Physics Malaysian Matriculation Semester 1 Notes Complete

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Nota Padat Fizik Matrikulasi Malaysia Sesi 2013/2014

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    CHAPTER 2:CHAPTER 2:Kinematics of linear motionKinematics of linear motion

    1

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    Kinematics of linear motionKinematics of linear motion

    2.1 Linear Motion2.2 Uniformly Accelerated Motion2.3 Free Falling Body2.4 Projectile Motion

    2

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    3

    At the end of this chapter, students should be able to: At the end of this chapter, students should be able to: DefineDefine and distinguish between and distinguish between

    i.i. distance and displacement distance and displacement ii.ii. speed and velocityspeed and velocityiii.iii. instantaneous velocity, average velocity and uniform instantaneous velocity, average velocity and uniform

    velocity.velocity.iv.iv. instantaneous acceleration, average acceleration and instantaneous acceleration, average acceleration and

    uniform acceleration. uniform acceleration. SketchSketch graphs of displacement-time, velocity-time and graphs of displacement-time, velocity-time and

    acceleration-time.acceleration-time. DetermineDetermine the distance travelled, displacement, velocity the distance travelled, displacement, velocity

    and acceleration from appropriate graphs.and acceleration from appropriate graphs.

    Learning Outcome:2.1 Linear Motion

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    4

    2.1. Linear motion (1-D)

    2.1.1. Distance, d scalar quantity. is defined as the length of actual path between two pointslength of actual path between two points. For example :

    The length of the path from P to Q is 25 cm.

    P

    Q

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    5

    vector quantity is defined as the distance between initial point and final the distance between initial point and final

    point in a straight linepoint in a straight line. The S.I. unit of displacement is metre (m).

    Example 1:An object P moves 20 m to the east after that 10 m to the south and finally moves 30 m to west. Determine the displacement of P relative to the original position.Solution :Solution :

    2.1.2 Displacement,s

    N

    EW

    S

    O

    P

    20 m

    10 m

    10 m 20 m

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    6

    The magnitude of the displacement is given by

    and its direction is

    2.1.3 Speed, v is defined the rate of change of distancerate of change of distance. scalar quantity. Equation:

    interval timedistance of changespeed =

    tdv =

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    7

    is a vector quantity. The S.I. unit for velocity is m s-1.

    Average velocity, Average velocity, vvavav is defined as the rate of change of displacementthe rate of change of displacement. Equation:

    Its direction is in the same direction of the change in same direction of the change in displacementdisplacement.

    2.1.4 Velocity,v

    interval timentdisplaceme of change

    =avv

    tsvav =

    12

    12av tt

    ssv

    =

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    8

    Instantaneous velocity, Instantaneous velocity, vv is defined as the instantaneous rate of change of the instantaneous rate of change of

    displacementdisplacement. Equation:

    An object is moving in uniform velocitymoving in uniform velocity if

    ts

    0tv

    =

    limit

    constant=dtds

    dtdsv =

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    9

    Therefore

    Q

    s

    t0

    s1

    t1

    The gradient of the tangent to the curve at point Q

    = the instantaneous velocity at time, t = t1

    Gradient of s-t graph = velocity

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    10

    vector quantity The S.I. unit for acceleration is m s-2.

    Average acceleration, Average acceleration, aaavav is defined as the rate of change of velocitythe rate of change of velocity. Equation:

    Its direction is in the same direction of motionsame direction of motion. The accelerationacceleration of an object is uniformuniform when the magnitude magnitude

    of velocity changes at a constant rate and along fixed of velocity changes at a constant rate and along fixed direction.direction.

    2.1.5 Acceleration, a

    interval time velocityof change

    =ava

    12

    12av tt

    vva

    =

    tvaav =

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    11

    Instantaneous acceleration, Instantaneous acceleration, aa is defined as the instantaneous rate of change of velocityinstantaneous rate of change of velocity. Equation:

    An object is moving in uniform acceleration moving in uniform acceleration if

    tv

    0ta

    =

    limit

    constant=dtdv

    2

    2

    dtsd

    dtdva ==

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    12

    Deceleration,Deceleration, aa is a negative accelerationnegative acceleration. The object is slowing downslowing down meaning the speed of the object speed of the object

    decreases with timedecreases with time.

    Therefore

    v

    t

    Q

    0

    v1

    t1

    The gradient of the tangent to the curve at point Q

    = the instantaneous acceleration at time, t = t1

    Gradient of v-t graph = acceleration

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    13

    Displacement against time graph (Displacement against time graph (s-ts-t))2.1.6 Graphical methods

    s

    t0

    s

    t0(a) Uniform velocity (b) The velocity increases with time

    Gradient = constant

    Gradient increases with time

    (c)s

    t0

    Q

    RP

    The direction of velocity is changing.

    Gradient at point R is negative.

    Gradient at point Q is zero.

    The velocity is zero.

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    14

    Velocity versus time graph (Velocity versus time graph (v-tv-t))

    The gradient at point A is positive a > 0(speeding up) The gradient at point B is zero a= 0 The gradient at point C is negative a < 0(slowing down)

    t1 t2

    v

    t0 (a) t2t1

    v

    t0 (b) t1 t2

    v

    t0 (c)

    Uniform velocityUniform acceleration

    Area under the v-t graph = displacement

    BC

    A

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    15

    From the equation of instantaneous velocity,

    Therefore

    dtdsv =

    = vdtds= 2

    1

    t

    tvdts

    graph under the area dedsha tvs =

    Simulation 2.1 Simulation 2.2 Simulation 2.3

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    16

    A toy train moves slowly along a straight track according to the displacement, s against time, t graph in figure 2.1.

    a. Explain qualitatively the motion of the toy train.b. Sketch a velocity (cm s-1) against time (s) graph.c. Determine the average velocity for the whole journey.d. Calculate the instantaneous velocity at t = 12 s.

    Example 2 :

    0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 t (s)

    2

    4

    68

    10

    s (cm)

    Figure 2.1Figure 2.1

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    17

    Solution :Solution :0 to 6 s :

    6 to 10 s : 10 to 14 s :

    b.

    0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 t (s)

    0.68

    1.50

    v (cm s1)

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    18

    Solution :Solution :c.

    d.

    12

    12

    ttssvav

    =

    s 14 tos 10 from velocity average=v

    12

    12

    ttssv

    =

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    19

    A velocity-time (v-t) graph in figure 2.2 shows the motion of a lift.

    a. Describe qualitatively the motion of the lift.b. Sketch a graph of acceleration (m s-1) against time (s).c. Determine the total distance travelled by the lift and its displacement.d. Calculate the average acceleration between 20 s to 40 s.

    Example 3 :

    05 10 15 20 25 30 35 t (s)

    -4-2

    2

    4

    v (m s 1)

    Figure 2.2Figure 2.2

    40 45 50

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    20

    Solution :Solution :a. 0 to 5 s : Lift moves upward from rest with

    acceleration of 0.4 m s2. 5 to 15 s : The velocity of the lift from 2 m s1 to

    4 m s1 but the acceleration to 0.2 m s2. 15 to 20 s : Lift 20 to 25 s : Lift 25 to 30 s : Lift 30 to 35 s : Lift moves

    35 to 40 s : Lift moving

    40 to 50 s :

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    21

    Solution :Solution :b.

    t (s)5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 500

    -0.4-0.2

    0.2

    0.6

    a (m s2)

    -0.6

    -0.8

    0.8

    0.4

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    22

    Solution :Solution :c. i.

    05 10 15 20 25 30 35 t (s)

    -4-2

    2

    4

    v (m s 1)

    40 45 50A1

    A2 A3

    A4 A5

    v-t ofgraph under the area distance Total =54321 AAAAA ++++=

    ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( )45152145

    214105

    211042

    2152

    21distance Total +++++++=

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    23

    Solution :Solution :c. ii.

    d.

    v-t ofgraph under the areant Displaceme =

    54321 AAAAA ++++=

    ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( )45152145

    214105

    211042

    2152

    21ntDisplaceme +++++++=

    12

    12

    ttvvaav

    =

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    24

    Figure 2.3Figure 2.3

    1. Figure 2.3 shows a velocity versus time graph for an object constrained to move along a line. The positive direction is to the right.

    a. Describe the motion of the object in 10 s.b. Sketch a graph of acceleration (m s-2) against time (s) for the whole journey.c. Calculate the displacement of the object in 10 s.

    ANS. : 6 mANS. : 6 m

    Exercise 2.1 :

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    25

    2. A train pulls out of a station and accelerates steadily for 20 s until its velocity reaches 8 m s1. It then travels at a constant velocity for 100 s, then it decelerates steadily to rest in a further time of 30 s.a. Sketch a velocity-time graph for the journey.b. Calculate the acceleration and the distance travelled in each part of the journey.c. Calculate the average velocity for the journey.Physics For Advanced Level, 4th edition, Jim Breithaupt, Nelson Thornes, pg.15, no. 1.11

    ANS. : 0.4 m sANS. : 0.4 m s22,0 m s,0 m s22,-0.267 m s,-0.267 m s22, 80 m, 800 m, 120 m; , 80 m, 800 m, 120 m; 6.67 m s6.67 m s11..

    Exercise 2.1 :

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    26

    At the end of this chapter, students should be able to: At the end of this chapter, students should be able to: Derive and applyDerive and apply equations of motion with uniform equations of motion with uniform

    acceleration:acceleration:

    Learning Outcome:2.2 Uniformly accelerated motion

    atuv +=2

    21 atuts +=

    asuv 222 +=

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    27

    2.2. Uniformly accelerated motion From the definition of average acceleration, uniform (constantconstant)

    acceleration is given by

    where v : final velocityu : initial velocitya : uniform (constant) accelerationt : time

    atuv += (1)t

    uva =

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    28

    From equation (1), the velocity-time graph is shown in figure 2.4:

    From the graph, The displacement after time, s = shaded area under the

    graph = the area of trapezium

    Hence,

    velocity

    0

    v

    utimetFigure 2.4Figure 2.4

    ( )tvu21s += (2)

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    29

    By substituting eq. (1) into eq. (2) thus

    From eq. (1),

    From eq. (2),

    ( )[ ]tatuus ++=21

    (3)2

    21 atuts +=

    ( ) atuv =( )

    tsuv 2=+

    multiply

    ( ) ( ) ( )attsuvuv

    =+2

    asuv 222 += (4)

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    30

    Notes: equations (1) (4) can be used if the motion in a straight motion in a straight

    line with constant acceleration.line with constant acceleration. For a body moving at constant velocity, ( ( aa = 0) = 0) the

    equations (1) and (4) become

    Therefore the equations (2) and (3) can be written asuv =

    vts = constant velocityconstant velocity

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    31

    A plane on a runway takes 16.2 s over a distance of 1200 m to take off from rest. Assuming constant acceleration during take off, calculatea. the speed on leaving the ground,b. the acceleration during take off.Solution :Solution :

    a. Use

    Example 4 :

    s 2.16=t

    ?=v

    ( )tvus +=21

    0=u

    m 1200=s

    ?=a

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    32

    Solution :Solution :b. By using the equation of linear motion,

    asuv 222 +=

    OROR2

    21 atuts +=

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    33

    A bus travelling steadily at 30 m s1 along a straight road passes a stationary car which, 5 s later, begins to move with a uniform acceleration of 2 m s2 in the same direction as the bus. Determinea. the time taken for the car to acquire the same velocity as the bus,b. the distance travelled by the car when it is level with the bus.Solution :Solution :

    a. Given Use

    Example 5 :

    21 ms 2 0; ;constant s m 30 ==== ccb auv

    cccc tauv +=1s m 30 == bc vv

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    34

    b.

    From the diagram,

    c

    b

    1s m 30 =bv

    0=cus 0=bt s 5=bt

    2s m 2 =cab

    bv b

    c

    bv

    ttb =bc ss =

    bc ss =

    bbcccc tvtatu =+2

    21

    Thereforetvs bc =

    ;ttb = 5= ttc

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    35

    A particle moves along horizontal line according to the equation

    Where s is displacement in meters and t is time in seconds. At time, t =2.00 s, determinea. the displacement of the particle,b. Its velocity, andc. Its acceleration.Solution :Solution :a. t =2.00 s ;

    Example 6 :

    ttts 23 243 +=

    ttts 23 243 +=

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    36

    Solution :Solution :b. Instantaneous velocity at t = 2.00 s,

    Use

    Thus

    dtdsv =

    ( )tttdtdv 243 23 +=

    ( ) ( ) 22.0082.009 2 +=v

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    37

    Solution :Solution :c. Instantaneous acceleration at t = 2.00 s,

    Use

    Hence

    dtdva =

    ( ) 82.0018 =a

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    38

    1. A speedboat moving at 30.0 m s-1 approaches stationary buoy marker 100 m ahead. The pilot slows the boat with a constant acceleration of -3.50 m s-2 by reducing the throttle.a. How long does it take the boat to reach the buoy?b. What is the velocity of the boat when it reaches the buoy?No. 23,pg. 51,Physics for scientists and engineers with modern physics, Serway & Jewett,6th edition.

    ANS. : 4.53 s; 14.1 m sANS. : 4.53 s; 14.1 m s11

    2. An unmarked police car travelling a constant 95 km h-1 is passed by a speeder traveling 140 km h-1. Precisely 1.00 s after the speeder passes, the policemen steps on the accelerator; if the police cars acceleration is 2.00 m s-2, how much time passes before the police car overtakes the speeder (assumed moving at constant speed)?No. 44, pg. 41,Physics for scientists and engineers with modern physics, Douglas C. Giancoli,3rd edition.

