit them for per- formance only by student organizations or at summer "pops" concerts. Frank Martin: Etudes pour orches- tre a cordes. (UE, 12694.) Wien, Zurich, & London: Universal Edi- tion; U. S. A.; Associated Music Publishers, New York, 1957. [Min. score, 51 p.; $2.50]

    This striking twenty-minute work of Martin's consists of a sharply profiled overture followed by four etudes, each of ;which treats an important aspect of string performance. The first stresses the connecting of short motives distributed among violins, violas, and cellos. A lively pizzicato tour de force constitutes the second etude, while the third, an Adagio for divided violas and cellos, places emphasis on the sosteniLto espressivo. At- tention is given to fugal style in the final etude, which puts two contrasting subjects to work singly and in combina-

    Leo Weiner: Divertimento No. 2, Op. 24. Hungarian Folk Melodies for String Orchestra. (Pocket Scores, 54.) Budapest: Editio Musica; U. S. A.: Boosey & Hawkes, New York, 1958. [Min. score, 31 p., $1.75]

    Although most of the critical points made above would apply here as well, these four movements show in general a slightly more imaginative handling of the Hungarian melodic material. The Czardas-like first movement is followed by a scherzando second movement of ternary design, in which changing meters add some variety to the otherwise un- deviating rhythmic regularity. A short mixolydian-flavored Andante in Db pre- cedes the Allegro finale, which places considerable emphasis on melodic tritones and minor thirds.

    Perhaps it should be pointed out that, although these pocket scores are new, the works themselves are not. They date respectively from 1933 and 1939. Thus there can be no question here of politi- cally inspired conservatism. Indeed, since they are hardly new and untried works, their present re-publication would seem to indicate a certain amount of accept- ance-at least, in Hungary. Nevertheless, considered as a whole, their rather un- inspired academicism suit them for per- formance only by student organizations or at summer "pops" concerts. Frank Martin: Etudes pour orches- tre a cordes. (UE, 12694.) Wien, Zurich, & London: Universal Edi- tion; U. S. A.; Associated Music Publishers, New York, 1957. [Min. score, 51 p.; $2.50]

    This striking twenty-minute work of Martin's consists of a sharply profiled overture followed by four etudes, each of ;which treats an important aspect of string performance. The first stresses the connecting of short motives distributed among violins, violas, and cellos. A lively pizzicato tour de force constitutes the second etude, while the third, an Adagio for divided violas and cellos, places emphasis on the sosteniLto espressivo. At- tention is given to fugal style in the final etude, which puts two contrasting subjects to work singly and in combina-

    Leo Weiner: Divertimento No. 2, Op. 24. Hungarian Folk Melodies for String Orchestra. (Pocket Scores, 54.) Budapest: Editio Musica; U. S. A.: Boosey & Hawkes, New York, 1958. [Min. score, 31 p., $1.75]

    Although most of the critical points made above would apply here as well, these four movements show in general a slightly more imaginative handling of the Hungarian melodic material. The Czardas-like first movement is followed by a scherzando second movement of ternary design, in which changing meters add some variety to the otherwise un- deviating rhythmic regularity. A short mixolydian-flavored Andante in Db pre- cedes the Allegro finale, which places considerable emphasis on melodic tritones and minor thirds.

    Perhaps it should be pointed out that, although these pocket scores are new, the works themselves are not. They date respectively from 1933 and 1939. Thus there can be no question here of politi- cally inspired conservatism. Indeed, since they are hardly new and untried works, their present re-publication would seem to indicate a certain amount of accept- ance-at least, in Hungary. Nevertheless, considered as a whole, their rather un- inspired academicism suit them for per- formance only by student organizations or at summer "pops" concerts. Frank Martin: Etudes pour orches- tre a cordes. (UE, 12694.) Wien, Zurich, & London: Universal Edi- tion; U. S. A.; Associated Music Publishers, New York, 1957. [Min. score, 51 p.; $2.50]

