port broughton foreshore master plan

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Revision Letter Date Reason for Issue A 09/10/2015 Draft report for discussion B 04/12/2015 Draft report for discussion C 05/02/2016 Draft report for discussion D 01/04/2016 Draft report for discussion E 21/04/2016 Draft report for discussion F 22/06/2016 Draft report for discussion I 28/06/2016 Final Draft J 19/07/2016 Final Report
The indigenous artwork included in this report was created by Quenten Agius and Aboriginal Cultural Tours SA. Reproduced with permission from the creator.
The information regarding the history of the Nharangga has been provided by Quenten Agius and Aboriginal Cultural Tours SA, and used with permission.
2 HAMES SHARLEY + DISTRICT COUNCIL OF BARUNGA WEST JULY 2016
HAMES SHARLEY
Level 15, 19 Grenfell Street Adelaide SA 5000 Australia
T +61 8 8112 3400 F +61 8 8112 3499
www.hamessharley.com.au
2
5.0 ENGAGEMENT PHASE 1
INTRODUCTION1.0 INTRODUCTION
1.0 Introduction
The Port Broughton Foreshore Master Plan Report is prepared for the District Council of Barunga West in support of the long term development vision for the Port Broughton and Fisherman Bay foreshore area. The purpose of the report is to provide a framework for the future development of Port Broughton and Fisherman Bay. It describes the aspirations and principles for a long term development strategy, in consideration of existing regional planning initiatives as well as current and future demographic and economic projections for the region.
This document provides a primer, or a blue- print, to be utilised by the District Council of Barunga West in discussing the vision of potential future development for the foreshore and to inform further investigations on selected opportunities.
It defines the precincts of and between Port Broughton and Fisherman Bay and identifies both present and future opportunities within this context.
1.1 ESTABLISHING PORT BROUGHTON AS A CONTEMPORARY REGIONAL DESTINATION
The primary goal of the Port Broughton Foreshore Master Plan report is the development of a framework and vision to improve the physical and social utilisation of the foreshore area. This will benefit the existing community as well as facilitate and encourage tourists and visitors to experience the area.
The study will articulate urban design, architecture, social and economic opportunities to facilitate a desirable outcome through a process of consultation and design.
The plan will focus on active transport, extending cycling networks by working to improve the attraction and convenience of cycling and walking routes, making these the desired modes of travel, particularly for short trips.
The overarching task of the Port Broughton Foreshore Master Plan report is to create an integrated framework incorporating development opportunities related to each foreshore precinct.
The resulting Master Plan is the culmination of a broad initial context analysis, an understanding of the historical significance of the township and the wider region, previous strategic planning processes and documentation, initial concept proposals and community consultation.
Ultimately, the Port Broughton Foreshore Master Plan report will provide a development framework leveraging both existing and future assets within the context of a regional centre. Port Broughton and Fisherman Bay will become more dynamic, prosperous and liveable towns through encouraging the active and safe use of pedestrian and cycling trails, thereby raising the quality of life and experience of this area for all.
6 HAMES SHARLEY + DISTRICT COUNCIL OF BARUNGA WEST JULY 20166
1.2 A BRIEF HISTORY
Guranna gura yarlgu budla dhidna ngadjadhura bangarra.
G’day, Welcome to the leg, calf and foot of the Nharangga people, traditional owners of Yorke Peninsula. For 75,000 years, before Colonial settlement, the Nharangga people of the Yorke Peninsula consisted of four distinct Aboriginal tribal groups and totems.
NORTH : Garnarra (Nhandhu Kangaroo) EAST : Windara (Garrdi Emu) SOUTH : Dhilba (Widhadha Shark ) WEST : Warri (Wildu Sea Eagle)
(Nharangga also known as Narungga, Ngadjadhura and Adjahdura).
Australia’s Aboriginal people are one of the world’s oldest living cultures. There are significant Aboriginal archaeological sites on Yorke Peninsula. The oldest midden site discovered on Yorke Peninsula is 8,000 years old - 3,000 years older than the Pyramids of Giza in Egypt.
Language (warra), stories, songlines, performance and ceremonies are still practiced today by some Nharangga people. Ceremonies explain stories to the young and most stories are to do with lore of the country. Some stories can be shared with others through performance.
The deep spiritual and physical connection Aboriginal people have with their country comes from their ancestors and their mothers and fathers passing down Creation and Dreaming stories and cultural knowledge, from generation to generation for thousands of years and identifies who they are as Aboriginal people. Their stories are connected - how the land, insects, plants, animals and humans got lore to look after one another.
The first Colonial lease was taken out on Yorke Peninsula in 1846, and from that time there was much conflict between pastoralists and the Aboriginal population - over land, stock and fresh water.
In the late 1800’s and early 1900’s, missions from other areas in the state were closed down by the Colonial Government and Aboriginal people from other clan groups were moved to Point Pearce to live with the traditional owners of the area.
The Nharangga neighbours are the Kaurna of the Adelaide Plains and the Nukunu and Ngadjuri to the north with whom they would meet for trade and ceremony.
7PORT BROUGHTON FORESHORE MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN REPORT
During this early period, the export of grain defined itself as the most significant economic industry in the surrounding region. In its prime, windjammers, large seafaring freight vessels too large for the shallower waters of the port, would anchor 8 miles offshore in the Spencer Gulf and await the delivery of up to 5000 tonnes of grain before returning to England, Germany, Norway or Finland. Men would load 72 kilogram bags of wheat by hand onto trucks at the head of the jetty from large stacks that would be built up from deliveries during the harvest season. The men who did this heavy, dusty work were usually referred to as ‘lumpers’.
Many of the streets in the town now carry the name of the ketches or the windjammers and remnants of the old narrow gauge line can be seen at the entrance of the jetty. Although the jetty was extensively repaired in the 1950s, grain shipments from the port ceased when bulk handling facilities were installed at Wallaroo in 1958 and at Port Pirie in 1962. The jetty continues to be used commercially by the local fishing industry.
1.3 SETTLEMENT AND INDUSTRY
Initially surveyed in 1871 on the recommendation of Captain Henry Dale, Port Broughton gained its name from the Broughton River, of which the mouth sits 40kms north of the township. The land around Port Broughton was first used for grazing, however it was quickly understood that the characteristics of the land were not suitable and the area was split into one acre blocks and sold. Shortly after, the township began servicing the surrounding wheat and barley growers within the Mundoora Arm and northern end of the Yorke Peninsula. In 1878 the iconic ‘T’ shaped jetty was established. Serviced by a narrow gauge rail line it was used to shift the wheat and barley from the pastures further inland down to vessels awaiting load. The town’s rail line, infamous for not supporting an actual train, also provided a limited passenger service, which some locals still speak fondly of, coined ‘the Pie Cart’. This service operated up until 1925 while the industrial rail service operation ceased in 1942.
Motor Vehicles line up along East Terrace north of Bay Street
All images courtesy of the State Library of South Australia. B48927
8 HAMES SHARLEY + DISTRICT COUNCIL OF BARUNGA WEST JULY 20168
The ‘Broughton’ KetchLooking back through the dunes towards the ‘T’ jetty
Men standing proudly at the end of the now removed northern jetty
Port Broughton Beach with partially established vegetationPort Broughton Beach cleared of vegetation
A view east from Mundoora Arm towards the ‘T’ jetty and the Port Broughton Hotel
Coastal vegetation
9PORT BROUGHTON FORESHORE MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN REPORT
Several buildings from the original township still exist today. First established in 1882, the original school building included three rooms and a verandah designed to accommodate up to 90 students, with later additions including a further classroom to host a total of 150. During the 1940’s many other schools in the area closed as the number of students rose to above 200. The Port Broughton Area School, as it was later known, was relocated to its present location at the end of East Terrace in 1984 and the original school building now houses the Port Broughton Heritage Centre.
Another turn of the century building remaining in Port Broughton iis the original District Council Office, circa 1895. All business was carried out here until 1955 when new offices were constructed. The building was extensively restored by a group of locals in 1983 and in 2010 another group campaigned for its retention in the face of potential demolition to make way for extensions to the Council Offices. It now houses the local Genealogy group focusing on researching local family histories.
The Port Broughton Hotel, built at the corner of Bay Street and West Terrace facing the Mundoora Arm Inlet, was developed in two stages. The single storey section was built by Mr Edward Wall. Later his son, Mr William Wall, completed works on the second storey of the beach side building with a foundation stone dated the 14th of April, 1910. The ornamental balcony of the hotel, especially imported from England, still remains today and can be admired from the street.
While a number of buildings remain, there have also been some significant demolitions, including the Port Broughton Coffee Palace and Temperance Bar. Built in 1908, it provided accommodation for travellers and visitors alike. Originating in Scotland in the 1830’s, the coffee house movement was popular within temperance societies, the first of which was established in Australia in 1837. The Coffee Palace, situated in Bay street, offered 22 bedrooms as accommodation. Later it was sold and used as a private residence before being demolished in the 1970’s.
The Port Broughton Flour Mill is another significant icon of the township’s history that no longer exists today. Built originally for John Darling, the three storey flour mill held a considerable footprint within the township as it required large quantities of firewood and stumps as fuel to power the mill. It produced more than enough flour for the immediate needs of the township and flour was even shipped from Port Broughton down to Port Adelaide in 1905. The Mill ceased production due to a serious drought in 1914.
