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  • RESEARCH INNOVATION PARTNERSHIP633 Pea Dr. Davis, CA 95618 | cltc.ucdavis.edu | P: 530-747-3838 F: 530-754-3812

    Residential Lighting: Title 24 and Technology UpdateBest practices in lighting design to comply with Californias Title 24 energy code

    Kelly CunninghamOutreach DirectorCalifornia Lighting Technology Centerkcunning@ucdavis.edu

  • INTRODUCTION

    DisclaimerTHIS PRESENTATION IS PROTECTED BY U.S. AND INTERNATIONAL COPYRIGHT LAWS. REPRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION, DISPLAY AND USE OF THE PRESENTATION WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE SPEAKER IS PROHIBITED.

    THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT IS BELIEVED TO ACCURATELY DESCRIBE THE TECHNOLOGIES ADDRESSED HEREIN AND IS MEANT TO CLARIFY AND ILLUSTRATE TYPICAL SITUATIONS, WHICH MUST BE APPROPRIATELY ADAPTED TO INDIVIDUAL CIRCUMSTANCES. THESE MATERIALS WERE PREPARED TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH A FREE EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM AND ARE NOT INTENDED TO PROVIDE LEGAL ADVICE OR ESTABLISH LEGAL STANDARDS OF REASONABLE BEHAVIOR. NEITHER PACIFIC GAS & ELECTRIC (PG&E) NOR ANY OF ITS EMPLOYEES AND AGENTS:

    (1) MAKES ANY WRITTEN OR ORAL WARRANTY, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE;

    (2) ASSUMES ANY LEGAL LIABILITY OR RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE ACCURACY OR COMPLETENESS OF ANY INFORMATION, APPARATUS, PRODUCT, PROCESS, METHOD, OR POLICY CONTAINED HEREIN; OR

    (3) REPRESENTS THAT ITS USE WOULD NOT INFRINGE ANY PRIVATELY OWNED RIGHTS, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO PATENTS, TRADEMARKS OR COPYRIGHTS. FURTHERMORE, THE INFORMATION, STATEMENTS, REPRESENTATIONS, GRAPHS AND DATA PRESENTED IN THIS REPORT ARE PROVIDED BY PG&E AS A SERVICE TO OUR CUSTOMERS. PG&E DOES NOT ENDORSE PRODUCTS OR MANUFACTURERS. MENTION OF ANY PARTICULAR PRODUCT OR MANUFACTURER IN THIS COURSE MATERIAL SHOULD NOT BE CONSTRUED AS AN IMPLIED ENDORSEMENT.

  • Credit(s) earned on completion of this course will be reported to AIA CES for AIA members. Certificates of Completion for both AIA members and non-AIA members are available upon request.

    This course is registered with AIA CES for continuing professional education. As such, it does not include content that may be deemed or construed to be an approval or endorsement by the AIA of any material of construction or any method or manner ofhandling, using, distributing, or dealing in any material or product._______________________________________Questions related to specific materials, methods, and services will be addressed at the conclusion of this presentation.

  • This intermediate class is for professionals who design, specify, and/or inspect lighting installations in new and remodeled homes. Participants should already have general knowledge of the residential lighting code.

    CourseDescription

  • LearningObjectives

    1. Effectively apply the residential Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards requirements specific to lighting.

    2. Apply Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards compliance methodology and procedures in professional practice.

    3. Identify current lighting technologies, including LED luminaires, that are available to fulfill code requirements.

    4. Prepare for the major lighting-related updates in the 2013 Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards code. Access resources through utility and lighting technology training centers for continued professional development.

    At the end of the this course, participants will be able to:

  • INTRODUCTION

    California Lighting Technology Center, UC Davis

    To stimulate, facilitate & accelerate the development, application and commercialization of energy-efficient lighting and daylighting technologies in partnership with utilities, manufacturers, occupants, builders, designers, researchers, academicians, and governmental agencies.

    Mission-driven Activities:

    Research & Development Demonstration & Outreach Education & Training

  • INTRODUCTION

    CLTC Founding Organizations

    California Energy Commission

    University of California, Davis

    National Electrical Manufacturers Association

    US Department of Energy

  • LARGE END-USERS

    FOUNDING ORGANIZATIONS AFFILIATES

    MANUFACTURERS

    UTILITIES

  • Select the appropriate:Source+Luminaire+ControlsFor the application

  • INTRODUCTION

    Residential Lighting Design GuideProvides a simplified and practical approach to lighting code compliance and design.

    Topics include: Explanation of the code Technical guidelines Steps to compliance Lighting design examples

  • INTRODUCTION

    Course TopicsPart 1: Technology Overview

    Common lighting terminology Main lighting technologies that apply to Title 24 Demonstrations of energy-efficient lighting technologies

    Part 2: Background and Policy Why Title 24? Savings opportunities Benefits and results

    Part 3: Technology & the Code Lamps, luminaires and controls

    Part 4: Lighting Design Guide Title 24 residential lighting regulation Design examples to reach or exceed code

    Part 5: Compliance Process Step-by-step: the Title 24 compliance process

    Part 6: Updates, Forecast and Additional Resources Title 24 2013 update Additional resources

  • PART 1: TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW

    Common lighting terminology Lighting technologies to use for compliance

  • TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW

    Common Lighting Terminology

    1. What are the definitions of the following lighting terms?

    2. Do you use these terms in professional practice?

    3. What other lighting terminology do you use on the job?

    Luminous Flux Lux Footcandle Illuminance Efficiency Efficacy CCT CRI

  • TerminologyLuminous flux: rate of flow of visible light emitted from a light source over time, measured in lumens (lm).

    Footcandle: equal to one lumen per square foot (1 footcandle = 10 lux).

    Illuminance: the amount of luminous flux that covers a surface (measured in lux or footcandles).

    Luminous flux is analogous to the flow rate of water, represented by gallons per hour.

    TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW

  • TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW

    Terminology

  • TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW

    TerminologyLuminous Intensity: the concentration of light emitted from a given source in a particular direction, measured in candela (cd) (1cd = 1lm per steradian).

    *Note: color represents intensity not CCT or CRI

  • TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW

    TerminologyEfficiency: the ratio between the useful output of energy and the input of energy.

    Luminous Efficacy compares the amount of light produced by a lamp (lumens), to amount of power consumed to produce it (watts).

    A high efficacy luminaire provides a large amount of light using little power.

  • TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW

    TerminologyEfficiency is usually dimensionless, we compare the lumens exiting a fixture to the lumens produced by the light source.

    Efficacy is normally used where input and output units differ. We compare the lumens produced by an amount of wattage.

    Which is more efficient?Efficiency = miles/gallon (energy out, energy in)

    Which has a higher efficacy?Efficacy = fun/gallon

  • TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW

    TerminologyCorrelated Color Temperature (CCT)A specification of the color appearanceof light emitted by a lamp, relating its color to the color of light from a source when heated to a particular temperature.

    CCT rating for a lamp is a general warmth or coolnessmeasure of its appearance.

  • TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW

    1931 CIE Color Chart

  • TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW

    CCTC

    OO

    LW

    ARM

  • TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW

    DYNAMIC SPD LUMINAIRES

    12000K, 65fc average 6000K, 100fc average 3500K, 50fc average 2900K, 50fc average

  • TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW

    CRIColor Rendering Index (CRI)Measures the ability of a light source to reproduce the colors of various objects compared with an ideal light source.

  • TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW

    CRIColor Rendering Index (CRI) Color rendering is defined as Effect of an illuminant on the color

    appearance of objects by conscious or subconscious comparison with their color appearance under a reference illuminant (CIE 17.41987)

    It is the only color rendering metric with wide spread acceptance It is calculated by comparing the color appearance of the test source

    to a reference source for 8 reflective samples (Score from 1100) All other aspects of the source for a true comparison should be the same

    CRI = 62 CRI = 93 CRI = 80 CRI = 92

  • TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW

    LIGHTING FACTS LABEL

  • TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW

    CCT & CRI

    Balancing quality and efficacy1. What are your preferred CCTs? 2. How important is CRI?

