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Slide 2 PRESENTATION HEADER Presentation Title Placeholder PRESENTATION HEADER Presentation Title Placeholder Slide 3 The eQRm Framework Credential Recognition for International Engineering Graduates Instructors Name | Instructors Organization Slide 4 The eQRm Framework Presentation Objectives Explain the underlying issue Trace the evolution of eQRm Present the conceptual framework Identify key players Explain the program creation process Highlight an early adopter Establish the business case for eQRm adoption Share the participant experience Slide 5 Todays Agenda Morning Session Introduction IEEQ Origins and Development C O F F E E eQRm Conceptual Framework Essential Partnerships L U N C H Afternoon Session Program Creation Process C O F F E E An Early Adopter: Ryerson The Business Case Review and Conclusion Slide 6 The eQRm Framework Introductions Who are you? Why are you here? What would you like to accomplish? Slide 7 The eQRm Framework Why eQRm Programs Make Sense IEEs are an important resource There are current shortages of licenced engineers Tried and tested models already exist Engineering graduates become generous alumni Resources are available Slide 8 Questions? Comments? Slide 9 2. Foundations 2.1 The Issue Slide 10 The Issue Foundations Origins and Development of the Internationally-Educated Engineers Qualification (IEEQ) Program Slide 11 The Issue How to accommodate international engineering graduates who immigrate to Canada? Slide 12 The Issue How Big is the Challenge? Engineering Immigrants 1986-91: 12,000 1992-97: 35,000 Immigrant % of Engineering Workforce In BC: 19% In Ontario: 30% 2006 Engineering Registrants having received their engineering degrees from outside of Canada: 50% Slide 13 2.2 Engineers Canadas response: FC2I Slide 14 Engineers Canadas response: FC2I An Agenda for Change The profession should work together to: facilitate the integration of international engineering graduates into the profession, ensure that they can obtain their P.Eng. more quickly and efficiently, avoid lowering admission standards or compromising public safety. Slide 15 Engineers Canadas response: FC2I Credentials Recognition Foreign Credentials Recognition (FCR) Qualifications Recognition (QR) Slide 16 Engineers Canadas response: FC2I Federal Government Perspective Foreign Credentials Recognition should be: Fair Accessible Coherent Transparent Rigorous Slide 17 Engineers Canadas response: FC2I From Consideration to Integration (FC2I) An initiative of Engineers Canada and Engineering Licensing Bodies to: Develop new and improved processes to help IEGs obtain their license Assist IEGs to find engineering employment Slide 18 Engineers Canadas response: FC2I FC2I Phases Phase 1: understand the IEG experience examine provincial and territorial engineering licensing procedures learn from those who work with and employ IEGs Slide 19 Engineers Canadas response: FC2I FC2I Phases Phase II: Analyze Phase I information Identify areas for improvement Labour market study Employment Communications Licensing Build consensus Slide 20 Engineers Canadas response: FC2I FC2I Phases Phase III (current): Implement the recommendations Slide 21 2.3 A parallel response in Manitoba: IEEQ Slide 22 A parallel response in Manitoba: IEEQ Internationally-Educated Engineers Qualification program (IEEQ) engineering Qualifications Recognition model (eQRm) Slide 23 A parallel response in Manitoba: IEEQ IEEQ One-year U of M program Available to IEGs assigned 5 exams or fewer after assessment by APEGM IEGs take courses with other engineering students over an 8- month period Special Practicing Engineering in Manitoba course also required Four-month paid work term Slide 24 A parallel response in Manitoba: IEEQ FC2I Recommendations Addressed by IEEQ studying the feasibility of alternative evaluation systems creating a Working in Canada seminar promoting cross-cultural training studying best practices for integrating IEGs into the workplace developing a mentoring program. Slide 25 2.4 The Working in Canada Course Slide 26 The Working in Canada Course Practicing Professional Engineering in Manitoba Course Working in Canada Course Slide 27 The Working in Canada Course Working in Canada Course Why