    ANS. : 14.4 sANS. : 14.4 s

    Exercise 2.2 :

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    39

    3. A car traveling 90 km h-1 is 100 m behind a truck traveling 75 km h-1. Assuming both vehicles moving at constant velocity, calculate the time taken for the car to reach the truck.No. 15, pg. 39,Physics for scientists and engineers with modern physics, Douglas C. Giancoli,3rd edition.

    ANS. : 24 sANS. : 24 s4. A car driver, travelling in his car at a constant velocity of

    8 m s-1, sees a dog walking across the road 30 m ahead. The drivers reaction time is 0.2 s, and the brakes are capable of producing a deceleration of 1.2 m s-2. Calculate the distance from where the car stops to where the dog is crossing, assuming the driver reacts and brakes as quickly as possible.

    ANS. : 1.73 mANS. : 1.73 m

    Exercise 2.2 :

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    40

    At the end of this chapter, students should be able to: At the end of this chapter, students should be able to: Describe and useDescribe and use equations for free falling body. equations for free falling body.

    For For upward and downwardupward and downward motion, use motion, useaa = = gg = = 9.81 m s9.81 m s22

    Learning Outcome:2.3 Free falling body

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    41

    2.3. Free falling body is defined as the vertical motion of a body at constant the vertical motion of a body at constant

    acceleration, acceleration, gg under gravitational field under gravitational field without air without air resistanceresistance..

    In the earths gravitational field, the constant acceleration known as acceleration due to gravityacceleration due to gravity or free-fall free-fall

    accelerationacceleration or gravitational accelerationgravitational acceleration. the value is gg = 9.81 m s= 9.81 m s22 the direction is towards the centre of the earth towards the centre of the earth

    (downward).(downward). Note:

    In solving any problem involves freely falling bodies or free fall motion, the assumption made is ignore the air assumption made is ignore the air resistanceresistance.

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    42

    Sign convention:

    Table 2.1 shows the equations of linear motion and freely falling bodies.

    Table 2.1Table 2.1

    Linear motion Freely falling bodiesatuv += gtuv =

    as2uv 22 += gs2uv 22 =2at

    21uts += 2gt

    21uts =

    +

    - +

    -

    From the sign convention thus,

    ga =

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    43

    An example of freely falling body is the motion of a ball thrown vertically upwards with initial velocity, u as shown in figure 2.5.

    Assuming air resistance is negligible, the acceleration of the ball, a = g when the ball moves upward and its velocity velocity decreases to zerodecreases to zero when the ball reaches the maximum maximum height, height, HH.

    H

    uv

    velocity = 0

    Figure 2.5Figure 2.5

    uv =

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    44

    The graphs in figure 2.6 show the motion of the ball moves up and down.

    Derivation of equationsDerivation of equations At the maximum height or

    displacement, H where t = t1, its velocity,

    hence

    therefore the time taken for the ball reaches H,

    Figure 2.6Figure 2.6

    t0

    vu

    u

    t1 2t1

    t0

    a

    g

    t1 2t1

    t

    s

    0

    H

    t1 2t1

    v =0

    gtuv =1gtu =0

    0=v

    gut1 =

    Simulation 2.4

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    45

    To calculate the maximum height or displacement, H:use either

    maximum height,

    Another form of freely falling bodies expressions are

    211 gtuts 2

    1=

    gsuv 22 2=Where s = H

    gHu 20 2 =

    OROR

    guH2

    2

    =

    gtuv =gsuv 222 =

    2

    21 gtuts =

    gtuv yy =yyy gsuv 2

    22=

    2

    21 gttus yy =

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    46

    A ball is thrown from the top of a building is given an initial velocity of 10.0 m s1 straight upward. The building is 30.0 m high and the ball just misses the edge of the roof on its way down, as shown in figure 2.7. Calculatea. the maximum height of the stone from point A.b. the time taken from point A to C.c. the time taken from point A to D.d. the velocity of the stone when it reaches point D.(Given g = 9.81 m s2)

    Example 7 :

    A

    B

    C

    D

    u =10.0 m s1

    30.0 m

    Figure 2.7Figure 2.7

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    47

    Solution :Solution :a. At the maximum height, H, vy = 0 and u = uy = 10.0 m s1 thus

    b. From point A to C, the vertical displacement, sy= 0 m thus

    y2y

    2y gsuv 2=

    2yy gttus 2

    1=

    A

    B

    C

    D

    u

    30.0 m

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    48

    Solution :Solution :c. From point A to D, the vertical displacement, sy= 30.0 m thus

    By using

    2yy gttus 2

    1=

    A

    B

    C

    D

    u

    30.0 m2a

    4acbb 2 =t

    ORTime dont Time dont have have negative negative value.value.

    a b c

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    49

    Solution :Solution :d. Time taken from A to D is t = 3.69 s thus

    From A to D, sy = 30.0 m

    Therefore the balls velocity at D is

    A

    B

    C

    D

    u

    30.0 m

    gtuv yy =( ) ( ) ( )3.699.8110.0 =yvOR

    y2

    y2

    y gsuv 2=( ) ( )( )30.09.81210.0 = 22yv

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    50

    A book is dropped 150 m from the ground. Determinea. the time taken for the book reaches the ground.b. the velocity of the book when it reaches the ground.(given g = 9.81 m s-2)Solution :Solution :

    a. The vertical displacement issy = 150 m

    Hence

    Example 8 :

    uy = 0 m s1

    150 mm 150=ys

    2yy gttus 2

    1=

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    51

    Solution :Solution :b. The books velocity is given by

    Therefore the books velocity is

    gtuv yy =

    OR

    y2

    y2

    y gsuv 2=m 150=ys

    0=yu

    ?=yv

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    52

    1. A ball is thrown directly downward, with an initial speed of 8.00 m s1, from a height of 30.0 m. Calculate a. the time taken for the ball to strike the ground,b. the balls speed when it reaches the ground.

    ANS. : 1.79 s; 25.6 m sANS. : 1.79 s; 25.6 m s11

    2. A falling stone takes 0.30 s to travel past a window 2.2 m tall as shown in figure 2.8.

    From what height above the top of the windows did the stone fall?

    ANS. : 1.75 mANS. : 1.75 m

    Exercise 2.3 :

    m 2.2

    Figure 2.8Figure 2.8

    to travel this distance took 0.30 s

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    53

    At the end of this chapter, students should be able to: At the end of this chapter, students should be able to: Describe and useDescribe and use equations for projectile, equations for projectile,

    CalculateCalculate time of flight, maximum height, range, time of flight, maximum height, range, maximum range, instantaneous position and velocity.maximum range, instantaneous position and velocity.

    Learning Outcome:2.4 Projectile motion

    uux cos=uu y sin=

    0=xagay =

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    54

    2.4. Projectile motion A projectile motion consists of two components:

    vertical component (y-comp.) motion under constant acceleration, ay= g

    horizontal component (x-comp.) motion with constant velocity thus ax= 0

    The path followed by a projectile is called trajectory is shown in figure 2.9.

    v

    u

    sx= R

    sy=H

    ux

    v2yuy

    v1x

    v1y

    v2x

    v11

    v22

    t1 t2

    B

    A

    P Q

    C

    y

    xFigure 2.9Figure 2.9

    Simulation 2.5

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    55

    From figure 2.9, The x-component of velocityx-component of velocity along AC (horizontal) at any

    point is constant,constant,

    The y-component (vertical) of velocity variesy-component (vertical) of velocity varies from one point to another point along AC.but the y-component of the initial velocity is given by

    uux cos=

    uu y sin=

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    56

    Table 2.2 shows the x and y-components, magnitude and direction of velocities at points P and Q.

    Velocity Point P Point Q

    x-comp.

    y-comp.

    magnitude

    direction

    11 gtuv yy =uuv xx1 cos==

    22 gtuv yy =uuv xx2 cos==

    ( ) ( )2y12x11 vvv +=

    =

    x1

    y111 v

    v tan

    ( ) ( )2y22x22 vvv +=

    =

    x2

    y212 v

    v tan

    Table 2.2Table 2.2

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    57

    The ball reaches the highest point at point B at velocity, v where x-component of the velocity, y-component of the velocity, y-component of the displacement,

    Use

    2.4.1 Maximum height, H

    uuvv xx cos===0=yv

    yyy gsuv 222

    =

    ( ) gHu 2sin0 2 =

    guH

    2sin 22

    =

    Hsy =

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    58

    At maximum height, H Time, t = t and vy= 0

    Use

    2.4.2 Time taken to reach maximum height, t

    gtuv yy =( ) 'sin0 tgu =

    gut sin' =

    2.4.3 Flight time, t (from point A to point C)'2 tt =

    gut sin2=

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    59

    Since the x-component for velocity along AC is constant hence

    From the displacement formula with uniform velocity, thus the x-component of displacement along AC is

    2.4.4 Horizontal range, R and value of R maximum

    tus xx =

    cosuvu xx ==

    ( ) ( )tuR = cos( )

    =

    guuR sin2cos

    ( ) cossin22guR =

    and Rsx =

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    60

    From the trigonometry identity,

    thus

    The value of R maximum when = = 4545 and sin 2sin 2 = = 11 therefore

    cossin22sin =

    2sin2

    guR =

    guR

    2

    max =

    Simulation 2.6

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    61

    Figure 2.10 shows a ball bearing rolling off the end of a table with an initial velocity, u in the horizontal direction.

    Horizontal component along path AB.

    Vertical component along path AB.

    2.4.5 Horizontal projectile

    h

    xA B

    u u

    vxv

    yv

    Figure 2.10Figure 2.10

    constant velocity, === xx vuuxsx = nt,displaceme

    0u y = velocity,initialhsy = nt,displaceme

    Simulation 2.7

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    62

    Time taken for the ball to reach the floor (point B), Time taken for the ball to reach the floor (point B), tt By using the equation of freely falling bodies,

    Horizontal displacement, Horizontal displacement, xx Use condition below :

    2yy gttus 2

    1=

    2gt0h21

    =

    ght 2=

    The time taken for the ball free fall to point A

    The time taken for the ball to reach point B=

    (Refer to figure 2.11)

    Figure 2.11Figure 2.11

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    63

    Since the x-component of velocity along AB is constant, thus the horizontal displacement, x

    Note : In solving any calculation problem about projectile motion,

    the air resistance is negligibleair resistance is negligible.

    tus xx =

    =

    ghux 2

    and xsx =

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    64

    Figure 2.12 shows a ball thrown by superman with an initial speed, u = 200 m s-1 and makes an angle, = 60.0 to the horizontal. Determinea. the position of the ball, and the magnitude and direction of its velocity, when t = 2.0 s.

    Example 9 :

    Figure 2.12Figure 2.12 xO

    u

    = 60.0

    y

    R

    H

    v2y

    v1x

    v1y v2xQv1

    P

    v2

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    65

    b. the time taken for the ball reaches the maximum height, H and calculate the value of H.

    c. the horizontal range, Rd. the magnitude and direction of its velocity when the ball

    reaches the ground (point P).e. the position of the ball, and the magnitude and direction of its

    velocity at point Q if the ball was hit from a flat-topped hill with the time at point Q is 45.0 s.

    (given g = 9.81 m s-2)Solution :Solution :The component of Initial velocity :

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    66

    Solution :Solution :a. i. position of the ball when t = 2.0 s ,

    Horizontal component :

    Vertical component :

    therefore the position of the ball is

    2yy gttus 2

    1=

    tus xx =

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    67

    Solution :Solution :a. ii. magnitude and direction of balls velocity at t = 2.0 s ,

    Horizontal component :

    Vertical component :

    Magnitude,

    Direction,

    gtuv yy =

    1xx uv

    == s m 100

    ( ) ( ) 2222 153100 +=+= yx vvv

    =

    =

    100153tantan 11

    x

    y

    vv

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    68

    Solution :Solution :b. i. At the maximum height, H :

    Thus the time taken to reach maximum height is given by

    ii. Apply

    gtuv yy =

    0=yv

    gttus yy 21

    =

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    69

    Solution :Solution :c. Flight time = 2(the time taken to reach the maximum height)

    Hence the horizontal range, R is

    d. When the ball reaches point P thusThe velocity of the ball at point P,Horizontal component:Vertical component:

    ( )17.62=t

    tus xx =

    11 s m 100

    == xx uv

    0=ys

    gtuv yy =1

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    70

    Solution :Solution :Magnitude,

    Direction,

    therefore the direction of balls velocity is

    e. The time taken from point O to Q is 45.0 s. i. position of the ball when t = 45.0 s,

    Horizontal component :

    ( ) ( ) 2221211 172100 +=+= yx vvv

    =

    =

    100172tantan 1

    1

    11

    x

    y

    vv

    300= from positive x-axis anticlockwisefrom positive x-axis anticlockwise

    tus xx =

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    71

    Solution :Solution :Vertical component :

    therefore the position of the ball is (4500 m, (4500 m, 2148 m)2148 m)e. ii. magnitude and direction of balls velocity at t = 45.0 s ,

    Horizontal component :

    Vertical component :

    2yy gttus 2

    1=

    gtuv yy =2

    12 s m 100

    == xx uv

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    72

    Solution :Solution :Magnitude,

    Direction,

    therefore the direction of balls velocity is

    ( ) ( ) 222 269100 +=v22

    222 yx vvv +=

    =

    x

    y

    vv

    2

    21tan

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    73

    A transport plane travelling at a constant velocity of 50 m s1 at an altitude of 300 m releases a parcel when directly above a point X on level ground. Calculatea. the flight time of the parcel,b. the velocity of impact of the parcel,c. the distance from X to the point of impact.(given g = 9.81 m s-2)Solution :Solution :

    Example 10 :

    300 m

    d

    1s m 50 =u

    X

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    74

    Solution :Solution :The parcels velocity = planes velocity

    thus

    a. The vertical displacement is given by

    Thus the flight time of the parcel is

    1s m 50 == uux

    1s m 50 =uand 1s m 0 =yu

    2

    21 gttus yy =

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    75

    Solution :Solution :b. The components of velocity of impact of the parcel:

    Horizontal component:Vertical component:

    Magnitude,

    Direction,

    therefore the direction of parcels velocity is

    1s m 50 == xx uv

    ( ) ( )7.829.810 =yvgtuv yy =

    =

    =

    506.77tantan 11

    x

    y

    vv

    ( ) ( ) 2222 6.7750 +=+= yx vvv

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    76

    Solution :Solution :c. Let the distance from X to the point of impact is d.

