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A Rockford, Illinois based publication highlighting the work of local artists.

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  • Sock the MonkeyVolume One Angela Hiss, Frey Lemonholm, Luke

    McGowan-Arnold, Ethan Patterson, Jake

    Rotta, and Tyler Szatek

  • I want you to want me--Rockford, Illinois

  • Contents

    Poetry & Prose

    Smoke Signals 6

    Ghosts 6

    Unearthing Derelicts 10

    Wouldn't it Be Nice 12

    Charles Street 16

    Visual Art

    Makenzi Conklin 8

    Jake Rotta 4

    Interviews

    Angela Hiss 13

    Pardon My Subconsciousness 24

    Rockfordia

    Silience Slams 18

    The Norwegian 30

    Bon Appetit

    Forest City Foraging: Edible Nettles

    DIY Vegan Acorn Pasta w/ Nettle Pesto

  • We Could Make This City Great If Only People Would Try--Jake Rotta, 17

  • The Rabbit Hole--Jake Rotta, 17

  • Smoke Signals

    She smoked her cigarettes differently when she was sad

    Thats how you could always tell

    She wouldnt puff the smoke out with one deep breath

    She would merely open her mouth halfway

    And sigh slowly allowing the smoke to trickle from her lips

    It would crash into her eyes and make them water

    Creating a transparent curtain before her face

    That shielded her from the world

    That was often too much for her to bare

    --Madi Guzman, 18

    Ghosts

    She could narrowly remember a time she hated herself so much, but then, then

    she could blame it on the demons in her head that caused her to do such awful

    things. The vile smell of vomit and the shakiness of her entire body had a reason,

    a valid reason. When you are being eaten alive by your own mind and desires it

    is hardly your fault, or so everyone had told her.

  • They all said that she wasnt to blame for the things she fell victim to for so many

    years. That it was not her fault at all, no, she was just a victim of the society that

    has trained us all to hate the way that we look and to force us to adapt to these

    ideal images even though it is never feasible. She was told time and time again

    that it wasnt her. But her memory flashed back to all the times that she had

    done damage to herself and she knew the truth, though she never spoke it; it was

    her fault.

    This time, this round of disgust, there were no excuses to be made for her, she

    was entirely to blame. She made the decision to become a different person to be

    a person that no one would recognize.

    While she never told nor showed anybody, she still had the old her tucked into

    the back of her closet. She lived in the shirts, sweaters and dresses she just didnt

    have the heart to get rid of. She didnt mind living with a ghost much anyway.

    --Madi Guzman, 18

  • @ Nicholas Conservatory--Makenzi Conklin

  • @ Nicholas Conservatory--Makenzi Conklin

  • Unearthing Derelicts

    Derelicts is Emily Sipiora's first

    novel. Sipiora is an Auburn High

    School graduate and a freshman

    at the University of Illinois at

    Chicago. She completed the

    composition during the foremost

    portion of her senior year. As

    Sipiora related in a previous

    interview, she intended to

    document the final chapter of her

    youth and all the complexities

    that come from hovering on the

    brink of adulthood. Copies of

    Derelicts can be bought at

    Culture Shock. In the following

    review, Luke Seamus McGowan-

    Arnold studies the themes

    reoccurring throughout the book.

    Derelicts by Emily Sipiora is a

    novel at odds at with itself. The

    writing and themes of the text

    reflect this. The prose constantly

    chages perspectives and tylistic

    elements to show new opinions

    about Audrey. However, several

    times in the book, she experiences

    an epiphany about her. The prose in

    these sections can be vastly different

    stylistically than the other portions

    The author with a copy of her book

  • to emphasize the epiphany. The first

    section of the book presents an epiphany

    about self criticism. Self hatred or

    excessive self hatred causes self harm.

