[RELO] American Culture Series: Black History Month

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Cultural Affairs Officer Melissa Schumi Jones and English Language Fellow Ryan Brux talk about Black History Month and Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have A Dream" speech.

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<ul><li> 1. American Culture Webinars ForEnglish Language Teachers Brought to you by : U.S. Embassy Limas Public Affairs Section</li></ul> <p> 2. WELCOME!Our goal: to provide info on U.S. cultureAND to help you create an effective plan to use inyour classroom.Please ask questions! Thats why were here. 3. First Question: Do you know who this man is?If you know who he is, what do you think he is thinking about? 4. Martin Luther King Jr.January 15, 1929 April 4, 1968 5. Second question: What is Black HistoryMonth? 6. BHM is about honoring the achievements ofAfrican-Americans and celebrating theirinfluence on American society Recognized formally by the U.S. government in1976 during the bicentennial 7. Life of Dr. King American Civil Rights leader, born in Atlanta, Georgia January 15, 1929. Became a pastor at age 25 in Montgomery, Alabama. Dr. King espoused non- violence as a means to achieve social change. 8. Life of Dr. KingIn 1963, MLK was arrestedin Birmingham. His famousLetter from a Birminghamjail was written there.Notable campaigns took placeacross the south, Georgia, Alabama,Florida. 9. March on Washington August 28,I Have a 1963Dream What is the message to students: 10. I Have a DreamSpeech considered one ofthe best in American historyDr. King presented vision fora United States no longerdivided by race, wherepeople are judged not bythe color of their skin, butby the content of theircharacter. 11. Life of Dr. King Civil Rights Act of 1964 passed. Dr. King is at President Johnsons side for the signing. In October 1964, Dr. King was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. 12. Life and Death of Dr. King 13. Plan your Lesson Plan1) What are your topics?2) What kind of questions/conversations starterswill you ask?3) What new vocabulary do you need?4) What activities can you do with your students? 14. Vocabulary - Beginner 15. DefinitionsLeader (n.) A person who rules, guides, or inspires others; head.Dream (v.) to see or imagine in sleep or in a vision; (n.) succession of images, thoughts, or emotions passing through the mind during sleepRights (n.) a moral, ethical, or legal principle considered as an underlying cause of truth, justice, morality, or ethicsSpeech (n.) form of communication in spoken language, made by a speaker before an audience for a given purposeEqual (adj.) having the same value, measure, or amount as something elseHistory (n.) record of past events and times, especially in connection with the human raceFreedom (n.) state of being free or at liberty rather than in confinement or under physical restraint 16. Vocabulary - Advanced 17. DefinitionsI Have a Dream phrase from the most celebrated speech by Martin LutherKing, Jr., delivered at the March on Washington in 1963 to supporters ofthe civil rights movement. King stressed the importance of nonviolentresistance and vividly painted his vision of a better future for people of allcolors in the United States.Civil rights rights to personal liberty established by the 13th and 14th Amendments to the U.S. constitution and certain Congressional acts, especially as applied to an individual or a minority group. (Dictionary.com)Equality (n.) state or quality of being equal; correspondence in quantity, degree, value, rank, or ability.Segregation (n.) separation or isolation of a race, class, or group (as byrestriction to an area or by separate schools) 18. DefinitionsSeparate but Equal A legal doctrine in United States Constitutional law that justified systems of segregation; term for a racial policy by which blacks may be segregated if granted equal opportunities and facilities, as for education, transportation, or jobs. The phrase was derived from a Louisiana law of 1890.Non-violence (n.) policy, practice, or technique of refraining from the use ofviolence, especially when reacting to or protesting against oppression,injustice, or discrimination.Boycott (v.) To refuse to buy, use, or go to, in order to make a protest or bring about a change. (also can be n.) 19. Discussion Questions 20. Discussion Questions What are civil rights? How does a countryprotect a citizens civil rights? What do you think about racial inequality? Doesit exist in your country? Does your country have leaders like MartinLuther King? What is the meaning of the phrase, I Have aDream? What is your dream for your country? What Other Questions Do You Have? 21. Activities1) MLK Interactive Timeline Using the picture timeline, go through the eventsof MLKs life. Address any comprehension issues.Point out Vocabulary, Break students into groups. With a timeline setfor each group, have students write out the keyidea for each event. Have students put events inorder. When all groups have finished, choose studentsto orally tell each event. 22. Timeline ActivityStep 1 Teach the story in theclassroom using the timeline pictures 23. Timeline ActivityStep 2 Print out slides and have students write/discuss what each slide shows 24. Timeline ActivityStep 3 Put the events in order, Students describe the events 25. Activities2) I Have a Dream (see pictures) Watch a short clip from MLKs I Have a Dream speech. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MgYzJGmBXU8 Discuss some examples of dreams (i.e. to own ones own business) Distribute Dove Template. http://www.activityvillage.co.uk/dove_template.htm Have students reflect and write down their personal dream. Post around the room. Have students participate in a gallery walk, in which they walk around the room and read each others dreams 26. Dove ActivityStep 1 Cut out dove template and write dreams in EnglishStep 2 Hang doves on clothesline or wall in classroomStep 3 Take a gallery walk and visit each dove, talk withstudents about messages 27. ResourcesAmerican English webpage americanenglish.state.govRELO Andes webpage reloandes.com (link to this presentation found here!)Larry Ferlazzos List of Best Websites Best websites to teach about Black History Best websites about teach about Martin Luther King 28. LevelTopic/ThemeUpper-Beginner American Culture: Black History Month and Martin Luther King, Jr.American Culture Themes : Black History Month and Martin VocabularyLuther King Jr.Civil RightsBlack History Month is celebrated every year in February. It Martin Luther King, Jr.is an opportunity to celebrate the contributions to American Non-violencesociety by African-Americans.FreedomMartin Luther King, Jr. was an important civil rights leader Equality (opposite: Inequality)who believed in non-violence His I Have a Dream speech Dreamduring the March on Washington in August 1963 inspired the Segregationwhole country and is considered one of the best speeches in BoycottAmerican history.I Have a DreamEquality for all citizens is an American value. The United African-AmericanStates, and any country that shares this value, must continueto work toward this goal.Questions/Conversation StartersWhat are civil rights? How does a country protect a citizens civil rights? What do you think about racial inequality? Does it exist in your country? Does your country have leaders like Martin Luther King? Why is it important to talk about civil rights?What is the meaning of the phrase, I Have a Dream? What is your dream for your country?Suggested Extension Activity Materials/NotesMLK Interactive Timeline + I Have a Dream (see pictures) PPT presentationFrom the timeline, go through the events of MLKs life. Address any comprehension issues.Sets of blank timeline events 1Break students into groups. With a timeline set for each group have students write out the keyset/groupidea for each event. Have students put events in order.Rope/clothespins (for hangingWatch a short clip from MLKs I Have a Dream speech. Discuss some examples of dreams (i.e.timelines/doves) or tapeto own ones own business) Pencils/PensDistribute Dove Template. Have students reflect and write down their personal dream. Postaround the room. Have students participate in a gallery walk, in which they walk around theroom and read each others dreams 29. QUESTIONS? Remember:You can check out this presentation andthe corresponding resources on the RELO Andes blog - reloandes.com </p>