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Public Affairs Find the Story- Get the Story- Tell the Story. Squadron Sponsor Reps Tell the Story! Get in the Game!. Major Mike Lagace, MBA 27 October 2012. Media Mogul. OK- Let’s Begin!. Who are the Team?. Major Mike Lagace Captain Kerry Walker Lt (N) Conor Lloyd SLt Jessica Cameron - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Slide 1Public Affairs
Major Mike Lagace, MBA
Media Mogul
OK- Let’s Begin!
Who are the Team?
Squadron Sponsors
Training
Getting the right person for the job
Receiving top-down support
Providing internal information
Becoming a spokesperson
Alberta UPAR Training
Find the Story/ Get the Story/ Tell the Story
Act as a resource to the unit CO in public affairs and community relations
Cover public affairs duties for Squadron/Corp during Public Affairs Officer’s absence
Execute public affairs activities
Chop to PAO in an emergency – as media escort or to speak directly to the media
The UPAR
Prepare hometowners
Gather and retain PA material
Identify appropriate spokespersons or SMEs
Support unit tours and visits
Solicit unit members willing to assist the PA program and its initiatives
The UPAR
Cadets are the face!
2011-2014 RCSU (Pra)
Strategic Communications Plan
Inform
Persuade
Influence
Engage
2011-2014 RCSU (Pra)
Strategic Communications Plan
Raising the public profile of the Cadets in Prairie Region.
Each level of the organization has a role and responsibility to work towards the stated goals with the objective of strengthening community support for the program
Resulting in increased cadet attraction and improved cadet retention.
Find the Story/ Get the Story/ Tell the Story
2011-2014 RCSU (Pra)
Strategic Communications Plan
Enhance communications in the region by utilizing all available capabilities within the CF in conjunction with league partners
Ensure cadets are able to communicate their cadet experience with friends and family.
Establish stronger stakeholder relations where it enables them to communicate our mission.
Find the Story/ Get the Story/ Tell the Story
How Do We Communicate
How Do We Communicate
New Wave- (Social Media)
How is PA conducted?
Opportunity to get your side of the story out
Tool to build rapport with community and media
The proactive approach: Being ready to go to the media with the news before they come to you. You can’t predict when a
hard news event, good or bad, is going to occur. However, you can have a plan prepared ahead of time. Being proactive with
all news, good and bad, is . . .
Find the Story/ Get the Story/ Tell the Story
Why bother with PA?
How Can Our League Partners Help?
Social Media
Region Comm Tools
Social Media in
Facebook and Image Galleries
Principles of Participation
Do no harm
Members of DND / CF are reminded to follow these principles for all social media activities.
Find the Story/ Get the Story/ Tell the Story
Planning, Design and Coordination
Review good sites
(12 City of Edmonton- www.12air.ca )
Make it functional and relevant
- Own it- CO is responsible
All DND / CF guidance on web-related activities dedicates significant time to the PLANNING, DESIGN and COORDINATION phase. These aren’t new to any of us, and are similar steps we take to design training programs and other activities.
IM Group has assembled an entire web design process, adopting the principles from Usability.gov. These are:
Plan and Analyse
Know your users and their tasks
Establish measures of success.
Conduct card sorting to prepare information architecture (Process flows or websites)
Deveop information arhitectures, navigation & page wireframes (Websites only)
Write the content
Develop a prototype.
Guidelines for Release
Squadron CO decision
The Media
What do Squadrons publicize?
Unit member achievements (e.g. sports, scholastic, heroic)
Community service projects, (i.e. United Way appeal) Inspections and change-of-command ceremonies
Awards, unit and individual
Find the Story/ Get the Story/ Tell the Story
Know your Audience and the Media
Define the audience
Radio/TV/Cable stations
Basics for media relations:
• Assign one person from your unit to act as media liaison officer contact;
• Make a list of your media contacts, with proper name, address, telephone number and fax number and e-mail
address;
• Contact the media to learn their policies in accepting news releases (i.e. deadlines). Some media have handouts
describing the services available;
• Be neat and concise in your news releases;
• Be accurate. Check dates, names and correct spelling before you submit copy;
• Be innovative. Don’t be afraid to make suggestions if you honestly believe you have a workable idea. Media people
welcome original ideas;
• Be appreciative of all space and time given to your unit. Write “Thank You” letters to reporters, editors and managers
who have helped;
• Treat all media fairly and give them the same material at the same time; and
• Trust your news contacts. If they don’t use your story this time, that’s their prerogative. Don’t argue or be concerned.
Keep doing your job by providing good news releases.
Find the Story/ Get the Story/ Tell the Story
Who to see?
Three Main Products
Public Service Announcement
The Public Service Announcement
Issued 3 weeks in advance to local media
Could be an ACR or cool squadron activity where you want local folks involved
Here are some tips to help you get started:
1. You need to seek advice and guidance from the Formation or Wing PAO prior to issuing a news release. Regardless, the
DAOD requires that you inform the next level of the chain of command of all news releases and media contact.
