skills & strategies anchor comprehension strategies skills & strategies anchor comprehension...

Download Skills & Strategies Anchor Comprehension Strategies Skills & Strategies Anchor Comprehension Strategies

Post on 23-Mar-2020

12 views

Category:

Documents

0 download

Embed Size (px)

TRANSCRIPT

  • B e n c h m a r k e d u c a t i o n c o m p a n y

    Themes • Biology • Medical Sciences • Human Body

    Science

    Cells Level V/60

    Skills & Strategies

    Anchor Comprehension Strategies

    • Summarize Information • Draw Conclusions

    Comprehension • Ask questions

    • Identify cause and effect

    • Use graphic features to interpret information

    Vocabulary/Word Study Strategy • Use knowledge of word structures to

    determine word meaning

    Science Big Idea • All living things are made of cells.

    TeACher’S Guide

  • Page 11: After Reading • Administer Posttest • Synthesize Information: Identify Cause and Effect

    D a y

    1

    2

    3

    4

    5

    A c t i v i t i e s

    A dd i t i o n a l R e l a t e d R e s o u r c e s

    Notable Trade Books for Read-Aloud • Day, Nancy. Killer Superbugs: The Story

    of Drug-Resistant Diseases. Enslow Publishers, 2001.

    • Monroe, Judy. Influenza and Other Viruses. Capstone Press, 2001.

    • Romanek, Trudee. Achoo! The Most Interesting Book You’ll Ever Read About Germs. Kids Can Press, 2003.

    • Snedden, Robert. Cell Division and Genetics. Heinemann Library, 2002.

    Web Site for Content Information • CELLS alive!

    http://www.cellsalive.com/ CELLS alive! contains a wealth of information about cells for students and teachers from grades 6–12. It includes interactive cell diagrams, 3-D models, and the “Cell Cam.” In addition, it provides general informational links containing suggestions and tips for homework projects, and quizzes on topics covered in the site.

    C o r e L e s s o n P l a n n i n g G u i d e

    © 2011 Benchmark Education Company, LLC. All rights reserved. Teachers may photocopy the reproducible pages for classroom use. No other part of the guide may be reproduced or transmitted in whole or in part in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording, or any information storage or retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.

    ISBN: 978-1-4108-2584-12

    Lesson at a Glance Before Reading (page 3)

    • Build Background • Introduce the Book • Administer Preassessment

    During Reading (pages 4–10)

    Introduction–Chapter 1 (pages 4–6) • Model Metacognitive Strategy:

    Ask Questions • Set a Purpose for Reading • Discuss the Reading • Model Comprehension Strategy: Draw

    Conclusions • Use Knowledge of Word Structures to

    Determine Word Meaning: Base Words

    Chapter 2 (pages 7–8) • Apply Metacognitive Strategy:

    Ask Questions • Set a Purpose for Reading • Discuss the Reading • Guide Comprehension Strategy:

    Draw Conclusions • Use Graphic Features to Interpret

    Information: Labeled Diagrams

    Chapter 3–Conclusion (pages 9–10) • Apply Metacognitive Strategy:

    Ask Questions • Set a Purpose for Reading • Discuss the Reading • Apply Comprehension Strategy:

    Draw Conclusions • Use Knowledge of Word Structures to

    Determine Word Meaning: Base Words

    After Reading (page 11)

    • Administer Posttest • Synthesize Information: Identify Cause

    and Effect

    Writing Workshop (pages 12–13)

    • Model the Writing Process: Write a Clues and Evidence Paragraph

    Blackline Masters (pages 14–16)

    • Draw Conclusions (page 14) • Use Knowledge of Word Structure: Base

    Words (page 15) • Conclusions (page 18)

    Page 3: Before Reading • Build Background • Introduce the Book • Administer Preassessment

    Pages 4–6: During Reading: Introduction–Chapter 1 • Model Metacognitive Strategy: Ask Questions • Model Comprehension Strategy: Draw Conclusions • Use Knowledge of Word Structures to Determine Word Meaning:

    Base Words

    Pages 7–8: During Reading: Chapter 2 • Apply Metacognitive Strategy: Ask Questions • Guide Comprehension Strategy: Draw Conclusions • Use Graphic Features to Interpret Information: Labeled Diagrams

    Pages 9–10: During Reading: Chapter 3–Conclusion • Apply Metacognitive Strategy: Ask Questions • Apply Comprehension Strategy: Draw Conclusions • Use Knowledge of Word Structures to Determine Word Meaning:

    Base Words

    The following five-day lesson plan is just one option for incorporating this teacher’s guide into your daily lesson plans.