    Home

    Work

    Dining out

    Shopping

    Photo Credit: Philips Photo Credit: Color Kinetics

    Photo Credit: Color Kinetics

  • PART 2: BACKGROUND AND POLICY

    Why Title 24? Savings opportunities Benefits and results

  • BACKGROUND AND POLICY

    Why Title 24?Efficiency before generationThe CEC has found energy efficiency and demand response as the preferred means of meeting the energy needs of a growing population.

  • BACKGROUND AND POLICY

    Other Critical Legislation2006 Global Warming Solutions Act (AB 32)Reduce greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 levels by 2020.

    2007 Huffman Bill (AB 1109)Reduce lighting energy consumption by more than 50% from 2007 residential levels and 25% from 2007 commercial levels by 2018.

    The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007Eliminates from the market most of the remaining commonly used types of T12 linear fluorescent lamps by July 14, 2012. The magnetic ballasts required to operate those lamps were already phased out beginning July of 2010.

    The bill also begins a phase-out of traditional incandescent lamps, establishing a mandated 25% reduction in energy use beginning in January, 2012.

    Comprehensive Energy Efficiency Program for Existing Buildings (AB 758)Requires the California Energy Commission to develop and implement a comprehensive program to achieve greater energy savings in the Californias existing residential and nonresidential building stock. The primary focus of this program is on those buildings that fall significantly below the efficiency required by Title 24.

  • BACKGROUND AND POLICY

    Lighting in Title 24Lighting is the largest electrical load in both homes and businesses, accounting for

    35%of commercial annual electricity use and

    22%of residential annual use.1

    1: 2011 Integrated Energy Policy Report, Commission Final Report

  • BACKGROUND AND POLICY

    Savings OpportunitiesNew Construction Standard incandescent lamps Dimming systems Occupancy/vacancy Sensors

    Existing Buildings Approximately 60% of lamps

    installed in California residences were incandescent lamps

    Advanced lamps* represented about 5% of installed lamps

    58%

    42%

    CTLC survey of new 2007 homes (2-6 bedrooms, 2000-4500 sq. ft.)

    FlourescentIncandescent

    Source 2009 KEMA report: Advanced Lighting Baseline Study

    *Advanced lamps as defined by this study: Bare spiral CFLs greater than 30 watts, A-shaped CFLs, Globe CFLs, Candelabra CFLsReflector CFLs, 3-way CFLs, Bare & covered dimmable CFLs, GU-24 products, EISA-compliant halogens, Advanced incandescents, LEDs

  • BACKGROUND AND POLICY

    Benefits and ResultsHighly effective in the long term2007 survey showed 58% of new residential construction adopted high-efficacy fixtures.

    Incorporates efficiency into the building design processTitle 24 mandates a combination of sensors, dimmers and high-efficacy lights during the design stages of construction.

    Controls leading the way2007 survey found that most new residential construction projects have about 10 dimmers per home and that more than 90% of hardwired incandescent fixtures are on dimming systems.

    Codes & standards have saved California about $66 billion For nearly 35 years, the CEC has saved Californians more than $66 billion in energy costs through its standards for energy-efficient buildings and appliances. These same standards have reduced greenhouse gas emissions by more than 250 million metric tons.

  • BACKGROUND AND POLICY

    Code cycle timelineThe California Energy Commission adopted the 2008 Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards on April 23, 2008, and the Building Standards Commission approved them for publication on September 11, 2008.

    The most recent revision, the 2013 Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards was adopted by the California Energy Commission in May 2012. Any application for a Building Permit submitted on or after January 1, 2014 must meet the 2013 standards.

    Research and planning for the 2016 Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards has already begun.

    Note: This guide is not intended to be used in lieu of the Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards. Please visit www.energy.ca.gov/title24 to download the official Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standardsas well as the Nonresidential Compliance Manual. To obtain a printed copy of the standards, contact the California Energy Commissions publications unit: (916) 654-5200.

    http://www.energy.ca.gov/title24

  • BACKGROUND AND POLICY

    Prescriptive vs. Performance Standards

    Prescriptive Standards Simpler, but does not allow as

    much flexibility in design Each individual component of the

    proposed building must meet a prescribed minimum energy requirement

    Applicant needs only to show that a building meets each minimum or maximum level prescribed in the set of requirements contained in a package

    Performance Standards Allows the builder more freedom,

    but the standards are more complex and involved

    Detailed accounting of energy trade-offs between measures is possible

    Uses CEC-approved computersoftware to calculate energy trade-offs based on Title 24 guidelines

    Which technology is appropriate for my project?

    What is available, and how can I piece together the building I want while complying with Title 24?

    Title 24 compliance is achievable through two approaches:

  • BACKGROUND AND POLICY

    Computer Compliance ProgramsThe following computer programs for energy analysis include all Alternative Calculation Methods approved by the California Energy Commission for use in Title 24 2008 certification:

    CALRES 2008 v1.1 ($125$375) EnergyPro 5.1 ($480$800) MICROPAS 8.1 ($795)

    Additional details are available at:http://www.energy.ca.gov/title24/2008standards/2008_computer_prog_list.html

  • PART 3: TECHNOLOGY & THE CODE

    Lamps High-efficacy luminaires Controls

  • TECHNOLOGY & THE CODE

    Two strategies, three main technologiesHigh-efficacy LuminairesThese lighting fixtures are designed and built to operate only energy-efficient light sources, such as fluorescent T8 lamps, compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs), LEDs and high intensity discharge (HID) lamps.

    SensorsOccupancy/vacancy sensors and daylight sensors are all devices that automatically turn lights off (or dim them) in response to conditions that they sense or see.

    DimmersDimmers, which are already common in many residential applications, allow room occupants to lower lighting levels (and thus energy use) as desired.C

    ontro

    lsS

    ourc

    es

  • TECHNOLOGY & THE CODE

    2008 High Efficacy, According to the StandardsWhat is never high efficacy? Any luminaire that does not qualify

    by CEC definition or is not certified to the Commission

    Any luminaire containing medium screw-base socket (E24/E26)

    Any luminaire containing any line-voltage lamp socket (except GU-24 under certain conditions)

    Whats different about the tables?The efficacy for LEDs accounts for the whole system, whereas lamps do not involve a source system, so the efficacy is based on lamp power.

    2008 High efficacy lamps (non-LED)

    Lamp Power Min. Lamp Efficacy

    5W or less 30 lm/W

    5W 15W 40 lm/W

    15W 40W 50 lm/W

    Over 40W 60 lm/W

    2008 High efficacy LED source systems

    Lamp Power Min. System Efficacy

    5W or less 30 lm/W

    5W 15W 40 lm/W

    15W 40W 50 lm/W

    Over 40W 60 lm/WEfficacy = initial lumens watts used by lamp

    In the 2008 code: Table 150-C and Section 150(k) 1 and 2

  • TECHNOLOGY & THE CODE

    2013 High Efficacy, According to the Standards

    In the 2013 code: Table 150.0-A and Section 150(k) 1

  • TECHNOLOGY & THE CODE

    2013 High Efficacy, According to the StandardsWhat is never high efficacy? Any luminaire that does not qualify

    by CEC definition or is not certified to the Commission

    Any luminaire containing medium screw-base socket (E24/E26)

    Any luminaire containing any line-voltage lamp socket (except GU-24 under certain conditions)

    Track lighting where track heads or lamps can be changed to a source other than LED

    2013 high efficacy: other sources

    Lamp Power Min. System Efficacy

    5W or less 30 lm/W

    5W 15W 45 lm/W

    15W 40W 60 lm/W

    Over 40W 90 lm/W

    Efficacy = initial lumens luminaire total rated system input power

    In the 2013 code: Table 150.0-A and 150.0-B and Section 150(k) 1

  • TECHNOLOGY & THE CODE

    CEC Appliances Database

    http://www.appliances.energy.ca.gov/AdvancedSearch.aspx

  • TECHNOLOGY & THE CODE

    2013 High Efficacy Luminaires

    In the 2013 code: Table 150.0-A and 150.0-B and Section 150(k) 1

    CR6 recessed downlight by CREE

    90 CRI and high efficacy, the CR6 is currently on the CEC Database.

    Various CCT: 2700K4000K.

    GU-24 base.

