richard meacham architectural portfolio

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Richard Meacham Architectural Portfolio, University of South Florida

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  • RM

    THE BITTERNESS OF POOR QUALITY LASTS LONG AFTER THE SWEETNESS OF A CHEAP PRICE IS FORGOTTEN

    -BENJAMIN FRANKLIN

  • C O N T E N T S

    LARGE

    EXTRA LARGE

    ZACK STREET INTERVENTION 70

    MEDIUM

    CLOTHESPIN MUSEUM 32BOUTIQUE HOTEL 48

    SMALL

    BOATHOUSE + PUBLIC POOLS 4BITS + PIECES 12INTERACTIVE FURNITURE 24

    MIXED-USE WATERFRONT TOWER 60

  • ARCH ITECTURAL PORTFOL IOR ICHARD M EACHAM

  • B O A T H O U S ET A M P A , F L O R I D Acore design 3 I fall 2011 I 9 weeks I professor: levent kara

  • B O A T H O U S E+PUBLIC POOLSLOCATIONDOWNTOWN TAMPA, FLORIDA

    SITE AREA52,000 SQ. FT.

    BUILDING AREA100,000 SQ. FT.

    Located on the Hillsborough River directly adjacent the Tampa Museum of Art, this project is informed by the intense num-ber of local site forces. Illustrated as vector lines, the intensive site analysis developed the formal qualities of the boathouse and its adjacent support functions. A series of study models diagramed existing vectors to under-stand the relationships between the various omni present site conditions. The boathouse portion of the program is treated as a jewel. This concept was developed by aligning the boathouse with the museum and separating the support functions from the boathouse within its own geometry. The project, locat-ed on the downtown Tampa river walk, had to maintain a public right of way along the edge of the Hillsborough River. The colliding spatial geometries between the two build-ings are where the pools have been sited. They serve as publicly dynamic in-between spaces that connect the urban core with the river. The goal was to discover the inher-ent forces within the site and integrate the architecture within them. This was first stud-ied two dimensionally and then modeled.

  • Sketch Model Scale 1/16 = 1

    Sketch Models Scale 1/32 = 1

    7

  • The project seeks to provide an architectural interpretation of the tension between the forces of the museum with that of the rivers edge. The rectilinear nature of the museum conflicts with the hard diagonal edge of the Hillsborough River. Located on the south side of the project is Curtis Hixon Park. This is one of down-town Tampas most successful public spaces. By aligning the boat-house with the museum and placing a reflecting pool below it, the project provides an inviting gesture for pedestrians to discover the boathouse as they walk along the river. The project embodies a sense of architectural tension between the boathouse and the sup-port functions located to the north. The support functions have also been divided to provide a path for pedestrians on the river walk.

    SECTION A

    SECTION B

  • P R O G R A M1- river walk 7- offices2- boathouse 8- caf3- weight room 9- event space4- recreation pools 10- locker rooms5- diving pool 11- boat launch6- reflecting pool 12- mechanical

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    101000

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    The intent was to encourage public en-gagement with the project because boathouses are often only used by elite rowing teams. This boathouse is intended for public use and there-fore creates a resting place along the river walk. The resting place is accompanied by a portion of the river that has been designed for swimming and wading. On the north side of the river walk resting place is a diving pool with different levels to leap from the landscape into the pool below. The 3 large walls that come out from the ground anchor it to the landscape and are imagined to be living walls reducing the air temperature and providing a more comfortable space as a result of the vegetation growing on them. The walls canti-lever the structure over the river so that the event space on the ground floor will feel as though it is a part of the river for anyone inside of it.

