SharksSharks Shy Ocean Creatures?. Sharks are Cartilagenous Fish  What parts of the human body are made of cartilage?  Ears  Tips of nose  Covering.

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  • Slide 1
  • SharksSharks Shy Ocean Creatures?
  • Slide 2
  • Sharks are Cartilagenous Fish What parts of the human body are made of cartilage? Ears Tips of nose Covering at the end of bones Front parts of the ribs Tendons and ligaments Growth plates in children and adolescents What parts of the human body are made of cartilage? Ears Tips of nose Covering at the end of bones Front parts of the ribs Tendons and ligaments Growth plates in children and adolescents
  • Slide 3
  • Anatomy of a Shark Sharks belong to a family called Chondrichthyes. The members all have cartilage rather than bones. Sharks belong to a family called Chondrichthyes. The members all have cartilage rather than bones.
  • Slide 4
  • Members Sharks, skates and the rays There are approximately 700 species. Sharks, skates and the rays There are approximately 700 species.
  • Slide 5
  • Cartilage not Bones Cartilage is lighter than bone and helps the shark to float.
  • Slide 6
  • Unique Characteristics Placoid Scales tiny teeth embedded in skin that point towards the back to the fish. Prevent fish from being eaten from the tail Ventral gill slits with no covering Very vulnerable area Spiracles are breathing holes on the dorsal side of the head behind the eyes Mouth is ventral and used for bottom feeding Pectoral fins help give the fish lift like the wings of a plane. Placoid Scales tiny teeth embedded in skin that point towards the back to the fish. Prevent fish from being eaten from the tail Ventral gill slits with no covering Very vulnerable area Spiracles are breathing holes on the dorsal side of the head behind the eyes Mouth is ventral and used for bottom feeding Pectoral fins help give the fish lift like the wings of a plane.
  • Slide 7
  • Stingrays and Skates Most are bottom dwellers in the sand of the Gulf of Mexico and on the Atlantic Coast from the Carolinas to Brazil. Their tail is used for stabbing prey and enemies. Stingrays have a spine on their tail, skates do not. Most are bottom dwellers in the sand of the Gulf of Mexico and on the Atlantic Coast from the Carolinas to Brazil. Their tail is used for stabbing prey and enemies. Stingrays have a spine on their tail, skates do not.
  • Slide 8
  • Stingrays and Skates
  • Slide 9
  • Sharks Comes in all Sizes about 350 species Whale Shark Dwarf Dog Shark 6.5 in up to 59 ft. Whale Shark Dwarf Dog Shark 6.5 in up to 59 ft.
  • Slide 10
  • Mermaid Purses? Shark egg sacs
  • Slide 11
  • Lemon Shark
  • Slide 12
  • Great Whites Ocean Acrobats
  • Slide 13
  • Tiger Sharks Garbage Cans of the Ocean They eat anything they can and help keep the ocean clean Garbage Cans of the Ocean They eat anything they can and help keep the ocean clean
  • Slide 14
  • The Real Jaws Meet the bull shark
  • Slide 15
  • Bull Sharks in Fresh Water? Bull sharks can live in both the sea and fresh water. They have been found in the Amazon, Ganges, Mississippi and Australian rivers. Bull sharks can live in both the sea and fresh water. They have been found in the Amazon, Ganges, Mississippi and Australian rivers.
  • Slide 16
  • Goblin Sharks Found only in deep waters, are extremely rare, live on fish and octopus, grow to apprx. 10 ft. Found only in deep waters, are extremely rare, live on fish and octopus, grow to apprx. 10 ft.
  • Slide 17
  • Structure of Sharks Sharks are living fossils because todays form closely resembles fossilized forms.
  • Slide 18
  • Sharks Adaptations Lateral line organ picks up sound vibrations in the water Ampullae of Lorenzini pick up the electrical impulses of the nervous system Streamlined body shape allows them to move quickly through the water Caudal (tail) fin is used for forward thrust Lateral line organ picks up sound vibrations in the water Ampullae of Lorenzini pick up the electrical impulses of the nervous system Streamlined body shape allows them to move quickly through the water Caudal (tail) fin is used for forward thrust
  • Slide 19
  • More shark adaptations Teeth are serrated like a steak knife and are used to sever food into smaller pieces Sharks must be in constant motion or in moving water because they will sink and need the oxygen to keep flowing over their body Can detect the smell of blood from miles away Teeth are serrated like a steak knife and are used to sever food into smaller pieces Sharks must be in constant motion or in moving water because they will sink and need the oxygen to keep flowing over their body Can detect the smell of blood from miles away
  • Slide 20
  • Shark Anatomy Lateral Line Organ
  • Slide 21
  • Reproduction Fertilization is internal and the shark usually gives birth to live babies, but some sharks produce eggs in cases that they attach to seaweed Males have claspers to transfer sperm to the female reproductive tract. Fertilization is internal and the shark usually gives birth to live babies, but some sharks produce eggs in cases that they attach to seaweed Males have claspers to transfer sperm to the female reproductive tract.
  • Slide 22
  • Human Influence Each year over 30 to 100 million shark are killed by nets, for food or for sport.
  • Slide 23
  • Shark Delicacys
  • Slide 24
  • Research Researchers combine shark cartilage and cow collagen to make sheet to place over a burn victims skin. The patients cells invade, absorb and replace the sheet with new human skin. Researchers combine shark cartilage and cow collagen to make sheet to place over a burn victims skin. The patients cells invade, absorb and replace the sheet with new human skin.
  • Slide 25
  • Protection Great whites are now protected along the coast of California, Australia, South Africa and the Maldives. Wildlife Conservation Society has begun a tagging program. Great whites are now protected along the coast of California, Australia, South Africa and the Maldives. Wildlife Conservation Society has begun a tagging program.

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