Over the last 100 years the town has been affected by further industrialisation and corresponding labour offsets that have affected various forms of industry across the nation.
10 HAMES SHARLEY + DISTRICT COUNCIL OF BARUNGA WEST JULY 201610
A group of men standing for a photograph beside the narrow gauge line along the jetty with the Port Broughton Hotel sitting behind as a grand gesture on the coast
Image courtesy of the State Library of South Australia. B15350
11PORT BROUGHTON FORESHORE MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN REPORT
REGIONAL CONTEXT2.0
REGIONAL CONTEXT
Port Broughton is located approximately 174 kilometres north of the Adelaide CBD and is largely identified and defined as a seasonal holiday destination for visiting family members, recreational fishers and as a coastal retreat. The town is situated along the Spencer Highway which runs parallel to the Princess Highway. Visitors often migrate from Adelaide City through the northern suburbs and Port Wakefield, with Port Broughton being a two hour journey from the CBD.
This section of the report investigates the existing Port Broughton district in the context of long term planning for the Barunga West Council area. It analyses Port Broughton as a Regional Centre that sees an increase in population of up to 400% during high-season.
This section of the report will Identify the key drivers in transit infrastructure, health facilities, education facilities and leisure activities. This allows us to highlight the disconnection and opportunities of the Port Broughton Regional district as it will consider the centre’s geographic relationship to other regional towns and areas.
2.0 Regional Context
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2.1 REGIONAL CENTRES
150 kilom etres
200 kilom etres
Understanding the context of the Port Broughton Regional Centre to its surrounding areas assists in showing connection shortfalls and opportunities, as detailed in the following diagrams.
The geographic positioning of the Port Broughton Regional Centre poses several challenges and disadvantages however it is these factors that also offer the strongest opportunities for development, growth and enhanced quality of the built and natural environments while maintaining its pull as a holiday destination.
Regional Centre0 20 40
2.2 REGIONAL TRANSIT INFRASTRUCTURE
Identified in this map are the primary transportation passages between Port Lincoln and Adelaide. The Port Broughton Regional Centre’s geographical location on this route presents an opportunity to capitalise on the economic benefits presented by through flow of travellers.
Short range transit relationships are those that facilitate the opportunity to commute from home to work/study on a daily basis. The location of the Port Broughton district represents a short/medium range transit relationship to the City of Adelaide, two hours away, while also sustaining short range transit relationships to Wallaroo, Kadina, Port Pirie and Port Augusta.
Major Transport Route
Secondary Transport Route
0 20 40
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MOONTA
ADELAIDE
ADELAIDE - PORT BROUGHTON 174 KM
PORT AUGUSTA- PORT BROUGHTON 150 KM
WHYALLA - PORT BROUGHTON 222 KM
PORT LINCOLN - PORT BROUGHTON 487 KM
Princess Highway
Spencer Highway
Lincoln Highway
2.3 REGIONAL CENTRES TRANSIT RELATIONSHIPS
The above diagrams allow for a comparison of distances between the Port Broughton Regional Centre and the other identified regional centres.
Identifying and separating these distances allows for a greater understanding of the possible opportunities that can be supported by developing and maintaining relationships with other regional centres.
17PORT BROUGHTON FORESHORE MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN REPORT
ADELAIDE
ADELAIDE - PORT BROUGHTON 174 KM 2 HOURS 10 MINS
PORT AUGUSTA- PORT BROUGHTON 150 KM 1 HOUR 36 MINS
WHYALLA - PORT BROUGHTON 222 KM 2 HOURS 23 MINS
PORT LINCOLN - PORT BROUGHTON 487 KM 5 HOURS 4 MINS
ADELAIDE
ADELAIDE - PORT BROUGHTON 174 KM 2 HOURS 10 MINS
PORT AUGUSTA- PORT BROUGHTON 150 KM 1 HOUR 36 MINS
WHYALLA - PORT BROUGHTON 222 KM 2 HOURS 23 MINS
PORT LINCOLN - PORT BROUGHTON 487 KM 5 HOURS 4 MINS
ADELAIDE
ADELAIDE - PORT BROUGHTON 174 KM 2 HOURS 10 MINS
PORT AUGUSTA- PORT BROUGHTON 150 KM 1 HOUR 36 MINS
WHYALLA - PORT BROUGHTON 222 KM 2 HOURS 23 MINS
PORT LINCOLN - PORT BROUGHTON 487 KM 5 HOURS 4 MINS
ADELAIDE
ADELAIDE - PORT BROUGHTON 174 KM 2 HOURS 10 MINS
PORT AUGUSTA- PORT BROUGHTON 150 KM 1 HOUR 36 MINS
WHYALLA - PORT BROUGHTON 222 KM 2 HOURS 23 MINS
PORT LINCOLN - PORT BROUGHTON 487 KM 5 HOURS 4 MINS
ADELAIDE
ADELAIDE - PORT BROUGHTON 174 KM 2 HOURS 10 MINS
PORT AUGUSTA- PORT BROUGHTON 150 KM 1 HOUR 36 MINS
WHYALLA - PORT BROUGHTON 222 KM 2 HOURS 23 MINS
PORT LINCOLN - PORT BROUGHTON 487 KM 5 HOURS 4 MINS
ADELAIDE
ADELAIDE - PORT BROUGHTON 174 KM 2 HOURS 10 MINS
PORT AUGUSTA- PORT BROUGHTON 150 KM 1 HOUR 36 MINS
WHYALLA - PORT BROUGHTON 222 KM 2 HOURS 23 MINS
PORT LINCOLN - PORT BROUGHTON 487 KM 5 HOURS 4 MINS
ADELAIDE
ADELAIDE - PORT BROUGHTON 174 KM 2 HOURS 10 MINS
PORT AUGUSTA- PORT BROUGHTON 150 KM 1 HOUR 36 MINS
WHYALLA - PORT BROUGHTON 222 KM 2 HOURS 23 MINS
PORT LINCOLN - PORT BROUGHTON 487 KM 5 HOURS 4 MINS
ADELAIDE
2.4 REGIONAL HEALTH FACILITIES
The ‘Port Broughton and District Hospital and Health Service’ is the only inpatient services for the community while emergencies and cases of severe trauma are taken to the region’s most significant hospital, Port Pirie Medical Centre 56 kilometres away. Although many of the smaller regional hospitals provide emergency services, only Port Pirie, Port Augusta and Whyalla Hospitals have a full servicing Emergency department and can host over fifty patients.
Highlighted here is the need to retain, build upon and emphasise the importance of Port Broughton Hospital, especially to assist and respond in times of crisis to trauma in the south of the Barunga West Council area.
With limited specialist health facilities in the Northern Adelaide region and Yorke Peninsula, the opportunity exists to secure a greater role for Port Broughton Hospital within the regional centre. For Port Broughton Hospital to grow as a significant regional health centre it must address two issues. Greater support for current supervisors overseeing student health placements and secondly, the development of an adjoining childcare centre, either in partnership with the hospital or privately owned and operated to entice new staff and retain existing staff.
Health CentreMajor Health Centre 0 20
40 60
80 100KM
18 HAMES SHARLEY + DISTRICT COUNCIL OF BARUNGA WEST JULY 201618
50 kilom etres
100 m ilom
2.5 REGIONAL EDUCATION FACILITIES
The lack of proximity to TAFE campuses, University providers and primary and secondary school facilities within the research area shows that residents of the Port Broughton Regional Centre and the District of Barunga West Council area have limited opportunities to partake in educational programmes. The two closest university level campuses are the Adelaide University Agricultural Roseworthy Campus and the University of South Australia’s Whyalla Regional Campus.
Providing an educational facility could reinvigorate and encourage people within the District of Barunga West area to remain in Port Broughton for future generations .
The opportunity exists to leverage a relationship with TAFE SA or one of the major South Australian Universities given the region’s geographical situation and its involvement with both Agricultural Industries and Fisheries.
A relationship with one of these educational institutions and Primary Industries and Regions SA (PIRSA) with a view to consider, in the future, a Regional Centre of Excellence, provides an opportunity to encourage sustainable and incremental population growth and educational pathways while encouraging government and regional investment.
TAFE Facilities Primary & Secondary Education Centre
TAFE Campuses
50 kilom etres
100 m ilom
2.6 REGIONAL GOLF FACILITIES
A key leisure attraction for locals and tourists alike in the Port Broughton Regional Centre is golf, with over ten different facilities available within a 150km radius.
Three of these are high quality courses consisting of watered fairways and greens while the others are limited in their ability to support the year-round maintenance and irrigation requirements, especially in the drier summer months.
Copper Club Port Hughes 18 holes w/Greens Clare Golf Club 18 holes w/Greens Balaklava Golf Club 18 hole w/Greens Port Pirie 18 holes w/scrapes Port Wakefield 18 holes w/scrapes Kadina 18 holes w/scrapes Wallaroo 18 holes w/scrapes Port Broughton 18 holes w/scrapes 9 Holes during Summer months
Golf Courses 0 20
20 HAMES SHARLEY + DISTRICT COUNCIL OF BARUNGA WEST JULY 201620
ADELAIDE
2.7 REGIONAL SNAPPER CLOSURE LOCATIONS
Known for quality fishing, Port Broughton has recently faced restrictions on fishing key species during specific times of the year. This diagram shows the coordinates and exclusion zones for snapper fishing, both professional and recreational, during the snapper spawning season. While the Gulf of St Vincent does not adversely effect Port Broughton, the Illusion, Santa Anna, Jurrassic Park and Estelle Star spawning closures have limited where fishers and tours are able to operate and fish.