at University? IEGs are already well integrated into the student body Keeps all course activities at one location Facilitates development of a cohort network Provides a venue for information sharing Creates a sense of belonging Slide 28 The Working in Canada Course Working in Canada Course Alternatives to On-Campus Delivery Continuing Education course Immigrant Serving Agency delivery Workshops delivered by the Regulator or Engineering Society Distance Education Delivery by a specific Industry or Sector group Slide 29 The Working in Canada Course Working in Canada Course Background 90-120 minute timeslot, once per week over two university terms 26 classes in all, divided into four modules: Understanding Culture and Cultural Differences The Organization & Regulation of Professional Engineering in Canada Employability & Employment Maintenance Engineering Law & Engineering Ethics Participants are typically between 30 and 50 years of age Course is continually evaluated and modified Slide 30 The Working in Canada Course Working in Canada Course The Primary Instructor Registered as a P.Eng. Background in industry Formal education in post-secondary teaching and curriculum development Personal experience with immigration and foreign residency Slide 31 The Working in Canada Course Working in Canada Course Use of Guest Speakers Helps to address diverse content Reinforces and validates challenging messages Expands opportunities for students to meet Canadian practicing engineers Slide 32 The Working in Canada Course Working in Canada Course Industry Tours 3-4 tours of typical Canadian engineering environments Tours limited to 10 participants to encourage interaction between students and the hosts Slide 33 The Working in Canada Course Working in Canada Course English Language Support Participants are required to take the Canadian Language Benchmark Assessment (CLBA) Provincial CLBA locations available at: http://www.tcet.com/clba/locs.aspx Access provided to an on-going English language training program Access to up to 10 hours of an ESL tutors time Slide 34 The Working in Canada Course Working in Canada Course Approach to Course Instruction Value placed on participant knowledge Sage on the Stage approach to instruction is avoided Class interaction is encouraged Attention given to cognitive, behavioural, and affective outcomes Learning built on and reinforced over time In-class activities complemented by personal readings and assignments Slide 35 The Working in Canada Course Working in Canada Course Evaluation The individuals participation in class Quizzes Grading of critiques, papers and presentations Personal reflections on learning assignments Interviews with the instructor and counsellors Slide 36 The Working in Canada Course Working in Canada Course Results to Date 9-24 months after taking the course, participants believe they would not be in the same career position without having attended IEEQ Participants perceive IEEQ to be a time-effective alternative to Confirmatory Exams Two of the three cohorts identified support mechanisms within IEEQ as a program strength. Participants perceive IEEQ as a vehicle to transition and integration into Canadian professional engineering The Working in Canada course model is a best practices in recognition and integration programs for immigrant professionals Slide 37 Questions? Comments? Slide 38 Coffee Break Slide 39 3. eQRm Conceptual Framework 3.1 Guiding Principles Slide 40 Guiding Principles The Next Step: eQRm Slide 41 Guiding Principles The Regulatory Context P.Eng. = Academic Qualifications + Four years supervised experience Slide 42 Guiding Principles Assigned Exams Generally a long process The IEG normally undertakes the process alone Exams are a one-shot opportunity None of the immigrants other needs are addressed Slide 43 Guiding Principles Recommended Structural Features Foreign Credentials Recognition External Partnerships Alignment with Access Programs Slide 44 3.2 Licensure Paths Slide 45 Licensure Paths Need to be considered Academically Qualified Need 48 months of acceptable engineer work experience (at least 12 months in Canada) Slide 46 Licensure Paths Where Assessment of Academic Credentials is Required Proficiency Exams Required DETAILS Confirmatory Exams