reading comprehension strategies

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Reading Comprehension Strategies . What works for students with High Functioning Autism?. Susan Hines. Characteristics of HFA. Do not make connections with others. Are most often visual learners. Tend to be literal and concrete thinkers and have difficulty with abstract ideas. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Reading Comprehension Strategies

Reading Comprehension Strategies What works for students with High Functioning Autism?

Susan HinesCharacteristics of HFADo not make connections with others.Are most often visual learners.Tend to be literal and concrete thinkers and have difficulty with abstract ideas.Have difficulty finding or following a pattern or sequence.Often develops an area of intense interest.

Do not make connections Help the student make connections to text before he reads. Ask questions of your students to assess prior knowledge.

StrategiesComplete the K segment of a KWL chart.Complete a Mind Mapping Activity.

Make ConnectionsKWLKWhat do you already know about this topic?

What do I predict this will be about??Mind MappingOrganize key concepts and vocabulary into a visual map that is a pictorial representation of the topic. Add familiar landmarks to help new information fit into current background knowledge.

Graphic Organizersfor Visual Learners

Help with abstract ideas: Anaphoric CueingWith a fairly short list of anaphora (words that refer to other words) that can be listed on a bookmark we can teach them when to stop in their reading and what to ask themselves before they move on.When we read: he, she, they, we, I, you We ask who?When we read: hers, his, its, theirs, ours, yours We ask whose?

Anaphoric CueingWhen we read: it, that, this, can, do We ask what?When we read: here, there, come, go We ask where?When we read: then, before, after We ask when?

Finding Patterns or SequencesHelp students see that stories follow a pattern.Divide a page into four boxes.Box One - Setting: where and when the story took place.Box Two Characters: identify the main character and one or a couple helper characters. Box Three Problem: describe the problem of that story or chapter or draw a picture showing the problem.Box Four What Will Happen Next: Describe what will happen next in words or pictures.Build on Interest