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Module 8: Satire NOVINS

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  • 1. Satire Satirical Literature & Political Cartoons RDG 101 OLA Dr. Novins Fall 1013
  • 2. Satire: Definitions Satire is like a mirror in which [a man] sees everyones face but [his] own. ~Jonathan Swift Satire is a literary genre that uses irony, wit and sometimes sarcasm, to expose humanitys foibles giving impetus to changes through ridicule. The author of a satire reduces the vaulted worth of something to its realdecidedly lower- worth.
  • 3. Characteristics of Satire SATIRE IS NOT COMEDY, which just seeks to entertain or amuse. Satire, while implicitly humorous, has a moral purpose. 1. Moral lesson 2. Funny 3. Shared community standard of correct behavior (which begets the humor!) **The goal of satire is not just to abuse, but rather, to provoke change or reform.
  • 4. Two Examples of Satire: One technique used in satire is that of disputation which can be effective in making any logical argument appear ridiculous, when it may not be, by stretching it to an extreme which goes far beyond the body or intent or scope of the argument. Example 1: A. In America, citizens have the right to bear arms. B. Oh, so it's OK with you for hundreds of innocent kids to be killed each year with unregistered handguns? Example 2: A. Everyone in a free country ought to be able to live according to their own religious beliefs. B. Oh, so it's OK for witches to dig up bodies to cut out gall bladders for ingredients for their magic potions? From: http://maggiesfarm.anotherdotcom.co m/archives/2130-Fallacy-of-the-WeekReductio-ad-Absurdum.html
  • 5. The next section of the PowerPoint explains two types of satire AND the different techniques or characteristics of satire. Since you will be taking a quiz AND creating your own short satirical piece at the end of the module, it is important to not just glance through the PowerPoint but to understand the different concepts.
  • 6. Two Examples of Satirical Text
  • 7. EXAMPLE #1: An Older Article Apple Hard At Work Making iPhone Obsolete CUPERTINO, CAOnly a month after the much-heralded announcement of the iPhone, Apple CEO Steve Jobs confirmed that his engineers were already working around-the-clock on the touch screen smart phone's farsuperior replacement. "We looked at [the iPhone's] innovative user interface, the paradigm-shifting voicemail, the best-in-class mobile browser, and we realized we could make all that seem ridiculously outdated by the time the product becomes available to customers in June," said Jobs, who described the project as "Apple reinventing the iPhone." "When the secondgeneration iPhone comes out this fall, we want iPhone users to feel not just jealous, but downright foolish for owning such laughably primitive technology." Jobs also hinted that the second iPhone device would not be compatible with existing Mac computers, third-party peripherals, or any future Apple products. 2/2007
  • 8. What You Should Have Noticed In order to mock/ ridicule technology companies, this article utilizes sarcasm and irony. For example, Jobs supposedly states that apple wants users to feel not just jealous, but downright foolish for owning such laughably primitive technology."
  • 9. Example #2 It Almost As If Rite Aid Cashier Doesnt Care About Reputation Of Rite Aid Corporation PEORIA, ILCiting the mans wrinkled uniform and detached attitude, Rite Aid patrons surmised Thursday that, if appearances could be believed, it would almost seem as though cashier Gabriel Morales was wholly unconcerned with the reputation and overall corporate health of the third largest retail pharmacy chain in the United States. I dont want to jump to conclusions here, but his body language and general behavior might nearly imply that he has little or no regard for the history of the Rite Aid corporation and the image that it wants to project to the world, said pharmacy customer Michael Valetta of the 39-year-old Rite Aid employee, noting that Morales nonexistent greeting, slow response time, and general air of indifference all but pointed to the conclusion that he perhaps did not see himself as a representative of the Rite Aid brand who has been tasked with upholding that companys sense of tradition and character. Honestly, if I didnt know any better, Id say he was just treating this job ashow should I put thiswell, almost like it were any other minimum wage retail job rather than an esteemed position at one of Americas most beloved, time-honored companies. At press time, customers were baffled to note Morales smoking outside of the store while on a break, as though he wasnt the public face of the countrys premier purveyor of pharmacy, health, and wellness services. From: The Onion 11/14/13
  • 10. What You Should Ask Yourself Is all the information in the text true? What point is the author trying to make? What serious problem is the author trying to bring to light? What techniques does the author employ to make his point?