Required DETAILS Assessment of Academic Credentials This is a review of the transcript and course syllabi (course outlines) from the original bachelor degree in engineering The two most likely outcomes are: 1. Complete the Proficiency Exams DETAILS 3. Complete the Confirmatory Exams DETAILS 4. Oral Interview DETAILS 2. Take the Courses at the University of Manitoba DETAILS 6. Internationally Educated Engineers Qualification (IEEQ) Program DETAILS 5. Take the Courses at the University of Manitoba DETAILS Slide 47 Licensure Paths Where Assessment of Academic Credentials is Required CONTINUE PRESENTATION Proficiency Exams Required DETAILS Confirmatory Exams Required DETAILS Assessment of Academic Credentials This is a review of the transcript and course syllabi (course outlines) from the original bachelor degree in engineering The two most likely outcomes are: 1. Complete the Proficiency Exams DETAILS 3. Complete the Confirmatory Exams DETAILS 4. Oral Interview DETAILS 2. Take the Courses at the University of Manitoba DETAILS 6. Internationally Educated Engineers Qualification (IEEQ) Program DETAILS 5. Take the Courses at the University of Manitoba DETAILS Slide 48 Licensure Paths Where Assessment of Academic Credentials is Required Proficiency Exams Required (Upgrading to the level of a bachelor-level engineering degree from an accredited Canadian program). BACK Slide 49 Licensure Paths Where Assessment of Academic Credentials is Required 1. Complete the Proficiency Exams List of Examinations is provided by APEGM based on academic review. BACK Slide 50 Licensure Paths Where Assessment of Academic Credentials is Required 2. Take the Courses at the University of Manitoba Equivalent courses are determined by APEGM. Often one exam = two senior level courses at the university. BACK Slide 51 Licensure Paths Where Assessment of Academic Credentials is Required Confirmatory Exams Required (Confirmation of academic background; possibly addressing an identified gap in academic background) BACK Slide 52 Licensure Paths Where Assessment of Academic Credentials is Required 3. Complete the Confirmatory Exams List of Examinations is provided by APEGM based on academic review. BACK Slide 53 Licensure Paths Where Assessment of Academic Credentials is Required 4. Oral Interview If applicant has more than ten years engineering experience in their field of engineering they may request an interview BACK Slide 54 Licensure Paths Where Assessment of Academic Credentials is Required 5. Take the Courses at the University of Manitoba Equivalent courses are determined by APEGM. Often one exam = two courses at the university. BACK Slide 55 Licensure Paths Where Assessment of Academic Credentials is Required 6. Internationally Educated Engineers Qualification (IEEQ) If applicant is assigned 5 or fewer exams and has the requisite language skills, they can apply to the IEEQ Program at the University of Manitoba. BACK Slide 56 Questions? Comments? Slide 57 4. eQRm Essential Partnerships 4.1 Key Partners and Their Roles Slide 58 eQRm Essential Partnerships Partners and Their Roles Provincial Regulator Degree-granting institution Industry Immigrant Support Agencies Funding Agent Slide 59 eQRm Essential Partnerships eQRm Partnership Concept University Regulator Settlement COMMUNICATION SKILLS MEMBERSHIP IN PROFESSION MENTORSHIP ACADEMIC REVIEWCO-OP JOB SKILLS Industry Slide 60 eQRm Essential Partnerships Regulators Role Guidance Forwards participants Assesses academic qualifications Accepts qualifications on successful completion of the eQRm program Slide 61 eQRm Essential Partnerships The Universitys Role Program set-up Co-ordinate stream of applicants from Regulator Day-to-day operations (e.g. classroom instruction, guest speaker recruitment, etc.) Administrative support Financial support for students (i.e. bursaries, etc.) Slide 62 eQRm Essential Partnerships Industrys Role Provides input on committees Makes co-op placements available Bursaries and grants Hires graduates Slide 63 eQRm Essential Partnerships Community Partners Immigrant support services Settlement agencies Language skills training Cultural awareness instruction Slide 64 eQRm Essential Partnerships Funding for: Salary Office costs Classroom space Administrative support Services