    This striking twenty-minute work of Martin's consists of a sharply profiled overture followed by four etudes, each of ;which treats an important aspect of string performance. The first stresses the connecting of short motives distributed among violins, violas, and cellos. A lively pizzicato tour de force constitutes the second etude, while the third, an Adagio for divided violas and cellos, places emphasis on the sosteniLto espressivo. At- tention is given to fugal style in the final etude, which puts two contrasting subjects to work singly and in combina-

    tion. Characterized by free chromaticism within a tonal framework, the composi- tion should provide interest and variety for any group choosing to perform it. Elliott Carter: Elegy for String Orchestra. New York: Peer Inter- national Corp.; distr.: Southern Music Publishing Co., 1967. [Score, 6 p., $1.00; pts., $1.50; extra pts., $.30 ea.]

    Arranged for String Orchestra in 1952 from a work for viola and piano of 1943, this middle-period Elegy shows little or no relation to Carter's present style. The short movement is decidedly romantic in character and is constructed along the most conventional lines, combining simple harmonic and contrapuntal material with strong tonal feeling. After some forty- five bars of slow-moving sostenuto, a climax is reached, followed by a closing section based on the rising and falling seconds with which the movement began. Matyis Seiber: Fantasia concertante fur Violine und Streichorchester. Klavierauszug. Mainz: Ars Viva Verlag; U. S. A.: Associated Music Publishers, New York, 1958. [Score, 25 p., & pt., 8 p., $3.00; orchestra pts. available]

    Seiber's impressive twelve-tone Fantasia should prove gratifying to the forward- looking violinist seeking new material. Employing the row rather freely, the work is cast in three principal divisions which combine warm lyricism with sec- tions of vigorous rhythmic character. The solo violin part begins in declama- tory style and makes use of much double- stopping, glissando, and sixteenth-note passage work, enhanced by a cleverly conceived string accompaniment. A long cadenza leads into the coda where an effective climax is achieved by grouping the twelve tones of the row into a single chord. Hans Werner Henze: Sonata per archi. (Ed. Schott 4591.) Mainz: B. Schott; U. S. A.: Associated Music Publishers, New York, 1958. [Min. score, 34 p., $2.25]

    Easily the most interesting work of this group, Henze's two-movement Sonata begins in a robust, somewhat Stravinsky-like manner, with changing

    tion. Characterized by free chromaticism within a tonal framework, the composi- tion should provide interest and variety for any group choosing to perform it. Elliott Carter: Elegy for String Orchestra. New York: Peer Inter- national Corp.; distr.: Southern Music Publishing Co., 1967. [Score, 6 p., $1.00; pts., $1.50; extra pts., $.30 ea.]

    Arranged for String Orchestra in 1952 from a work for viola and piano of 1943, this middle-period Elegy shows little or no relation to Carter's present style. The short movement is decidedly romantic in character and is constructed along the most conventional lines, combining simple harmonic and contrapuntal material with strong tonal feeling. After some forty- five bars of slow-moving sostenuto, a climax is reached, followed by a closing section based on the rising and falling seconds with which the movement began. Matyis Seiber: Fantasia concertante fur Violine und Streichorchester. Klavierauszug. Mainz: Ars Viva Verlag; U. S. A.: Associated Music Publishers, New York, 1958. [Score, 25 p., & pt., 8 p., $3.00; orchestra pts. available]

    Seiber's impressive twelve-tone Fantasia should prove gratifying to the forward- looking violinist seeking new material. Employing the row rather freely, the work is cast in three principal divisions which combine warm lyricism with sec- tions of vigorous rhythmic character. The solo violin part begins in declama- tory style and makes use of much double- stopping, glissando, and sixteenth-note passage work, enhanced by a cleverly conceived string accompaniment. A long cadenza leads into the coda where an effective climax is achieved by grouping the twelve tones of the row into a si...

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