2. News releases should be typewritten on 8 ½” x 11” bond paper. You may use letterhead paper.
3. Be sure to keep a copy of every release you send out.
4. Leave larger-than-normal margins on each side of the paper – at least one inch on each side of the story.
5. Indicate a specific release date only when there is cause to do so, otherwise all releases will be used when they are received.
6. Give your story a heading that will catch the editor’s attention.
7. Try to use present or future tense. Past tense should only be used if it is unavoidable.
8. When writing your story, make sure you have answered what news people call the five “W’s”. Include them in your first
paragraph, as editors tend to chop from the bottom up. The five W’s are:
a. WHO is involved;
b. WHAT is happening;
e. WHY is it happening; and
f. HOW (if it applies) or how much it costs.
9. Each succeeding paragraph of your story should be of declining importance.
10. Use short words. Write short sentences and short paragraphs.
11. Be brief. Try to do your story on one page.
12. If your story runs more than one page, write “MORE” at the bottom of the page.
13. At the bottom of the page, include the name and telephone number of your contact person or 13. names of persons who can
provide further information.
14. Your news release does not need to be a work of art. It should be neat, concise, precise and legible. If you are uncomfortable
writing prose, provide the story in point form, allowing the reporter to ask questions that will flesh out the story.
15. Regardless how elaborate or simple your news release is, make a follow-up telephone call; ask if the release has been
received and determine if further information is required.
16. There’s a real possibility the media will use the entire content of your news release if it’s well written!
Find the Story/ Get the Story/ Tell the Story
Find the Story/ Get the Story/ Tell the Story
The Media Advisory
You have great activity where you would like the media to cover the activity
Could be an ACR of field event
Similar to a PSA but specifically an invite for your local media
They may want more information- be prepared to support
Time need- if a daily- a couple days with a follow up phone call- if a weekly- then depends! Again a few days before with a follow up phone call
Find the Story/ Get the Story/ Tell the Story
Media Avisory
Here are some tips to help you get started:
1. You need to seek advice and guidance from the Formation or Wing PAO prior to issuing a news release. Regardless, the
DAOD requires that you inform the next level of the chain of command of all news releases and media contact.
2. News releases should be typewritten on 8 ½” x 11” bond paper. You may use letterhead paper.
3. Be sure to keep a copy of every release you send out.
4. Leave larger-than-normal margins on each side of the paper – at least one inch on each side of the story.
5. Indicate a specific release date only when there is cause to do so, otherwise all releases will be used when they are received.
6. Give your story a heading that will catch the editor’s attention.
7. Try to use present or future tense. Past tense should only be used if it is unavoidable.
8. When writing your story, make sure you have answered what news people call the five “W’s”. Include them in your first
paragraph, as editors tend to chop from the bottom up. The five W’s are:
a. WHO is involved;
b. WHAT is happening;
e. WHY is it happening; and
f. HOW (if it applies) or how much it costs.
9. Each succeeding paragraph of your story should be of declining importance.
10. Use short words. Write short sentences and short paragraphs.
11. Be brief. Try to do your story on one page.
12. If your story runs more than one page, write “MORE” at the bottom of the page.
13. At the bottom of the page, include the name and telephone number of your contact person or 13. names of persons who can
provide further information.
14. Your news release does not need to be a work of art. It should be neat, concise, precise and legible. If you are uncomfortable
writing prose, provide the story in point form, allowing the reporter to ask questions that will flesh out the story.
15. Regardless how elaborate or simple your news release is, make a follow-up telephone call; ask if the release has been
received and determine if further information is required.
16. There’s a real possibility the media will use the entire content of your news release if it’s well written!
Find the Story/ Get the Story/ Tell the Story
The News Release
Informs the media about a newsworthy event- a cadet award or scholarship
Notifies a number of media at same time
Saves time and phone calls
Provides the same information
The News Release
Find the Story/ Get the Story/ Tell the Story
The Media
The DO’S
Ensure that you are the right person for the interview
Publish their interpretation of what they believe the facts to be and go with what they have.
Find out who will do the interview and where it will be done (their studio or your place of work.)
Decide on one or two messages and make sure you know them well.
Find the Story/ Get the Story/ Tell the Story
The DO’S
Correct any false premise, seize the moral high ground.
Think of an interview as an opportunity to get your message across.
Ask yourself, “What if they did this story without me?”
Find the Story/ Get the Story/ Tell the Story
The DON’Ts
Use one-word answers.
Repeat a reporter’s question.
Ever use NO COMMENT. If you don’t know, say, “I don't know,” and offer to find the information.
EVER LIE.
H Give HONEST answers and be direct.
O Use this as an OPPORTUNITY to pass your message, expand your answer.
W Use colourful language to prove or illustrate your WHOLE POINT.
S SELL IT, make the reporter/audience feel good, then stop talking.
Find the Story/ Get the Story/ Tell the Story
Air League
Tools and Templates
As found in the Region Strat Comm Plan (on Region website)
Find the Story/ Get the Story/ Tell the Story
Tools and Templates
SWAG Plan-
Find the Story/ Get the Story/ Tell the Story
Questions?