Sheltered Instruction for English Language Learners

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Sheltered Instruction for English Language Learners. Tonie Garza tgarza@elsaberenterprises.com. Learner Outcomes. Identify the characteristics of the Sheltered Instruction Model. Analyze the different components. Practice various strategies. Apply theory into practice. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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<ul><li><p>Sheltered Instruction for English Language Learners Tonie Garzatgarza@elsaberenterprises.com</p></li><li><p>Learner OutcomesIdentify the characteristics of the Sheltered Instruction Model.Analyze the different components.Practice various strategies.Apply theory into practice.Identify different methods of adapting lesson plans for ELL.</p></li><li><p>ELL AssessmentEntryOral Language Proficiency--Woodcock-Muoz Standardized Assessment BenchmarksAs appropriateCriterionTAKSSpanish, English, LATLinguisticTELPASWoodcock-Muoz</p></li><li><p>Student Exit and MonitoringExit CriteriaFluent English SpeakerMeeting Grade level StandardsMeeting Minimum Expectations on TAKS or 40%ile on a Standardized AssessmentMonitoringYear 1 and 2LPAC Reviews academic progress each grading periodReclassify if necessary</p></li><li><p>Planning a Learning Experience++ProductVisual=Learning Experiences</p></li><li><p>Components of Sheltered InstructionLanguage AcquisitionComprehensible Input Lesson Preparation ObjectivesBackground Knowledge VocabularyLesson DeliveryInteractionScaffoldingInstructional StrategiesAssessment</p></li><li><p>Academic English Language ProficiencyAcademic Language ProficiencyAcademic AchievementLanguage Proficiency</p></li><li><p>Krashens Monitor ModelThe Affective Filter HypothesisVariables like motives, needs, attitudes, &amp; anxiety may prevent learners from using input (i.e. from acquisition)</p></li><li><p>Making Input ComprehensibleUse authentic language.Use non - verbal cues.Use manipulatives, realia, and visuals.Create a low - stress friendly environment.Give clear explanation of academic tasks.</p></li><li><p>Making Input ComprehensibleRestate.Use cognates.Use high frequency words.Reduce the number of pronouns.Avoid slang and idioms (for beginners).</p></li><li><p>Making Input ComprehensibleStress student involvement; hands - on activities.Use prior content introduction in the primary language.Simplify teacher talk.</p></li><li><p>Simplifying Teacher TalkSpeak slowly.Enunciate clearly.Include pauses.Repeat key words/vocabulary.</p></li><li><p>Providing substantial amounts of support and assistance in the earliest stages of teaching a new concept or strategy, and then decrease the amount of support as the learners acquire experience through multiple practice opportunities (Vacca, 2000).Scaffolding</p></li><li><p>ScaffoldingI DoYou DoWe Do</p></li><li><p>I DoObjectivsCuesGuided PracticeYou DoGroup PracticeIndependent PracticeWe Do</p></li><li><p>A wide range of reading opportunitiesLanguage interactionEducational MediaDirect vocabulary instruction related to content</p><p>Ways of Building Background Knowledge</p></li><li><p>Activities to Deepen Understanding of VocabularyComparing termsClassifying termsGenerating metaphors using termsGenerating analogies using termsRevising initial descriptions or nonlinguistic representations of termsUsing understanding of roots and affixes to deepen knowledge of terms</p></li><li><p>Decide on an appropriate cue word and give students 3 minutes to write as many words as they can associate with the term. Ask for a quick justification for how each word or expression relates to the topic.List-Group-Label</p></li><li><p>When a sufficient list has been compiled, have students work in cooperative teams to groups items by common characteristics. Provide teams with small slips of paper so they can record items and physically shift then into groups. Students should aim for at least three items per group, if possible.List-Group-Label (cont.)</p></li><li><p>List-Group-Label (cont.)</p><p>Finally have students examine their groupings and decide on an appropriate label, which can be written on a slip of paper and used as a title for each sublist. Each team shares its categories and explains the rationale for organizing the lists.</p></li><li><p>Frayer Model</p></li><li><p>*Other Strategies</p><p>Add Subtract MultiplyClosed or Open Word SortWord WallCloze SentencesAlphaboxesSocratic SeminarPWIMGistGraphic OrganizersSQP2RS</p></li><li><p>Textbook Highlights</p><p>Contents and IndexTitlesChapter, Sections and SubsectionsOutlines and QuestionsSummaries and Review SectionsGlossariesText Boxes and Highlighted AreasText OrganizersGraphicsVisualsVocabulary</p><p>**Presenters Directions:Review Objectives.