  • 11. Political Cartoons FIVE Characteristics 1. Symbolism 2. Exaggeration 3. Labeling 4. Analogy 5. Irony
  • 12. Symbolism Cartoonists use simple objects, or symbols, to stand for larger concepts or ideas. After you identify the symbols in a cartoon, think about what the cartoonist intends each symbol to stand for.
  • 13. Symbolism What are the simple objects, or symbols, to stand for larger concepts or ideas. What does the cartoonist intend each symbol to stand for?
  • 14. Exaggeration Sometimes cartoonists overdo, or exaggerate, the physical characteristics of people or things in order to make a point. When you study a cartoon, look for any characteristics that seem overdone or overblown. (Facial characteristics and clothing are some of the most commonly exaggerated characteristics.) Then, try to decide what point the cartoonist was trying to make through exaggeration.
  • 15. Exaggeration What physical characteristics of people or things are exaggerated in order to make a point? What is over done(Facial characteristics and clothing are some of the most commonly exaggerated characteristics.) What point is the cartoonist trying to make?
  • 16. Labeling Cartoonists often label objects or people to make it clear exactly what they stand for. Watch out for the different labels that appear in a cartoon, and ask yourself why the cartoonist chose to label that particular person or object. Does the label make the meaning of the object clearer?
  • 17. Labeling What labeling is there? Why did the cartoonist chose to label that particular person or object? Does the label make the meaning of the object clearer?
  • 18. Analogy An analogy is a comparison between two unlike things that share some characteristics. By comparing a complex issue or situation with a more familiar one, cartoonists can help their readers see it in a different light. After youve studied a cartoon for a awhile, try to decide what the cartoons main analogy is. What two situations does the cartoon compare? Once you understand the main analogy, decide if this comparison makes the cartoonists point more clear to you.
  • 19. Analogy What 2 unlike things are being compared? Does this make the cartoonists point more clear to you. You need to understand the history.
  • 20. Irony Is the difference between the ways things are and the way things should be, or the way things are expected to be. Cartoonists often use irony to express their opinion on an issue. When you look at a cartoon, see if you can find any irony in the situation the cartoon depicts. If you can, think about what point the irony might be intended to emphasize. Does the irony help the cartoonist express his or her opinion more effectively?
  • 21. Irony The difference between the ways things are and the way things should be, or the way things are expected to be. Can you find any irony in the situation the cartoon depicts? Does the irony help the cartoonist express his or her opinion more effectively?
  • 22. Labeling: MD to make it clear that this woman is a doctor. Symbolism: Child = All people in US who need some type of medical services. I am using this cartoon as an example not as a derogatory statement about Obama Care. It is a very current PC and a great example. Political Cartoon Example Symbolism: Obama = ObamaCare Exaggeration: Obamas height Irony: Obama says Dont mind me like he is trying to be quiet and unassuming and not in anyones business, but in reality his concept of ObamaCare has gotten involved in peoples private matters and made something that was private more public. Analogy: Two unlike things a baby who needs a quick check-up TO the millions of Americans who need health care that will keep them alive
  • 23. Parts 2 -5 of Module 8 Part 2: Reading A Modest Proposal Part 3: Quiz Part 4: Discussion Board Part 5: Create short satirical essay
  • 24. Give Credit Where Credit is Due This PowerPoint is a compilation of different PowerPoint presentations I have used over the years. I have created some of the slides and have also borrowed some of the slides from other educators work. I greatly thank everyone who has contributed to this PowerPoint.