Snapper Spawning Closure 4km radius
0 20 40
ADELAIDE
137° 19.100' E 33° 54.700' S136° 50.900' E
33° 58.900' S
S p e n c e r
G u l f
G u l f
V i n c e n t
K a n g a r o o I s l a n d
2.8 ACCOMMODATION FACILITIES
As a key holiday destination, Port Broughton supports a fluctuating population, increasing by approximately 400% during the summer seasons with regular visitors and non- resident ratepayers. The popularity of Port Broughton as a destination for tourists may, however be affected by a lack of resources and facilities, including accommodation. With just one motel and two caravan parks, tourists that may have chosen to stay in Port Broughton would perhaps choose to spend their holiday, or overnight stay, in another regional centre.
Approx Number of Accommodation Facilities
Port Broughton 3 Kadina 10+ Wallaroo 15+ Moonta 30+ Port Pirie 18+ Port Augusta 20+ Whyalla 20+ Port Lincoln 30+
Accommodation Facilities 0 20
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ADELAIDE
2.9 YORKE PENINSULA TRAIL CONNECTION
‘Walk the Yorke’ explores the Yorke Peninsula’s coastline between Port Wakefield and Moonta Bay with over 500 kilometres of continuous shared walking and cycling leisure trails. The trails connect many of the coastal communities and environments that are unique to ‘The Yorke’. Tourists are encouraged to visit and stay at many of the accommodation facilities on offer through links found on the Yorke Peninsula website, yorkepeninsula.com.au.
The current network of trails include facilities such as camping grounds, public toilets and observation points.
As Port Broughton is often referred to as the top of the Yorke, it makes sense to attempt to connect any future walking or mixed used trails in this area with the ‘Walk the Yorke’ trail finishing at Moonta Bay. This connection would increase Port Broughton’s identity as a Yorke Peninsula tourism destination and encourage future economic income within the town.
Existing Yorke Peninsula Trails
ADELAIDE
3.0 Urban/Local Context
This section of the report investigates the existing Port Broughton Regional Centre at a local level. The report considers the Barunga West Council area and defines more detailed study areas. These areas are explored in relation to local demographics, road hierarchies, pedestrian connectivity, existing formal and informal open spaces, land uses, current zoning allowances and transport connectivity.
26 HAMES SHARLEY + DISTRICT COUNCIL OF BARUNGA WEST JULY 201626
Port Broughton is the largest and most populous centre within the District Council of Barunga West, with other townships including Alford, Bute, Kulpara, Melton and Tickera making up the remaining District Council population.
3.1 DISTRICT COUNCIL OF BARUNGA WEST LGA AREA
27PORT BROUGHTON FORESHORE MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN REPORT
Land Not Within a Council Area (Coastal Waters)
Northern Areas
BARUNGA WEST COUNCIL
Zone Map BaW/1
0 10 km
Northern Areas
BARUNGA WEST COUNCIL
Zone Map BaW/1
0 10 km
Northern Areas
BARUNGA WEST COUNCIL
Zone Map BaW/1
0 10 km
10KM
Connection outside of Port Broughton Regional Centre is primarily via motor vehicles; using the Spencer Highway and Bute/Upper York Road, or by the passenger transit bus service providing limited services to Adelaide and other regional centres.
3.2 DISTRICT COUNCIL OF BARUNGA WEST - ROAD HIERARCHY
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Land Not Within a Council Area (Coastal Waters)
Northern Areas
C OP P E R C OAS T HW Y
C OP P E R C OAS T HWY
AU G
U S
Y
B UT E R D
PO RT
BRO UG
UPP E R Y OR KE R D
C LE
M EN
TS R
H W
BARUNGA WEST COUNCIL
Overlay Map BaW/1
Northern Areas
C OP P E R C OAS T HW Y
C OP P E R C OAS T HWY
AU G
U S
Y
B UT E R D
PO RT
BRO UG
UPP E R Y OR KE R D
C LE
M EN
TS R
H W
BARUNGA WEST COUNCIL
Overlay Map BaW/1
Northern Areas
C OP P E R C OAS T HW Y
C OP P E R C OAS T HWY
AU G
U S
Y
B UT E R D
PO RT
BRO UG
UPP E R Y OR KE R D
C LE
M EN
TS R
H W
BARUNGA WEST COUNCIL
Overlay Map BaW/1
10KM
The Port Broughton development area has been divided into four separate research precincts. These precincts include the Fisherman Bay, Port Broughton North, Port Broughton Centre and Port Broughton South. Analysis of each precinct explores the area’s character, local road hierarchy and vegetated open spaces before expanding on the Port Broughton Centre in regards to land use and the local development plan.
3.3 STUDY AREAS
29PORT BROUGHTON FORESHORE MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN REPORT
Fisherman Bay is the northern most precinct to be identified. The area is a popular destination for fishers, many of whom have holiday homes or shacks at the port or bay.
Port Broughton North is the area of coastline and foreshore providing essential pedestrian connectivity between Fisherman Bay and the Port Broughton Centre.
3.3.2 PRECINCT 2: PORT BROUGHTON NORTH 3.3.1 PRECINCT 1: FISHERMAN BAY
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0 200 600 1000M0 200 600 1000M
Port Broughton Centre is the central business district of the region and contains the majority of civic and recreational facilities including health and aged care facilities, sports facilities and a golf course.
Port Broughton South is the area of coastline and foreshore between Port Broughton Centre and Bypass Road.
3.3.3 PRECINCT 3: PORT BROUGHTON CENTRE 3.3.4 PRECINCT 4: PORT BROUGHTON SOUTH
31PORT BROUGHTON FORESHORE MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN REPORT
0 200 600 1000M0 200 600 1000M
At Fisherman Bay, the waves and tidal currents have formed an 800m long north facing spit, which is entirely occupied by houses and shacks. Many of these are occupied only in the summer months. The beach is fronted by a narrow sand flat, then met by the deeper bay tidal channel. Fishermen use this channel for launching boats and reaching the deeper gulf waters.
The Fisherman Bay Precinct is bound by Snook Road to the north and east, Whiting Road to the west and Dolphin Road to the south.
3.4.1 PRECINCT 1: FISHERMAN BAY
AREA CHARACTER
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AREA CHARACTER
Port Broughton North is a mix of permanent and seasonal accommodation and open foreshore vegetation. The area is bound on the west by tidal gulf waters and on the east by agricultural land plots for farming grain and livestock.
The Port Broughton North precinct offers a tremendous opportunity for pedestrian connectivity between Fisherman Bay and the Port Broughton Centre as well as further residential development.
3.4.2 PRECINCT 2:
ARBON RD
FI SH
ER M
AN B
AY R
3.4.3 PRECINCT 3:
PORT BROUGHTON CENTRE
Port Broughton Centre is the central hub for civic and recreational activities. The precinct contains all major civic facilities and services as well as several ovals, a golf course and a landscaped foreshore area.
The jetty beach is 1.2 km long and extends south of the boat ramp, down past the jetty to the southern caravan park. The jetty in Port Broughton Centre is the most popular location to fish and crab. Otherwise fishers can head out to the deeper channel and gulf waters via the boat-ramp.
All swimming is dependent on the high tides covering the tidal flats.
AREA CHARACTER
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0 100 300 500M
3.4.4 PRECINCT 4:
PORT BROUGHTON SOUTH
Port Broughton South is defined similarly to Port Broughton North, bound to the west by tidal gulf waters and to the east by agricultural plots. To the north, the area is bound by Barker Street and Duffield Road and by Bypass Road to the South.
Most of this area is undeveloped with only minimal vegetation. The Port Broughton Caravan park borders onto Port Broughton Centre.
AREA CHARACTER
0 100 300 500M
W ES
T TE
R R
A CE
DUFFIELD RD
The Fisherman Bay precinct generally consists of two road typologies; Whiting Road provides arterial road connectivity south to Port Broughton Centre and local roads making up residential connectivity.
Similar to the Fisherman Bay precinct, Port Broughton North relies on Whiting/Fisherman Bay Roads for priority arterial connectivity. Smaller local roads such as John Lewis Drive, Capella Street and Passat Drive are used for residential connections.
3.5 LOCAL ROAD HIERARCHY
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0 100 300 500M
3.5.4 PRECINCT 4:
PORT BROUGHTON SOUTH
3.5.3 PRECINCT 3:
PORT BROUGHTON CENTRE
Port Broughton Centre supports small local roads connecting residential plots while North, South, East and West Terraces define the town centre. Bay Street runs parallel to North and South Terrace along with Cross, James and Edmund Streets.
Bute Road, Mundoora Road and Fisherman Bay Road all provide wider arterial connectivity while the Spencer Highway connects both Port Broughton Centre and Port Broughton South.
Port Broughton South contains small local roads, undefined networks within caravan parks and the Spencer Highway heading south from Port Broughton Centre before it becomes the Spencer Highway / Kadina Road.