</p><p>Participants Directions:Make foldableUse 1 colored sheet 11 x 17Fold Shutter StyleFold down one more timeTitle the flip book Sheltered InstructionLabel each flap Language AcquisitionLanguage FocusComprehensible InputBackground Knowledge</p><p>**Think Pair Share***Discuss the distinction between language proficiency as a whole, academic achievement as a whole, and the overlapping sectionacademic language proficiency. Explain that academic language proficiency is not the same as academic achievement but is an essential component of academic achievement. English language learners who have academic language proficiency understand the English that enables them to access learning needed for academic achievement. Language proficiency incorporates both social language proficiency and academic language proficiency. </p><p>Social Language Proficiency Language of social interaction Language acquisition often outside of school Tied to everyday life Grounded in language proficiency standardsAcademic Language Proficiency Language of content-based instruction Language acquisition mainly within school Tied to school life Grounded in language proficiency standardsAcademic Achievement Concepts of content-based instruction Conceptual development Tied to curriculum in specific content areas Grounded in academic content standards **Presenter:Read slide:</p><p>Realia means real objects. Real objects are better than pictures, while pictures are better than words alone.</p><p>*Presenter:Read slide and give examples.</p><p>Restating means Not rephrasing. Explain that to an ELL they may not understand that the rephrased question is the same question. They may feel like they failed with the first question and feel anxious about the next one. Explain that it is best to repeat the same question and use gestures or point to pictures, etc. to make the question comprehensible.</p><p>Give some examples of cognates and/or ask the participants to think of some between English and Spanish.</p><p>Give an example of an idiom that would be difficult for a beginner to understand, like Its raining cats and dogs when the ELL has just learned animal names. Explain that idioms should be taught to intermediate and advanced students when it relates to the content being taught and that idioms should be taught as meaningful chunks.*Presenter:Read slide and discuss.</p><p>Use 5 senses if possible.*Presenter:Read slide and discuss.</p><p>Make sure teachers understand that speaking should not be so slow that it interrupts understanding. Speaking should be natural.</p><p>*When you think of the word scaffold what comes to mind? Discuss.</p><p>Read definition.Scaffolding is a term associated with Vygotskys notion of the Zone of Proximal Development. The Zone of Proximal Development is the difference between what a child can accomplish alone and what he or she can accomplish with the assistance of a more experienced individual.</p><p>In teaching, scaffolding instruction means providing substantial amounts of support and assistance in the earliest stages of teaching a new concept or strategy, and then decrease the amount of support as the learners acquire experience through multiple practice opportunities (Vacca, 2000).</p><p>*Ask participants to find the cross-curricular second language acquisition essential knowledge and skills on the foldable. Review essential knowledge and skills.Cross-curricular second language acquisition/learning strategies. The ELL uses language learning strategies to develop an awareness of his or her own learning processes in all content areas. </p><p>2. Cross-curricular second language acquisition/listening. The ELL listens to a variety of speakers including teachers, peers, and electronic media to gain an increasing level of comprehension of newly acquired language in all content areas. </p><p>3. Cross-curricular second language acquisition/speaking. The ELL speaks in a variety of modes for a variety of purposes with an awareness of different language registers (formal/informal) using vocabulary with increasing fluency and accuracy in language arts and all content areas. 4. Cross-curricular second language acquisition/reading. The ELL reads a variety of texts for a variety of purposes with an increasing level of comprehension in all content areas. For Kindergarten and Grade 1, certain of these student expectations apply to text read aloud for students not yet at the stage of decoding written text. </p><p>5. Cross-curricular second language acquisition/writing. The ELL writes in a variety of forms with increasing accuracy to effectively address a specific purpose and audience in all content areas. For Kindergarten and Grade 1, certain of these student expectations do not apply until the student has reached the stage of generating original written text using a standard writing system. </p><p>Click In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English for cross-curricular second language acquisition essential knowledge and skills must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency, beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high. </p><p>Refer to the foldable and review how to linguistically accommodate your instruction.