    Thus the distance, d is given by

    tus xx =

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    77

    Figure 2.13Figure 2.13

    Use gravitational acceleration, g = 9.81 m s21. A basketball player who is 2.00 m tall is standing on the floor

    10.0 m from the basket, as in figure 2.13. If he shoots the ball at a 40.0 angle above the horizontal, at what initial speed must he throw so that it goes through the hoop without striking the backboard? The basket height is 3.05 m.

    ANS. : 10.7 m sANS. : 10.7 m s11

    Exercise 2.4 :

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    78

    2. An apple is thrown at an angle of 30 above the horizontal from the top of a building 20 m high. Its initial speed is 40 m s1. Calculatea. the time taken for the apple to strikes the ground,b. the distance from the foot of the building will it strikes

    the ground,c. the maximum height reached by the apple from the

    ground.ANS. : 4.90 s; 170 m; 40.4 mANS. : 4.90 s; 170 m; 40.4 m

    3. A stone is thrown from the top of one building toward a tall building 50 m away. The initial velocity of the ball is 20 m s1 at 40 above the horizontal. How far above or below its original level will the stone strike the opposite wall?

    ANS. : 10.3 m below the original level.ANS. : 10.3 m below the original level.

    Exercise 2.4 :

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 2

    79

    THE ENDNext Chapter

    CHAPTER 3 :Force, Momentum and Impulse

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 3

    1

    MOMENTUM AND IMPULSE

    CHAPTER 3

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 3

    3.0 MOMENTUM AND IMPULSE

    3.1 Momentum and impulse

    3.2 Conservation of linear momentum

    2

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 3

    3

    At the end of this chapter, students should be able to:At the end of this chapter, students should be able to:

    DefineDefine momentum.

    DefineDefine impulse and use F-t graph to determine impulse

    Use Use

    Learning Outcome:3.1 Momentum and impulse

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 3

    4

    3.1.1 Linear momentum,

    is defined as the product between mass and velocitythe product between mass and velocity. is a vector quantity. Equation :

    The S.I. unit of linear momentum is kg m skg m s-1-1. The direction of the momentumdirection of the momentum is the samesame as the direction direction

    of the velocityof the velocity. It can be resolve into vertical (y) component and horizontal (x)

    component.

    p

    vmp =

    xp

    pyp

    mvppx coscos ==mvppy sinsin ==

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 3

    5

    3.1.2 Impulse, Let a single constant force, constant force, FF acts on an object in a short time

    interval (collision), thus the Newtons 2nd law can be written as

    is defined as the product of a force, the product of a force, FF and the time, and the time, tt OR the change of momentumthe change of momentum.

    is a vector quantityvector quantity whose directiondirection is the samesame as the constant forceconstant force on the object.

    J

    constant === dtpdFF

    12 pppddtFJ

    ===

    momentum final: 2p

    wheremomentum initial: 1p

    force impulsive :F

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 3

    6

    The S.I. unit of impulse is N sN s or kg m skg m s11. If the forceforce acts on the object is not constantnot constant then

    Since impulse and momentum are both vector quantities, then it is often easiest to use them in component form :

    dtFdtFJ avt

    t

    == 2

    1

    where force impulsive average :avF

    ( ) ( )xxx1x2xavx uvmppdtFJ ===( ) ( )yyy1y2yavy uvmppdtFJ ===( ) ( )zzz1z2zavz uvmppdtFJ ===

    consider 2-D consider 2-D collision onlycollision only

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 3

    7

    When two objects in collision, the impulsive force, F against time, t graph is given by the Figure 3.20.

    1t 2tFigure 3.20Figure 3.20 t0

    F

    Shaded area under the Ft graph = impulse

    Picture 3.1

    Picture 3.2

    Picture 3.3

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 3

    8

    A 0.20 kg tennis ball strikes the wall horizontally with a speed of 100 m s1 and it bounces off with a speed of 70 m s1 in the opposite direction.a. Calculate the magnitude of impulse delivered to the ball by the wall,b. If the ball is in contact with the wall for 10 ms, determine the magnitude of average force exerted by the wall on the ball.Solution :Solution :

    Example 3.1 :

    Wall (2)11

    1s m 100 =1u

    111s m 70 =1v

    022 == uv

    kg 0.201 =m

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 3

    9

    Solution :Solution :a. From the equation of impulse that the force is constant,

    Therefore the magnitude of the impulse is 34 N s34 N s.

    b. Given the contact time,

    12 ppdpJ ==( )111 uvmJ =

    dtFJ av=

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 3

    10

    An estimated force-time curve for a tennis ball of mass 60.0 g struck by a racket is shown in Figure 3.21. Determinea. the impulse delivered to the ball,b. the speed of the ball after being struck, assuming the ball is being served so it is nearly at rest initially.

    Example 3.2 :

    0.2 1.8 ( )mst0

    ( )kNF

    1.0

    18

    Figure 3.21Figure 3.21

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 3

    11

    Solution :Solution :a. From the force-time graph,

    b. Given the balls initial speed,

    graph under the area tFJ =

    0=u( )uvmdpJ ==

    kg 1060.0 3=m

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 3

    12

    1. A steel ball with mass 40.0 g is dropped from a height of 2.00 m onto a horizontal steel slab. The ball rebounds to a height of 1.60 m.a. Calculate the impulse delivered to the ball during impact.b. If the ball is in contact with the slab for 2.00 ms, determine the average force on the ball during impact.

    ANS. : 0.47 N s; 237. 1 NANS. : 0.47 N s; 237. 1 N2. A golf ball (m = 46.0 g) is struck with a force that makes an

    angle of 45 with the horizontal. The ball lands 200 m away on a flat fairway. If the golf club and ball are in contact for 7.00 ms, calculate the average force of impact. (neglect the air resistance.)

    ANS. : 293 NANS. : 293 N

    Exercise 3.1 :

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 3

    13

    Figure 3.22Figure 3.22

    3.

    A tennis ball of mass, m = 0.060 kg and a speed, v = 28 m s1 strikes a wall at a 45 angle and rebounds with the same speed at 45 as shown in Figure 3.22. Calculate the impulse given by the wall.

    ANS. : 2.4 N s to the left or ANS. : 2.4 N s to the left or 2.4 N s2.4 N s

    Exercise 3.1 :

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 3

    14

    3.2 Conservation of linear momentum

    14

    3.2.1 Principle of conservation of linear momentum states In an isolated (closed) system, the total momentum In an isolated (closed) system, the total momentum

    of that system is constantof that system is constant. ORWhen the net external force on a system is zero, the total When the net external force on a system is zero, the total momentum of that system is constantmomentum of that system is constant.

    In a Closed system,

    From the Newtons second law, thus

    0 == dtpdF

    0= F

    0=pd

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 3

    15

    According to the principle of conservation of linear momentum, we obtain

    OR

    The total of initial momentum = the total of final momentumThe total of initial momentum = the total of final momentum

    = fi pp

    constant=p

    constant= xpconstant= yp

    Therefore then

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 3

    16

    Linear momentum in one dimension collisionLinear momentum in one dimension collisionExample 3.3 :

    Figure 3.14 shows an object A of mass 200 g collides head-on with object B of mass 100 g. After the collision, B moves at a speed of 2 m s-1 to the left. Determine the velocity of A after Collision.SolutionSolution : :

    1s m 6 =Au

    AB

    1s m 3 =Bu

    Figure 3.14Figure 3.14

    = fi pp 1s m 6 ;kg 0.100 ;kg 0.200 === ABA umm

    11 s m 2 ;s m 3 == BB vu

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 3

    17

    Linear momentum in two dimension collisionLinear momentum in two dimension collisionExample 3.4 :

    A tennis ball of mass m1 moving with initial velocity u1 collides with a soccer ball of mass m2 initially at rest. After the collision, the tennis ball is deflected 50 from its initial direction with a velocity v1 as shown in figure 3.15. Suppose that m1 = 250 g, m2 = 900 g, u1 = 20 m s1 and v1 = 4 m s1. Calculate the magnitude and direction of soccer ball after the collision.

    Figure 3.15Figure 3.15

    1u

    Before collision After collision

    m1 m2

    m1 1v

    50

    Simulation 3.3

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 3

    18

    Solution :Solution :

    From the principle of conservation of linear momentum,

    The x-component of linear momentum,

    = fi pp

    x22x11x22x11 vmvmumum +=+

    ;s m 20 ;kg 0.900 ;kg 0.250 1=== 121 umm0 ;s m 4 ;0 1 5vu 112 ===

    = fxix pp

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 3

    19

    Solution :Solution :The y-component of linear momentum,

    Magnitude of the soccer ball,

    Direction of the soccer ball,

    yy vmvm 22110 += = fyiy pp

    ( ) ( )2y22x22 vvv +=

    =

    =

    4.840.851tantan 1

    x2

    y212 v

    v

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 3

    20

    1. An object P of mass 4 kg moving with a velocity 4 m s1 collides elastically with another object Q of mass 2 kg moving with a velocity 3 m s1 towards it.a. Determine the total momentum before collision.b. If P immediately stop after the collision, calculate the final velocity of Q.c. If the two objects stick together after the collision, calculate

    the final velocity of both objects.ANS. : 10 kg m sANS. : 10 kg m s11; 5 m s; 5 m s11 to the right; 1.7 m s to the right; 1.7 m s11 to the right to the right2. A marksman holds a rifle of mass mr = 3.00 kg loosely in his

    hands, so as to let it recoil freely when fired. He fires a bullet of mass mb = 5.00 g horizontally with a velocity 300 m s-1. Determinea. the recoil velocity of the rifle,b. the final momentum of the system.

    ANS. : ANS. : 0.5 m s0.5 m s11; U think.; U think.

    Exercise 3.2 :

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 3

    21

    3.

    In Figure 3.16 show a 3.50 g bullet is fired horizontally at two blocks at rest on a frictionless tabletop. The bullet passes through the first block, with mass 1.20 kg, and embeds itself in the second block, with mass 1.80 kg. Speeds of 0.630 m s1 and 1.40 m s-1, respectively, are thereby given to the blocks. Neglecting the mass removed from the first block by the bullet, determinea. the speed of the bullet immediately after it emerges from the first block andb. the initial speed of the bullet.ANS. : 721 m sANS. : 721 m s11; 937.4 m s; 937.4 m s11

    Figure 3.16Figure 3.16

    1.20 kg 1.80 kg

    0.630 m s-1 1.40 m s-1Before

    After

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 3

    22

    Figure 3.17Figure 3.17

    4. A ball moving with a speed of 17 m s1 strikes an identical ball that is initially at rest. After the collision, the incoming ball has been deviated by 45 from its original direction, and the struck ball moves off at 30 from the original direction as shown in Figure 3.17. Calculate the speed of each ball after the collision.

    ANS. : 8.80 m sANS. : 8.80 m s 1 1; 12.4 m s; 12.4 m s11

    Exercise 3.2 :

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 3

    23

    3.2.2 Collision

    is defined as an isolated event in which two or more bodies an isolated event in which two or more bodies (the colliding bodies) exert relatively strong forces on each (the colliding bodies) exert relatively strong forces on each other for a relatively short timeother for a relatively short time.

    Two types of collisions :

    Elastic collisionElastic collision

    Inelastic (non-elastic) collisionInelastic (non-elastic) collision

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 3

    24

    Elastic collisionElastic collision is defined as one in which the total kinetic energy (as well as one in which the total kinetic energy (as well as

    total momentum) of the system is the same before and after total momentum) of the system is the same before and after the collisionthe collision.

    Figure 3.18 shows the head-on collision of two billiard balls.

    11 22

    Before collision

    At collision

    After collision

    11 2222um11um

    11 2222vm11vm

    Figure 3.18Figure 3.18

    Simulation 3.4

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 3

    25

    The properties of elastic collisionproperties of elastic collision are

    a. The total momentum is conservedtotal momentum is conserved.

    b. The total kinetic energy is conservedtotal kinetic energy is conserved.

    OR

    = fi pp

    = fi KK

    222

    211

    222

    211 vmvmumum 2

    121

    21

    21

    +=+

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 3

    26

    Inelastic (non-elastic) collisionInelastic (non-elastic) collision is defined as one in which the total kinetic energy of the one in which the total kinetic energy of the

    system is not the same before and after the collision (even system is not the same before and after the collision (even though the total momentum of the system is conserved)though the total momentum of the system is conserved).

    Figure 3.19 shows the model of a completely inelastic completely inelastic collisioncollision of two billiard balls.

    11 22At collision

    After collision (stick together)

    11 22v

    Figure 3.19Figure 3.19

    Before collision 11 2211um

    0=2u

    2m

    Simulation 3.5

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 3

    27

    Caution: Not allNot all the inelastic collision is stick togetherstick together. In fact, inelastic collisions include many situationsmany situations in which

    the bodies do not stickbodies do not stick

    The properties of inelastic collisionproperties of inelastic collision area. The total momentum is conservedtotal momentum is conserved.

    b. The total kinetic energy is not conservedtotal kinetic energy is not conserved because some of the energy is converted to internal energyinternal energy and some of it is transferred away by means of sound or heatsound or heat. But the total total energy is conservedenergy is conserved.