LOCAL
ARTERIAL
HIGHWAY
0 100 300 500M
Fisherman Bay, Port Broughton North, Port Broughton Centre and Port Broughton South Precincts’ pedestrian connectivity is largely limited to residential roads, with no current formal connection from any of the precincts along the foreshore area. There are currently designated bicycle lanes that run along Whiting Road between Arbon Road and just before Dolphin Road. However, at both of these intersections the lanes cease abruptly. Early 2016, a traffic survey was undertaken at the intersection of Whiting and Dolphin Roads to establish the number of vehicles using this road per day. Survey results can be found at the Council website. http://www.barungawest.sa.gov.au/ webdata/resources/files/2016-01%20 Traffic%20Counts%20-%20 Fisherman%20Bay%20Rd.pdf
3.6 PEDESTRIAN AND CYCLIST CONNECTIVITY
3.6.1 PEDESTRIAN CONNECTIVITY
DESIGNATED BICYCLE LANES
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0 100 300 500M
PEDESTRIAN ACCESS
Port Broughton Centre has the most developed foreshore with a landscaped lawned area, public toilets, shelters, outdoor gym and children’s playground. However its separation from other areas greatly limits its functionality and with no formal connection. Pressure is placed onto on-street parking during the busier months.
With the establishment of a formal foreshore pathway, pedestrian connectivity from Fisherman Bay through Port Broughton North into Port Broughton Centre connects Fisherman Bay to the two Port Broughton Caravan Parks and provides the opportunity to access and utilise the foreshore down to Bypass Road.
FI SH
ER M
A N
B A
Y R
0 100 300 500M
The Fisherman Bay precinct has a distinct character of vegetation on private and unmaintained land plots. Much of the coastal vegetation has been removed within the area although a significant mangrove tidal area exists to the east.
The majority of Port Broughton North is still comprised of natural coastal vegetation in the northern end with more formally defined streetscape vegetation towards the south.
3.7 VEGETATION AND OPEN SPACES
3.7.2 PRECINCT 2:
PORT BROUGHTON NORTH
3.7.1 PRECINCT 1:
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SNOOK RD
W H
IT IN
G R
3.7.4 PRECINCT 4:
PORT BROUGHTON SOUTH
3.7.3 PRECINCT 3:
PORT BROUGHTON CENTRE
Port Broughton Centre has a formal foreshore landscape, with large trees lining West Terrace. Dense planting lines the entry to Spencer Highway to the north, Mundoora Road and surrounds the formal recreational spaces.
Port Broughton South is severely lacking in vegetative connections with minimal vegetation along the foreshore, lining roads and throughout the caravan park.
FI SH
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0 100 300 500M
Port Broughton Centre consists of multiple land uses that have been defined in the following codes; Commercial, Non-rateable, Residential, Agricultural and Vacant. The Commercial areas within the Centre precinct include formal recreation spaces and small businesses. Non-rateable areas include much of the tidal foreshore and some other areas. The Agricultural land appears scattered yet expansive while Residential is the dominant land use within this area.
The Port Broughton Centre is dissected by Bay Street with the town businesses located along the main street promenade.
Port Broughton Centre’s primary uses include civic (District Council of Barunga West, Visitor Centre and Port Broughton LPO), health (Port Broughton & District Hospital & Health Service), recreation (Port Broughton Jetty, foreshore and boat ramp), and a number of small food retailers (Palate 2 Palette, Harris Beachfront Deli, Prices’s Port Broughton Bakery and Port Broughton Meat Store) and several services providers (Mitre 10, Fuel Station and Marine Service Provider).
3.8 LAND USE MAP
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0 100 300 500M
This development plan from the Barunga West Council, published 19th March 2015, shows the zones applicable for four different zoning policies within Port Broughton Regional Centre.
The zones include the Tourist Park Policy Area, Port Broughton Centre Policy Area, Port Broughton South Policy Area and Port Broughton Waterfront Policy Area. The greater residential area is contained within the Port Broughton Centre Policy Area while the foreshore is a combination of Tourist Park Policy Area and Port Broughton Waterfront Policy Area.
The existing Port Broughton Regional Centre has low density, lacks permeability and occupies a vast area of land. The opportunity exists to consolidate activities within the centre and in further points (Fisherman Bay & Southern caravan park) in order to achieve appropriate and sustainable activation, and ensure long term staging and phasing of reinvestment.
3.9 DEVELOPMENT PLAN
1000
1000
1000
0 100 300 500M
Port Broughton Regional Centre is connected by a private bus transport service. Interchanges exist providing connections between Port Broughton Regional Centre, the city of Adelaide and other South Australian regional centres. The Whyalla-Adelaide service loops through Port Augusta and Port Pirie regional centres. This transport route services Port Broughton twice daily en route to Adelaide 7 days a week while servicing Port Broughton to Whyalla only once daily 7 days a week.
As of April 2016
3.10 PUBLIC TRANSPORT NETWORK
The public transport services at Port Broughton are discontinuous and irregular. Opportunity exists to increase the commuting population through relationships with industry and education, thereby creating a larger user base for buses and cycling and providing demand for a clearly defined transit node for Port Broughton.
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WHYALLA - PORT AUGUSTA - PORT PIRIE - ADELAIDE TIMETABLE
The information presented in this demographic study has been sourced from the Australian Bureau of Statistics, census 2011.
It shows the total permanent population to be approximately 1,424 with a median age of 52, thirteen years older than the state average and fifteen years older than the national average. 31% of Port Broughton’s total population is made up of senior citizens. Conversely, only 19.7% of Port Broughton’s population was attending some form of educational institution.
3.11 SOCIO- ECONOMIC BACKGROUND
The information also shows that of the 543 people reported to be a part of the labour force at the time of the last census, only 295 were employed full time.
The largest industries were Sheep, Beef Cattle and Grain Farming.
45PORT BROUGHTON FORESHORE MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN REPORT
In the 2011 Census there were 1,424 people in Port Broughton (State Suburbs). 48.8% were male and 51.2% were female. Aboriginal and Torres Straight islander people made up 1.1% of the population
Of people in Port Broughton (State Suburbs) aged 15 years and over, 55.9% were married and 12.1% were either divorced or separated.
The median age of people in Port Broughton (State Suburbs) was 52 years. Children aged 0-14 years made up 13.7% of the population and people aged 65 years and over made up 31% of the population.
In Port Broughton (State Suburbs) 19.7% of people were attending an educational institution. Of these, 29% were in primary school, 21.9% in secondary school and 7.9% in a tertiary or technical institution.
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In Port Broughton (State Suburbs), 66.2% of private dwellings were occupied and 33.8% were unoccupied.
Of occupied private dwellings in Port Broughton (State Suburbs), 91.3% were separate houses, 0.5% were semi detached, row or terrace houses, town houses etc. 6.2% were flats, units or apartments and 1.5% were other dwellings.
Of the employed people in Port Broughton (State Suburbs), 20.5% worked in Sheep, Beef, Cattle and Grain Farming. Other major industries of employment included School Education 6.7%, Residential Care Services 6.1%, Accommodation 4.0% and Road Freight Transport 3.8%
There were 543 people who reported being in the labour force in the week before Census night in Port Broughton (State Suburbs). Of these 54.3% were employed full time, 35.9% were employed part-time and 4.2% were unemployed.
Of the employed people in Port Broughton (State Suburbs), 14.7% worked 1 to 15 hours, 10.5 worked 16 to 24 hours and 47.4% worked 40 hours or more.
The most common occupations in Port Broughton (State Suburbs) included Managers 27.3%, technicians and Trades Workers 14.1%, Community and Personal Service Workers 13.8%, Labourers 12.2% and Professionals 11.1%.
47PORT BROUGHTON FORESHORE MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN REPORT
The median age of people employed either full-time or part-time in Port Broughton (State Suburbs) was 47 years and for people who were employed part time was 47 years.
Of the families in Port Broughton (State Suburbs), 26.9% were couple families with children, 60.6% were couples with families without children and 11.2% were one parent families.
In Port Broughton (State Suburbs), of occupied private dwellings 4.4% had 1 bedroom, 19.9% had 2 bedrooms and 53.4% had 3 bedrooms. The average number of bedrooms per occupied private dwelling was 2.9. The average household was 2 people.
PREVIOUS STUDIES AND
NARUNGGA AREA INDIGENOUS LAND USE AGREEMENT - DEC 2004
The Narungga Nation Aboriginal Corporation, Aboriginal Rights Movement Inc, District Council of Yorke Peninsula, Wakefield Regional Council, District Council of Copper Coast and District Council of Barunga West in agreeance with the State of South Australia and Local Government Councils which are parties to this Indigenous Land Use Agreement(ILUA) acknowledge that the Narungga People are the traditional owners of the land and waters defined in this ILUA now referred to as Narunnga Country.
This document identifies that strong consideration should be given to the consultation and possible involvement of members from the Narunnga people in the planning, development and construction of any development within this ILUA area.
The Hames Sharley - Port Broughton Urban Design Framework document, produced in collaboration with Murray Young (transport engineers) in May 2003 was an initial project engagement document following meetings with Nigal Hand of the District Council, Robert Hart, planning consultant to the council, and Jason Green of Planning SA.
The document outlines Hames Sharley’s experience in regional centre redevelopments and main street revitalisation, defines an approach and methodology and sets an outcome for the final Master Plan and future urban design vision over a ten year period.
It will be important to refer back to this document to understand the initial context of the work.