  • TECHNOLOGY & THE CODE

    2013 High Efficacy Luminaires

    In the 2013 code: Table 150.0-A and 150.0-B and Section 150(k) 1

    BeveLED pendant by USA Illumination

    12 watt, 90 CRI BeveLED pendant meets Title 24 high efficacy requirement.

  • TECHNOLOGY & THE CODE

    2013 High Efficacy Luminaires

    In the 2013 code: Table 150.0-A and 150.0-B and Section 150(k) 1

    Unilume Direct Wire undercabinet lighting by Tech Lighting

    90 CRI and various lengths with optional occupancy sensors.

    Single remote phosphor design illuminates multiple shadows.

    Unilume Other LED

  • TECHNOLOGY & THE CODE

    2013 High Efficacy Luminaires

    In the 2013 code: Table 150.0-A and 150.0-B and Section 150(k) 1

    CS14 linear fixture by CREE

    90 CRI and high efficacy, can be suspended or surface mounted.

    Dimmable.

  • TECHNOLOGY & THE CODE

    IES Illuminance RecommendationsCategory Space Illuminance

    A Public spaces 3 footcandles (30 lux)

    B Simple orientation for short visits 5 footcandles (50 lux)

    C Working spaces where simple visual tasks are performed 10 footcandles (100 lux)

    D Performance of visual tasks of high contrast and large size 30 footcandles (300 lux)

    E Performance of visual tasks of high contrast and small size, or visual tasks of low contrast and large size

    50 footcandles (500 lux)

    F Performance of visual tasks of low contrast and small size 100 footcandles (1,000 lux)

    G Performance of visual tasks near threshold

    300 to 1,000 footcandles(3,000 to 10,000 lux)

  • TECHNOLOGY & THE CODE

    Examples of Illuminance levelsCategory Building Types

    A (3fc) Movie theater, observatory

    B (5fc) Public auditorium, night club, arcade

    C (10fc) Art gallery, restaurant, parking garage, public restroom

    D (30fc) Coliseum/arena, school gymnasium, chapel, grocery store, commercial building

    E (50fc) School, medical laboratory, computer processing office, vehicle repair center

    F (100fc) Hospital facilities, veterinary clinic

    G (800fc) Operating table

  • TECHNOLOGY & THE CODE

    High-Efficacy LuminairesTypically Compliant High-efficacy fixtures with

    electronic ballasts

    Pin-based CFL fixtures with electronic ballasts (4 pin)

    Fixtures with high-intensity discharge (HID) lamps

    Not Usually Compliant Any fixture with

    incandescent lamps

    Any fixture with a screw base, regardless of what source it is (even CFL or LED!)

    Light Emitting Diodes Newer technology with a great deal

    of confusion

    Efficacies are improving

    Quality is not consistent

    Look for product that clearly meets lumen/Watt requirements

    Follow the Design Lights Consortium Qualified Products List for non-res product evolution

    Follow utility rebate program guidelines for res products

    Note: Ballast wattage is not included when determining lamp efficacy.

  • TECHNOLOGY & THE CODE

    Replacement Lamp Technologies in Use

    A BR PAR CFL LED A*

    Wattage 40-100 W 30-150 W 50-150 W 5-40 W 2.3-23 W

    Efficacy 10-17 lm/W 7-12 lm/W 6-15 lm/W 50-70 lm/W 33-97 lm/W

    Price** < $1 $4-7 $6-8 $1-8 $10-50

    Application General Lighting Downlights,SpotlightsDownlights,Spotlights

    General Lighting

    General Lighting

    *August 17, 21013 Product review of 286 A-lamps listed in the Lighting Facts database**Approximate price ranges

  • TECHNOLOGY & THE CODE

    Choosing the Right LuminaireSpecify the appropriate light outputYou should be able to lumen match the low-efficacy fixtures by specifying systems that use less energy.

    Specify the appropriate colorWarmer lamp colors (CCT 2700-3000K) are the closest match to incandescent.

    2013 UpdateIn the 2013 code, in order to qualify as high efficacy, LED luminaires must be > 90 CRI and 27004000K (indoor) or 27005000K (outdoor)

    Specify the right lumens/watt ratioDepending on what lamp wattage is chosen (with the same number of fixtures) you could have a much brighter space or a much darker space in comparison to an existing incandescent space.

    For example:8 (65 watt) BR lamps x 750 lumens = 7100 lumens

    5 (26 watt) CFL lamps x 1300 lumens = 6500 lumens

    10 (13 watt) CFL lamps x 600 lumens = 6000 lumens

  • TECHNOLOGY & THE CODE

    In the 2008 and 2013 Code: Recessed FixturesApplications between conditioned and unconditioned spaces Approved for IC and label certifying

    AT according to ASTM E283

    Gasket or caulking between housing and ceiling all air leak paths through luminaire assembly or ceiling opening must be sealed

    IC applications: Ballasts that are rated for higher

    operating ranges

    Fixture configurations that limit heat to the ballast

    Electronic ballasts Certified to the CEC

    Mandated in all high-efficacy luminaires of 13W or higher

    Output frequency of no less than 20 kHz

    In the 2008 code: 150 (k)12 and 150 (k)4In the 2013 code: 150(k)8 and 150(k)1 D

  • TECHNOLOGY & THE CODE

    Recessed Luminaires in Insulated Ceilings Have a minimum rated life of

    30,000 hours when operated at or below a specified maximum case temperature

    Must not exceed maximum ballast case temperature

    Have a ballast factor of not less than 0.90 for non-dimming ballasts

    Have a ballast factor of not less than 0.85 for dimming ballasts

    Allow ballast maintenance and replacement from below the ceiling without cutting holes in ceiling

    Same in 2008 and 2013

    In the 2008 code: 119 (n) and 150 (k)12In the 2013 code: 110.9 (f) and 150 (k)8

  • TECHNOLOGY & THE CODE

    What is a GU-24 replacement lamp?1. Lead Wire2. Fixing Hole I3. Fixing Holes II4. Base5. Prongs6. Replacement Ballast7. Replacement Lamp8. Lamp Base9. Lamp Holder10.Thread

  • TECHNOLOGY & THE CODE

    High Efficacy GU-24 Qualifications Factory-installed GU-24 lamp holder

    No other types of line voltage sockets in the luminaire

    Manufacturer does not provide adaptors to convert other line voltage lamp holder

    Luminaire rated only for high efficacy systems

    NO GU-24 low efficacy lamps

    NO GU-24 low efficacy luminaires

    NO GU-24 modular adaptors or luminaire conversions

    Quick-connects to GU-24 are allowed

    In 2008 code: no recessed downlightswith GU-24 sockets that could receive a compact fluorescent lamp

    In the 2008 code: 150 (k)2In the 2013 code: Table 150 A

  • TECHNOLOGY & THE CODE

    No Permanent AdaptorsIf a luminaire has a screw-base socket, or an adaptor with a screw-base socket, it is NOT high efficacy, regardless of manufacturer claims.

  • TECHNOLOGY & THE CODE

    Fixture Labels for Compliance and Quality

    The ENERGY STAR definition of high efficacy has been updated to match Title 24 and guarantees a minimum standard of quality.

    There is no way to tell old ENERGY STAR fixtures from new ones.

    Sample qualifications for ENERGY STAR rated products For lamps shipped with the

    fixtures, the average rated life of the lamp must be > 10,000 hours.

    All qualified light fixtures carry a two-year warranty

    The CRI of lamps shipped with fixtures is more than 80 for CFL lamps and more than 75 for linear fluorescent lamps.

    Airtight Label: ASTM E283The ASTM E283 label certifies a fixture as being airtight in accordance with ASTM E283 testing and Title 24.

    U.S. government-backed label earned by products that prevent air pollution by meeting strict energy efficiency guidelines set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Department of Energy.