in kind Paid co-op placements Slide 65 4.2 The eQRm Leadership Organization Slide 66 eQRm Leadership Organization Usually a university Usually a Faculty of Engineering Slide 67 eQRm Leadership Organization Reasons for Centering eQRm Programs at Universities IEGs can be benchmarked against CEAB-accredited programs IEGs are already on campus Infrastructure is in place to deliver services IEGs can take advantage of existing co-op programs There are opportunities for integration with peers Slide 68 eQRm Leadership Organization The Need for Logistical Support An eQRm program requires a full-time director / coordinator Director must be able to draw on support staff and services IEGs have a demonstrated need for proactive coaching and counseling Slide 69 Questions/Comments Essential Partnerships Slide 70 eQRm Essential Partnerships eQRm Partnership Concept University Regulator Settlement / Immigration COMMUNICATION SKILLS MEMBERSHIP IN PROFESSION MENTORSHIP ACADEMIC REVIEWCO-OP JOB SKILLS Industry PROJECT FUNDING Slide 71 Lunch Slide 72 5. Process for Establishing an eQRm Program 5.1 Core Functions and Deliverables Slide 73 Core Functions and Deliverables Topics This Afternoon: Process for Establishing an eQRm Program Ryerson Program Profile Review of the Business Case for an eQRm Program The eQRm Course Student Experience Conclusion Slide 74 Core Functions & Deliverables essential lines of communications between partners an assessment and reporting regime with the University, Regulator and Funding Agent Protocols for course functions Slide 75 Core Functions & Deliverables Update the Exam vs. Equivalent Course matrix Promote the program Establish a network for Co-op employers participants Establish a presence on campus Customize the Working in Canada Course and fit it into your curriculum Slide 76 Core Functions & Deliverables Create and process applications Participate in selection of participants Coordinate acceptance in the faculty of engineering, and assist in enrolment Monitor students progress and provide advisory services Develop literature, forms and materials Slide 77 Core Functions & Deliverables Gather and publish resource information regarding other services Direct participants to student loan agents, and assist in administering book & tuition grants Establish bursaries for under-funded individuals Establish networking opportunities for cohorts and their families Slide 78 5.2 Regulator Tasks and Procedures Slide 79 Regulator Tasks and Procedures The Licensure Process Slide 80 Regulator Tasks and Procedures The Licensure Process Applications for assessment of academic credentials is processed by the Regulator Application is reviewed by an Academic Review Committee (ARC) reviewer Exams are assigned based on the review The recommended assessment is reviewed by the ARC Results are forwarded to the applicant by mail Slide 81 Should the Regulator be involved in the education business? Regulator Tasks and Procedures Slide 82 Recommended Procedures: Temporary staff increase to handle additional academic assessments Slide 83 Regulator Tasks and Procedures Recommended Procedures: Coordination and Timing eQRm and ARC Slide 84 Regulator Tasks and Procedures Recommended Procedures: Modifications to the Course Load Slide 85 Regulator Tasks and Procedures Recommended Procedures: Thesis Quality Slide 86 Regulator Tasks and Procedures Recommended Procedures: Development of an ARC / IEEQ Liaison Committee Slide 87 Regulator Tasks and Procedures Recommended Procedures: Communication with ARC Slide 88 Regulator Tasks and Procedures Recommended Procedures: Dealing with Perception of IEEQ among IEGs Slide 89 Regulator Tasks and Procedures Recommended Procedures: Adoption of the Program Slide 90 5.3 University Tasks and Procedures Slide 91 University Tasks and Procedures The Universitys Tasks and Procedures Key objectives: Provide a route to recognition of academic qualification for engineering Give participants legitimacy among peers and employers Slide 92 University Tasks and Procedures The Universitys Tasks and Procedures The Working in Canada course provides: - An introduction to Canadian engineering culture - A meeting place - Access to support services - IEEE, CSCE, ASHRAE Slide 93 University Tasks and Procedures The