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Searching OCLC Assignment. LIS 605 Spring 2012 Dr. donna Bair-Mundy. Derived key title search:. Mitchell, Margaret. 1996. Gone with the wind. New York: Scribner. gon,wi,th,w. Derived key title search: 3,2,2,1. Mitchell, Margaret. 1996. Gone with the wind. New York: Scribner. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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  • Searching OCLC AssignmentLIS 605Spring 2012Dr. donna Bair-Mundy

  • Mitchell, Margaret. 1996. Gone with the wind. New York: Scribner.gon,wi,th,wDerived key title search:3,2,2,1Derived key title search:

  • Mitchell, Margaret. 1996. Gone with the wind. New York: Scribner.

  • Mitchell, Margaret. 1996. Gone with the wind. New York: Scribner.

  • Mitchell, Margaret. c1996. Gone with the wind. New York: Scribner. 506.Mitchell, Margaret, 1900-1949. Gone with the wind / Margaret Mitchell ; with a new preface by Pat Conroy and an introduction by James A. Michener. 60th Anniversary ed. New York : Scribner, c1996.

  • Mitchell, Margaret. 1996. Gone with the wind. New York: Scribner.

  • Pirsig, Robert M. 1974. Zen and the art of motorcycle maintenance : an inquiry into values. New York: Morrow.zen,an,th,a

  • Pirsig, Robert M. 1974. Zen and the art of motorcycle maintenance : an inquiry into values. New York: Morrow.

  • Pirsig, Robert M. 1974. Zen and the art of motorcycle maintenance : an inquiry into values. New York: Morrow.

  • Pirsig, Robert M. 1974. Zen and the art of motorcycle maintenance : an inquiry into values. New York: Morrow.

  • Austen, Jane. 2003. Sense and sensibility. New York: Barnes & Noble Classics.sen,an,se,Note: Nothing after third commasen,an,se,

  • Austen, Jane. 2003. Sense and sensibility. New York: Barnes & Noble Classics.sen,an,se,

  • Austen, Jane. 2003. Sense and sensibility. New York: Barnes & Noble Classics.sen,an,se,

  • Yolen, Jane (ed.). 1993. Xanadu. New York: TOR.xan,,,Note: Still need 3 commas

  • Uris, Leon. 1962. Exodus. Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday.exo,,,Would retrieve too many recordsuris,exodName/title search

  • Multiple indexes to main fileSeriesIndexBibliographicrecordsISBNIndexBrowseTitleIndexAuthorIndexCall no.IndexSubjectIndex

  • Rowling, J.K. 1999. Harry Potter and the prisoner of Azkaban. New York: Arthur A. Levine Books.ti:harry potter prisoner azkabantiTitle index:Key word searchwords to search onCommand-line keyword search:

  • Harry Potter and the prisoner of Azkaban in Hungarianti:harry potter prisoner azkaban and la:hunBoolean operatorlanguage indexCode for HungarianCombining fields using Boolean:

  • Harry Potter and the prisoner of Azkaban in Hungarianti:harry potter prisoner azkaban and la:hunCombining fields using Boolean:Uniform title

  • Harry Potter and the prisoner of Azkaban in Hungarianti:harry potter prisoner azkaban and la:hun

  • Finding a language code

  • MARC Code List for Languages

  • MARC language codes

  • MARC language code for Hungarian

  • Rowling, J.K. 1999. Harry Potter and the prisoner of Azkaban. New York: Arthur A. Levine Books.ti:harry potter prisoner azkaban and la:chiBoolean operatorlanguage indexCode for Chinese

  • Alcott, Louisa May. 1869. Little women. Boston, Roberts Bros.ti=little wom#ntiTitle index=Phrase searchWords in sequence#Single-character wildcardCommand-line phrase search:

  • Gone with the wind in Japanesegon,wi,th,w la:jpnCombining derived-key and keyword searches:

  • The assignment:1. Find your records in OCLC 24510Harry Potter and the goblet of fire / $c by J.K. Rowling ; illustrations by Mary GrandPre. 2501st American ed. 260New York : $b Arthur A. Levine Books, $c c2000.