    SITE PLAN

    AAAA

    B

    B

    9

  • Final Model Scale 1/16 = 1 11

  • B I T S + P I E C E SDIGITAL TECTONICS FOR A SYSTEMICALLY INTEGRATED FUTUREmasters project I fall 2013 --- spring 2014 I 28 weeks I critic, chair + professor: mark weston

  • B I T S + P I E C E SDIGITAL TECTONICS FOR A SYSTEMICALLY INTEGRATED FUTURE

    INTENTEXPLORE ROLE OF THE DIGITAL AGE WITHIN ARCHITECTURE

    INSPIRATIONNATURAL LIVING SYSTEMS

    GOALSALGORITHMS AS A DESIGN TOOL +DESIGN OF DESIGNING PROCESS +INTEGRATED ARCHITECTURE

    As a result of the developments in computer tech-nology, our built environments are experiencing significant changes. Advances in computation and computer aided design, coupled with a rapid adoption of industrial techniques centered on robotic fabrication, have provided the ability to use complex algorithms as a design tool. We can use this computing power to create architec-ture that performs like a living system. One of the goals for this work is to envision a design pro-cess that produces performance based ecologi-cally integrated architecture. I refer to this as liv-ing system architecture. Rather than autonomous architecture that separates itself from its surround-ings, the goal is to integrate architecture within its environment. Whether in a dense urban set-ting or a wide open prairie, architecture should be a part of the larger living systems where it is located in order to obtain a sustainable human condition. This research explores: digital fabrica-tion techniques, emergent design, computational

  • methods and the use of algorithms as a design tool for obtaining a sustainable human condition. Through digital fabrication I rapidly prototyped concepts and tested them within the elements. The design concepts are informed by local site specific living systems and perform within the in-herent material properties they are composed of. The ultimate goal for this work was to develop a design process for establishing a sustainable human condition full of abundance and growth rather than a world of limits and restrictions. The work seen here on these two pages are initial studies of the digital design process.I had to begin by learning how to use the tools that would enable me to achieve my design inten-tions. The studies that follow in this section of the portfolio are a series of investigations into what it means for architecture to perform like a living system. How can computer scripting allow us to design within a determined set of rules and/or relationships? Is it even possible? I believe that it is. Designers are always creating rules for them-selves and software like Grasshopper is a tool for visualizing those rules. It allows you to instantly see the consequences of your design decisions. Today, like never before, we have the abil-ity to test and re-test design concepts within the computer at ever increasing speeds. How-ever, the process does not and should not end there. We must bring these concepts to life. Rapid prototyping makes that possible. The work here attempts to rapidly prototype many ideas and concepts with the intent of develop-ing a design process that will help to create an ecologically integrated built environment.

    ALGOR I T HM I C E X P E R I M E N TAT ION

    15

  • MATERIAL + FABRICATION STUDIES

  • 17

  • I N S P I R E D B Y T H E D R O PD E S I G N I N G W I T H T H E L E F T O V E R W A S T E

  • Inspired by the drop, I began design-ing with the left over waste I had cre-ated from my previous studies. Studies that were aiming to eliminate the con-cept of waste, but producing a lot of it. However, the production of waste in construction did more than create a per-sonal call to action to eliminate it. The left over waste became a design tool. I was so inspired by the beauty in the left over pieces I began to analyze them. They presented a concept to me that I had previously not considered pursuing. The concept is based on an aggregate system of construction. This concept falls right in line with my design research. An aggregate is a collection of particulars into a whole mass. Essentially, it is a liv-ing system. This was evident in my previ-ous interests in beehives and the hexa-gons they are composed of, but was not realized at that time. The beehive and its ability to take on many different con-figurations from the same hexagonal ele-ment is the ideal embodiment for what is meant by living system architecture. The architecture of a beehive is always re-sponding to the environment with regard to performance needs. It maximizes the building material based on a simple set of rules and relationships with the local ecology to make it one of the most effec-tive examples of architecture in nature. It is essentially a naturally bonded aggre-gate. Bonded aggregates like concrete

    are very common in construction, howev-er I was seeking something other. I was interested in an aggregate that was more closely related to sand dunes, one which has spaces between the particles. My re-search was about performance based in materiality and is related to the beehive and its ability to support and sustain life. The next step of my design process was to discover a way to make this system performance based. This would involve

    more iterations and research into aggre-gate systems of design. I began by first taking inspiration from a piece found in the drop pile. I then took the di

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