</p><p>The proficiency levels of ELLs will vary in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Becoming familiar with the proficiency level descriptors is important in order to meet the linguistic need of the ELL. </p><p>Lets take a look at the proficiency level descriptors for reading in the foldable. Move across from Beginning to Advanced High and identify the differences. Discuss.</p><p>*Ask participants to find the cross-curricular second language acquisition essential knowledge and skills on the foldable. Review essential knowledge and skills.Cross-curricular second language acquisition/learning strategies. The ELL uses language learning strategies to develop an awareness of his or her own learning processes in all content areas. </p><p>2. Cross-curricular second language acquisition/listening. The ELL listens to a variety of speakers including teachers, peers, and electronic media to gain an increasing level of comprehension of newly acquired language in all content areas. </p><p>3. Cross-curricular second language acquisition/speaking. The ELL speaks in a variety of modes for a variety of purposes with an awareness of different language registers (formal/informal) using vocabulary with increasing fluency and accuracy in language arts and all content areas. 4. Cross-curricular second language acquisition/reading. The ELL reads a variety of texts for a variety of purposes with an increasing level of comprehension in all content areas. For Kindergarten and Grade 1, certain of these student expectations apply to text read aloud for students not yet at the stage of decoding written text. </p><p>5. Cross-curricular second language acquisition/writing. The ELL writes in a variety of forms with increasing accuracy to effectively address a specific purpose and audience in all content areas. For Kindergarten and Grade 1, certain of these student expectations do not apply until the student has reached the stage of generating original written text using a standard writing system. </p><p>Click In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English for cross-curricular second language acquisition essential knowledge and skills must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency, beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high. </p><p>Refer to the foldable and review how to linguistically accommodate your instruction.</p><p>The proficiency levels of ELLs will vary in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Becoming familiar with the proficiency level descriptors is important in order to meet the linguistic need of the ELL. </p><p>Lets take a look at the proficiency level descriptors for reading in the foldable. Move across from Beginning to Advanced High and identify the differences. Discuss.</p><p>*Presenters Directions:</p><p>Explain to participants that there are three distinct ways that Background Knowledge is developed.</p><p>Background Experiences relates to what the student knows on his own</p><p>Linking past and new learning is to relate to previous school activities.</p><p>Key vocabulary that can be related to previous knowledge.</p><p>**Presenters Directions:The teacher develops a list of termsThe students divide them into categories at their own discretion. The students decide on the number of categories and what the titles will be.</p><p>Ask for teachers to give examples of how they have used this strategy.</p><p>*Presenters Directions:The teacher develops a list of termsThe students divide them into categories at their own discretion. The students decide on the number of categories and what the titles will be.</p><p>Ask for teachers to give examples of how they have used this strategy.</p><p>*Presenters Directions:The teacher develops a list of termsThe students divide them into categories at their own discretion. The students decide on the number of categories and what the titles will be.</p><p>Ask for teachers to give examples of how they have used this strategy.</p><p>*Presenter Directions:Introduce another type of a Concept Definition Map known as a Word Box. This is mainly used with primary students.</p><p>The Concept is entered into the center box.DefinitionExamplesReal World UseRelated Words</p><p>**</p></li></ul>

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