Preparing Managers for the Future

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<ul><li><p>Preparing Managers for the FutureAuthor(s): Robert J. DworakSource: Public Administration Review, Vol. 35, No. 6 (Nov. - Dec., 1975), pp. 674-675Published by: Wiley on behalf of the American Society for Public AdministrationStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/974291 .Accessed: 14/06/2014 19:16</p><p>Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of the Terms &amp; Conditions of Use, available at .http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp</p><p> .JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range ofcontent in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new formsof scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org.</p><p> .</p><p>Wiley and American Society for Public Administration are collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve andextend access to Public Administration Review.</p><p>http://www.jstor.org </p><p>This content downloaded from 188.72.126.25 on Sat, 14 Jun 2014 19:16:21 PMAll use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions</p><p>http://www.jstor.org/action/showPublisher?publisherCode=blackhttp://www.jstor.org/action/showPublisher?publisherCode=aspahttp://www.jstor.org/stable/974291?origin=JSTOR-pdfhttp://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsphttp://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp</p></li><li><p>PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION REVIEW PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION REVIEW </p><p>When the recent surge of political activism by students moved many of the public administration teachers and universities to concentrate on areas such as public policy and foreign administration- and away from their involvement in local govern- ment-a sense of unreality entered their proposals which further isolated the two worlds. Before we affect the "wedding" with business administration curricula proposed by some (writhing in PM), should not the practitioners again be consulted? Such proposals by academes still reflect their isolation from their "clientele." There may be </p><p>good reasons for moving toward such a union, but </p><p>they have not been discussed in the city manager's journals to date, as far as I recall. </p><p>An integral part of any total approach to education and training for the future should also be a concern with the "graduate" by the univer- sities and the professional organizations for that individual's entire career. In addition to offering in-service classes, attention should be given to his </p><p>periods "between" employment. At this most </p><p>desperate period in the administrator's life, no concern or effort is forthcoming from these two </p><p>groups to be of meaningful assistance. One pro- posal worth discussing is possible funding for his </p><p>continuing education during such periods of unem- </p><p>ployment. University "intensive semesters" or utilization of the manager in seminars, research </p><p>projects, League assignments, etc.-all of these would provide for the manager's growth and make the idle period positively utilized. This aspect of "professionalism" should be joint responsibility of ICMA and the universities-and thus, part of the </p><p>proposed "agenda." I perceive the required approach to this issue as </p><p>one of several overlapping circles of respon- sibility-academia, practitioners, and community- all involved in defining the problems, assigning roles, involved in the programs and feeding back ideas and reactions. All should be involved in the other areas-jointly-with managers on faculty committees, faculty serving on local commissions and boards, and with citizen input into all areas. </p><p>With the many problems on the horizon for local government, such an effort becomes impera- tive, but I feel the present piecemeal approach is doomed to much rhetoric, many studies and, alas, only limited value. </p><p>Murray Brown Editor and Manager </p><p>Western City Magazine </p><p>When the recent surge of political activism by students moved many of the public administration teachers and universities to concentrate on areas such as public policy and foreign administration- and away from their involvement in local govern- ment-a sense of unreality entered their proposals which further isolated the two worlds. Before we affect the "wedding" with business administration curricula proposed by some (writhing in PM), should not the practitioners again be consulted? Such proposals by academes still reflect their isolation from their "clientele." There may be </p><p>good reasons for moving toward such a union, but </p><p>they have not been discussed in the city manager's journals to date, as far as I recall. </p><p>An integral part of any total approach to education and training for the future should also be a concern with the "graduate" by the univer- sities and the professional organizations for that individual's entire career. In addition to offering in-service classes, attention should be given to his </p><p>periods "between" employment. At this most </p><p>desperate period in the administrator's life, no concern or effort is forthcoming from these two </p><p>groups to be of meaningful assistance. One pro- posal worth discussing is possible funding for his </p><p>continuing education during such periods of unem- </p><p>ployment. University "intensive semesters" or utilization of the manager in seminars, research </p><p>projects, League assignments, etc.