shibori techniques lesson 4 arashi

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Shibori Techniques Lesson 4 Arashi

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  • 2010 Glennis Dolce all rights reserved www.shiborigirlstudios.com No part of this document may be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the author Patterns and templates are provided for personal use only and are not to be sold or distributed in any way.

    1

    Shibori Techniques on Silk with Glennis Dolce (Shibori Girl Studios)

    using Colorhue dyes

    Lesson Four Arashi Shibori! Well now we have arrived at what I consider to be my specialty. Or at least that with which I have the most experience. Arashi shibori (pole wrapping) was developed in the interest of productivity. A desire to create pattern on cloth in a way that was less time consuming than some of the previous shibori traditions. And although it took Suzuki Kanezo 8 years to invent and perfect the technique of arashi shibori around 1860 in Arimatsu it was an effort rewarded in the end as it allowed for a new and less costly approach to producing pattern on cloth. Many thanks to Suzuki Kanezo for his practice and patience. In this lesson, you will discover the beauty of practice in producing arashi patterning. Arashi translates to storm-driven rain the diagonal lines representing the torrential rains often experienced during hurricane season in Japan. I mentioned earlier that the wine bottle used in this lesson must have perfectly parallel sides. I made the mistake of drinking a nice red whose bottle unfortunately did not meet the criteria. I didnt discover this until I was half way into the lesson and had to rewrap the silk onto a pole. But I include some pictures here anyway (before the disaster of pushing the fabric to the end only to discover that the end was narrower and relaxing all my nice tight wraps!). I had actually never tried the wine bottle method myself but had seen it done and was thinking about having you use something you might easily have on hand. Alas, I will have to open another bottle! Or, you can pick up a PVC pipe at the local hardware store. 2 x 4 is a good size. While you are there, some blue painters masking tape is helpful. Not sure if I added this to the supply list. Oops- if I didnt. Now here is the point where I will give homage to the master. Karren Brito. She is quite clearly the master here. There are others who have done amazing things with this technique but it is Karren who wrote the book, Shibori-Color and Texture on Silk. If you have any intention of doing more arashi on silk with acid dyes just march over to her blog and click on the link to purchase her book. Her blog Entwinements is a great resource as well although she is no longer updating it or answering comments that I am aware of. Karren has been a great inspiration to me and I am ever grateful and appreciative. Her level of mastery of this technique is above and beyond. Not only that, but her knowledge of dye chemistry is superlative. If you order the book from her instead of Amazon, shell sign it for you plus she will get the benefit of the sale herself instead of some anonymous Amazon seller. I am going to warn you now- pole wrapping is fun. It can be quick if you want it to be. If you are looking for precision, expect to practice quite a bit. Expect to learn by trial and error. Each type and weight of fabric, each kind of wrapping thread, each sort of dyeset you use will yield different and interesting results. I personally have wrapped over 80,000 yards of string around poles. Easily the first 20,000 were kinda iffy by my current standards. Still I have off days. Yet I keep at it. Mostly I use this technique in combination with steam setting the silk to get the lovely fine pleats on lightweight silk. You can experiment with both depending on what your interest is. Okay- lets get started!

  • 2010 Glennis Dolce all rights reserved www.shiborigirlstudios.com No part of this document may be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the author Patterns and templates are provided for personal use only and are not to be sold or distributed in any way.

    2

    Shibori Techniques on Silk with Glennis Dolce (Shibori Girl Studios)

    using Colorhue dyes

    Lesson Four (cont.) Gather together your supplies for this lesson. This will include bottle, PVC pipe (or any straight sided smooth tube that is rigid and impervious to water), strong string, scissors, masking tape, your dye materials and containers, and your fabric. Here I am using some silk organza and a 12 x 60 lightweight (5momme) silk scarf. In arashi shibori, the dye must penetrate through several layers of fabric if it is folded and pleated before wrapping - just know that lighter weight fabrics get better dye penetration. Experiment!