    24010Harry Potter and the goblet of fire. $l Chinese.245 10Hali Bote yu huo yan bei / $c J.K. Luolin zhu; Ma Aixin yi.260Beijing : $b Ren min wen xue chu ban she, $c 2001.Light pink: EasyLavender: Not quite as easy

  • The assignment:2.Write down the OCLCnumber

  • 3. Turn in for each record:Colored sheet with:Your nameOCLC numberOCLC Searching Exercise

    OCLC 47702921 Name Belinda Beststudent

    245 1 0 Harry Potter and the goblet of fire Bring to class next class session

    Bring to class: Searching OCLC handout light-pink records (to search) dark-pink records (to search)

    Before we get into todays main lecture lets talk about your OCLC searching assignment. This is worth ten points and will be due one week from today.

    In order to perform a search you simply log onto Connexion the way you did when you were inputting records in the descriptive section of the course. But instead of creating a record were going to access the Search function using the button in the upper left corner of the screen. [click] So lets click on Search. [click] This will give you a search screen. For this demo were going to use the top portion of the screen to do a command-line search. [click] This type of search offers great precision but requires some explanation. Lets say we want to search for Gone with the Wind, by Margaret Mitchell. There are a number of ways to search for this. One way is to do a Derived key search on the title. In this type of search you type in the first letters of the first four words of the title. The system looks at the punctuation you use, then determines what index to search in. On the verso of the first leaf of your handout youll see a table. For a title search we type the first 3 letters of the first word, then a comma, the first 2 letters of the second word, then a comma, the first 2 letters of the third word, then a comma, and the first letter of the fourth word. So to retrieve gone with the wind we type: [click]gon,wi,th,wAgain, this is a derived key title search. [click]Now we click on the Search button. [click] Because there are lots of works that fit our search pattern, the software groups the retrieved records by format and within each format by date. [click]Since our work is a book and was published in 1996, lets click on the first group listed. [click]

    We dont see our book immediately so lets scroll down. This looks like our book. [click] Lets enlarge this a bit so we can see it.[click] Lets click on the link to see our record. And heres our record. If we were in a library and wished to download this record into our OPAC we could do so but Im not going to demo that today. Lets try another one. This time lets search for Zen and the art of motorcycle maintenance. If we want to do a title search, what do we type? [click] zen,an,th,aNow we click on our search button. [click] Since it was published in 1974 well click on the link for works published between 1959 and 1992. We see data that matches our book and click on the link. [click]

    And here is our record. Now, what if we have a book with a title that has fewer than four words? The number of commas tell the software what type of search to perform, so we need to have the three commas. If we dont have that fourth word, we simply type nothing after the third comma. So, we we are searching for sense and sensibility we type:sen,an,se, Lets see this against a darker background. [click] Now, note that we still have three commas even though there is nothing after the comma. [click] Dont forget the last comma or the software wont do the appropriate search. Our book was published in 2003 so we select the 2000-2005 group. [click] And heres our record. What if we have a single-word title, like Xanadu? We still need our three commas, so we type the first three letters of the first (and only) word, followed by the three commas. Now, with an odd word like Xanadu we dont all that many items retrieved so this isnt bad. But this would not work well with a more commonly-spelled first word. But what if we were searching for the book Exodus, by Leon Uris? Searching on exo,,, [click]would retrieve far too many records [click]titles starting with exobiology, exonerate, exorcism, exorbitant, exoskeletal, exoteric, exotic, and so forth. So for this type of title we use another type of searcha name/title search.[click] In this type of search we type the first four letters of the authors name, then the first four letters of the first word of the title: uris, exod [click] Now the search engine finds a reasonable number of records and presents them to us. [click] To pull up our record wed click on the link [click] OCLC offers another type of command-line search. However, it helps to know a bit about how a bibliographic database works before you hear about the other type of search. In most large bibliographic databases, when you enter a search statement youre not searching the bibliographic records. Rather, the database software periodically pulls data from the bibliographic records and creates various indexes to those records. For example, theres a subject index, an author index, and so forth. Index files are much smaller than the bibliographic record files. They only contain index terms and pointers to bibliographic records. When you enter a search statement the search engine goes to the index you have selected and searches it, then pulls up the appropriate bibliographic records. Now, in OCLC you can also do command-line keyword searches. In the searches we just did, the number of commas told the search engine which indexes to search. In command-line keyword searches we tell the computer which index to search using index labels. For example, if we want to do a command-line keyword search for Harry Potter and the prisoner of Askaban, we first tell the search engine to search in the title index by typing ti. Then we type a colon to tell the software this is a keyword search. Then we type our keywords: harry potter prisoner azkaban We can also use a Boolean operator to refine your search. Lets say we want to find the same Harry Potter book in Hungarian. Here is a search statement that will cause the search engine to look for the first words in the title index, then among the reco

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