    OR

    = fi pp

    = fi EE energy losses += fi KK

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 3

    28

    Ball A of mass 400 g and velocity 4 m s-1 collides with ball B of mass 600 g and velocity 10 m s-1. After collision, A and B will move together. Determine the final velocity of both balls if A and B moves in the opposite direction initiallySolution : Solution : mmAA = 0.4 kg, u = 0.4 kg, uAA = 4 m s = 4 m s-1 -1 , m, mB B = 0.6 kg, u= 0.6 kg, uB B = -10 m s= -10 m s-1-1, , inelastic collisioninelastic collision

    By using the principle of conservation of linear momentum, thus

    Example 3.5 :

    Before collision AA BBBuAu

    After collision AA BB?=v

    = fi pp vmmumum BABBAA )( +=+

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 3

    29

    Solution :Solution :

    Final velocity of both balls is - 4.4 m s -1

    BA

    BBAA

    mmumumv

    +

    +=

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 3

    30

    A ball A of mass 1 kg moving at a velocity of 4 m s-1 collides with ball B of mass 2 kg which at rest. Calculate the velocity of both balls after collision if the collision is an elastic collision. Solution :Solution :

    Given mA = 1 kg, uA = 4 m s-1, mB = 2 kg, uB = 0 m s-1, elastic collision

    Example 3.6 :

    Before collision AA BB

    10 = msuBAu

    After collision AA BB?=Bv?=Av

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 3

    31

    Solution :Solution :Apply principle of conservation of momentum,

    Apply principle of conservation of kinetic energy,

    BBAABBAA vmvmumum +=+)(2)(1)0(2)4(1 BA vv +=+

    222 )(21)(

    21)(

    21

    BBAAAA vmvmum +=

    222 )()()( BBAAAA vmvmum +=

    1B s m v2 -4

    =Av ..(1)

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 3

    32

    222 )(2)(1)4(1 BA vv +=Solution :Solution :

    2216 BA vv += ..(2)Substitute equation (1) into equation (2)

    22 2)24(16 BB vv +=22 2)2(416 BB vv +=

    22)2(28 BB vv +=

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 3

    33

    Substitute into equation (1),

    238 BB vv =

    167.2 = msvB

    (2.67) 2 -4=Av

    Solution :Solution :

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 3

    34

    THE ENDNext Chapter

    CHAPTER 4 :Forces

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    1

    CHAPTER 4:

    FORCES

    ww

    w.k

    ms.m

    atr

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    .my/p

    hysic

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    4. FORCES

    4.1 Basic of Forces and Free Body Diagram

    4.2 Newtons Laws of Motion

    2

    ww

    w.k

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    3

    At the end of this chapter, students should be able to:

    Identify the forces acting on a body in different situations.

    Weight

    Tension

    Normal force

    Friction

    Determine weight, static friction and kinetic friction

    Draw free body diagram

    Determine the resultant force

    Learning Outcome:

    4.1 Basic of Forces and Free Body Diagram

    ww

    w.k

    ms.m

    atr

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    hysic

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    4.1 Basic of Forces and Free Body DiagramWeight,

    is defined as the force exerted on a body under gravitational

    field.

    It is a vector quantity.

    It is dependant on where it is measured, because the value of gvaries at different localities on the earths surface.

    It always directed toward the centre of the earth or in the same

    direction of acceleration due to gravity, g.

    The S.I. unit is kg m s-2 or Newton (N).

    Equation:

    gmW

    ww

    w.k

    ms.m

    atr

    ik.e

    du

    .my/p

    hysic

    s

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    5

    Tension, T

    The tension force is the force that is transmitted through a

    string, rope, cable or wire when it is pulled tight by forces

    acting from opposite ends. The tension force is directed

    along the length of the wire and pulls equally on the objects

    on the opposite ends of the wire.

    ww

    w.k

    ms.m

    atr

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    .my/p

    hysic

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    Figure 4.1

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    66

    Normal (reaction) force,

    is defined as a reaction force that exerted by the surface to

    an object interact with it and the direction always

    perpendicular to the surface.

    An object lies at rest on a flat horizontal surface as shown in

    Figure 4.2.

    Ror N

    N

    gmW

    0mgNFy

    mgN

    ThereforeFigure 4.2

    Action: weight of an object is exerted on the

    horizontal surface

    Reaction: surface is exerted a force, N on the object

    ww

    w.k

    ms.m

    atr

    ik.e

    du

    .my/p

    hysic

    s

    A free body diagram is defined as a diagram showing the chosen body by itself, with vectors

    drawn to show the magnitude and directions of all the forces applied to the body by the other bodies

    that interact with it.

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    7

    Friction

    is defined as a force that resists the motion of one surface relative to another with which it is in contact.

    is independent of the area of contact between the two surfaces..

    is directly proportional to the reaction force.

    OR

    Coefficient of friction, is defined as the ratio between frictional force to reaction

    force.

    OR

    is dimensionless and depends on the nature of the surfaces.

    Nf

    Nf force frictional:f

    friction oft coefficien :

    forcereaction : N

    where

    N

    f

    ww

    w.k

    ms.m

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    8

    There are three types of frictional force :

    Static, fs (frictional force act on the object before its move)

    Kinetic, fk (frictional force act on the object when its move)

    Rolling, fr (frictional force act on the object when its rolling)

    Caution:

    The direction of the frictional force exerted by a surface

    on an object is always in the opposite direction of the

    motion.

    The frictional and the reaction forces are always

    perpendicular.

    Nf kk

    Nf ss

    Nf rr

    skr fff where

    thus skr

    Can be ignored

    Simulation 4.1

    ww

    w.k

    ms.m

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    Example 4.1:

    A mass is resting on a flat surface which has a normal force of

    98N, with a coefficient of static friction of 0.35. What force

    would it take to move the object?

    9

    Solution: N = 98N, s = 0.35

    Nf ss

    ww

    w.k

    ms.m

    atr

    ik.e

    du

    .my/p

    hysic

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    10

    Example 4.2:

    A 15 kg piece of wood is placed on top of another piece of

    wood. There is 35N of static friction measured between them.

    Determine the coefficient of static friction between the two

    pieces of wood.

    Solution: N = mg = 15(9.81) = 147.15 N, Fs = 35 N

    N

    fss

    ww

    w.k

    ms.m

    atr

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    hysic

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    Example 4.3

    A dock worker loading crates on a ship finds that a 15 kg crate,

    initially at rest on a horizontal surface, requires a 50 N

    horizontal force to set it in motion. However, after the crate is in

    motion, a horizontal force of 30 N is required to keep it moving

    with a constant speed. The acceleration of gravity is 9.8 ms-2.

    Find the coefficient of kinetic friction.

    11

    Solution:

    Mass of crate = m = 15 kg

    Force required to set the crate in motion = F1 = 50 N

    Force required to keep the crate in moving at constant speed =

    fk = 30 N

    Acceleration of gravity = g = 9.81 ms-2

    Normal force, N = mg = =

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    12

    Solution:

    From

    N

    fkk

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    Resultant force Is defined as a single force that represents the combined

    effect of two or more forces

    1313

    The figure above shows three forces F1, F2 and F3 acted on a

    particle O. Calculate the magnitude and direction of the

    resultant force on particle O.

    Example 4.4:y

    30o

    O

    )N30(2F

    )N10(1F

    30ox

    )N40(3F

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    14

    30o

    Solution :

    O

    y

    x

    3F

    30o

    y3F

    321 FFFFFr

    yxr FFF

    xxxx FFFF 321

    yyyy FFFF 321

    xF2

    1F

    2F

    60o

    yF2

    x3F

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    15

    Vector x-component y-component

    1F

    3F

    2F

    N 01 xF 11FF y

    N 011 yF

    60cos302 xFN 152 xF

    60sin302 yF

    N 622 yF

    30cos403 xFN 34.63 xF

    30sin403 yFN 203 yF

    Vector

    sum

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    16

    y

    xO

    Solution :

    The magnitude of the resultant force is

    and

    Its direction is 162 from positive x-axis OR 18 above negative x-

    axis.

    22 yxr FFF

    x

    y

    F

    F 1tan

    yF

    xF

    162

    rF

    18

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    17

    1. Given three vectors P, Q and R as shown in Figure 4.3.

    Calculate the resultant vector of P, Q and R.

    ANS. : 49.4 m s2; 70.1 above + x-axis

    Exercise 4.1:

    Figure 4.3

    y

    x0

    50 2s m 10 R

    2s m 35 P

    2s m 24 Q

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    18

    At the end of this chapter, students should be able to:

    State Newtons First Law

    Define mass as a measure of inertia.

    Define the equilibrium of a particle.

    Apply Newtons First Law in equilibrium of forces

    State and apply Newtons Second Law

    State and apply Newtons Third Law.

    Learning Outcome:

    4.2 Newtons laws of motion

    td

    vdm

    td

    mdvmv

    td

    d

    td

    dpF

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    19

    4.2 Newtons laws of motion

    4.2.1 Newtons first law of motion states an object at rest will remain at rest, or continues to

    move with uniform velocity in a straight line unless it is acted upon by a external forces

    OR

    The first law gives the idea of inertia.

    0FFnett

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    20

    4.2.2 InertiaInertia

    is defined as the tendency of an object to resist any change in its state of rest or motion.

    is a scalar quantity.

    Mass, m

    is defined as a measure of a bodys inertia.

    is a scalar quantity.

    The S.I. unit of mass is kilogram (kg).

    The value of mass is independent of location.

    If the mass of a body increases then its inertia will increase.

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    21

    Figures 4.4a and 4.4b show the examples of real experience of inertia.

    Figure 4.4

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    22

    4.2.3 Equilibrium of a particle

    is defined as the vector sum of all forces acting on a particle (point) must be zero.

    The equilibrium of a particle ensures the body in translational equilibrium and its condition is given by

    This is equivalent to the three independent scalar equations along the direction of the coordinate axes,

    There are two types of equilibrium of a particle. It is

    Static equilibrium (v=0) body remains at rest (stationary).

    Dynamic equilibrium (a=0) body moving at a uniform (constant) velocity.

    0nettFF

    Newtons first law of motion

    0 , 0 , 0 zyx FFF

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    23

    Problem solving strategies for equilibrium of a

    particle

    The following procedure is recommended when dealing with

    problems involving the equilibrium of a particle:

    Sketch a simple diagram of the system to help

    conceptualize the problem.

    Sketch a separate free body diagram for each body.

    Choose a convenient coordinate axes for each body and

    construct a table to resolve the forces into their

    components.

    Apply the condition for equilibrium of a particle in

    component form :

    Solve the component equations for the unknowns.

    0xF 0yFand

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    2424

    A load of 250 kg is hung by a cranes cable. The load is pulled by a horizontal force such that the cable makes a 30 angle to the

    vertical plane. If the load is in the equilibrium, calculate

    a. the magnitude of the tension in the cable,

    b. the magnitude of the horizontal force. (Given g =9.81 m s2)

    Solution :

    Example 4.5:

    30

    F F

    Free body diagram of the load :

    gm

    T

    yT3060

    xT

    kg 250m

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    25

    Solution :

    1st method :

    a.

    Since the load is in the equilibrium, then

    Thus

    b. By substituting eq. (2) into eq. (1), therefore

    0xF 060cos TF

    kg 250m

    Force x-component (N) y-component (N)

    gm

    0 9.81250mg

    F

    F 0

    T 60cosT 60sinT

    2453

    0F

    (1)

    (2) 0yF 0245360sin T

    060cos2833 F

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    26

    30

    Solution :

    2nd method :

    a. Since the load is in the equilibrium, then a closed triangle of

    forces can be sketched as shown below.

    b. 30sinT

    F

    kg 250m

    30cosT

    mg

    30sin2833

    F

    F

    gm T

    From the closed triangle of forces, hence

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    27

    Calculate the magnitude and direction of a force that balance the

    three forces acted at point A as shown in Figure 4.5.

    Example 4.6:

    N 121FN 202F

    N 303F

    30.055.0

    45.0A

    Figure 4.5

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    28

    Solution :

    To find a force to balance the three forces means the system must

    be in equilibrium hence

    N 30 N; 20 N; 12 321 FFF

    Force x-component (N) y-component (N)

    1F 55.0cos12

    F

    xF yF

    6.88

    55.0sin129.83

    2F 30.0cos20

    17.3

    30.0sin2010.0

    3F 45.0cos30

    21.2

    45.0sin3021.2

    0 xF

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    29

    Solution :

    The magnitude of the force,

    and its direction,

    0 yF021.210.09.83 yF

    222y2x FFF 1.3731.6

    x

    y1

    F

    F tan

    31.6

    1.37tan 1

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    30

    30

    A window washer pushes his scrub brush up a vertical window at

    constant speed by applying a force F as shown in Figure 4.6. The brush weighs 10.0 N and the coefficient of kinetic friction is

    k= 0.125. Calculate

    a. the magnitude of the force F ,

    b. the normal force exerted by the window on the brush.

    Example 4.7:

    F

    50.0

    Figure 4.6

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    31

    Solution :

    a. The free body diagram of the brush :

    The brush moves up at constant speed (a=0) so that

    Thus

    0.125 ;N 10.0 kW

    W

    F

    N

    kf

    constant

    speed

    Force x-component (N) y-component (N)

    F

    50.0cosF

    kf

    0Nk

    50.0sinF

    W

    0 10.0

    N

    N 0

    N0.125

    0amF

    50.0cosFN 0 xF (1)(2)10.00.12550.0sin NF 0 yF

    50.0

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    32

    Solution :

    a. By substituting eq. (1) into eq. (2), thus

    b. Therefore the normal force exerted by the window on the brush

    is given by

    10.050.0cos0.12550.0sin FF

    50.0cosFN

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    33

    Exercise 4.2:

    Use gravitational acceleration, g = 9.81 m s2

    1.