-all of these would provide for the manager's growth and make the idle period positively utilized. This aspect of "professionalism" should be joint responsibility of ICMA and the universities-and thus, part of the </p><p>proposed "agenda." I perceive the required approach to this issue as </p><p>one of several overlapping circles of respon- sibility-academia, practitioners, and community- all involved in defining the problems, assigning roles, involved in the programs and feeding back ideas and reactions. All should be involved in the other areas-jointly-with managers on faculty committees, faculty serving on local commissions and boards, and with citizen input into all areas. </p><p>With the many problems on the horizon for local government, such an effort becomes impera- tive, but I feel the present piecemeal approach is doomed to much rhetoric, many studies and, alas, only limited value. </p><p>Murray Brown Editor and Manager </p><p>Western City Magazine </p><p>Preparing Managers for the Future </p><p>To the Editor: </p><p>In the July/August issue of our Review, two </p><p>separate articles appeared which in my view relate </p><p>directly to the same subject: the creation of </p><p>generic management programs which strive to </p><p>provide present and future managers with the </p><p>opportunity to equip themselves for careers in either the private or public sectors. </p><p>In his article, "Comparing Public and Private </p><p>Management: An Exploratory Essay," Michael A. </p><p>Murray does an excellent job of describing some of the points of convergence he sees between private and public management. His summary states his belief that ".. . actual management practices point to a blurring of public and private sectors rather than to a bifurcation." His argument that the lack of conceptual development is a more serious hinderance to genericism than the self-protective stance of free standing schools of business and </p><p>public administration might be disputed on the basis of Professor Henry's article, "Paradigms of Public Administration," published in the same issue. </p><p>Professor Henry concludes his article with the </p><p>suggestion that "... public administration can </p><p>prosper only in institutionally autonomous units, free of the intellectual baggage that burdens the field in political science departments and adminis- trative science schools, alike." I believe that </p><p>Henry's support for separation is clear. Perhaps the </p><p>question of whether or not public administration </p><p>prospers is not as significant as the question of what is the most beneficial approach to educating managers for future government service. </p><p>My interest in the issue stems in part from my current situation as a public administrationist (BS in PA, MPA, and DPA), coordinating an under- </p><p>graduate generic management program; elected by a faculty (12) composed of about 1/3 business, 1/3 social science, and 1/3 public administration. Our program offers 28 hours of integrated, generic course work beginning with communication skills and concluding with management policy informa- tion systems and organizational policy analysis. </p><p>The collective experience at Sangamon State </p><p>University has been that the motivation and interest of the individual faculty members (vis d vis </p><p>generic management) is of paramount importance. A belief in and a commitment to the utility of the </p><p>generic management approach is an absolute re- </p><p>Preparing Managers for the Future </p><p>To the Editor: </p><p>In the July/August issue of our Review, two </p><p>separate articles appeared which in my view relate </p><p>directly to the same subject: the creation of </p><p>generic management programs which strive to </p><p>provide present and future managers with the </p><p>opportunity to equip themselves for careers in either the private or public sectors. </p><p>In his article, "Comparing Public and Private </p><p>Management: An Exploratory Essay," Michael A. </p><p>Murray does an excellent job of describing some of the points of convergence he sees between private and public management. His summary states his belief that ".. . actual management practices point to a blurring of public and private sectors rather than to a bifurcation." His argument that the lack of conceptual development is a more serious hinderance to genericism than the self-protective stance of free standing schools of business and </p><p>public administration might be disputed on the basis of Professor Henry's article, "Paradigms of Public Administration," published in the same issue. </p><p>Professor Henry concludes his article with the </p><p>suggestion that "... public administration can </p><p>prosper only in institutionally autonomous units, free of the intellectual baggage that burdens the field in political science departments and adminis- trative science schools, alike." I believe that </p><p>Henry's support for separation is clear. Perhaps the </p><p>question of whether or not public administration </p><p>prospers is not as significant as the question of what is the most beneficial approach to educating managers for future government service. </p><p>My interest in the issue stems in part from my current situation as a public administrationist (BS in PA, MPA, and DPA), coordinating an under- </p><p>graduate generic management program; elected by a faculty (12) composed of about 1/3 business, 1/3 social science, and 1/3 public administration. Our program offers 28 hours of integrated, generic course work beginning with communication skills and concluding with management policy informa- tion systems and organizational policy analysis. </p><p>The collective experience at Sangamon State </p><p>University has been that the motivation and interest of the individual faculty members (vis d vis </p><p>generic management) is of paramount importance. A belief in and a commitment to the utility of the </p><p>generic management approach is an absolute re- </p><p>NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 1975 NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 1975 </p><p>674 674 </p><p>This content downloaded from 188.72.126.25 on Sat, 14 Jun 2014 19:16:21 PMAll use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions</p><p>http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp</p></li><li><p>COMMUNICATIONS COMMUNICATIONS </p><p>quirement if the obstacles to generic management education are to be overcome. These obstacles include among others: lack of conceptual frame- works, lack of text materials, difficulty in finding "generic" faculty, and a "step-person" status vis a vis schools of business administration and schools of public administration. </p><p>Despite these obstacles, I firmly believe that a generic approach to management offers the best possible preparation for managers (or potential managers) at the undergraduate level. An emphasis on basic managerial skills; communication, ability to motivate people, ability to use quantitative tools, ability to pursue a continual self-education process, and an understanding of the people-organ- ization-society relationships; is equally ap- plicable to business, government, or any organiza- tion in between. Additionally, mobility between business and government is facilitated by a generic preparation. </p><p>From my obviously biased perspective, I would like to see a dialogue begin among the few but growing number of business, social science, and public administration faculty committed to pre- paring managers for a future where the "private- public" dichotomy will be as meaningless as the "politics-administration" dichotomy is today. </p><p>Robert J. Dworak, Coordinator, Management Program </p><p>Sangamon State University </p><p>quirement if the obstacles to generic management education are to be overcome. These obstacles include among others: lack of conceptual frame- works, lack of text materials, difficulty in finding "generic" faculty, and a "step-person" status vis a vis schools of business administration and schools of public administration. </p><p>Despite these obstacles, I firmly believe that a generic approach to management offers the best possible preparation for managers (or potential managers) at the undergraduate level. An emphasis on basic managerial skills; communication, ability to motivate people, ability to use quantitative tools, ability to pursue a continual self-education process, and an understanding of the people-organ- ization-society relationships; is equally ap- plicable to business, government, or any organiza- tion in between. Additionally, mobility between business and government is facilitated by a generic preparation. </p><p>From my obviously biased perspective, I would like to see a dialogue begin among the few but growing number of business, social science, and public administration faculty committed to pre- paring managers for a future where the "private- public" dichotomy will be as meaningless as the "politics-administration" dichotomy is today. </p><p>Robert J. Dworak, Coordinator, Management Program </p><p>Sangamon State University </p><p>On the Virtues of Wheel Re-Invention </p><p>After having re-viewed Jacob Bronowski's As- cent of Man and been made slightly uneasy over how tenuous and fragile were those first critical developments in man's rise, I am convinced that those people who decry wheel re-invention are speaking nonsense. In numerous meetings of academics and practitioners in public administra- tion, I have heard the phrase repeated with obvious disgust that people shouldn't go around trying to re-invent the wheel. The obvious point of these phrase repeaters is that they know the answer to a problem and for only a slight honorarium or honorary degree they will bestow the solution upon the schmucks who've been struggling so long and fruitlessly to find it. </p><p>My retort is: let them struggle! Wheel re- invention is necessary and important! Struggling over problems is a healthy exercise in mental </p><p>On the Virtues of Wheel Re-Invention </p><p>After having re-viewed Jacob Bronowski's As- cent of Man and been made slightly uneasy over how tenuous and fragile were those first critical developments in man...</p></li></ul>