Universitys Tasks and Procedures The Policy Environment Important to integrate eQRm policy requirements into the universitys overall policy framework A special Student Handbook highlights information of particular relevance to IEGs Slide 94 University Tasks and Procedures The IEEQ Student Handbook Slide 95 University Tasks and Procedures Slide 96 Slide 97 Slide 98 Slide 99 Slide 100 Slide 101 Slide 102 Engineers in Residence Slide 103 University Tasks and Procedures IEEQ Staffing Program Director Academic Coordinator Culture & Communications (Consultant) Program Assistant Co-op Coordinator (Part Time) Continued Engineers in Residence input (occasional) Slide 104 University Tasks and Procedures Slide 105 IEEQB Staffing (Ryerson) Program Director and Academic Advisor Student (Social) Counselor Administrative Coordinator Director of Co-op and Internship Administrative Assistant Slide 106 University Tasks and Procedures Finances Staffing: 3 - 4 PYs Plus benefits Plus space costs The participant contribution: Normal assessed fees Slide 107 5.4 Industry and Employer Support Slide 108 Industry and Employer Support Co-op Placement Slide 109 Industry and Employer Support Co-op Placement: Recruiting Industry Partners IEEQ EMPLOYERS BY SECTOR Engineering Consulting (5) Manufacturing (4) Aerospace (1) Agri-business (1) Public Sector (2) Slide 110 Industry and Employer Support Co-op Placement: A Shared Responsibility Slide 111 Industry and Employer Support Mentoring Slide 112 Industry and Employer Support Long-Term Employment Tracking Slide 113 Industry and Employer Support Sustaining Industry and Employer Support Emphasize the benefits to businesses Establish a business case Engage settlement agencies in making connections Provide incentives such as wage assistance Develop a marketing strategy Slide 114 5.5 Immigrant Agency Support Slide 115 Immigrant Agency Support Slide 116 English as a Second Language (ESL) Build written and spoken language skills in English Deliver to individuals and small groups Link to soft skills training Slide 117 Immigrant Agency Support Delivering ESL Training Delivered by experienced ESL teacher No charge 3-hour commitment over 8 months Focused on meeting specific student needs Slide 118 Immigrant Agency Support Engaging with Employers Slide 119 Immigrant Agency Support Career Mentoring Focus on: Helping immigrants to establish rewarding lives in Canada Creating networking opportunities Developing a career-building strategy Providing encouragement and support Slide 120 5.6 The Government Role Slide 121 The Government Role Funding for eQRm through the Foreign Credentials Recognition Program (FCR). www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/workplaceskills/credential_recognition/index.shtml The Federal Government Role Slide 122 The Government Role The Provincial Government Role Funding for eQRm-type programs Support for FCR initiatives Provision of immigrant services Financial assistance for individuals Slide 123 5.7 Communications Slide 124 Communications Essential Lines of Communication Lines run between the eQRm program and Regulators admissions office Academic Review Committee Mentoring contacts Dean of Engineering or Applied Science office Other university departments Campus Co-op Coordinator ESL Agency Engineering Employers Slide 125 Communications Guidance Materials for eQRm Program Development Slide 126 Communications The Process for Establishing An eQRm-style Program Questions / Comments Slide 127 Coffee Break Slide 128 6. An Early Adopter: The Ryerson Initiative 6.1 IEEQB Program Overview Slide 129 IEEQB Program Overview The Ryerson University IEEQB Program A Study in eQRm Flexibility Slide 130 IEEQB Program Overview The IEEQB Program Launched in 2007 Hosted by Faculty of Engineering, Architecture and Science Established specifically for IEGs Funded jointly by Federal and Ontario provincial governments Slide 131 IEEQB Program Overview The IEEQB Program: Study Streams Stream 1: Licensure applicants who have been offered a Confirmatory Examination Program Stream 2: Licensure for applicants offered a Specific Examination Program or who may wish to pursue an accredited Bachelor of Engineering degree Slide 132 IEEQB Program Overview The IEEQB Program: Stream 1 Candidates must