  • TECHNOLOGY & THE CODE

    Indoor Vacancy Sensor Specifications Must be manual-on/automatic-off

    (can also be turned off manually)

    Time delay cannot be greater than 30 minutes

    Cannot be locked in a permanent on state (no on override)

    No more than 1 W consumed by the indicator light

    Specify with no minimum load amount

    Optional features to consider

    Energy-efficient LED night-light

    Impact-resistant lens and switch

    In the 2008 code: 119 (j)In the 2013 code: 110.9 (b) In Title 20: 1605.3 (g) 8

  • TECHNOLOGY & THE CODE

    2008 Dimmer Requirements Reduce power consumption by a

    minimum of 65% at the lowest level If the dimmer controls

    incandescent or fluorescent lamps, provide electrical outputs to lamps for reduced flicker

    Be UL listed by a rating lab recognized by the International Code Council (ICC)

    For wall box dimmers designed to be used in a 3 or more-way circuit with non-dimmable switches, the level set by the dimmer shall not be overridden by any of the switches in the circuit.

    In the 2008 code: see 119 (k) in regards to power reductionIn the 2013 code: 150 (k)

  • TECHNOLOGY & THE CODE

    2008 Dimmer Requirements The dimmer and all of the switches

    in the circuit shall have the capability of turning lighting OFF if it is ON, and turning lighting ON to the level set by the dimmer if the lighting is OFF.

    Stepped dimmers will include an off position to turn lights completely off.

    In the 2008 code: see 119 (k) in regards to power reductionIn the 2013 code: 150 (k)

  • TECHNOLOGY & THE CODE

    2013 Dimmer Requirements Comply with Title 20 Very subtle differences in language The dimmer shall:

    reduce power consumption by a minimum of 65% percent at its lowest level;

    include an off position which produces a zero lumen output; and not consume more than 1 W per lighting dimmer switch leg when in the off position.

    Same: Reduce flicker through

    dimming range For 3-way, do not override level set

    by dimmer and all switches should turn light off

    In the 2008 code: see 119 (k) in regards to power reductionIn the 2013 code: 150 (k) In Title 20: 1605.3 (f)

  • TECHNOLOGY & THE CODE

    Dimmer SpecificationsSpecify the correct load amount

    Line voltage

    Low voltage

    3-way dimmers (ex. hallway applications)

    Pair LED luminaires and lamps carefully with dimmers, check manufacturer websites and spec sheets for compatibility

    In the 2008 code: see 119 (k) in regards to power reductionIn the 2013 code: 150 (k)

  • TECHNOLOGY & THE CODE

    Dimmers on the MarketLeviton Decora SureSlide Dimmer

    $25

    Provides smooth, slide-action, full-range dimming for incandescent and dimmable LED and CFL lamps.

    Compatible with CFL, LED, incandescent, and halogen

    Options: LED/CFL/Incandescent Dimmer, Single pole or 3-way with pre-set ON/OFF switch, Rating of 150W LED/CFL & 600W Incandescent.

    Few LED products dim 0100%

  • TECHNOLOGY & THE CODE

    Dimmers on the MarketLutron Diva 1 Amp. White Dimmer

    $30

    Paddle switch on/off, use slide control to adjust light level.

    Compatible with dimmable CFL (compact fluorescent), LED, incandescent and halogen.

    150W capacity.

    Options: No. DVWCL-153PH-IV: Color/Finish: Ivory, Voltage Rating: 120V, Power Rating: 150W, Switch Type: Single-Pole or 3-Way

  • TECHNOLOGY & THE CODE

    Dimmers on the MarketLutron Nova T

    $80

    On/off and adjust light levels with slider. Compatible with incandescent, halogen, fluorescent, LED, magnetic and electronic low voltage lighting, and ceiling fans.Options: Lutron controls are rated at 120 VAC, 60 Hz unless otherwise noted

  • TECHNOLOGY & THE CODE

    Dimmers on the MarketLutron Vierti Push Button Dimmer

    $120

    Illuminated control bar is longer than on most standard dimmers and allows for lighting control with slide of a finger.

    Compatible with incandescent, halogen, fluorescent, LED, magnetic and electronic low voltage lighting, and ceiling fans.

    Suggested maximum lighting load for magnetic low voltage dimming is 450W for 600VA products to allow for magnetic transformer loss.

  • Dimmers on the Market

    Leviton Decora SureSlide Dimmer

    Lutron Diva Dimmer

    Lutron Nova TDimmer

    Lutron Verti Dimmer

    $25 $30 $80 $120

  • TECHNOLOGY & THE CODE

    Check Your UnderstandingQuestion:In stairwells and some corridors, 3-way circuits are a common way to allow control of the lighting from either end of the space. How can I use dimmers to give a similar level of control?

    Answer:In this case, the Standards require that the lighting must be controlled by at least one dimmer. It is functionally preferable to have dimmers at every point. However, the Standards do not require that every control point must allow dimming. One of the switches could be a dimmer and the other could be a regular toggle switch.

    Alternatively, more advanced controls are available that allow dimming from both ends of the circuit.

    However, the toggles switch(es) must not allow the lighting to come on at a higher level than is set by the dimmer.

  • TECHNOLOGY & THE CODE

    Permanently Installed Night-Lights Shall contain only high-efficacy

    lamps with no line voltage lamp holder

    Shall consume no more than 5 watts

    No screw-base lamp holders

    Indicator lights that are integral to lighting controls shall consume no more than 1 watt

    Also applies to night-lights integral to permanently installed luminaires or exhaust fans

    In the 2008 code: 150 (k) 5In the 2013 code: 150 (k) E

  • TECHNOLOGY & THE CODE

    Check Your UnderstandingQuestion:Is it good lighting practice to have all the lighting in a room controlled by a single vacancy sensor?

    Answer:If the sensor can see the whole space, then it can be enough.

    In rooms where safety is an issue, high-efficacy luminaires should be installed. High-efficacy luminaires do not require a vacancy sensor to meet the Residential Lighting Standards. If a sensor is also used, consider a dual-tech sensor or include a second luminaire that stays on.

  • PART 4: LIGHTING DESIGN GUIDE

    Changes and additions to the 2008 code Changes and additions to the 2013 code Title 24 residential lighting regulation Demonstrations of energy-efficient lighting

    technologies

  • LIGHTING DESIGN GUIDE

    2008 Title 24 Standards by AreaKitchen > 50% of installed wattage must be high efficacy

    Bathroom, garage, laundry room, utility room, closets

    High efficacy or Manual-on vacancy sensor

    All other interior rooms High efficacy or Manual-on vacancy sensor or Dimmer

    Outdoor Lighting

    High efficacy or Low efficacy controlled by a manual on/off switch and both:

    Motion sensor without bypass switch and One of the following: integral photocontrol, astronomical time

    clock, energy management control system

    Common Areas High efficacy or vacancy sensor

    Residential Parking

    Lots for < 7 cars must comply with Outdoor Lighting requirements Garages for < 7 cars must comply with Garage requirements Lots and garages for more than 7 vehicles must comply with

    Nonresidential Lighting Standards

  • LIGHTING DESIGN GUIDE

    2013 Title 24 Standards by AreaKitchen > 50% of installed wattage must be high efficacy

    Bathroom One high efficacy fixture and Manual-on vacancy sensor or high efficacy for all other fixtures

    Garage, laundry room, utility room, closets

    High efficacy and Manual-on vacancy sensor

    All other interior rooms High efficacy or Manual-on vacancy sensor or Dimmer

    Outdoor Lighting

    High efficacy or Low efficacy controlled by a manual on/off switch and both:

    Motion sensor without bypass switch and One of the following: integral photocontrol, astronomical time

    clock, energy management control system

    Common Areas

    High efficacy or vacancy sensor in areas where common space 20% of floor area

    In common areas that 20% of floor area, occupancy repsonsiveadaptive corridor and stairwell lighting is required

    Residential Parking

    Lots for < 7 cars must comply with Outdoor Lighting requirements Garages for < 7 cars must comply with Garage requirements Lots and garages for more than 7 vehicles must comply with

    Nonresidential Lighting Standards

  • LIGHTING DESIGN GUIDE: KITCHEN

    2008 and 2013 Kitchen: Mandatory RequirementsWattage No limit to number of watts, but

    must be at least 50% high efficacy

    Quantity of fixtures is not regulated by code

    If a fixture can accept multiple lamp wattages, its wattage for the sake of code compliance is the highest re-lamping rated wattage designated by the manufacturer on a permanent, factory-installed Underwriters Laboratory label

    Lighting Controls High-efficacy and low-efficacy light

    fixtures must be controlled separately

    Nook lighting must be on a separate switch in order to be counted as an other space and not part of the kitchen

    Recommended to separately switch different layers of the kitchen lighting

    In the 2008 code: 150(k) 8In the 2013 code: 150(k) 3

  • LIGHTING DESIGN GUIDE: KITCHEN

    2008 Kitchen: Additional Low-Efficacy WattageAdditional low-efficacy wattage bonuses Up to 50 watts per dwelling in units < 2,500 sq. ft.

