power point for fishy

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    Obtaining stability:Peoples drive tosecure social class &

    position in the 1920sDahlia

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    P: Body image has proven to be a centralconcern for people in the 1920s ultimatelyaffecting their social behavior in the attemptto secure their position.

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    E: Sure I did. I was going to wear it tonight,but it was too big in the bust and had to bealtered. It was a gas blue with lavenderbeads. Two hundred and sixty-five dollars.(The Great Gatsby, 48)

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    P: the profound subjective dissatisfactionwith their body image that is evident andprevalent among, young women in particular.(Heunemann et al., 1966)

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    I: By attempting to mold ones self into theunofficial, socially regulated idea for bodyimage and how one should look, people losesight in their own accepted beliefs on howthey should look and eventually give intosocial corruption of all forms.

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    P: Leisurely time serves as an opportunity forpeople in a particular social class, particularlyupper, to show society their wealth, and toprove and establish their social standingthrough monetary amounts.

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    E: The first supper there would be anotherafter midnight was now being served (TheGreat Gatsby, 48)

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    P: The upper class had the greatest wealth andcontrol of time. They used leisure activitiesfor fun and social prestige by participating inand financing expensive high-status pastimes.

    Parties, clubs, and sports dominated theirsocial calendar, (Chicago Historical Society).

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    I: Time that is take out of the day for leisurelyactivities in itself contradict the originalobjective for leisure. The wealthy societywork toward proving their social standings by

    showing off with their down timecapabilities.

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    P: Society in the 1920s take hold of allopportunities to use materialism to showothers their privileged lifestyles in the effortto prove themselves socially.

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    E: Evidently he lived in this vicinity for he toldme that he had just bought a hydroplane andwas going to try it out in the morning. (TheGreat Gatsby, 52)

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    P: Obviously, besides cultural and historicaldifferences in the tendency towardmaterialism, there are also individualdifferences in the manifestation of

    materialism. (Materialism: Trait Aspects ofLiving in the Material World, 265)

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    I: Having the most this, buying the mostexpensive that.. Members of society dilutethemselves into believing that obtaining thebest of the best through materialism puts

    them at their suited social level, but itultimately brainwashes and changes lifestylesthrough the effort.

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    The complete and total drive put intosocial stability by members of society by usingbody image, leisure, and materialism provesto have lasting effects on lifestyles in negative

    ways. The effort in proving social place dilutesthe mind and effects the accustomednormalcy in people of the 1920s.

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    Work cited

    A Century of Work and Leisure. 02nd ed. Vol. 01. AmericanEconomic Association. 189-224. Print.

    The Great Gatsby. New York, NY: Simon & Schuster, 1995.Print.

    Leisure. The Electronic Encyclopedia of Chicago, 2005. Web.Dec. 2009..

    Materialism: Trait Aspects of Living in the Material World.The University of Chicago Press, Dec. 1985. Web. Dec. 2009..