    The system in Figure 5.8 is in equilibrium, with the string at the

    centre exactly horizontal. Calculate

    a. the tensions T1, T2 and T3.

    b. the angle .ANS. : 49 N, 28 N, 57 N; 29

    Figure 4.7

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    34

    Exercise 4.2:

    2.

    A 20 kg ball is supported from the ceiling by a rope A. Rope B

    pulls downward and to the side on the ball. If the angle of A to

    the vertical is 20 and if B makes an angle of 50 to the vertical

    as shown in Figure 4.8, Determine the tension in ropes A and B.

    ANS. : 134 N; 300 N

    Figure 4.8

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    35

    Exercise 4.2:

    3.

    A block of mass 3.00 kg is pushed up against a wall by a force

    P that makes a 50.0 angle with the horizontal as show in Figure 4.9. The coefficient of static friction between the block

    and the wall is 0.250. Determine the possible values for the

    magnitude of P that allow the block to remain stationary.

    ANS. : 31.8 N; 48.6 N

    Figure 4.9

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    36

    Newtons second law of motion

    states the rate of change of linear momentum of a moving body is proportional to the resultant force and is in the

    same direction as the force acting on it

    OR

    its can be represented by

    dt

    pdF

    where

    momentumlinear in change : pd

    interval time:dt

    forceresultant : F

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    37

    From the Newtons 2nd law of motion, it also can be written as

    Case 1:

    Object at rest or in motion with constant velocity but with

    changing mass. For example : Rocket

    dt

    vdm

    dt

    dmvF

    dt

    pdF

    dt

    vmdF

    dt

    vdm

    dt

    dmvF

    mvp and

    0dt

    vd

    dt

    dmvF

    and

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    38

    Case 2:

    Object at rest or in motion with constant velocity and constant

    mass.

    Thus

    dt

    vdm

    dt

    dmvF

    Newtons 1st law of motion

    0 dt

    pdF

    constantp

    0dt

    dm 0

    dt

    vd

    0F

    where and

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    39

    Case 3:

    Object with constant mass but changing velocity.

    The direction of the resultant force always in the same

    direction of the motion or acceleration.

    dt

    vdm

    dt

    dmvF

    0dt

    dman

    d

    amF

    dt

    vdmF

    dt

    vda

    and

    where

    objectan of mass : m

    onaccelerati :a

    forceresultant : F

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    40

    Newtons 2nd law of motion restates that The acceleration of an object is directly proportional to the nett force acting on

    it and inversely proportional to its mass.

    OR

    One newton(1 N) is defined as the amount of nett force that

    gives an acceleration of one metre per second squared to a

    body with a mass of one kilogramme.

    OR 1 N = 1 kg m s-2

    Notes:

    is a nett force or effective force or resultant force.

    The force which causes the motion of an object.

    If the forces act on an object and the object moving at

    uniform acceleration (not at rest or not in the

    equilibrium) hence

    amFFnett

    m

    Fa

    F

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    41

    Newtons third law of motion states every action force has a reaction force that is equal

    in magnitude but opposite in direction. For example :

    When the student push on the wall it will push back with the same force. (refer to Figure 4.10)

    BAAB FF

    A (hand)

    B (wall)

    BAF

    ABF

    Figure 4.10

    is a force by the hand on the wall (action)Where

    is a force by the wall on the hand (reaction)BAFABF

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    42

    When a book is placed on the table. (refer to Figure 4.11)

    If a car is accelerating forward, it is because its tyres are pushing backward on the road and the road is pushing forward on the tyres.

    A rocket moves forward as a result of the push exerted on it by the exhaust gases which the rocket has pushed out.

    In all cases when two bodies interact, the action and reaction forces act on different bodies.

    Figure 4.11

    Force by the book on the table (action)

    Force by the table on the book (reaction)

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    43

    Applications of Newtons 2nd law of motion

    From the Newtons second law of motion, we arrived at equation

    There are five steps in applying the equation above to solve problems in mechanics:

    Identify the object whose motion is considered.

    Determine the forces exerted on the object.

    Draw a free body diagram for each object.

    is defined as a diagram showing the chosen body by itself, with vectors drawn to show the magnitude and directions of all the forces applied to the body by the other bodies that interact with it.

    Choose a system of coordinates so that calculations may be simplified.

    Apply the equation above,

    Along x-axis:

    Along y-axis:

    maFF nett

    xxmaF

    yy maF

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    44

    Three wooden blocks connected by a rope of negligible mass are

    being dragged by a horizontal force, F in Figure 4.12.

    Suppose that F = 1000 N, m1 = 3 kg, m2 = 15 kg and m3 = 30 kg. Determine

    a. the acceleration of blocks system.

    b. the tension of the rope, T1 and T2.

    Neglect the friction between the floor and the wooden blocks.

    Example 4.8:

    Figure 4.12

    1T

    m1 m2 m32T

    F

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    45

    Solution :

    a. For the block, m1 = 3 kg

    For the block, m2 = 15 kg

    For the block, m3 = 30 kg

    a

    amTFF 11x

    (1)

    amTTF 221x

    (2)

    1T

    m1

    m2

    m3

    2T

    F

    aTF 1x 31000

    1T a

    aTTF 21x 15

    2T a

    amTF 32x

    (3)

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    46

    Solution :

    a. By substituting eq. (3) into eq. (2) thus

    Eq. (1)(4) :

    b. By substituting the value of acceleration into equations (4) and

    (3), therefore

    045 aT1 (4)

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    47

    Two objects of masses m1 = 10 kg and m2 = 15 kg are connected

    by a light string which passes over a smooth pulley as shown in

    Figure 4.13. Calculate

    a. the acceleration of the object of mass 10 kg.

    b. the tension in the each string.

    (Given g = 9.81 m s2)

    Solution :

    a. For the object m1= 10 kg,

    Example 4.9:

    Figure 4.13

    m1

    m2

    1T

    gmW 11

    amgmTF 111y

    (1)agT 1010 a where TTT 21

    Simulation 4.2

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    48

    Solution :

    a. For the object m2= 15 kg,

    Eq. (1) + (2) :

    b. Substitute the value of acceleration into equation (1) thus

    Therefore

    2T

    gmW 22

    amTgmF 222y

    (2)agT 1515 a

    aTgFy 1515

    1.96109.8110 T

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    49

    Two blocks, A of mass 10 kg and B of mass 30 kg, are side by side

    and in contact with each another. They are pushed along a smooth

    floor under the action of a constant force F of magnitude 200 N applied to A as shown in Figure 4.14. Determine

    a. the acceleration of the blocks,

    b. the force exerted by A on B.

    Solution :

    a. Let the acceleration of the blocks is a. Therefore

    Example 4.10:

    ammF BAx

    N 200 kg; 30 kg; 10 Fmm BA

    Figure 4.14

    A BF

    ammF BA

    Simulation 4.3

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    50

    Solution :

    b. For the object A,

    From the Newtons 3rd law, thus

    OR

    For the object B,

    amFFF ABAx 5.010200 BAFF

    a

    BAF

    A

    BABF

    a

    amFF BABx

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    51

    1. A block is dragged by forces, F1 and F2 of the magnitude 20 N and 30 N respectively as shown in Figure 4.15. The

    frictional force f exerted on the block is 5 N. If the weight of the block is 200 N and it is move horizontally, determine the

    acceleration of the block.

    (Given g = 9.81 m s2)

    ANS. : 1.77 m s2

    Exercise 4.3:

    50

    a

    1F

    2F

    f

    20

    Figure 4.15

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    52

    2. One 3.5 kg paint bucket is hanging by a massless cord from

    another 3.5 kg paint bucket, also hanging by a massless cord

    as shown in Figure 4.16. If the two buckets are pulled upward

    with an acceleration of 1.60 m s2 by the upper cord, calculate

    the tension in each cord.

    (Given g = 9.81 m s2)

    ANS. : 39.9 N; 79.8 N

    Exercise 4.3:

    Figure 4.16

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 4

    53

    THE ENDNext Chapter

    CHAPTER 5 :

    Work, Energy and Power

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  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    1

    CHAPTER 5:

    Work, Energy and Power

    (3 Hours)

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    2

    At the end of this chapter, students should be able to:

    (a)Define and use work done by a force.

    (b) Determine work done from the force-

    displacement graph.

    Learning Outcome:

    5.1 Work (1 hour)

    sFW

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    3

    5.1 Work, W

    Work done by a constant force

    is defined as the product of the component of the

    force parallel to the displacement times the

    displacement of a body.

    OR

    is defined as the scalar (dot) product between

    force and displacement of a body.

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    4

    sFW

    FssFW coscos

    force of magnitude:F

    body theofnt displaceme : s

    sF

    and between angle the:

    Where,

    Mathematically :

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    5

    It is a scalar quantity.

    Dimension :

    The S.I. unit of work is kg m2 s2 or joule (J).

    The joule (1 J) is defined as the work done by a force of 1 N

    which results in a displacement of 1 m in the direction of

    the force.

    sFW

    22TML W

    22 s m kg 1m N 1J 1

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    6

    Work done by a variable force

    Figure 5.1 shows a force, F whose magnitude

    changes with the displacement, s.

    For a small displacement, s1 the force remains almost constant at F1 and work done therefore

    becomes W1=F1 s1 .

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    7

    To find the total work done by a variable force, W when the displacement changes from s=s1 to s=s2, we can divide the displacement into N small successive displacements :

    s1 , s2 , s3 , , sNThus

    FN

    F4

    s4 sNs1 s2

    F/N

    s0

    F1

    s1

    W1

    NN2211 sFsFsFW ...

    Figure 5.1

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    8

    When N , s 0, therefore

    2

    1

    s

    sFdsW

    graphnt displaceme-force under the area theW

    F/N

    s/ms1 s20

    Work = Area

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    9

    Applications of works equation

    Case 1 :

    Work done by a horizontal force, F on an object (Figure 4.2).

    Case 2 :

    Work done by a vertical force, F on an object (Figure 4.3).

    0F

    s

    Figure 5.2

    FsW cosFsW

    and

    90FsW cosJ 0W

    andF

    s

    Figure 5.3

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    10

    Case 3 :

    Work done by a horizontal forces, F1 and F2 on an object (Figure 5.4).

    Case 4 :

    Work done by a force, F and frictional force, f on an object (Figure 5.5).

    0cos sFW 11

    0cos sFW 22

    sFWW nettnett

    1F

    2F

    s

    Figure 5.4 sFsFWWW 2121 21nett FFF sFFW 21 and

    cos mafFFnett sFW nettnett sfFWnett cos masWnett

    f F

    Figure 5.5 s

    and

    OR

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    11

    Caution :

    Work done on an object is zero when F = 0 or s = 0 and = 90.

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    12

    Sign for work.

    If 0 0 (positive) work done on the system ( by the external force) where energy is transferred to the system.

    If 90

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    13

    You push your physics reference book 1.50 m along a horizontal

    table with a horizontal force of 5.00 N. The frictional force is 1.60 N.

    Calculate

    a. the work done by the 5.00 N force,

    b. the work done by the frictional force,

    c. the total work done on the book.

    Solution :

    a. Use works equation of constant force,

    Example 5.1 :

    m 1.50s

    N 5.00F

    N 1.60f

    cosFsWF 0and

    Example 5.1 :

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    14

    Solution :

    b.

    c.

    fsW f cos

    fF WWW

    OR

    sFW nett sfFW

    180and

    180cos1.501.60fW

    2.407.50W

    1.501.605.00W

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    15

    A box of mass 20 kg moves up a rough plane which is inclined to

    the horizontal at 25.0. It is pulled by a horizontal force F of magnitude 250 N. The coefficient of kinetic friction between the box

    and the plane is 0.300.

    a. If the box travels 3.80 m along the plane, determine

    i. the work done on the box by the force F,

    ii. the work done on the box by the gravitational force,

    iii. the work done on the box by the reaction force,

    iv. the work done on the box by the frictional force,

    v. the total work done on the box.

    b. If the speed of the box is zero at the bottom of the plane,

    calculate its speed when it is travelled 3.80 m.

    (Given g = 9.81 m s2)

    Example 5.2 :

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    16

    Solution :

    a. Consider the work done along inclined plane, thus

    i.

    m 3.800.300; ;N 250 ;kg 20 sFm k

    sFW xF cos0and

    0cos3.8025cos250FW

    25

    25

    kf

    N

    F

    s

    gmW

    yF

    25cosmg

    xF

    25sinmg

    a

    25x

    y

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    17

    Solution :

    a. ii.

    iii.

    iv.

    smgWg cos25sin 180and 180cos3.8025sin9.8120gW

    NsWN cos90and

    sfW kf cos180and

    180cossNW kf smgFW kf 25cos25sin

    3.8025cos9.812025sin2500.300 fW

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    18

    Solution :

    a. v.

    b. Given

    By using equation of work for nett force,

    Hence by using the equation of linear motion,

    fNgF WWWWW 3230315861W

    masW 3.8020223 a

    asuv 22 2

    0u

    3.802.93202v

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    19

    A horizontal force F is applied to a 2.0 kg radio-controlled car as it moves along a straight track. The force varies with the

    displacement of the car as shown in Figure 5.6. Calculate the work

    done by the force F when the car moves from 0 to 7 m.