    Up to 100 watts per dwelling in units > 2,500 sq. ft.

    The bonuses are available if the following conditions are met:1. In kitchens, all low-efficacy luminaires must be controlled by a vacancy

    sensor, dimmer, EMCS, or multi-scene programmable control,

    and

    2. in garages, laundry rooms, closets over 70 square feet, and utility rooms, all luminaires must be high efficacy and employ vacancy sensors.

    In the 2008 code: 150(k) 8

  • LIGHTING DESIGN GUIDE: KITCHEN

    2013 Kitchen: Additional Low-Efficacy WattageAdditional low-efficacy wattage bonuses Up to 50 watts per dwelling in units < 2,500 sq. ft.

    Up to 100 watts per dwelling in units > 2,500 sq. ft.

    The bonuses are available if the following conditions are met:All lighting in the kitchen is controlled in accordance with the applicable provisions in Section 150.0(k)2, and is also controlled by vacancy sensors or dimmers.

    In 2013 the code: 150(k) 2

  • LIGHTING DESIGN GUIDE: KITCHEN

    Special CircumstancesAppliancesLighting that is part of an appliance is not regulated by the code

    Blank Electrical BoxesCalculated and treated as 180 watts of low-efficacy lighting

    Internal Cabinet Lighting Not considered part of the kitchen

    lighting for calculating 50%

    No more than 20W per linear foot of illuminated cabinet

    Lighting installed inside a cabinet may only be used to illuminate the inside of the cabinet

  • LIGHTING DESIGN GUIDE: KITCHEN

    Cabinets: Measurement methods for 2013The length of an illuminated cabinet shall be determined using one of the following measurements, regardless of the number of shelves or the number of doors per cabinet section:

    A. One horizontal length of illuminated cabinet; or

    B. One vertical length, per illuminated cabinet section; or

    C. No more than one vertical length per every 40 horizontal inches of illuminated cabinet.

    In 2013 the code: 150(k) 4

  • LIGHTING DESIGN GUIDE: KITCHEN

    Cabinets: Measurement methods for 2013The length of an illuminated cabinet shall be determined using one of the following measurements, regardless of the number of shelves or the number of doors per cabinet section:

    In 2013 the code: 150(k) 4

    C. No more than one vertical length per every 40 horizontal inches of illuminated cabinet.

  • LIGHTING DESIGN GUIDE: KITCHEN

    Kitchen: Sample Floor Plan and Calculation

    298 Square Feet

  • LIGHTING DESIGN GUIDE: KITCHEN

    Activity: Consulting on Kitchen LightingQuestion: The designer of a new kitchen plans to submit her paperwork for a project beginning before November 2013. She plans to install six high efficacy 10.5W LED recessed downlights, and four high efficacy 18W linear LED under cabinet luminaires.

    How many watts of low efficacy lighting can she install?

    Answer:6 x 10.5W LED downlights = 63W4 x 18W LED undercabs = 72WTotal: 135 watts

  • LIGHTING DESIGN GUIDE: KITCHEN

    Activity: Consulting on Kitchen LightingQuestion: Given that in a kitchen, the maximum wattage of low-efficacy lighting that can be installed is 135W, and the designer wants to use 40W incandescent lamps (bulbs) in single-socket pendant luminaires that have a relamping rated wattage of 90W.

    How many incandescent luminaires can he install?

    Answer:40W per lamp90W luminaire maximumOne single-socket pendant luminaire

  • All can lighting is fluorescent, 2700K, 26w. All the incandescent lighting (unless otherwise indicated as full-fluorescent) is a 50:50 match (or less) to the fluorescent and all are on dimmer switches. Under- and up-lighting is fluorescent. All fluorescent meets requirements for electronic ballasts rated 13 watts or greater. All recessed cans in insulated ceilings are IC-approved and certified airtight. Main Street Kitchens in Walnut Creek, CAwww.mainstreetkitchens.com

  • All fluorescent lighting, with the exception of the pendants over the breakfast bar.

    Dave Adams Photography

  • LIGHTING DESIGN GUIDE: KITCHEN

    Check Your UnderstandingQuestion:A home owner asks you:

    I am doing some kitchen remodeling. The kitchen lighting consists of six recessed incandescent cans, and Im planning to replace one of them. Must the new luminaire be high efficacy?

    How do you answer?

    Answer:

    a. No, replacements are not counted in the requirement for high efficacy.

    b. Yes, any luminaire replacement must be high efficacy until at least 50% of the total lighting wattage comes from high efficacy luminaires.

  • Main Street Kitchens in Walnut Creek, CAwww.mainstreetkitchens.com

    http://www.mainstreetkitchens.com

  • Main Street Kitchens in Walnut Creek, CAwww.mainstreetkitchens.com

    http://www.mainstreetkitchens.com

  • LIGHTING DESIGN GUIDE: KITCHEN

    Check Your UnderstandingQuestion:I am designing kitchen lighting for a 2,400-ft2 house under the 2008 code. My design exceeds the 50% low-efficacy lighting ratio. This design includes 208W of high-efficacy lighting. I plan to control the low-efficacy lighting in the kitchen with a multi-scene programmable control system and install both high-efficacy lighting and vacancy sensors in the garage, laundry room, all closets greater than 70 ft2, and the utility room.

    How many watts of low-efficacy lighting can I install in my kitchen?

    Answer:You are allowed an additional 50W of low efficacy lighting in the kitchen because the house is less than 2,500 ft2. You are also allowed less than or equal to 208W of low-efficacy lighting based upon the watts of high-efficacy lighting you are installing.

    50W + 208W = 258W

    Therefore, you are allowed to install up to 258W of low-efficacy lighting in the kitchen.

  • LIGHTING DESIGN GUIDE: KITCHEN

    Check Your Understanding: 2013 codeQuestion:I am designing kitchen lighting for a 2,400-ft2 house under the 2013 code. My design exceeds the 50% low-efficacy lighting ratio. This design includes 208W of high-efficacy lighting. I plan to control the low-efficacy lighting in the kitchen with a multi-scene programmable control system and install both high-efficacy lighting and vacancy sensors in the garage, laundry room, all closets greater than 70 ft2, and the utility room.

    Can I still use the bonus wattage of low-efficacy lighting in my kitchen? What other conditions apply in the new code?

    Answer:You are allowed an additional 50W of low efficacy lighting in the kitchen because the house is less than 2,500 ft2 AND if the kitchen lighting is also connected to vacancy sensors. You are also allowed less than or equal to 208W of low-efficacy lighting based upon the watts of high-efficacy lighting you are installing.

    50W + 208W = 258W

    Therefore, you are allowed to install up to 258W of low-efficacy lighting in the kitchen.

  • All fluorescent can lights.Dave Adams Photography

  • Hidden LED cove lighting in kitchen/dining room/living roomDave Adams Photography

  • LIGHTING DESIGN GUIDE: KITCHEN

    Check Your UnderstandingQuestion:I am installing puck lights under the shelves of cabinets with glass doors. Some of the lighting will inadvertently spill through the glass.

    Is this still considered lighting only for the purpose of illuminating the inside of the cabinets?

    Answer:Yes. This is still considered lighting for the purpose of illuminating the inside of the cabinets because the lighting system is specifically designed for illuminating the inside of the cabinets.

    If a different lighting system, such as adjustable flood lights, is designed to project lighting onto surfaces external to the cabinets, that lighting will be considered permanently installed kitchen lighting and not internal cabinet lighting.

  • LIGHTING DESIGN GUIDE: KITCHEN

    Activity: Lighting designOf the technologies we looked at earlier, which ones do you think would work well in the kitchen? Others that you use frequently?