  • Before Reading Build Background • Say: Look around you. What is the smallest living thing you can

    see? Can you think of things that are smaller? Even a mosquito or a seed has smaller parts that you can’t see. These parts are called cells. Every living thing is made up of cells. Think about how small cells are and what tools you can use to see them. For the next two minutes, write down everything you know about cells.

    • At the end of the two minutes, have students work in pairs and share what they wrote.

    • Display the graphic organizer shown on the right. Read the labels together with students. Ask: Did any of you write something that matches one of the topics on this web?

    • List students’ ideas in the appropriate places on the web.

    Introduce the Book • Give students a copy of the book. Have them read the title and

    locate the table of contents. Ask: How is this book organized? What is each chapter about?

    • Point out that Chapter 2 describes the main parts of cells. Have students preview Chapter 2, looking for the pictures that show cell parts.

    • Have pairs of students choose a chapter to skim. Tell each pair to choose one or two boldfaced words and one or two pictures to tell the group about.

    Administer Preassessment • Have students take Ongoing Assessment #11 on page 58 in the

    Comprehension Strategy Assessment Handbook (Grade 6).

    • Score assessments and use the results to determine instruction.

    • Keep group assessments in a small-group reading folder. For in-depth analysis, discuss responses with individual students.

    Informal Assessment Tips

    1. Assess students’ ability to locate chapters using the table of contents.

    2. Document informal observations in a folder or notebook.

    3. Keep the folder or notebook at the small-group reading table for handy reference.

    4. Tell struggling students that the chapter starts on the page number next to the chapter’s title in the table of contents. Explain that the boldfaced words in the chapter are also in the glossary.

    © 2011 Benchmark Education Company, LLC Cells 3

    bacteria microscope

    animal plant

    Cells

  • During Reading: Introduction–Chapter 1 Model Metacognitive Strategy: Ask Questions

    • Say: Good readers ask questions all the time. They ask questions about unfamiliar words; questions about how, why, what, when, and where; and questions about what will happen next.

    • Use a real-life example of asking questions. Say: When I come across an unfamiliar word, I stop and ask myself what the word means. Sometimes unfamiliar words are boldfaced, in dark print. Sometimes the author defines the word, but other times I have to figure out the meaning on my own.

    • Say: Yesterday we previewed the book Cells. Today we are going to ask questions about unknown words in Chapter 1.

    • Read page 4 aloud (including the caption) while students follow along. Ask yourself questions about vocabulary as you read. Write the questions on self-stick notes and place them in the book where the question first came up. Some ideas for questions follow. What does represents mean? (to show in a picture, to describe) What are compartments? (separate divisions or sections)

    • Read pages 5–6 aloud while students follow along. Say: When I see a boldfaced word in this book, I know I can look up its definition in the glossary in the back. Otherwise, if I can’t define a word from context clues, I can use a dictionary.

    • Ask: On page 6, what does concluded mean? (to come to a decision)

    Set a Purpose for Reading • Ask students to read pages 7–9. Have them write questions

    about unknown words on self-stick notes or in their journals. When they define the words, have them write the words and definitions in their journals. If necessary, have students use dictionaries to determine the meanings of unfamiliar words.

    4 Cells © 2011 Benchmark Education Company, LLC

    Good readers ask questions before, during, and after reading. Asking questions keeps readers engaged with the text and enhances their understanding of what they read. Readers ask questions about what unknown words mean, why something happened, how it happened, and what might happen next. Good readers keep track of their questions by writing them in a journal or on self-stick notes.

    Content Information Students might be interested in the following facts about cells:

    • Everyone starts life as a single cell. The more you grow, the more cells you have.

    • Most body cells can divide into two identical cells. These new cells can then divide over and over again. Cell division can create huge numbers of new cells quickly. Cells divide as your body grows and anywhere damaged or worn-out cells need to be replaced.

    • Water moves in and out of cells. A plant wilts when its cells lose water and shrink. A plant is strong when it

View more