    Audrey has the first epiphany after

    going out with friends. She and her

    friends go to a restaurant where Audrey

    takes drugs. The drugs are a literary tool

    to develop opinions Audrey has about

    herself during that moment. Drugs are

    something which alter brain chemistry

    which happens to the thoughts of

    Audrey at the moment. She thinks very

    introspectively in this section. After

    insulting one of her friends, Cara, she

    makes an observation that she can make

    people feel bad about insecurities

    because she feels bad about her

    insecurities. After she makes a mean

    quip about one of her friends, she makes

    an observation about herself and the

    current waitress. The waitress is

    impatient and is being rude to the

    customers, this could be because

    she is frustrated and tired but

    Audrey makes the observation that

    she is naturally rude, likening her

    to how Audrey views her own

    behavior. The waitress is used as a

    foil for the behavior of Audrey.

    Audrey unconsciously makes the

    observation that her own self

    destructive behavior is caused by

    the self hatred. Evidence for this is

    found directly in the lines where

    she makes reference to her own

    insecurities and then proceeds to

    insult and hurt others. The text

    draws an indirect but apparent

    correlation between the two

    actions. Audrey realizes it but she

    cannot fully make the connection.

    Another example of this is where

  • Audrey thinks mean things about her

    friend Jo. She defines Jo as ...a liar; an

    awful person in disguise. This draws

    direct similarities between what Audrey

    thinks of herself and Jo. She thinks

    about herself in this way as well, she

    projects her own self critical views of

    herself on others. She damages

    relationships with others because of her

    critical view of self.

    The first section of the book ends with

    someone telling Audrey something

    about herself that she lacks the ability to

    make clear to herself on her own.

    Different from the first section analyzed,

    the epiphany is put forth in the text after

    another character makes the clear

    statement. Audrey is angry and confused

    about why she made everyone upset. She

    makes the statement about all the love

    she has to give. Jack tells Audrey about

    herself at that moment and helps her

    realize she is at odds with herself. He

    makes the statement You have so much

    love to give because you can't love

    yourself. This is important for several

    reasons. First of all, it draws parallels

    with the previous style of the text, which

    was primarily Audrey thinking about

    herself. The argument here is that the

    love cannot be shared until she has

    some for herself. There is a new distinct

    opinion about Audrey. Jack forms this

    opinion. Even though the text shows

    how Audrey hurts herself due to her self

    hatred, she is not completely aware of

    it. Jack serves the role of the informer.

    The use of the perspective of Jack is to

    develop more thoroughly the argument

    about Audrey. Jack feels responsible in

    a way for Audrey, he protects her from

    herself. In chapter XVIII, the text says

    Jack took the responsibility of

  • herself.... This makes it clear that

    Audrey is hurting herself through

    various means whether it is the

    destruction of relationships or

    skipping of school, which is

    highlighted later. Once again, it is very

    important that Audrey does not make

    this observation. This is an important

    form choice. The character of Audrey

    cannot make the observation about

    self hatred leading to harm. However,

    the text conveys this theme very

    obviously.

    Audrey is a protagonist who fights

    against herself. She cannot make

    conscious observations about her

    behavior causing her to have the need

    to be informed that self hatred causes

    self harm.

    --Luke Seamus McGowan Arnold, 17

    Wouldn't It Be Nice

    I love inhaling your mustard fog

    as around the dawn arises,

    and twirling your spaghetti curls

    as our porous dew comprises.

    --Tyler Earls, 22

  • herself.... This makes it clear that

    Audrey is hurting herself through

    various means whether it is the

    destruction of relationships or

    skipping of school, which is

    highlighted later. Once again, it is very

    important that Audrey does not make

    this observation. This is an important

    form choice. The character of Audrey

    cannot make the observation about

    self hatred leading to harm. However,

    the text conveys this theme very

    obviously.

    Audrey is a protagonist who fights

    against herself. She cannot make

    conscious observations about her

    behavior causing her to have the need

    to be informed that self hatred causes

    self harm.

    --Luke Seamus McGowan Arnold, 17

    On the Rockford Poetry Scene:

    An Interview with Angela Hiss

    Angela Hiss is a poet and the host of

    the Rockford Certified Slam, the only

    Poetry, Inc. approved function in

    Rockford. It occurs on once a month

    in the Nordlof Center a