    Solution :

    Example 5.3 :

    5

    47

    053 6

    (N)F

    5 (m)s

    Figure 5.6

    graph under the area sFW

    4672

    15356

    2

    1W

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    20

    Exercise 5.1 :

    1. A block of mass 2.50 kg is pushed 2.20 m along a frictionless

    horizontal table by a constant 16.0 N force directed 25.0 below

    the horizontal. Determine the work done on the block by

    a. the applied force,

    b. the normal force exerted by the table, and

    c. the gravitational force.

    d. Determine the total work on the block.

    (Given g = 9.81 m s2)

    ANS. : 31.9 J; (b) & (c) U think; 31.9 J

    2. A trolley is rolling across a parking lot of a supermarket. You

    apply a constant force to the trolley as it

    undergoes a displacement . Calculate

    a. the work done on the trolley by the force F,

    b. the angle between the force and the displacement of the

    trolley.

    ANS. : 150 J; 108

    N j40i30 F m j3.0i9.0 s

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    21

    Exercise 5.1 :

    3.

    Figure 5.7 shows an overhead view of three horizontal forces

    acting on a cargo that was initially stationary but that now

    moves across a frictionless floor. The force magnitudes are

    F1 = 3.00 N, F2 = 4.00 N and F3 = 10.0 N. Determine the total work done on the cargo by the three forces during the first

    4.00 m of displacement.

    ANS. : 15.3 J

    3F

    1F

    2F

    y

    x

    35

    50

    Figure 5.7

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    22

    At the end of this chapter, students should be able to:

    (a) Define and use kinetic energy,

    (b) Define and use potential energy:

    i. gravitational potential energy,

    ii. elastic potential energy for spring,

    (c) State and use the principle of conservation of energy.

    (d) Explain the work-energy theorem and use the related

    equation.

    Learning Outcome:

    2

    2

    1mvK

    mghU

    2

    2

    1kxU

    5.2 Energy And Conservation Of Energy

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    23

    Energy is defined as the systems ability to do work.

    The S.I. unit for energy is same to the unit of work (joule, J).

    The dimension of energy

    is a scalar quantity.

    Table 5.1 summarises some common types of energy.

    22 TMLWorknergyE

    Forms of

    EnergyDescription

    ChemicalEnergy released when chemical bonds between atoms

    and molecules are broken.

    Electrical Energy that is associated with the flow of electrical charge.

    HeatEnergy that flows from one place to another as a result of

    a temperature difference.

    InternalTotal of kinetic and potential energy of atoms or molecules

    within a body.

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    24

    Forms of

    EnergyDescription

    Table 5.1

    Nuclear Energy released by the splitting of heavy nuclei.

    Mass

    Energy released when there is a loss of small amount

    of mass in a nuclear process. The amount of energy

    can be calculated from Einsteins mass-energy

    equation, E = mc2

    Radiant Heat Energy associated with infra-red radiation.

    SoundEnergy transmitted through the propagation of a series

    of compression and rarefaction in solid, liquid or gas.

    Mechanicala. Kinetic

    b. Gravitational

    potentialc. Elastic

    potential

    Energy associated with the motion of a body.

    Energy associated with the position of a body in a

    gravitational field.

    Energy stored in a compressed or stretched spring.

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    25

    Conservation of energy

    5.2.1 Kinetic energy, K is defined as the energy of a body due to its motion.

    Equation :

    Work-kinetic energy theorem

    Consider a block with mass, m moving along the horizontal surface (frictionless) under the action of a constant nett force,

    Fnett undergoes a displacement, s in Figure 4.8.

    2

    2

    1mvK

    body a ofenergy kinetic:K

    body a of speed : vbody a of mass : m

    where

    s

    nettF

    m

    Figure 5.8

    maFF nett (1)

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    26

    By using an equation of linear motion:

    By substituting equation (2) into (1), we arrive

    Therefore

    states the work done by the nett force on a body equals the change in the bodys kinetic energy.

    as uv 222

    s

    uva

    2

    22 (2)

    2

    22

    s

    uvmFnett

    ifnett KKmumvsF 22

    2

    1

    2

    1

    KWnett

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    27

    A stationary object of mass 3.0 kg is pulled upwards by a constant

    force of magnitude 50 N. Determine the speed of the object when it

    is travelled upwards through 4.0 m.

    (Given g = 9.81 m s2)

    Solution :

    The nett force acting on the object is given by

    By applying the work-kinetic energy theorem, thus

    Example 5.4 :

    0 m; 4.0 ;N 50; kg 3.0 usFm

    F

    s

    gm

    F

    gm

    9.813.050 mgFFnett

    ifnett KKW

    02

    1 2 mvsFnett

    23.02

    14.020.6 v

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    28

    A block of mass 2.00 kg slides 0.750 m down an inclined plane that

    slopes downward at an angle of 36.9 below the horizontal. If the

    block starts from rest, calculate its final speed. You can ignore the

    friction. (Given g = 9.81 m s2)

    Solution :

    Example 5.5 :

    s

    36.9

    0 m; 0.750 ; kg 2.00 usm

    N

    gm36.9

    36.9sinmg36.9cosmg

    a

    x

    y

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    29

    Solution :

    Since the motion of the block along the incline surface thus nett

    force is given by

    By using the work-kinetic energy theorem, thus

    36.9sinmgFnett

    0 m; 0.750 ; kg 2.00 usm

    36.9sin9.812.00nettF

    ifnett KKW

    02

    1 2 mvsFnett

    22.002

    10.75011.8 v

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    30

    An object of mass 2.0 kg moves along the x-axis and is acted on

    by a force F. Figure 5.9 shows how F varies with distance

    travelled, s. The speed of the object at s = 0 is 10 m s1.

    Determine

    a. the speed of the object at s = 10 m,

    b. the kinetic energy of the object at s = 6.0 m.

    Example 5.6 :

    10

    5

    064 10

    (N)F

    7 (m)s

    Figure 5.9

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    31

    Solution :

    a.

    By using the work-kinetic energy theorem, thus

    1s m 10 kg; 2.0 um

    m 10 tom 0 fromgraph under the area sFW

    57106102

    11046

    2

    1W

    if KKW

    22

    2

    1

    2

    1mumvW

    22 102.02

    12.0

    2

    132.5 v

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    32

    Solution :

    b.

    By using the work-kinetic energy theorem, thus

    m 6 tom 0 fromgraph under the area sFW

    10462

    1W

    if KKW

    2

    2

    1muKW f

    2102.02

    150 fK

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    33

    Exercise 5.2 :

    Use gravitational acceleration, g = 9.81 m s2

    1. A bullet of mass 15 g moves horizontally at velocity of

    250 m s1.It strikes a wooden block of mass 400 g placed at rest

    on a floor. After striking the block, the bullet is embedded in the

    block. The block then moves through 15 m and stops. Calculate

    the coefficient of kinetic friction between the block and the floor.

    ANS. : 0.278

    2. A parcel is launched at an initial speed of 3.0 m s1 up a rough

    plane inclined at an angle of 35 above the horizontal. The

    coefficient of kinetic friction between the parcel and the plane is

    0.30. Determine

    a. the maximum distance travelled by the parcel up the plane,

    b. the speed of the parcel when it slides back to the starting

    point.

    ANS. : 0.560 m; 1.90 m s1

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    34

    5.2.2 Potential Energy

    is defined as the energy stored in a body or system because

    of its position, shape and state.

    Gravitational potential energy, U

    is defined as the energy stored in a body or system because

    of its position.

    Equation :

    The gravitational potential energy depends only on the height

    of the object above the surface of the Earth.

    mghU

    energy potential nalgravitatio : U

    position initial thefrombody a ofheight : h

    where

    body a of mass : mgravity todueon accelerati : g

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    35

    Work-gravitational potential energy theorem

    Consider a book with mass, m is dropped from height, h1 to

    height, h2 as shown in the Figure 5.10.

    states the change in gravitational potential energy as the negative of the work done by the gravitational force.

    1h

    gm

    gm

    2h

    s

    Figure 5.10

    21g hhmgmgsW

    The work done by the gravitational force

    (weight) is

    fig UUmghmghW 21 UUUW ifg

    UW

    Therefore in general,

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    36

    Negative sign in the equation indicates that

    When the body moves down, h decreases, the

    gravitational force does positive work because U 0.

    For calculation, use

    if UUUW

    energy potential nalgravitatio final : fUwhere

    force nalgravitatio aby done work : W

    energy potential nalgravitatio initial : iU

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    37

    In a smooth pulley system, a force F is required to bring an object of mass 5.00 kg to the height of 20.0 m at a constant

    speed of 3.00 m s1 as shown in Figure 5.11. Determine

    a. the force, F

    b. the work done by the force, F.

    (Given g = 9.81 m s-2)

    Example 5.7 :

    Figure 5.11

    F

    m 20.0

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    38

    Solution :

    a. Since the object moves at the constant

    speed, thus

    b. From the equation of work,

    1s m 3.00constant m; 20.0 kg; 5.00 vhsm

    0nettFmgF

    F

    s

    gm

    F

    gm

    Constant

    speedFsW cos 0and

    OR

    FsW cosmghUW

    0and

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    39

    Elastic potential energy, Us is defined as the energy stored in in elastic materials as the

    result of their stretching or compressing.

    Springs are a special instance of device which can store

    elastic potential energy due to its compression or

    stretching.

    Hookes Law states the restoring force, Fs of spring is directly proportional to the amount of stretch or

    compression (extension or elongation), x if the limit of proportionality is not exceeded

    OR xFs

    kxFs

    spring of force restoring the: sF

    )(n compressioor stretch ofamount the: if -xxx

    constant forceor constant spring the:k

    where

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    40

    Negative sign in the equation indicates that the direction of Fsis always opposite to the direction of the amount of stretch or

    compression (extension), x.

    Case 1:

    The spring is hung vertically and its is stretched by a suspended

    object with mass, m as shown in Figure 5.12.

    The spring is in equilibrium, thus

    Initial position

    Final position

    sF

    gmW

    x

    Figure 5.12

    mgWFs

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    41Figure 5.13

    (Equilibrium position)

    Case 2:

    The spring is attached to an object and it is stretched and

    compre5sed by a force, F as shown in Figure 5.13.

    sF

    F

    0x

    0x

    sF

    F

    x

    x

    negative is sFpositive is x

    positive is sFnegative is x

    0 sF0x

    The spring is in equilibrium,

    hence

    FFs

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    42

    Caution:

    For calculation, use :

    Dimension of spring constant, k :

    The unit of k is kg s2 or N m1

    From the Hookes law (without sign), a restoring force, Fsagainst extension of the spring, x graph is shown in Figure 5.14.

    FkxFs

    2s MTx

    Fk

    force applied : Fwhere

    F

    sF

    0 x1x

    graph under the area xFW s

    1FxW2

    1 11 xkxW

    2

    1

    s21 UkxW

    2

    1

    Figure 5.14

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    43

    The equation of elastic potential energy, Us for compressing or stretching a spring is

    The work-elastic potential energy theorem,

    Notes :

    Work-energy theorem states the work done by the nett

    force on a body equals the change in the bodys total energy

    OR

    xF2

    1kx

    2

    1U s

    2s

    ifnett EEEW

    sUW 2

    i

    2

    fsisf kx2

    1kx

    2

    1UUW OR

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    44

    A force of magnitude 800 N caused an extension of 20 cm on a

    spring. Determine the elastic potential energy of the spring when

    a. the extension of the spring is 30 cm.

    b. a mass of 60 kg is suspended vertically from the spring.

    (Given g = 9.81 m s-2)

    Solution :

    From the Hookes law,

    a. Given x=0.300 m,

    Example 5.8 :

    m 0.200 N; 800 xF

    kxFFs 0.20800 k

    2

    2

    1kxU s

    23 0.3001042

    1sU

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    45

    Solution :

    b. Given m=60 kg. When the spring in equilibrium, thus

    Therefore

    0nettFmgFs mgkx

    9.8160104 3 x

    2

    2

    1kxU s

    23 0.1471042

    1sU

    sF

    gmW

    x

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    46

    5.2.3 Principle of conservation of energy

    states in an isolated (closed) system, the total energy of that system is constant.

    According to the principle of conservation of energy, we get

    The initial of total energy = the final of total energy

    Conservation of mechanical energy

    In an isolated system, the mechanical energy of a system is the

    sum of its potential energy, U and the kinetic energy, K of theobjects are constant.

    OR

    fi EE

    constant UKE

    OR

    ffii UKUK

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    47

    Before After

    cm 30

    x

    Figure 5.15

    A 1.5 kg sphere is dropped from a height of

    30 cm onto a spring of spring constant,

    k = 2000 N m1 . After the block hits the spring, the spring experiences maximum

    compression, x as shown in Figure 5.15.

    a. Describe the energy conversion

    occurred after the sphere is

    dropped onto the spring until the

    spring experiences maximum

    compression, x.

    b. Calculate the speed of the sphere just

    before strikes the spring.

    c. Determine the maximum compression, x.

    (Given g = 9.81 m s-2)

    Example 5.9 :

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    48

    The spring is not stretched

    hence Us = 0. The sphere is

    at height h1 above ground with speed, v just before strikes the spring. Therefore

    The sphere is at height h2above the ground after

    compressing the spring by x. The speed of the sphere at

    this moment is zero. Hence

    The spring is not stretched

    hence Us = 0. The sphere is

    at height h0 above ground

    therefore U = mgh0 and it is

    stationary hence K = 0.

    (2)

    v

    1h

    (3)

    x

    2h

    cm 30h

    0h

    (1)

    01 mghE 212 mv2

    1mghE 223 kx

    2

    1mghE

    Solution :

    a.