  • LIGHTING DESIGN GUIDE: BATHROOMS, GARAGES, LAUNDRY ROOMS, CLOSETS, AND UTILITY ROOMS

    2008 Bathrooms, Garages, Laundry Rooms, Closets, and Utility Rooms: RequirementsLighting High efficacy or controlled with a vacancy sensor

    ControlsThe first switch does not need to be a fluorescent light fixture.High-efficacy and low-efficacy light fixtures must be controlled separately.

    QuantityThe quantity of light fixtures is not regulated by the code.

    Vacancy Sensor Vacancy sensors must be manual

    on/off and automatic off Sensors cannot have an override

    allowing the light fixture to be continuously on

    The maximum time delay to turn off is 30 minutes after the last detected motion

    Closets < 70 sq ft are exempt from controls requirement

    In the code: see 150(k) 10

  • LIGHTING DESIGN GUIDE: BATHROOMS

    2013 BathroomsLighting At least one luminaire has to be high efficacy

    ControlsAll other lighting installed in each bathroom shall be high efficacy or controlled by vacancy sensors.

    QuantityThe quantity of luminaires is not regulated by the code. (for all of the residence)

    In the 2013 code: see 150(k) 5

  • LIGHTING DESIGN GUIDE: GARAGES, LAUNDRY ROOMS, CLOSETS, AND UTILITY ROOMS

    2013 Garages, Laundry Rooms, Closets, and Utility Rooms: RequirementsLighting and controlsAll lighting must be high efficacy, or shall be controlled by either dimmers or vacancy sensors.

    Exceptions Closets less than 70 sq ft Detached storage buildings less

    than 1,000 square feet located on a residential site

    In the 2013 code: see 150(k) 6

  • LIGHTING DESIGN GUIDE: BATHROOMS, GARAGES, LAUNDRY ROOMS, CLOSETS, AND UTILITY ROOMS

    Bathroom: Sample Floor Plan

    228 Square Feet

  • Main Street Kitchens in Walnut Creek, CAwww.mainstreetkitchens.com

    All incandescent lighting is on a manual-on/automatic-off switch.

    http://www.mainstreetkitchens.com

  • Main Street Kitchens in Walnut Creek, CAwww.mainstreetkitchens.com

    http://www.mainstreetkitchens.com

  • LIGHTING DESIGN GUIDE: BATHROOMS

    Check Your UnderstandingQuestion:Is the factory-installed lighting system in a bathrooms mounted medicine cabinet required to be either high-efficacy or controlled by a vacancy sensor?

    Answer:If the factory-installed lighting in a medicine cabinet is designed to only illuminate the inside of the cabinet, and the lighting is controlled only by a door-activated switch, then the factory installed lighting is not regulated by the Residential Lighting Standards.

    If the factory-installed lighting is connected to a manually operated switch, or the lighting is designed to illuminate or display contents of the cabinet when the door is closed, then it is considered permanently installed lighting and must comply with the Residential Lighting Standards.

  • LIGHTING DESIGN GUIDE: BEDROOMS

    2008 and 2013 Bedrooms High efficacy, vacancy sensor, or dimmer

    High-efficacy and low-efficacy light fixtures must be controlled separately

    Vacancy sensors must be manual on/off and automatic off

    Switched outlets (half-hots) do not require special controls

    Ceiling fans with incandescent light kits need one switch for the fan and one dimmer/vacancy sensor for the lights.

    High-efficacy: only one switch is needed, two are shown for flexibility

    In the 2008 code: see 150(k) 7 and 11In the 2013 code: see 150(k) 7

  • LIGHTING DESIGN GUIDE: LIVING AND DINING ROOMS

    2008 and 2013 Living and Dining Rooms High efficacy, vacancy sensor, or dimmer

    Switched outlets (half-hots) do not require special controls

    Decorative option: use incandescent fixtures and dimmer(s)

    Ceiling fans with low-efficacy light kits need one switch for the fan and one dimmer/vacancy sensor for the lights (with high-efficacy kits, only one switch is needed)

  • LIGHTING DESIGN GUIDE: LIVING AND DINING ROOMS

    Check Your UnderstandingQuestion:Can a ceiling fan with integrated lighting be a high-efficacy luminaire?

    Answer:Yes. Ceiling fan light kits with integral CFL ballasts are available. Some LED lighting may qualify as high efficacy.

    Some occupants are likely to prefer obscured lamps to visible lamps. When the ceiling fan is installed in a room other than a kitchen, bathroom, garage, laundry room and/or utility room, a less efficient alternative is to use incandescent lamps on a dimming circuit separate to the fan circuit.

  • LIGHTING DESIGN GUIDE: ATTICS & ENCLOSED PATIOS

    2008 and 2103 Attics and Enclosed PatiosAttic

    If an vacancy sensor cannot see the entire attic, the occupant could be left in the dark

    High efficacy, dimmer or vacancy sensor

    Sensors must be manual on/off and automatic off

    Enclosed Patio An enclosed (unconditioned) patio

    is considered an other space

    High-efficacy and low-efficacy light fixtures MUST be controlled separately

    High efficacy, or include a dimmer or vacancy sensor

  • LIGHTING DESIGN GUIDE: HALLWAYS

    2008 and 2013 Hallways High efficacy, vacancy sensor or dimmer Vacancy sensors must view the entire space (this application may require

    three-way switching as shown)

  • LIGHTING DESIGN GUIDE: OUTDOOR LIGHTING

    2008 and 2013 Outdoor Lighting: RequirementsGeneral Requirements

    Do not apply to landscape lighting that is not attached to the building, residential parking lots, or garages for eight or more vehicles

    Must be high-efficacy, or controlled by a manual on/off switch, motion sensor, and a method automatically turn off lights during daytime

    Low-efficacy outdoor luminaires may have a temporary override switch which bypasses the motion sensing function for up to six hours provided that the override switch automatically reactivates the motion sensor

    Outdoor luminaires in or around swimming pools or water features are exempt from Title 24

    A manual off/on switch (no override to on)

    Outdoor Motion Sensors Must have automatic on/off operation

    and photocells to keep lights off during daylight hours

    Must comply with the maximum 30-minute shut-off requirement

    Must view the space that it illuminates

    Override SwitchLow-efficacy outdoor luminaires may have a temporary override switch which bypasses the motion sensing function for up to six hours, provided that the override switch automatically reactivates the motion sensor.

  • LIGHTING DESIGN GUIDE: FRONT PORCH

    Front Porch Lighting Plan LEDs are ideal for cold outdoor environment, as CFLs often are not

    compatible with cold temperatures.

    The lifespan of LEDs are significantly longer than other lamp sources, requiring less maintenance.

    Although not required by the standards when using a high-efficacy fixture, including a motion sensor will provide light to occupants upon entering the space when no immediate access to a switch is available.

    For outdoor areas close to bedroom windows, high-efficacy luminaires are preferred over low-efficacy luminaires with motion sensors that may be triggered in the middle of the night.

  • LIGHTING DESIGN GUIDE: OUTDOOR SPACE

    Outdoor Space Lighting Plan Provide adequate lighting to support the function of the space and specific tasks

    performed within it.

    Although not required by the standards when using a high-efficacy fixture, including a motion sensor (as shown) will provide light to occupants where there is not immediate access to a switch in a transitional space.

    Motion sensor coverage should not be too large, or lights will be triggered by street traffic or a neighbors motion. Most sensors have a sensitivity control to adjust the degree of motion and light that triggers them.

    In addition to the motion sensor and one of the three other lighting control options, the owner also must be provided with a manual on/off switch for low-efficacy luminaires.

  • LIGHTING DESIGN GUIDE: KITCHEN

    Activity: Consulting on Exterior LightingQuestion: An applicant has the following outdoor lighting: A flood light on the patio wall on a photocell with no override or bypass switch, two patio lights located just outside the sliding glass door, and an outdoor ceiling fan in a covered porch with a light.

    Which fixtures must be high efficacy?

    Answer:Outdoor lighting must be high efficacy unless controlled by all three of:1. Manual on/off switch2. Motion sensor3. Automatic photocell, time clock, or EMS

    ALL of the fixtures (flood light not excluded)

  • All exterior LED lighting.

