Principles of Design. The ART ELEMENTS (line, shape, color, value, texture, form and space) combine to form the PRINCIPLES OF DESIGN

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<ul><li><p>Principles of Design</p></li><li><p>Principles of DesignThe ART ELEMENTS (line, shape, color, value, texture, form and space) combine to form the PRINCIPLES OF DESIGN</p></li><li><p>ContrastOpposites - A large difference between two things; for example, hot and cold, green and red, light and shadow, smooth and rough, organic and geometric B L A C KW H I T E</p></li><li><p>Contrast</p></li><li><p>ContrastRichard Deacon</p></li><li><p>Contrast</p></li><li><p>ContrastRuth Duckworth</p></li><li><p>Repetition an Element of art used over and over and over and over again</p></li><li><p>RepetitionLouise NevelsonDale Chihuly</p></li><li><p>RepetitionAndy Goldsworthy</p></li><li><p>Repetition</p></li><li><p>Repetition</p></li><li><p>RepetitionTony Cragg</p></li><li><p>RepetitionAlexander Calder</p></li><li><p>Repetition</p></li><li><p>Pattern With repetition, a pattern can be created. Any element can be repeated to form a pattern: line, shape, color, value, texture</p></li><li><p>Kandinskys Concentric Circles</p></li><li><p>MC Escher Tessellation</p></li><li><p>Pattern</p></li><li><p>Pattern</p></li><li><p>Pattern</p></li><li><p>PatternLauren ClayAino Kajaiemi</p></li><li><p>Pattern</p></li><li><p>MovementTo create the illusion of action and a sense of motion guides the viewer's eyes throughout the artwork Barbara Hepworth</p></li><li><p>MovementGiacomo BallaUmberto Boccioni </p></li><li><p>MovementRuth DuckworthEvolutionofGenius.com</p></li><li><p>MovementJen StarkDale Chihuly</p></li><li><p>Movement</p></li><li><p>MovementSydney Opera House</p></li><li><p>MovementTony CraggJennifer McCurdy</p></li><li><p>BalanceArranged elements so that no one part seems heavier or overpowers another</p><p> Symmetrical Balance - one side duplicates or mirrors the other </p><p> Asymmetrical Balance - one side differs from the other </p><p> Radial Symmetry - similar parts regularly arranged around a central axis </p></li><li><p>Symmetrical BalanceFerry StavermanSu BlackwellPeter Beasecker </p></li><li><p>Asymmetrical BalanceScott BennettTony Cragg</p></li><li><p>Radial BalanceRichard SweeneyAngela O'KellyJen Stark</p></li><li><p>Proportion the size relationship of one part to the whole of an object</p></li><li><p>ProportionAlberto GiacomettiMichelangelo</p></li><li><p>ProportionAnish Kapoor</p></li><li><p>Proportion</p></li><li><p>ProportionDonald Lipski </p></li><li><p>VarietyThe combination of different elements of artThe opposite of variety is unityBarbara HepworthJen Stark</p></li><li><p>VarietySol LeWittLouise Nevelson</p></li><li><p>Unity the look of completeness or wholeness A totality that combines all of its parts into one complete, cohesive whole. Alexander CalderRichard Deacon</p></li><li><p>UnitySol LeWitt</p></li><li><p>Emphasis points of interest that pull the viewer's eye to important parts Scott Bennett</p></li><li><p>Emphasis</p></li><li><p>Umberto Boccioni </p><p>*</p></li></ul>