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    49

    Solution :

    b. Applying the principle of conservation of energy involving the

    situation (1) and (2),

    210 mvhhmg2

    1

    21 EE2

    10 mvmghmgh2

    1

    0.309.812 v

    1m N 2000 m; 0.30 kg; 1.5 khm

    and 10 hhh

    ghv 2

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    50

    Solution :

    c. Applying the principle of conservation of energy involving the

    situation (2) and (3),

    2221 kxmvhhmg2

    1

    2

    1

    32 EE2

    22

    1 kxmghmvmgh2

    1

    2

    1

    1m N 2000 m; 0.30 kg; 1.5 khm

    and 21 hhx

    22 20002

    12.431.5

    2

    19.811.5 xx

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    51

    A bullet of mass, m1=5.00 g is fired into a wooden block of mass,

    m2=1.00 kg suspended from some light wires as shown in Figure 5.16. The block, initially at rest. The bullet embeds in the block, and

    together swing through a height, h=5.50 cm. Calculate

    a. the initial speed of the bullet.

    b. the amount of energy lost to the surrounding.

    (Given g = 9.81 m s2)

    Example 5.10 :

    Figure 5.16

    1m 2m

    21 mm

    h1u

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    52

    (1)

    1m 2m1u

    02u

    (3)

    h

    21 mm

    012v

    (2)

    21 mm 12u

    m 105.50 kg; 1.00kg; 105.00 23 hmm 21

    32 EE

    ghmmumm 211221 2

    2

    1

    2105.509.8122 ghu12

    UK

    Solution :

    a.

    Applying the principle of conservation of energy involving the

    situation (2) and (3),

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    53

    Solution :

    Applying the principle of conservation of linear momentum

    involving the situation (1) and (2),

    b. The energy lost to the surrounding, Q is given by

    m 105.50 kg; 1.00kg; 105.00 23 hmm 21

    21 pp

    122111 ummum 1.041.00105.00105.00 33 1u

    21 EEQ

    22

    1

    2

    11221

    211 ummumQ

    2323 1.041.00105.002

    1209105.00

    2

    1 Q

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    54

    Objects P and Q of masses 2.0 kg and 4.0 kg respectively are

    connected by a light string and suspended as shown in Figure

    5.17. Object Q is released from rest. Calculate the speed of Q at

    the instant just before it strikes the floor.

    (Given g = 9.81 m s2)

    Example 5.11 :

    Figure 5.17

    P

    Q

    m 2

    Smooth

    pulley

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    55

    Solution :

    Applying the principle of conservation of mechanical energy,

    0 m; 2 kg; 4.0kg; 2.0 QP uhmm

    fi EE2

    Q2

    PPQ2

    1

    2

    1vmvmghmghm

    QPPQ KKUU

    Initial

    P

    Q

    m 2

    Smooth

    pulley

    P

    Qm 2

    Smooth

    pulley

    v

    v

    Final

    22 4.02

    12.0

    2

    129.812.029.814.0 vv

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    56

    Exercise 5.3 :

    Use gravitational acceleration, g = 9.81 m s2

    1. If it takes 4.00 J of work to stretch a spring 10.0 cm from its

    initial length, determine the extra work required to stretch it an

    additional 10.0 cm.

    ANS. : 12.0 J

    2. A book of mass 0.250 kg is placed on top of a light vertical

    spring of force constant 5000 N m1 that is compressed by 10.0

    cm. If the spring is released, calculate the height of the book rise

    from its initial position.

    ANS. : 10.2 m

    3. A 60 kg bungee jumper jumps from a bridge. She is tied to a

    bungee cord that is 12 m long when unstretched and falls a total

    distance of 31 m. Calculate

    a. the spring constant of the bungee cord.

    b. the maximum acceleration experienced by the jumper.

    ANS. : 100 N m1; 22 m s2

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    57

    Exercise 5.3 :

    4.

    A 2.00 kg block is pushed against a light spring of the force

    constant, k = 400 N m-1, compressing it x =0.220 m. When the block is released, it moves along a frictionless horizontal surface

    and then up a frictionless incline plane with slope =37.0 as shown in Figure 5.18. Calculate

    a. the speed of the block as it slides along the horizontal

    surface after leaves the spring.

    b. the distance travelled by the block up the incline plane before

    it slides back down.

    ANS. : 3.11 m s1; 0.81 m

    Figure 5.18

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    58

    Exercise 5.3 :

    5.

    A ball of mass 0.50 kg is at point A with initial speed, u =4 m s1

    at a height of 10 m as shown in Figure 5.19 (Ignore the frictional

    force). Determine

    a. the total energy at point A,

    b. the speed of the ball at point B where the height is 3 m,

    c. the speed of the ball at point D,

    d. the maximum height of point C so that the ball can pass over

    it.

    ANS. : 53.1 J; 12.4 m s1; 14.6 m s1; 10.8 m

    u

    m 10

    A

    B

    C

    DFigure 5.19

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    59

    At the end of this chapter, students should be able to:

    (a) Define and use power:

    Average power,

    Instantaneous Power,

    (b) Derive and apply the formulae

    (c) Define and use mechanical efficiency,

    and the consequences of heat dissipation.

    Learning Outcome:

    5.3 Power and mechanical efficiency (1 hour)

    dt

    dWP

    vFP

    t

    WPav

    100%input

    output

    P

    P

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    60

    5.3 Power and mechanical efficiency

    5.3.1 Power, P is defined as the rate at which work is done.

    OR the rate at which energy is transferred.

    If an amount of work, W is done in an amount of time t by aforce, the average power, Pav due to force during that timeinterval is

    The instantaneous power, P is defined as the instantaneousrate of doing work, which can be write as

    t

    E

    t

    WPav

    dt

    dW

    t

    WP

    0tlimit

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    61

    is a scalar quantity.

    The dimension of the power is

    The S.I. unit of the power is kg m2 s3 or J s1 or watt (W).

    Unit conversion of watt (W), horsepower (hp) and foot pounds

    per second (ft. lb s1)

    Consider an object that is moving at a constant velocity v along a frictionless horizontal surface and is acted by a constant force,

    F directed at angle above the horizontal as shown in Figure 5.20. The object undergoes a displacement of ds.

    3222

    TMLT

    TML

    t

    WP

    1s lb ft. 550 W746hp 1

    Figure 5.20

    F

    sd

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    62

    Therefore the instantaneous power, P is given by

    OR

    dt

    dWP

    vFP

    dsFdW cos

    FvP cos

    and

    dt

    dsFP

    cos

    dt

    dsv and

    where

    vF

    and between angle the:

    force of magnitude:F velocityof magnitude : v

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    63

    An elevator has a mass of 1.5 Mg and is carrying 15 passengers

    through a height of 20 m from the ground. If the time taken to lift

    the elevator to that height is 55 s. Calculate the average power

    required by the motor if no energy is lost. (Use g = 9.81 m s2 and the average mass per passenger is 55 kg)

    Solution :

    M = mass of the elevator + mass of the 15 passengers

    M = 1500 + (5515) = 2325 kg

    According to the definition of average power,

    Example 5.12 :

    t

    MghPav

    t

    EPav

    s 55 m; 20 th

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    64

    An object of mass 2.0 kg moves at a constant speed of 5.0 m s1

    up a plane inclined at 30 to the horizontal. The constant frictional

    force acting on the object is 4.0 N. Determine

    a. the rate of work done against the gravitational force,

    b. the rate of work done against the frictional force,

    c. the power supplied to the object. (Given g = 9.81 m s2 )

    Solution :

    Example 5.13 :

    N 4.0 constant;s m 5.0 kg; 2.0 1 fvm

    30

    f

    N

    gmW

    30cosmg

    30sinmg

    v

    30x

    y

    s

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    65

    Solution :

    a. the rate of work done against the gravitational force is given by

    t

    smg

    t

    Wg cos30sin

    N 4.0 constant;s m 5.0 kg; 2.0 1 fvm

    180and

    t

    smg

    t

    Wg 30sin

    t

    sv and

    vmgt

    Wg 30sin

    5.030sin9.812.0

    t

    Wg

    OR vFt

    Wg

    gcos

    180cos30sin vmgt

    Wg

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    66

    Solution :

    b. The rate of work done against the frictional force is

    c. The power supplied to the object, Psupplied

    = the power lost against gravitational and frictional forces, Plost

    N 4.0 constant;s m 5.0 kg; 2.0 1 fvm

    180andfvt

    W fcos

    t

    W

    t

    WP

    fg

    supplied

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    67

    5.3.2 Mechanical efficiency, Efficiency is a measure of the performance of a machines,

    engine and etc...

    The efficiency of a machine is defined as the ratio of the useful

    (output) work done to the energy input.

    is a dimensionless quantity (no unit).

    Equations:

    100% in

    out

    E

    W

    OR

    100% in

    out

    P

    P

    where system by the producedpower :outP

    system a tosuppliedpower : inP

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    68

    Notes :

    In practice, Pout< Pin hence < 100%. The system loses energy to its surrounding because it may

    have encountered resistances such as surface friction or

    air resistance.

    The energy which is dissipated to the surroundings, may

    be in the form of heat or sound.

    A 1.0 kW motor is used to lift an object of mass 10 kg vertically

    upwards at a constant speed. The efficiency of the motor is 75 %.

    Determine

    a. the rate of heat dissipated to the surrounding.

    b. the vertical distance travelled by the object in 5.0 s.

    (Given g = 9.81 m s2 )

    Example 5.14 :

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    69

    Solution :

    a. The output power of the motor is given by

    Therefore the rate of heat dissipated to the surrounding is

    b.

    Since the speed is constant hence the vertical distance in 5.0 s

    is

    W1000 75%; kg; 10.0 inPm

    %100in

    out

    P

    P

    1001000

    75 outP

    7501000dissipatedheat of Rate outin PP

    FvPout cos0where and mgF

    0cosmgvPout

    t

    hv

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    70

    Exercise 5.4 :

    Use gravitational acceleration, g = 9.81 m s2

    1. A person of mass 50 kg runs 200 m up a straight road inclined

    at an angle of 20 in 50 s. Neglect friction and air resistance.

    Determine

    a. the work done,

    b. the average power of the person.

    ANS. : 3.36104 J; 672 W

    2. Electrical power of 2.0 kW is delivered to a motor, which has an

    efficiency of 85 %. The motor is used to lift a block of mass

    80 kg. Calculate

    a. the power produced by the motor.

    b. the constant speed at which the block being lifted vertically

    upwards by the force produced by the motor.

    (neglect air resistance)

    ANS. : 1.7 kW; 2.17 m s1

  • CHAPTER 5 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

    71

    Exercise 5.4 :

    3.

    A car of mass 1500 kg moves at a constant speed v up a road

    with an inclination of 1 in 10 as shown in Figure 5.21. All

    resistances against the motion of the car can be neglected. If

    the engine car supplies a power of 12.5 kW, calculate the

    speed v.

    ANS. : 8.50 m s1

    Figure 5.21

    10 1

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    1

    CHAPTER 6:

    Circular motion

    (3 Hours)

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    2

    At the end of this chapter, students should be able to:

    Describe graphically the uniform circular motion.

    In terms of velocity with constant magnitude (only the

    direction of the velocity changes).

    Learning Outcome:

    6.1 Uniform circular motion (1 hour)

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    3

    6.1 Uniform circular motion is defined as a motion in a circle (circular arc) at a constant

    speed.

    Consider an object which does move with uniform circular

    motion as shown in Figure 6.1.

    Figure 6.1

    r

    O

    s

    The length of a circular arc, s is given by

    rs

    pathcircular theof radius : r

    subtends arc which theangle : where

    radianin circle theof centre theto

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    4

    It is directed tangentially to the circular path and always

    perpendicular to the radius of the circular path as shown in

    Figure 6.2.

    In uniform circular motion, the magnitude of the linear velocity

    (speed) of an object is constant but the direction is

    continually changing.

    The unit of the tangential (linear) velocity is m s1.

    6.1.1 Linear (tangential) velocity ,

    r

    O

    v

    r

    v

    r

    vFigure 6.2

    v

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    5

    The linear velocity, v is difficult to measure but we can measure the period, T of an object in circular motion.

    Period, T

    is defined as the time taken for one complete revolution (cycle/rotation).

    The unit of the period is second (s).

    Frequency, f

    is defined as the number of revolutions (cycles/rotations) completed in one second.

    The unit of the frequency is hertz (Hz) or s1.

    Equation :

    Let the object makes one complete revolution in circular motion, thus

    the distance travelled is (circumference of the circle),

    the time interval is one period, T.

    Tf

    1

    r2

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    6

    From the definition of speed,

    If therefore

    Note:

    The unit of angular velocity (angular frequency) is rad s1

    (radian per second).

    Unit conversion of angle, :

    interval time

    distance of changev

    T

    rv

    2OR rfv 2

    fT

    22

    rv

    pathcircular theof radius : rfrequency)(angular locity angular ve :

    where

    360rad 2

    180rad

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    7

    At the end of this chapter, students should be able to:

    Define and use centripetal acceleration and use

    centripetal acceleration,

    Define and solve problem on centripetal force,

    Learning Outcome:

    6.2 Centripetal force (2 hours)

    r

    va

    2

    c

    r

    mvF

    2

    c

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    8

    Figure 6.3 shows a particle moving with constant speed in a

    circular path of radius, r with centre at O. The particle moves

    from A to B in a time, t.

    6.2.1 Centripetal (radial) acceleration,rc aa

    or

    Figure 6.3

    1v

    2v

    The arc length AB is given by

    The velocities of the particle at A

    and B are v1 and v2 respectively where

    rs

    r

    s

    vvv 21

    (1)

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    9

    Let PQ and PR represent the velocity vectors v1 and v2respectively, as shown in Figure 6.4.