    Dave Adams Photography

  • LIGHTING DESIGN GUIDE: OUTDOOR SPACE

    Check Your UnderstandingQuestion:My house has a row of small bollards along the walkway to the front door.

    Do these have to be high efficacy?

    Answer:No. The high efficacy requirement only applies to lighting mounted to the building.

  • LIGHTING DESIGN GUIDE: INTERNALLY ILLUMINATED ADDRESS SIGNS

    2008 Internally Illuminated Address Signs Cannot exceed 12 watts per sq. ft. internal illumination Cannot exceed 2.3 watts per sq. ft. external illumination

    Alternatives when equipped only with one or more of the light sources High-pressure sodium Metal halide lamps (with minimum efficiency) Neon or cold cathode lamps (with minimum efficiency) Fluorescent lamps (with a minimum CRI) LEDs (with minimum efficiency) Compact fluorescent lamps (not with screw-base socket) Electronic ballasts (minimum 20 kHz)

    In the 2008 code: see 150(k) 14

  • LIGHTING DESIGN GUIDE: INTERNALLY ILLUMINATED ADDRESS SIGNS

    2013 Internally Illuminated Address SignsConsume no more than 5 watts of powerORComply with the nonresidential sign lighting Standards in 140.8:

    Cannot exceed 12 watts per sq. ft. internal illumination Cannot exceed 2.3 watts per sq. ft. external illumination

    Alternatives when equipped only with one or more of the light sources High-pressure sodium Metal halide lamps (with minimum efficiency) Neon or cold cathode lamps (with minimum efficiency) Fluorescent lamps (with a minimum 80 CRI) + Electronic ballasts (minimum 20 kHz) Compact fluorescent lamps with no screw-base sockets LEDs (with minimum efficiency)

    In the 2013 code: see 150(k) 10

  • LIGHTING DESIGN GUIDE: OUTDOOR SPACE

    Check Your UnderstandingQuestion:I would like to install low-voltage landscape lighting in my yard highlighting a few trees.

    Are these required to be on a motion sensor and have photocontrols?

    Answer:No. Lighting not attached to a building is exempt from this requirement.

  • LIGHTING DESIGN GUIDE: MULTI-FAMILY COMMON AREAS

    2008 Low-rise Multi-family Common Areas

    A multi-family complex consists of four or more dwelling units. A low-rise is considered a building with three or fewer stories.

    All hardwired lighting must be high efficacy or controlled by a occupant sensor

    The occupant sensor must be directly on the walkway and/or view the entire space

    If the building has more than three stories the common areas must comply with the non-residential code.

    In the 2008 code: see 150(k) 16

  • LIGHTING DESIGN GUIDE: MULTI-FAMILY COMMON AREAS

    2013 Low-rise Multi-family Common Areas

    Lighting in corridors and stairwells of multi-family buildings must be controlled by sensors that reduce the lighting by at least 50% on vacancy.

    In buildings with common areas that are 20% of the floor space:

    All hardwired lighting must be high efficacy or controlled by an occupancy sensor

    In buildings with common areas that are > 20% of the floor space:

    Comply with non-res standards

    In the 2013 code: see 150(k) 12

    Credit: The Hanover Co.

  • LIGHTING DESIGN GUIDE: MULTI-FAMILY COMMON AREAS

    2008 Parking Lots and GaragesResidential Lots and Garages

    Residential standards apply to parking lots, carports and parking garages (attached and detached from dwelling unit) for seven or fewer vehicles per site

    Parking lots and carports must meet the residential outdoor lighting requirements

    Parking garages must meet the residential indoor lighting requirements: high efficacy orcontrolled by a manual-on occupant sensor

    Non-residential Lots and Garages Non-residential standards apply to

    parking lots, carports and parking garages (attached and detached from dwelling unit) for eight or more vehicles

    Must meet the lighting requirements for non-residential buildings

    Must meet the power density limits for non-residential lighting standards

    Light fixtures must be controlled by a photocontrol or time switch that turns lights off when daylight is present

    Fixtures with lamps rated over 175 watts are designated as cutoff, limiting light emitted upwards

    Uniform lighting is desired to help eliminate shadows in corners and provide a sense of safety

    In the 2008 code: see 150(k) 11

  • LIGHTING DESIGN GUIDE: MULTI-FAMILY COMMON AREAS

    2013 Parking Lots and GaragesResidential Lots and Garages

    Residential standards apply to parking lots, carports and parking garages (attached and detached from dwelling unit) for seven or fewer vehicles per site

    Parking lots and carports must meet the residential outdoor lighting requirements or the non-res requirements

    Parking garages must meet the residential indoor lighting requirements: high efficacy andcontrolled by a vacancy sensor

    Non-residential Lots and Garages Non-residential standards apply to

    parking lots, carports and parking garages (attached and detached from dwelling unit) for eight or more vehicles

    Must meet the power density limits for non-residential lighting standards

    Light fixtures must be controlled by a photocontrol or time switch that turns lights off when daylight is present

    New construction or major alterations are required to comply with Backlight, Uplight, Glare ratings per IES TM-15-11

    Pole mounted luminaire > 75W and < 24 ft must include motion sensors that reduce lighting levels on vacancy.

    Other conditions apply, see sections: 110.9, 130.0, 130.2, 130.4, 140.7 & 141.0

    In the 2013 code: see 150(k) 6

  • LIGHTING DESIGN GUIDE: MULTI-FAMILY COMMON AREAS

    Check Your UnderstandingQuestion 8:Does the lighting for an interior common-area hallway of a low-rise residential building with three or fewer dwelling units have to comply with the Residential or Nonresidential Lighting Standards?

    Answer:It must comply with the Residential Lighting Standards.

    A building with four or fewer dwelling units is not a multi-family building, but must comply with the Residential Lighting Standards since it is a low-rise building, three or less stories.

  • PART 5: COMPLIANCE PROCESS

    Walk-through of the Title 24 compliance process

    What is a Plans Examiner looking for? What is Building Inspector looking for?

  • COMPLIANCE PROCESS

    The Compliance ProcessDesignArchitects, engineers and designers must understand both the requirements and the underlying intent of the standards if they are to design buildings and systems that are inherently energy efficient and cost effective.

    Permit ApplicationDesign teams must make sure that the plans contain all the information that the building official will need to verify that the building or system satisfies the requirements.

    Plan CheckThe plans examiner of the local building department must verify that the building or system satisfies the requirements of the standards and that the plans (not just the compliance forms) contain the information to be verified during field inspection.

    ConstructionContractors must carefully follow the approved plans and specifications, and the building department field inspector(s) must verify that the building or system is constructed according to the plans and specifications.

    Acceptance CommissioningAfter completion of construction, the contractor and/or the design team must properly commission the building and its systems and provide information and/or training to the building operators on maintenance and operation of the building and its equipment.

    OperationAfter occupancy, the building and its systems must be correctly operated and properly maintained.

  • COMPLIANCE PROCESS

    Mandatory MeasuresMandatory measures required by both prescriptive and performance approaches include the following areas:

    Building envelope Space conditioning, water heating

    and plumbing Ducts and fans Pools and spas Fireplaces Lighting

  • COMPLIANCE PROCESS

    Locally Adopted Energy StandardsLocal governmental agencies, primarily cities and counties, may adopt and enforce standards for newly constructed and existing buildings that are more stringent than Title 24. These can include:

    Shorter timeframes Additional energy conservation measures More stringent energy budgets CALGreen or GreenPoint Rated

    It is critical to check with your local building agency for additional requirements.

    A list of all local ordinances exceeding the 2008 building energy efficiency standards is located at:http://www.energy.ca.gov/title24/2008standards/ordinances/

  • Residential COMPLIANCE PROCESS

    What the PE Is Verifying

    Kitchen LightingDo Electrical Plans specify minimum 50% total rated wattage of permanently installed kitchen lighting to be high efficacy?

    And does wattage total at least 50% high efficacy wattage?

    Bathroom, etc. and Other Room Lighting

    Do Electrical Plans specify any low efficacy lighting in these areas?

    Does Lighting Schedule on Electrical Plans identify lighting to be installed with manual-on occupant sensor? Installed with dimmer? (In Other Rooms)

    Outdoor Lighting

    Is all permanently-installed outdoor lighting specified on Electrical Plans?