The report, produced by Hames Sharley for the Barunga West District Council, explores in considerable detail the urban design approach. Development strategies, urban design contextual analysis and detailed proposals for possible improvements to the urban design framework and development opportunities. The document outlines relevant development strategies, including the state’s planning strategy and the Barunga West District Council Development Plan. It undertakes a valuable Urban Design Analysis of key areas within the study area, including Bay Street, The Foreshore reserve, The Boat Ramp, The Bay Street Eastern Entry and significant heritage places within the area.
Using this document to understand the initial considerations, constraints and implemented design strategies allows the opportunity to build on the urban design vision, identify new and explore further landscape and development opportunities and identify solutions to accommodate development pressures.
PORT BROUGHTON URBAN DESIGN FRAMEWORK FINAL REPORT - NOV 2003
PORT BROUGHTON URBAN DESIGN FRAMEWORK - MAY 2003
SUBMISSION Port Broughton Urban Design Framework For the District Council of Barunga West
Prepared by:
30408 May 2003
SUBMISSION Port Broughton Urban Design Framework For the District Council of Barunga West
Prepared by:
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Completed by Deb Allen, Coastcare officer, and Mark Marziale, Manager of Environmental Services, this document was prepared to meet the requirements of the Coastal Motor Vehicle Access Strategy (2008) for coastal councils within the Northern and Yorke Natural Resource Management regions. It focuses solely on land under Council care, control, management or ownership that demonstrates significant unauthorised vehicle access issues and has not considered or dealt with the impact or management of human / pedestrian or animal (dogs/horses) use.
The report provides a full description of recommendations concerning the improvement of coastal access signage, coastal access planning and improving opportunities for safe beach activities which will need to be taken into consideration within this proposal.
DISTRICT COUNCIL OF BARUNGA WEST COASTAL ASSESSMENT REPORT - MAY 2010
The Port Broughton Coastal walking trail risk assessment, produced by The District Council of Barunga West, assesses the liability and risk management considerations associated with the construction of a walking trail along the beach and coastal areas of Port Broughton to Alford Road.
Produced at the request of the Works Manager, the Risk Management Officer has prepared this report as a guide to all economic, social, cultural and environmental considerations in the implementation and construction of a walking trail along the Port Broughton Coastal Area.
This document will be necessary to quickly identify targets and assess what aspects of the design must considered in the planning process. Given the many stakeholders involved, this includes considering design specifications, ecological impacts, signage, lighting, facilities and ongoing and embedded costs.
PORT BROUGHTON COASTAL WALKING TRAIL – RISK ASSESSMENT - 2010
Port Broughton Coastal Walking
Trail
Risk Assessment in relation to the proposed walking trail from the Port Broughton Boat Ramp to opposite of
Bypass Road Port Broughton Foreshore and
Coastal Area 17 March 2010
The District Council of Barunga West’s Strategic Management Plan 2013- 2020 focuses on the future, outlining the Council’s vision, mission and values. It clearly sets out the objectives and actions needed to realise their vision and provides measures of success to gauge how well the objectives are being achieved. The plan was prepared with consideration of the resources and capabilities of the Council, the targets and State Strategic Plan, Regional Plans, initiatives of the federal government and consultation with the community. It provides a blueprint that elected members and staff are able to follow to achieve a welcoming, supportive, growing community with a sustainable lifestyle and environment.
Understanding the District Council of Barunga West’s future vision and key objectives in regards to community and economic development, the natural and built environments, tourism and recreation, infrastructure and asset management and governance and organisational development allows a directed approach to providing quality outcomes for the Council and wider community.
DCBW STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLAN 2013-2020 LIFESTYLE FOR THE FUTURE -2013
Life Style for the future
www.barungawest.sa.gov.au
District Council of Barunga West PO Box 3
Port Broughton SA 5522 T: 08 8635 2107 F: 08 8635 2596
E: [email protected]
Li fe
s ty
le fo
2013 - 2020
51PORT BROUGHTON FORESHORE MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN REPORT
Engaged by the District Council of Barunga West, Hames Sharley undertook a Built Form Study and prepared a Concept Plan for the current Fisherman Bay settlement.
Located approximately 5 kilometres north of Port Broughton, Fisherman Bay is a group of approximately 400 dwellings ranging in size from less than 40m2 up to 200m2. The Majority of the land at Fisherman Bay is currently managed by Fisherman’s Bay Management Pty Ltd who issues ‘Licences to Occupy’ to individuals to construct dwellings. The roads, water, and sewer infrastructure is all owned by Fisherman’s Bay Management Pty Ltd.
The document was able to identify front, rear and side setbacks as well as ground and upper levels. The building styles were investigated and building heights, density, land division, parking and garaging, private open spaces and other structures were all identified.
This Concept Plan and Built Form Study provides important information regarding the Fisherman Bay area and provides a framework for further study in the Port Broughton District.
Managed by Kristian Whitaker, the Starclub Field Officer for the region, on behalf of the Yorke Peninsula and Lower Mid North Strategic Alliance, the Yorke Peninsula and Lower Mid North Region Recreation, Sport and Open Space Strategy 2014 report was undertaken by Suter Planners with input provided by Jensen Planning. Input has been provided by staff and elected members from the four local councils, District Council of Barunga West, District Council of Copper Coast, Wakefield Regional Council and the Yorke Peninsula Council.
The Strategy strategically guides the present and future provision, development and management of recreation and sport facilities and open spaces in the region. The 2014 Recreation, Sport and Open Space Strategy is based on a review of a similar strategy developed in 2004.
The current 2014 strategy provides current information and is more concise and targeted towards identifying projects and opportunities for the region and for each local council area.
A PLEC scheme is designed to assist councils to meet their objectives of improving the appearance of a locality. This is achieved through placing power lines underground in conjunction with aesthetic improvements to the locale for the benefit of the general community.
This document defines the roles and responsibilities for PLEC projects and provides guidance to the PLEC process from inception to commissioning and construction. This booklet is mainly intended for Council use but includes participation with initiatives of the Department of Planning, Transport and Infrastructure (DPTI). It has been prepared in accordance with State Government Legislation and the Power Line Environment Committee (PLEC) Charter.
This report and the Power Line Environment Committee will be essential in the future planning and works within the Port Broughton Township.
POWER LINE ENVIRONMENT COMMITTEE – PROJECT GUIDELINES - ISSUE 6 JAN 2013
FISHERMAN BAY CONCEPT PLAN & STUDY OF BUILT FORM - JAN 2015
YORKE PENINSULA AND LOWER MID NORTH REGION RECREATION, SPORT AND OPEN SPACE STRATEGY - NOV 2014
www.hamessharley.com.au
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Strategic directions and suggested projects have been identified for each local council area to provide a clear direction for future works and grant applications. A summary of the suggested projects is also accompanied by maps within the report. An indicative priority linked to potential timing has been allocated to each project in consultation with the local councils. These Priorities and the broader directions could change over time in accordance with changing council priorities and community needs. Consideration of recommendations in other future planning will also be important.
This document identifies suggested projects for the District Council of Barunga West and can be used as a target checklist to potentially incorporate into future works. These include enhancements to foreshore and recreational destinations, trails and connections for walking and cycling, upkeep and upgrades to sports hubs and facilities and improved climate change response.
The Yorke Peninsula and Lower Mid North Region Recreation, Sport and Open Space Strategy 2014 has produced a hierarchy framework and recommended that local councils in the Yorke Peninsula and Lower Mid North region adopt the framework as an approach to providing and developing sport and recreation facilities and open spaces.
A hierarchy approach recognises that some facilities and open spaces justify being a higher level with regards to development and quality while others could be moderate or have minimal development. The Report defined four levels of hierarchy, Regional, District, Township and Local.
The Hierarchy Framework builds on a guide developed through the SA Local Government Sport and Recreation Sustainability Group by Suter Planners in 2011, immediately identifying the considered priority and intended time line of works to be considered. For the District Council of Barunga West, the top priorities for open space development are the Port Broughton and Fisherman Bay Foreshores.
REPORT 2: PLANNING, PROVISION AND DEVELOPMENT GUIDE - NOV 2014
REPORT 1: THE STRATEGY - NOV 2014
REPORT 3: BACKGROUND REPORT - NOV 2014
This Report outlines the findings of the 2004 Strategic Review and the demand and supply findings, and summarises the recreation, sport and open space related issues and opportunities for the Yorke Peninsula and Lower Mid North Region and the four councils in the region.
 
 
53PORT BROUGHTON FORESHORE MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN REPORT
Prepared by Urban and Regional Planning Solutions and Harlen Graphics on behalf of the South Australian Trails Coordination Committee, these guidelines have been established after reviewing the Recreation Trails Strategy for South Australia 2005-2010 and provides a ‘guidebook’ for the design and construction of recreational trails. This is an important tool for recreational user groups and land managers.
This document has been prepared to provide comprehensive and coordinated standards for trails to assist in planning, development, construction, management and promotion for shared-use trails that accommodate walking, cycling and horse riding.
GUIDELINES FOR THE PLANNING, DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION AND MAINTENANCE OF RECREATION TRAILS IN SOUTH AUSTRALIA SOUTH AUSTRALIAN TRAILS COORDINATING COMMITTEE.
Split into nine chapters, the first four provide a concise overview of the relevant legislation, strategic documents and government departments which are involved in the planning, development and management of recreational trails. This sets the scene for the remaining chapters which provide more specific detail and guidance for new trails. This could prove to be a useful asset in the development and planning of the Port Broughton Foreshore.