complete successfully for entry complete three to four complementary courses enroll in a four-month paid co-op work term In addition, candidates: may be required to take an ESL course must achieve a passing grade in each required course Slide 133 IEEQB Program Overview The IEEQB Program: Stream 2 Available to : applicants offered a Specific Examination Program IEGs with Confirmatory Examination Program who wish to pursue an accredited Bachelor of Engineering degree. Slide 134 6.2 Comparison of the IEEB and IEEQB Programs Slide 135 Comparison of the IEEB and IEEQB Programs IEEQ / IEEQB Attractions of the two programs: Access to the required academic bridging education Access to career and social counselling support Interaction with engineering student peers An opportunity to learn technical terminology, economic principles, and engineering law and ethics. Engineer-in-training (EIT) experience Eligibility for financial assistance Slide 136 Comparison of the IEEB and IEEQB Programs IEEQ / IEEQB Additional Similarities: Both programs are offered as an alternative means of achieving licensure IEEQ and IEEQB-Stream 1 are for applicants who have been assigned confirmatory exams Courses geared to assigned exams Slide 137 Comparison of the IEEB and IEEQB Programs IEEQ / IEEQB Key Differences IEEQB offers a second stream for IEGs who become part of the regular engineering program IEEQB does not have the equivalent of the Working in Canada course IEEQB is partnered with the Ryerson Continuing Education Department Ryerson students can enter the IEEQB program stream in September or January. Slide 138 Comparison of the IEEB and IEEQB Programs IEEQ / IEEQB Conclusion: More similarities than differences between the two programs The eQRm model demonstrates flexibility to accommodate local needs Slide 139 Discussion IEEQ / IEEQB Slide 140 7. The Business Case for Adoption 7.1 The Business Case Slide 141 The Business Case Key Questions Is there a need for the graduates? Will sufficient numbers of students be attracted? Is the regulating body likely to be supportive? Can costs be offset by available funds? Are there special benefits to potential program delivery partners? Slide 142 The Business Case What would motivate your administration to move forward? What information would you need? Who would have to be around the table? What would the deal breakers be? Slide 143 The Business Case The Britton Proposal Slide 144 The Business Case Annual increase in income: $15,000 Additional taxes paid: $6,000 Provincial tax take: $3,000 Slide 145 The Business Case 40 IEEQ grads per year Today: 10 IEG graduates would contribute $120 K IEEQ grads would contribute $2,700,000 Slide 146 The Business Case Total differential tax traceable directly to IEEQ: $2,820,000 for each group of 40 graduates The cost to the province will be paid off in: 8 1/3 years. Slide 147 The Business Case Social Responsibility Slide 148 The Business Case No business case per se Money was available when needed External pressure to offer such a course Ryerson faculty familiar with the IEEQ program Slide 149 The Business Case What would motivate your administration to move forward? What information would you need? Who would have to be around the table? What would the deal breakers be? Slide 150 8. Conclusion 8.1 The Participant Experience Slide 151 8.2 Key Points Summary Slide 152 Key Points Summary Successful programs underway The eQRm model is suitably flexible A template for the creation of similar programs is now available The need for such programs is growing A solid business case can be made for adoption Partners are available to support development and implementation These programs produce excellent graduates who contribute to our society Slide 153 8.3 Distribute and Describe Handouts Slide 154 Distribute and Describe Handouts Your Handouts Slide 155 8.4 What Should You Do First Slide 156 What Should You Do First What First? 1.report back to your institutions and seek buy-in to pursue the next step 2.Establish a nucleus by creating a mini-steering committee. 3.Use tools already created as the basis for action. 4.Decide on a lead / champion and agree on roles for the other participants 5.Develop a business plan. Slide 157 8.5 Wrap-up and Evaluation Slide 158 Thank You