    The center photo shows various fabrics ironed and pleated ready for wrapping. The one in the foreground shows an offset sort of pleating. You can pleat and fold the fabric in many ways achieving many different results. For this lesson I am using a basic accordion fold on organza (back right) and habotai (blue). The third photo is a picture of my pipe roller that I built based on photos from Karren Britos book (previously mentioned-see page one). For the wheels I used old rollerblade wheels the kids had deemed too used to be of value to them (they were roller hockey boys before they took up musical instruments). If you want to build one yourself- buy Karrens book for detailed photos.

  • 2010 Glennis Dolce all rights reserved www.shiborigirlstudios.com No part of this document may be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the author Patterns and templates are provided for personal use only and are not to be sold or distributed in any way.

    3

    Shibori Techniques on Silk with Glennis Dolce (Shibori Girl Studios)

    using Colorhue dyes

    Lesson Four (cont.)

    Step one soak, dye , and dry any of the fabrics with which you want to start out with a base dyed color.

    I chose a sky blue in honor of the sunny day!

    After your dyed fabric is dried, iron each piece. For both pieces exampled here I folded the silk in half lengthwise and ironed, then in half again-with a final ironing. If it helps you to pin a long piece to keep the layers together and behaving, go right ahead. I use only fine silk pins like those by Clover.

  • 2010 Glennis Dolce all rights reserved www.shiborigirlstudios.com No part of this document may be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the author Patterns and templates are provided for personal use only and are not to be sold or distributed in any way.

    4

    Shibori Techniques on Silk

    with Glennis Dolce (Shibori Girl Studios) using Colorhue dyes

    Lesson Four (cont.)

    The second step is to wrap the fabric around your bottle/pipe/tube securely taping it in place temporarily in order to free up your hands to manipulate the thread wrapping process. Keep in mind that patience is key. -doing a good job in each of these steps will reward you later on.

    Once the fabric is secure, you can begin the wrapping process. Begin by tying your thread around your tube and securing tightly with a good knot. Then wrap around several times in the same spot to secure the thread even further. Continue wrapping down the length of the tube spacing your threads about apart. Of course this can be altered in either direction-wider or narrower as desired but this is a good place to start. Most important is to keep a constant (tight) tension with the wrapping thread as you go. After you have wrapped 6-8 then stop and while maintaining tension on your wrapping thread (this is the part where you wish you could quickly grow an extra hand), push the fabric to the end of the tube. Continue on in this fashion until all fabric has been wrapped and pushed together. Wrap the string tightly over and over itself to hold it securely and make a knot. Cut the wrapping thread. Here are some photos of the process.

    and the video!

  • 2010 Glennis Dolce all rights reserved www.shiborigirlstudios.com No part of this document may be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the author Patterns and templates are provided for personal use only and are not to be sold or distributed in any way.

    5

    Shibori Techniques on Silk with Glennis Dolce (Shibori Girl Studios)

    using Colorhue dyes

    Lesson Four (cont.)

  • 2010 Glennis Dolce all rights reserved www.shiborigirlstudios.com No part of this document may be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the author Patterns and templates are provided for personal use only and are not to be sold or distributed in any way.

    6

    Shibori Techniques on Silk with Glennis Dolce (Shibori Girl Studios)

    using Colorhue dyes

    Lesson Four (cont.)

    The last thing to do before dyeing is to soak or wet the wrapped fabrics. Now on to dyeing.

    Here is a pole wrapped with white organza. I have prepared a light blue dyebath using the Colorhue dyes- a mix of turquoise and electric blue.

    Using a large brush, I brushed the dye over the fabric several times until I got the desired shade. Reuse the same dye that runs off. You can also pour over your dye. Here I chose to brush it over as the organza is such an open weave ( brushing provides more control).

    Hard to see here but pulling apart the pleats you can see the original white under the strings. Next, I add some overpainted colors- building up as I go. Adding scarlet over the blue results in purple.

  • 2010 Glennis Dolce all rights reserved www.shiborigirlstudios.com No part of this document may be

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