Sustainable Recreational Trails
Guidelines for the Planning, Design, Construction and Maintenance of Recreational Trails in South Australia
Produced by Econsearch on behalf of PIRSA Fisheries & Aquaculture, this report updates, at a broad level, the regional economic and social impact assessment of the final PIRSA spatial management arrangements for snapper, which apply to recreational, charter and commercial fisheries.
This work determines the estimated impact models to be used for the Commercial and Charter Boat Fisheries from spatial closures in 2013/2014, undertakes a survey of local businesses in the towns near the closures and to assess likely impacts, consults with local councils, industry associations and tourism bodies and compares results to those estimated in the 2013 report – ‘Regional economic and social impact of Snapper spawning spatial closure options 2012-2013’.
Five key spawning aggregation areas in the Spencer gulf and Gulf St Vincent are closed to Snapper fishing from the 15th of December to the 31st of January following the annual state wide spawning closure between the 1st of November and the 15th of December. The Report estimated losses of visitor expenditure during this period of up-to 40% and potential change in annual visitor expenditure of 0.786.
REGIONAL IMPACT OF THE SNAPPER SPAWNING SPATIAL CLOSURES - 2013-2014
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Prepared by URS and Michele Herriot Health Promotion Consulting, the Regional Public Health Plan is inclusive of the District Council of Barunga West, District Council of Copper Coast, Wakefield Regional Council and the Yorke Peninsula Council.
The Plan sets a direction for the Yorke Peninsula Alliance Councils to work together and partner organisations and the community to improve health and well being within the region over the next five years. Four priority areas are defined as ‘Building stronger, healthier communities for all generations’, ‘increasing opportunities for healthy living, eating and being active’, ‘preparing for climate change’ and ‘sustaining and improving public and environmental health’.
In particular, the community values the role councils play in providing infrastructure such as walking trails and cycle tracks as these facilitate activities considered important for promoting physical and mental health and community connectedness.
REGIONAL PUBLIC HEALTH PLAN YORKE PENINSULA ALLIANCE - 2014-2020
Another regional priority identified is the governance and decision making that leads to stronger relationships and greater collaboration between councils, community stakeholder groups and service providers.
Being able to identify these priorities within the Regional Public Health Plan report defines outcomes which help to develop quality planning and design proposals that respond directly to the Yorke Peninsula Alliance’s plan for the next five years.
1
2014-2020
Engaged by the District Council of Barunga West, Tonkin Consulting has undertaken a feasibility study into the creation of wetlands on the foreshore within the Port Broughton Township. The area identified by the report includes a reserve area along the coast at the end of South Terrace as a potential location for the wetland.
The intention of the report is to establish a wetland capable of improving the amenity and aesthetics of the town, enhance natural biodiversity and provide storm water quality improvement prior to the storm water outfall to the Mundoora Arm (an inlet of the Spencer Gulf).
As a part of the report Tonkin Consultants visited the proposed wetland site and catchment area, discussed potential opportunities with Council, collected data of catchment areas and reported on plans of underground storm water systems.
This proposal is no longer a priority for the District Council of Barunga West, however it is likely that water will be directed towards the southern end of the golf course and this document may be necessary to consider when engaging in future planning of the area.
PORT BROUGHTON WETLAND FEASIBILITY REPORT – DISTRICT COUNCIL OF BARUNGA WEST - MAR 2014
Port Broughton Wetland
March 2014
55PORT BROUGHTON FORESHORE MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN REPORT
This page depicts two ‘space creation’ concept designs for the Port Broughton foreshore area around the ‘T’ shaped jetty entrance.
The most considerable difference between the two is the shape and geometry of the seawall.
These pages were sourced from the District Council of Barugna West’s archives and show the documentation of foreshore development concepts along East Terrace from Bay Street to the now developed boat ramp. The date and curator of this work are unknown but it is believed the work had been undertaken by a
This page represents the Space Creation 2 concept with a foreshore footpath abutting the curved seawall north of the ‘T’ shaped Jetty.
4.1 PREVIOUS CONCEPT MASTER PLAN
qualified professional for the future development of the Port Broughton foreshore. It is unclear as to how much of this work was carried out to fruition.
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This sheet shows two sections of the foreshore in more of an indicative representation than a measured, developed document.
Similarly to the sheet above, the fourth sheet shows indicative representations of a section of a boat ramp, with differing vegetation typologies for the boat ramp and foreshore area. This can again be clearly identified in the foreshore plan.
57PORT BROUGHTON FORESHORE MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN REPORT
ENGAGEMENT PHASE 15.0
ENGAGEMENT PHASE 1
This section provides a summary of key issues and trends identified from feedback received during an afternoon of consultation with the public in regards to the Port Broughton Foreshore Plan on the 9th of November, 2015. This was held by The District Council of Barunga West, in collaboration with Hames Sharley.
The information has been separated into the four Precinct areas and includes the community’s responses to the two questions posed on each of the consultation boards.
The consultation started by informing the elected members of the work Hames Sharley had performed in terms of establishing an initial framework of analysis. It also provided the Council project team and Hames Sharley team with the opportunity to hear from the elected members, receiving initial feedback, additional aspirations, history of past interventions and possible future constraints to be aware of. The consultation event was then open to members of the general public and much interest was shown in wanting to understand what future interventions may be developed. The community consultation engagement boards, produced by Hames Sharley, separated the Port Broughton foreshore into four precincts, allowing the public to engage with the Master Plan process. They placed post-it-notes directly onto the feedback boards, to express their opinions in response to two key questions; “What do you believe makes this area so unique?” and “What would you most like to see developed in this foreshore area?”. In addition to the direct feedback on key elements of the Port Broughton Foreshore Master Plan development opportunity, other handwritten comments, including those drawn as maps at the consultation day, were incorporated and considered as part of the feedback and considered in the interim report findings. The Consultation Day drew a total of 120 responses.
From discussions with the elected members and the engagement of the public, several themes were identified; that facilitating health and well being and reinforcing the safety of residents and tourists was a key outcome; and that the connectedness to the area, personal memories and family ties to and within the community are of considerable significance.
5.0 Engagement Phase 1
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+ Several elected members discussing possible design interventions
+ Spread of community responses across the four separate specified precincts
+ A short presentation on the Port Broughton area and on past reports.
Spread of community responses across the four separate specified
61PORT BROUGHTON FORESHORE MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN REPORT
QUESTION 1 - WHAT DO YOU THINK MAKES FISHERMAN BAY UNIQUE?
+ Dunny Lane is a unique display of the area’s heritage.
+ Shack living provides a unique experience not available in Port Broughton.
+ The closed waterway allows for calmer inland waters perfect for swimming, kayaking and stand- up paddle boarding.
+ Provide public stair access along western dunes.
+ Provide scaling table and water.
+ Erect a shelter or shed as bird hide in the north west area facing north.
+ Let nature take its own course.
+ Foreshore lookout, facing both the west arm and gulf, and towards the ranges in the east.
+ Upgrade toilets.
+ Leave Shag Island alone.
+ Reseal current bicycle track.
+ Retain ‘Drop Dunnys’.
+ Remove Drop Dunnys’.
+ Fisherman Bay’s shack lifestyle is reminiscent of by gone coastal towns, with a population separated by vegetation from the majority of Port Broughton, it is Fisherman Bay’s position and relationship with its environmental and social surrounds that defines its unique character.
+ The maintenance of existing infrastructure must be set as priority including the maintenance and upgrade of coastal connectivity between Port Broughton and Fisherman Bay and other recreational facilities.
+ Defining a platform and semi- enclosed shelter as a lookout/bird watching/hide-away on the north eastern side of Fisherman Bay.
Project team comments Project team comments
Community response: Community response:
QUESTION 2 - WHAT IMPROVEMENTS TO FISHERMAN BAY WOULD YOU LIKE TO SEE IN THE NEXT FIVE YEARS?
5.1 PRECINCT 1: FISHERMAN BAY
+ Several responses being placed on the Fisherman Bay panel
+ Two members of the Port Broughton community viewing some of the many comments on the Fisherman Bay panel
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QUESTION 1 - WHAT DO YOU THINK MAKES PORT BROUGHTON NORTH UNIQUE?
+ The open stretch of natural vegetation and natural habitat is of significant value.
+ Shag Island and its proximity to Port Broughton North is unique to this stretch of coastline.
+ Wide waterfront views are valued by all residents and tourists and should be retained wherever possible.
+ Opportunities for kayak and paddle boarding help create a healthy and active community.
+ Walking trail.
+ Improved cycling facilities.
+ Safer options for pedestrians to reach town centre.
+ Port Broughton North showcases a wide stretch of beach front views and access in a relatively vegetated state. Its relationship with adjacent Shag Island and position as a link between Fisherman Bay and Port Broughton Centre provides a unique opportunity for the area and the community.
+ Priority development for Port Broughton North includes better connectivity between Fisherman Bay and Port Broughton Centre while maintaining the area’s vegetative make up to facilitate healthy, active lifestyles.
+ An emphasis should be placed on the retention of vegetated areas and integrating a relationship with Shag Island.
+ Safer pedestrian movement will be an essential target for any future development in Port Broughton North.