    Do Electrical Plans specify any low efficacy outdoor lighting?

    Are switching requirements specified on Electrical Plans?

    Controls (Switching)

  • Residential Lighting Standards

    What the BI Is Looking For High efficacy installed lighting

    OR Applicable lighting control

    alternatives (occupant sensors or dimmers)

    Cabinet lighting

    Drywall installed to limit infiltration and exfiltration, at lighting cans, HVAC registers and vents, electrical sockets, etc.

    Recessed luminaires

    Refer to Compliance Manual 6.11 Inspection Protocol for Recessed Luminaires in Insulated Ceilings 150 (k)12

  • Certificates of Compliance Worksheets Installation Certificates

    Certificates of Field Verification and Diagnostic Testing

    MF-1R [none] CF-6R-LTG-01 [none]

    Residential COMPLIANCE PROCESS

    What forms apply

  • PLAN REVIEW ACTIVITY:

    Johnson Residence Plan

  • COMPLIANCE PROCESS

    Pair/Team Activity: Review Johnson Residence Plan for Lighting

    Use the CF-6R-LTG-01 form and the MF-1R to check the Johnson Residence Plan for Lighting.

    Use your workbook, and excerpts from the Standards as needed.

  • COMPLIANCE PROCESS

    Pair/Team Activity: Debriefing

  • PART 6: UPDATES AND RESOURCES

    CEC updates to the code Additional Title 24 resources

  • UPDATES AND RESOURCES

    2013 StandardsThe California Energy Commission has adopted changes to Title 24. http://www.energy.ca.gov/title24/2013standards/rulemaking/documents/index.html

    Start date: January 1, 2014

  • UPDATES AND RESOURCES

    Residential Revisions: Interior lightingSwitching Devices and Controls1. High-efficacy luminaires must be switched separately from low-efficacy luminaires2. Exhaust fans must be switched separately from lighting systems3. Luminaires must be switched with readily accessible controls that permit manual on / off

    switching4. No controls may bypass a dimmer or vacancy sensor function where that dimmer or

    vacancy sensor has been installed for compliance

    Electronic BallastsBallasts for fluorescent lamps rated 13 W must be electronic and have an output frequency 20 kHz.

    KitchensA minimum of 50% of the total rated wattage of permanently installed lighting in kitchens must be high-efficacy lighting.

  • UPDATES AND RESOURCES

    Residential Revisions: Interior lightingCabinetsLighting that is permanently installed inside cabinets may use no more than 20 W of power per linear foot of illuminated cabinet.

    Regardless of the number of shelves or doors per cabinet section, the length of an illuminated cabinet must be determined using one of the following measurements:

    1. One horizontal length of illuminated cabinet 2. One vertical length per illuminated cabinet section 3. No more than one vertical length per every 40 horizontal inches of illuminated cabinet

    BathroomsA minimum of one high-efficacy luminaire must be installed in each bathroom. All other lighting must be high efficacy or controlled by vacancy sensors.

    KitchensA minimum of 50% of the total rated wattage of permanently installed lighting in kitchens must be high-efficacy lighting. Bonus credit now tied only to the kitchen.

  • UPDATES AND RESOURCES

    Residential Revisions: Interior lightingNight LightsPermanently installed night lights and night lights integral to installed luminaires or exhaust fans must be rated to consume no more than 5 W of power per luminaire and may not be controlled by vacancy sensors.

    Garages, laundry rooms and utility roomsLighting installed in attached and detached garages, laundry rooms and utility rooms must be high-efficacy and controlled by a vacancy sensor.

    Other AreasLighting installed in any rooms or areas other than those above must be high efficacy or must be controlled by either dimmers or vacancy sensors.

  • UPDATES AND RESOURCES

    Residential Revisions: Exterior lightingFor single-family residential buildings, outdoor lighting permanently mounted to a residential building or other buildings on the same lot must generally be high efficacy.

    Low-efficacy outdoor lighting must be controlled by all of the following:1. A manual on / off switch that does not override to on2. A motion sensor not having an override or bypass switch that disables the motion sensor,

    or a motion sensor with an override switch that temporarily bypasses the motion sensing function and automatically reactivates the motion sensor within 6 hours

    3. A photocontrol, astronomical time clock or energy management control system that does not have an override or bypass switch disabling the control and is programmed to automatically turn the outdoor lighting off during daylight hours

  • UPDATES AND RESOURCES

    Residential Revisions: LED quality standardNew quality standards require all residential LED luminaires to be certified to the California Energy Commission.

    Requirements include accurate color rendering (CRI 90 or above) and a warm color temperature similar to incandescent lamps (CCT: 2700K or 3000K).

    See Title 24 2013 Appendix JA8-3

  • UPDATES AND RESOURCES

    2008 Title 24 Residential Lighting Standardswww.energy.ca.gov/title24/2008standards

  • UPDATES AND RESOURCES

    2013 Title 24 Residential Lighting Standardswww.energy.ca.gov/title24/2013standards

  • UPDATES AND RESOURCES

    SCE T24 TRAINING CALENDARhttps://sce-web.ungerboeck.com/coe/coe_p1_all.aspx?oc=10&cc=COURSES

  • UPDATES AND RESOURCES

    CLTC Websitecltc.ucdavis.edu

  • This concludes The American Institute of Architects Continuing Education Systems Course

    PG&E

    Pacific Energy Center / Energy Training Center-Stockton

    Residential Lighting: Title 24 and Technology UpdateSlide Number 2Slide Number 3Slide Number 4Slide Number 5Slide Number 6Slide Number 7Slide Number 8Slide Number 9Slide Number 10Slide Number 11Slide Number 12Slide Number 13Slide Number 14Slide Number 15PART 1: TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEWSlide Number 17Slide Number 18Slide Number 19Slide Number 20Slide Number 21Slide Number 22Slide Number 23Slide Number 24Slide Number 25Slide Number 26Slide Number 27Slide Number 28Slide Number 29Slide Number 30PART 2: BACKGROUND AND POLICYSlide Number 32Slide Number 33Slide Number 34Slide Number 35Slide Number 36Slide Number 37Slide Number 38Slide Number 39PART 3: TECHNOLOGY & THE CODESlide Number 41Slide Number 42Slide Number 43Slide Number 44Slide Number 45Slide Number 46Slide Number 47Slide Number 48Slide Number 49Slide Number 50Slide Number 51Slide Number 52Slide Number 53Slide Number 54Slide Number 55Slide Number 56Slide Number 57Slide Number 58Slide Number 59Slide Number 60Slide Number 61Slide Number 62Slide Number 63Slide Number 64Slide Number 65Slide Number 66Slide Number 67Slide Number 68Slide Number 69Dimmers on the MarketSlide Number 72Slide Number 73Slide Number 74PART 4: LIGHTING DESIGN GUIDESlide Number 76Slide Number 77Slide Number 78Slide Number 79Slide Number 80Slide Number 81Slide Number 82Slide Number 83Slide Number 84Slide Number 85Slide Number 86Slide Number 87Slide Number 88Slide Number 89Slide Number 90Slide Number 91Slide Number 92Slide Number 93Slide Number 94Slide Number 95Slide Number 96Slide Number 97Slide Number 98Slide Number 99Slide Number 100Slide Number 101Slide Number 102Slide Number 103Slide Number 104Slide Number 106Slide Number 108Slide Number 109Slide Number 110Slide Number 111Slide Number 112Slide Number 113Slide Number 114Slide Number 115Slide Number 116Slide Number 117Slide Number 118Slide Number 119Slide Number 120Slide Number 121Slide Number 122Slide Number 123Slide Number 124Slide Number 125PART 5: COMPLIANCE PROCESSSlide Number 127Slide Number 128Slide Number 129Slide Number 130Slide Number 131Slide Number 132PLAN REVIEW ACTIVITY:Slide Number 134Slide Number 135PART 6: UPDATES AND RESOURCESSlide Number 137Slide Number 138Slide Number 139Slide Number 140Slide Number 141Slide Number 142Slide Number 143Slide Number 144Slide Number 145Slide Number 146Slide Number 147

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