Project team comments Project team comments
Community response: Community response:
QUESTION 2 - WHAT IMPROVEMENTS TO PORT BROUGHTON NORTH WOULD YOU LIKE TO SEE IN THE NEXT FIVE YEARS?
5.2 PRECINCT 2: PORT BROUGHTON NORTH
63PORT BROUGHTON FORESHORE MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN REPORT
QUESTION 1 - WHAT DO YOU THINK MAKES PORT BROUGHTON CENTRE UNIQUE?
+ The Port Broughton Foreshore Area has been a significant part of the township’s character both commercially and recreationally since its settlement.
+ The Port Broughton Jetty is a significant asset to the town both currently and historically with many members of the community remembering summers past with family and friends.
+ The closed waterway provides great opportunity for kayaking and stand up paddle boarding.
Community response:
+ Manage/detour storm water.
+ Upgrade/repaint toilets.
+ Link a trail from Port Broughton Centre through from Fisherman Bay to Port Broughton South.
+ Improve jetty entrance and include wash off shower, filtered drinking fountains and maintain remaining open space.
+ Reinstate smaller historic jetty.
+ Pontoon adjacent to jetty.
+ Define John Lewis Drive as one way, include wider footpath/trail.
+ Boat rinsing area and provide scaling table and water at boat ramp.
Community response:
QUESTION 2 - WHAT IMPROVEMENTS TO PORT BROUGHTON CENTRE WOULD YOU LIKE TO SEE IN THE NEXT FIVE YEARS?
+ Port Broughton’s scenic location and integration with the natural environment in addition to the area’s history, including working jetty and sentimental and reminiscent relationship held by the community, are the key factors of Port Broughton’s uniqueness.
+ Sensitive management of future development of the Port Broughton Centre foreshore area should include an upgrade of existing facilities and a focus on consistency in design while maintaining open space for flexible uses and expandable activities.
+ An increase in seating and connectivity to broader Port Broughton areas will encourage and facilitate increased utilisation of the foreshore and jetty area by a wider ranger of user groups.
+ A review of the current state and future safety of the Port Broughton Seawall should be undertaken to understand the associated benefits and issues with the current situation and define future action and investment.
+ A specialist consultant review should be conducted on the current condition of Port Broughton beach including stormwater contaminations, the influence of erosion and changing conditions of the beach-scape itself, including vegetation growth and sand migration, providing a viability report on mitigating such issues.
Project team comments
Project team comments
5.3 PRECINCT 3: PORT BROUGHTON CENTRE
+ Members of the Port Broughton community contributing to the Port Broughton Centre Precinct panel
64 HAMES SHARLEY + DISTRICT COUNCIL OF BARUNGA WEST JULY 201664
QUESTION 1 - WHAT DO YOU THINK MAKES PORT BROUGHTON SOUTH UNIQUE?
+ Friends of Broughton Beach South (FOBBS) have done significant work rejuvenating the landscape.
+ The natural habitat within this area holds great ecological value.
+ Opportunities for kayak and paddle boarding
+ Disallow horses on beach
+ More information on importance of mangroves and samphire areas
+ Remove mangroves
+ Walking trail
+ Board walk
+ Safer options for pedestrians to reach town centre
+ Wider, safer shoulders for walking, running and riding to include Bypass Road
Community response: Community response:
QUESTION 2 - WHAT IMPROVEMENTS TO PORT BROUGHTON SOUTH WOULD YOU LIKE TO SEE IN THE NEXT FIVE YEARS?
+ Port Broughton South provides a unique opportunity for water and land based recreation including kayak and paddle boarding, trail walking, running, cycling and bird watching.
+ The work already undertaken by FOBBS leads the way for future action towards stabilising a sustainable relationship between community and environment.
+ Following the successful work already undertaken by FOBBS, further re-establishment of the environment, in the potential wake of expanding development, is increasingly important. Awareness should be increased on the significance of dynamic natural systems and the environmental affects and responses to human intervention. Signage and a non- intrusive trail with clearly defined access points will be important interventions in this area.
+ The safety of pedestrians, both residents and tourists, is of utmost importance. By prioritising the widening, upgrading and maintenance of existing roadside easements including footpaths and bicycle lanes between Bypass Road and Port Broughton Centre, the safety and convenience of all users groups can be improved.
Project team comments
Project team comments
5.4 PRECINCT 4: PORT BROUGHTON SOUTH
+ Two members of the Port Broughton community analysing the boundary of the Port Broughton South Precinct
65PORT BROUGHTON FORESHORE MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN REPORT
BENCHMARKING6.0 BENCHMARKING
KINGSCOTE, KANGAROO ISLAND SOUTH AUSTRALIA
The largest town on Kangaroo Island, Kingscote has a resident population of approximately 1,800 people. Kingscote has developed as the Island’s civic, commercial and community focus. The township is significant as the original settlement of South Australia and is a gateway for many visitors arriving by air and sea.
In 2010 the Kangaroo Island Council received a 2.6 million dollar development grant for a range of works. In an eight month period the council were able to implement 12 BBQ shelters, 20 other small shelters, 60 waste and recycling stations, 2 shower blocks, 7 bin banks, 150 hardwood and recycled plastic tables, 2500m of walkways, 2000 timber bollards, 700m of coastal fencing and 3 stair cases. They were also able to develop 4 bridges, 3 entrance roads, 5 toilets, 3 iron ranges, install 50 signs and upgrade lighting and camp grounds.
6.0 Benchmarking
With a similar development structure, coastal site attributes and sustainability intent, the tourist trail and coastal development undertaken on Kangaroo Island serves as an important precedent of what is possible with a structured design and implementation scheme and successful applications for grant funding,
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6.2 PRECEDENT 02
MACKENZIE FALLS GORGE TRAIL VICTORIA
Engaged by Parks Victoria, Hansen Partnership developed a parks recovery Master Plan for the Mackenzie Falls Precinct after the destruction of a key footbridge in early 2012. The proposal defined a bold design solution for enhanced visitor experiences at one of Australia’s largest waterfalls, located with the Grampians National Park, Victoria. Hansen’s Master Plan proposal included a realignment of the Mackenzie Falls Trail path and a new footbridge crossing the Mackenzie River. The new alignment takes visitors through steep and at times challenging terrains with new steel bridges and expanded mesh platforms bolted into the rockface of the trail. The robust nature of the materials and the simple yet defined nature of the structure allows the design to stand up against both flooding and fires, both common in the Grampians National Park
The low impact implementation, and, selection of hard- wiring materials that are also aesthetically responsive to the surrounding environment provides a strong precedent for the possible implementation of a coastal trail along the Port Broughton foreshore.
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6.3 PRECEDENT 03
HOLDFAST BAY FORESHORE REDEVELOPMENT SA
In recent years the City of Holdfast Bay has undertaken numerous measures to revitalise its public open spaces and facilitate an active and sociable community. Coast Park, the development of coastline from North Haven to Sellicks Beach, provides an opportunity to develop a continuous public link in a park like setting along the metropolitan coastline. This enhances public use and enjoyment of the coast.
This project includes a significant initiative of a continuous shard use recreational path along the metropolitan foreshore which will cater for walking, jogging, cycling, wheeling prams and wheelchairs. This pathway will link to existing and future adjoining infrastructure and environment and incorporate landscaping, park furniture, traffic negotiation and commissioned art.
CITY OF HOLDFAST BAY
2
OUR PLACE ADELAIDE’S FAVOURITE COASTAL DESTINATION Located 11 kilometres south-west of the Adelaide Central Business District, Holdfast Bay is regarded as a progressive and lively seaside community. With our rich heritage, sandy beaches and exciting attractions, we are widely celebrated as Adelaide’s favourite coastal destination.
With a footprint of just under 14 square kilometres, our city includes the suburbs of Brighton, North Brighton, South Brighton, Glenelg, Glenelg East, Glenelg North, Glenelg South, Hove, Kingston Park, Seacli, Seacli Park and Somerton Park.
Our city is predominantly residential, with thriving retail precincts in Glenelg, Brighton and along Brighton Road, and a light industrial base at Somerton Park. The 2011 Commonwealth Census data shows a residential population of 36 035 of which 48.9 per cent are under the age of 45; 29.1 per cent are aged between 45 and 64; and 21.6 per cent are aged over 64. Comparisons with the 2006 Census show a slight decline in
aged 45 to 64 years.
INVESTMENT PROSPECTUS
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Accommodation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
View of City of Holdfast Bay from Kingston Park Lookout
The District Council of Barunga West could use the Coastal Park development as a specific case study for the successful future development of works, particularly around the Port Broughton Centre and Port Broughton North precincts, and to define a strong pedestrian link between the two caravan parks.
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6.4 PRECEDENT 04
THE BOGEY HOLE NEWCASTLE
Listed on the State Heritage Register, The Bogey Hole was hand-hewn out of a wave cute rock platform by local convicts for Major James Morisset in 1819. Under the responsibility of the Land and Property Management Authority - NSW, The Bogey Hole had deteriorated over time so heavily that the lower section of stairs had been completely washed away, the handrail was non-compliant and rusting. The sea-chains were lost, rusted or removed. After some time the Management Authority decided to reinstate access to the Bogey Hole, designing an entrance that would be acceptable to the Heritage Office, able to withstand the harsh sea wave conditions, provide good access for the public, reference and be sympathetic to the history of the site and minimise the impact on the surrounding area.
The design is now accessible to the public while relating to the form of the site and replicating the historical alignment of the steps. The structure uses high quality materials including 316 Marine Grade Stainless Steel and heavy duty fibre reinforced plastic grating.
The Bogey Hole is an excellent example of how the appropriate selection of materiality, coupled with specific design intent can provide a successful recreational area while mitigating the risks associated with public safety.
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6.5 PRECEDENT 05
THE 606/BLOOMINGDALE CHICAGO, UNITED STATES
The 606, or Bloomingdale Trail is a 4.5km trail and park in Chicago that runs along an unused, elevated rail line between Ashland and Ridgeway. The urban trail opened to the public on June 6, 2015.
Numerous public meetings brought community input into the park and trail system’s design, function, and the aesthetics of the parks trail, and event spaces. That process culminated in an unveiling of the final design plans and overarching project name in June of 2013.
The 606 brings together arts, history, design, trails for bikers, runners, and walkers, event spaces, alternative transportation avenues and green, open spaces.
The 606 provides another example for the pedestrian connection through the Port Broughton Centre Precinct with move significantly designed areas and from the Fisherman Bay Area through to the Port Broughton South Precinct with the incorporation of history, art, activity and open spaces.
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6.6 PRECEDENT 06
PEDREIRA DO CAMPO URBAN PLANNING VILLA DO PORTO, PORTUGAL
Located on the island of Santa Maria in the eastern group of the Portuguese archipelago of the Azores, Pedreira do Campo is a Natural Monument of Portugal, known for its abundance of oceanic fossils. With sensitivity to the existing landscape, two trails were created across a section of the Pedreira do Campo coast. The raised pathway covers the irregular and rocky terrain, unobtrusively ending at a cantilevered viewpoint facing the ocean.
This trail installation is an indication of how the simplicity of materials and subtle design allows the existing terrain and context to retain its significance and continue to exist as the focal point of the experience. This approach could be adopted along the Port Broughton foreshore with the vast horizon lines, coastal views and stunning sunsets embraced as the most significant natural assets.
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6.7 PRECEDENT 07
ERIE STREET PLAZA MILWAUKEE, USA
Positioned along the Federal Channel and Lake Michigan, the Erie Street plaza connects downtown Milwaukee to a revitalised zone out of the city centre.
It is part of a five kilometre long green corridor that promotes activity along the city’s reclaimed waterfront.
The project is based around maximizisng programmatic, environmental, and ecological variety within the space while recalling the site’s industrial past and surroundings .
The idea of fostering flexibility through varied ecology within the design of Erie Street Plaza can be used as a model for further urban reclamation projects such as the Port Broughton Foreshore Masterplan. Understanding how the Erie Street Plaza relates to complex contextual and programmatic relationships will be of significant importance to the successful design and development of the Port Broughton and Fisherman Bay districts.
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6.8 PRECEDENT 08
CANAL SWIMMER’S CLUB, BRUGES BELGIUM
The Canal Swimmer’s Club, a new multifunctional public space for meeting, relaxing, sunbathing and even swimming in the canals of Bruges opened in 2015, 40 years after the river had initially been closed to swimming because of poor water quality. The project is as much an exercise of public space development as it is an indicator of the improved water quality in the area by the people and the city. Youths were expected to utilise the new structure as well as the elderly who could remember the enjoyment of swimming in the canal when they were younger. The site is divided into two areas, one side providing a main access point for swimmers entering the water and on the other side tourist boats pass by on a regular basis and swimming is prohibited. Two platforms are placed on each side, connected by a path running under the “Carmersbrug”, a cycling and pedestrian bridge. There is also a bridge and ramp that allows people with disabilities to access the water level from the street.
This example of a multifunctional space on the waters edge could be adopted by the District Council of Barunga West and implemented along the existing Jetty, providing the opportunity to host both formal swimming lessons and encourage casual recreational swimming and water based activities.
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6.9 WAYFINDING EXAMPLES
6.9.2 PENNINGTON GARDENS RESERVE ARKETYPE
Arketype designed and implemented structural and interpretive elements for the City of Charles Sturt. The interpretive design is a key component to activating community space for the City of Charles Sturt. Pennington Gardens Reserve is a memorial to residents of South Australian Migrant Hostels, located on the site of the Finsbury-Pennington Hostel.
Simple elements similar to this project could be placed in positions of historical significance around Port Broughton and Fisherman Bay.
Collaborating with the City of Tea Tree Gully, Arketype redeveloped the design of citywide non-mandatory signage throughout the council area. A comprehensive style guide capturing signage hierarchy, design specifications, materials, drawings and style sheets was created to reflect the Council brand and ensure consistency during the staged rollout. This could serve as an exemplar for the Port Broughton Foreshore redevelopment.
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6.9.3 ADELAIDE CITY COUNCIL ARKETYPE
Relevant to Port Broughton’s foreshore trail, Arketype adopted the Adelaide City Council’s existing wayfinding strategy and applied a new collection of elements to the current ‘Walk Adelaide’ scheme to promote the unique running loops along the River Torrens.
While the graphic style of the signage suite remained consistent, it was able to respond to several different levels of information required at particular points of interest or intersections and included the use of wayfinding boards, maps, pedestrian markers and ground surface markers.
6.9.4 PELICAN PATH ARKETYPE
The Pelican Path is an interpretive trail developed as a collaboration between DENR and the Ngarrindjeri Community. Arketype designed, produced and installed a series of interpretive pillars and cantilevered seats and worked closely with local artist Tony Rosella who created the trail and it’s textured elements.
A similar collaboration could be undertaken by the Disrict Council of Barunga West to design, produce and implement a consistent wayfinding strategy along the foreshore trail.
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ENGAGEMENT PHASE 27.0
ENGAGEMENT, PHASE 2
This section outlines the second phase of the engagement process that was prepared by Hames Sharley in collaboration with the District Council of Barunga West.
The following summary is the result of engaging and consulting the local community of the Port Broughton and Fisherman Bay areas. The participants include stakeholders, residents, elected members and council staff.
The reason behind this second phase of consultation is that the project team is seeking feedback on the Foreshore Draft Master Plan. This feedback includes identifying infrastructure, facilities and required development areas that the community deems a priority or a necessity for the development of the foreshore.
Unlike the Engagement Phase 1, which was held over a 6 hour period, this consultation event ran for a duration of three weeks, and was open to members of the general public. A significant increase in the number of participants and amount of feedback was observed over this period with the consultation boards needing to be replaced to allow for further comment.
The public responded to key elements within each defined precinct with a direct show of support via the use of ‘priority’ or ‘non-priority’ dots, seen in blue and red respectively. Other handwritten post-it note comments, including those drawn on as maps, made during this period were also incorporated as part of the feedback and considered in the report findings.
Outside of the engagement session, copies of the engagement panels were provided to the Barunga Village By The Sea Retirement Village. These responses have been integrated into the summary of each precinct to accurately represent community opinion.
The Engagement Phase 2 drew approximately 200 written responses in addition to the priority/non-priority stickers. This phase of engagement suggests that a successful outcome must facilitate the health and well being and safety of residents and visitors.
Total number of visitors was approx. 109 participants
Recorded number of visitors between the 11th and the 29th of February
7.0 Engagement Phase 2
FEB NUMBER OF VISITORS
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Below is a scanned copy of the engagement board and the community responses
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FEEDBACK SUMMARY
7.1 PRECINCT 1 : FISHERMAN BAY
+ Toilet Facilities: Future development around the existing children’s playground, close to the proposed Lookout 2, drew considerable attention with interest in installing new toilet facilities.
+ Solar Lighting and Public Shade: Solar lighting and increased public shade shelters within immediate proximity of the existing facilities were an immediate desire.
+ Pedestrian Access: Clearly marked pedestrian access is necessary.
+ Bird Hide: Development of a bird hide at the proposed Lookout 2 should be avoided as the use of the playground and movement of people would detract from the experience. Instead providing connection to a potential bird hide at the proposed Lookout 1 along the coastal walk had greater support.
+ Cycling Infrastructure: The upgrade of cycling infrastructure was identified as an issue of immediate concern as was the retention of natural features and coastal ecologies.
+ Netting: The community were also vocal of their concern regarding the issue of netting along the Port Broughton and Fisherman Bay coastline.
+ Dunny Lane: Although the future of ‘Dunny Lane’ continues to be debated, it seems retaining what is left of the iconic feature is of value to the community for its historic significance and character.
+ Beach Access: Several pieces of feedback included the positioning of the proposed Beach Access 3 (BA3). This was regarding whether the current suggestion is the most appropriate position or if situating such access on what is currently crown land could be of greater value.
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FEEDBACK SUMMARY PROPOSED LOOKOUTS L1 & L2 PROPOSED BEACH ACCESS BA1, BA2 & BA3
Lookout 1 - (L1) - Typical
Sheltered structure with fixed seating. Formalised entrance with bollards, where beach access is an option.
Signage, including site history, vegetation information and distance to next rest stop.
Appropriate lighting.
Water access, either rain tank or serviced water where possible. Automated BBQ and Bins.
Formalised entrance with bollards where beach access is an option. Signage including site history, vegetation information and distance to next rest stop. Appropriate lighting. Rest seating, 1 bench minimum. Bin.
Lookout 2 - (L2)
Formalised entrance with bo