    Then QR represent the change in velocity vector v of the particle in time interval t. Since the angle between PQ and PR is small hence

    By equating (1) and (2) then

    12 vvv

    2v

    1v

    P Q

    RFigure 6.4

    PQQR vv

    v

    v (2)

    v

    v

    r

    s

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    10

    Dividing by time, t, thus

    t

    v

    v

    1

    t

    s

    r

    1

    v

    a

    r

    v

    r

    va

    2

    c

    pathcircular of radius : r

    onaccelerati lcentripeta : cawhere

    velocity gential)linear(tan : v

    OR vra 2c

    frequency)(angular locity angular ve :

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    11

    ca

    ca

    ca

    caca

    ca

    Figure 6.5

    The centripetal acceleration is defined as the acceleration of

    an object moving in circular path whose direction is

    towards the centre of the circular path and whose

    magnitude is equal to the square of the speed divided by

    the radius.

    The direction of centripetal (radial) acceleration is always

    directed toward the centre of the circle and perpendicular to

    the linear (tangential) velocity as shown in Figure 6.5.

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    12

    For uniform circular motion, the magnitude of the centripetal

    acceleration always constant but its direction continuously

    changes as the object moves around the circular path.

    Because of

    therefore we can obtain the alternative expression of centripetal

    acceleration is

    2

    2

    cT

    ra

    4

    T

    rv

    2

    r

    a

    2

    Tr

    c

    2

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    13

    A motorbike moving at a constant speed 20.0 m s1 in a circular

    track of radius 25.0 m. Calculate

    a. the centripetal acceleration of the motorbike,

    b. the time taken for the motorbike to complete one revolution.

    Solution :

    a. From the definition of the centripetal acceleration, thus

    b. From the alternate formula of the centripetal acceleration, hence

    Example 6.1 :

    m 25.0 ;s m 20.0 1 rv

    r

    va

    2

    c

    2

    2

    cT

    ra

    4

    25.0

    20.02

    ca

    2

    25.0416.0

    T

    2

    T

    rv

    2OR

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    14

    A car initially travelling eastward turns north by travelling in a

    circular path at uniform speed as shown in Figure 6.6. The length

    of the arc ABC is 235 m and the car completes the turn in 36.0 s.

    Determine

    a. the acceleration when the car is at B located at an angle of

    35.0,

    b. the cars speed,

    c. its average acceleration during the 36.0 s interval.

    Example 6.2 :

    Figure 6.6

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    15

    Solution :

    a. The period of the car is given by

    The radius of the circular path is

    Therefore the magnitude of the centripetal acceleration is

    s 36.0 m, 235 tsABC

    36.044 tTs 144T

    rsABC

    2

    235 r

    2

    2

    cT

    ra

    4 2

    2

    144

    1504ca

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    16

    Solution :

    b. From the definition of the speed, thus

    c. 1st method :

    By using the triangle method for vector addition, thus the change

    in the velocity is given by

    s 36.0 m, 235 tsABC

    t

    s

    t

    sv ABC

    36.0

    235v

    Cv

    Av

    AC vvv

    2A2

    C vvv

    22 6.536.53 v

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    17

    Solution :

    Therefore the magnitude of the average acceleration is

    and its direction :

    s 36.0 m, 235 tsABC

    t

    vaav

    36.0

    9.24ava

    A

    C1

    v

    v tan

    6.53

    6.53tan 1

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    18

    Solution :

    c. 2nd method :

    x-component :

    y-component :

    s 36.0 m, 235 tsABC

    t

    vv

    t

    va AxCxx

    xav

    36.0

    6.530

    xava

    t

    vv

    t

    va

    AyCyy

    yav

    36.0

    06.53

    yava

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    19

    Solution :

    Therefore the magnitude of the average acceleration is

    and

    s 36.0 m, 235 tsABC

    2yav

    2

    xavavaaa

    22 0.1810.181 ava

    xav

    yav1

    a

    a tan

    0.181

    0.181tan 1

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    20

    A boy whirls a marble in a horizontal circle of radius 2.00 m and at

    height 1.65 m above the ground. The string breaks and the marble

    flies off horizontally and strikes the ground after traveling a

    horizontal distance of 13.0 m. Calculate

    a. the speed of the marble in the circular path,

    b. the centripetal acceleration of the marble while in the circular

    motion.

    (Given g = 9.81 m s-2)

    Solution :

    Example 6.3 :

    1.65 m

    Before

    13.0 m

    u

    After

    u

    r =2.00 m

    1.65 m

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    21

    Solution :

    a. From the diagram :

    The time taken for the marble to strike the ground is

    The initial speed of the marble after the string breaks is equal to

    the tangential speed of the marble in the horizontal circle.

    Therefore

    0 ; yx uuu

    29.812

    101.65 t

    2

    2

    1gttus yy

    m 1.65 ; m 13.0 yx ss

    0.58013.0 utus xx

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    22

    Solution :

    b. From the definition of the centripetal acceleration, thus

    r

    u

    r

    vac

    22

    2.00

    22.42

    ca

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    25

    6.3 Centripetal force6.3.1 Equation of centripetal force

    From Newtons second law of motion, a force must be associated with the centripetal acceleration. This force is

    known as the centripetal force and is given by

    amFF nett

    cc amF

    mvmrr

    mvF 2

    2

    c

    caa

    vrr

    va 2

    2

    c

    where cFF

    and

    and

    force lcentripeta :cFwhere

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    26

    ca

    cF

    cF

    cF

    ca

    ca

    v

    v

    v

    The centripetal force is defined as a force acting on a body

    causing it to move in a circular path of magnitude

    and its always directed towards the centre of the circular

    path.

    Its direction is in the same direction of the centripetal

    acceleration as shown in Figure 6.8.

    Figure 6.8

    r

    mvF

    2

    c

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    27

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    28

    cF

    ca v

    cF

    cF

    ca

    ca

    v

    v

    v

    v

    0Fc

    0Fc

    0ac

    0ac

    If the centripetal force suddenly stops to act on a body in the

    circular motion, the body flies off in a straight line with the

    constant tangential (linear) speed as show in Figure 6.9.

    Note :

    In uniform circular motion, the nett force on the system is

    centripetal force.

    The work done by the centripetal force is zero but the

    kinetic energy of the body is not zero and given by

    Figure 6.9

    222 mr2

    1mv

    2

    1K

    Simulation 6.1

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    29

    As a car makes a turn, the force of friction acting upon the turned wheels of the car provides centripetal force required for circular motion.

    As a bucket of water is tied to a string and spun in a circle, the tension force acting upon the bucket provides the centripetal force required for circular motion.

    As the moon orbits the Earth, the force of gravity acting upon the moon provides the centripetal force required for circular motion

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    30

    Without a centripetal force, an

    object in motion continues along a

    straight-line path.

    With a centripetal force, an object in

    motion will be accelerated and change its

    direction.

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    31

    Note that the centripetal force is proportional to the square of the velocity, implying that a doubling of speed will require four times the centripetal force to keep the motion in a circle. If the centripetal force must be provided by friction alone on a curve, an increase in speed could lead to an unexpected skid if friction is insufficient.

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    32

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    33

    Conical Pendulum

    Example 6.4 :

    Figure 6.10 shows a conical pendulum

    with a bob of mass 80.0 kg on a 10.0 m

    long string making an angle of 5.00 to the

    vertical.

    a. Sketch a free body diagram of the bob.

    b. Determine

    i. the tension in the string,

    ii. the speed and the period of the bob,

    iii. the radial acceleration of the bob.

    (Given g =9.81 m s2)

    6.3.2 Examples of uniform circular motion

    Figure 6.10

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    34

    Solution :

    a. The free body diagram of the bob :

    b. i. From the diagram,

    5.00 ;m 10.0 ;kg 80.0 lm

    gm

    T

    T cos

    T sin

    0 yFmgT cos

    ca

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    35

    The centripetal force is contributed

    by the horizontal component of the

    tension.

    Solution :

    b. ii.

    5.00 ;m 10.0 ;kg 80.0 lm

    cx FF

    r

    mvT

    2

    sin

    l

    mvT

    2

    sinsin

    r

    ll

    r sin

    lr sin

    m

    Tlv

    2sin

    80.0

    5.00sin10.07882

    v

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    36

    Solution :

    b. ii. and the period of the bob is given by

    iii. From the definition of the radial acceleration, hence

    5.00 ;m 10.0 ;kg 80.0 lm

    T

    rv

    2

    T

    lv

    sin2

    T

    5.00sin10.020.865

    l

    va

    2

    rsin

    5.00sin10.0

    0.8652

    ra

    r

    va

    2

    r

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    37

    Centre of

    circle

    Motion rounds a curve on a flat (unbanked) track (for car,

    motorcycle, bicycle, etc)

    Example 6.5 :

    A car of mass 2000 kg rounds a circular turn of radius 20 m. The

    road is flat and the coefficient of friction between tires and the road

    is 0.70.

    a. Sketch a free body diagram of the car.

    b. Determine the maximum cars speed without skidding.

    (Given g = 9.81 m s-2)

    Solution :

    a. The free body diagram of the car :

    gm

    N

    f

    0.70 ;m 20 ;kg 2000 rm

    ca

    Picture 6.1

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    38

    Solution :

    b. From the diagram in (a),

    y-component :

    x-component : The centripetal force is provided by the frictional

    force between the wheel (4 tyres) and the road.

    Therefore

    0.70 ;m 20 ;kg 2000 rm

    0yF mgN

    r

    mvF

    2

    x

    r

    mvf

    2

    rgv r

    mvmg

    2

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    39

    T

    gm

    r

    ca

    Motion in a horizontal circle

    Example 6.6 :

    A ball of mass 150 g is attached to one end of a string 1.10 m long.

    The ball makes 2.00 revolution per second in a horizontal circle.

    a. Sketch the free body diagram for the ball.

    b. Determine

    i. the centripetal acceleration of the ball,

    ii. the magnitude of the tension in the string.

    Solution :

    a. The free body diagram for the ball :

    Hz 2.00 ;m 1.10 ;kg 0.150 frlm

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    40

    Solution :

    b. i. The linear speed of the ball is given by

    Therefore the centripetal acceleration is

    ii. From the diagram in (a), the centripetal force enables the ball

    to move in a circle is provided by the tension in the string.

    Hence

    Hz 2.00 ;m 1.10 ;kg 0.150 frlm

    rfT

    rv

    2

    2

    2.001.102v

    r

    va

    2

    c 1.10

    13.82

    ca

    ccx maFF cmaT

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    41

    Motion in a vertical circle

    Example 6.7 :

    A small remote control car with mass 1.20 kg moves at a constant

    speed of v = 15.0 m s1 in a vertical circle track of radius 3.00 m as shown in Figure 6.12. Determine the magnitude of the reaction

    force exerted on the car by the track at

    a. point A,

    b. point B.

    (Given g = 9.81 m s2)

    m 3.00

    v

    v

    A

    B

    Figure 6.12

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    42

    Solution :

    a. The free body diagram of the car at point A :

    1s m 15.0 ;m 3.00 ;kg 1.20 vrm

    gm

    AN

    ca

    r

    mvF

    2

    r

    mvmgN

    2

    A

    3.00

    15.01.209.811.20

    2

    AN

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    43

    Solution :

    b. The free body diagram of the car at point B :

    1s m 15.0 ;m 3.00 ;kg 1.20 vrm

    BN

    ca

    r

    mvF

    2

    r

    mvmgN

    2

    B

    3.00

    15.01.209.811.20

    2

    BN

    gm

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    44

    A rider on a Ferris wheel moves in a vertical circle of radius,

    r = 8 m at constant speed, v as shown in Figure 6.13. If the time taken to makes one rotation is 10 s and the mass of the rider is

    60 kg, Calculate the normal force exerted on the rider

    a. at the top of the circle,

    b. at the bottom of the circle.

    (Given g = 9.81 m s-2)

    Example 6.8 :

    v

    v

    Figure 6.13

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    45

    Solution :

    a. The constant speed of the rider is

    The free body diagram of the rider at the top of the circle :

    s 10 ;m 8 ;kg 60 Trm

    T

    rv

    2 10

    82v

    ca

    gm

    tN

    r

    mvF

    2

    r

    mvNmg

    2

    t

    8

    5.03609.8160

    2

    tN

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    46

    Solution :

    b. The free body diagram of the rider at the bottom of the circle :

    s 10 ;m 8 ;kg 60 Trm

    ca

    gm

    r

    mvF

    2

    r

    mvmgN

    2

    b

    8

    5.03609.8160

    2

    bNbN

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    47

    A sphere of mass 5.0 kg is tied to an inelastic string. It moves in a

    vertical circle of radius 55 cm at a constant speed of 3.0 m s1 as

    shown in Figure 6.14. By the aid of the free body diagram,

    determine the tension in the string at points A, D and E.

    (Given g = 9.81 m s-2)

    Example 6.9 :

    Figure 6.14

    A

    D

    E 3.0 m s1

    3.0 m s1

    3.0 m s1

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    48

    Solution :

    The free body diagram of the sphere at :

    Point A,

    Point D,

    1s m 0.3 ;m 55.0 ;kg 0.5 vrm

    ca

    r

    mvF

    2

    r

    mvmgTA

    2

    0.55

    3.05.09.815.0

    2

    AT

    A

    gmAT

    ca

    D

    gm

    DT

    r

    mvTD

    2

    0.55

    3.05.02

    DT

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    49

    Solution :

    The free body diagram of the sphere at :

    Point E,

    Caution :

    For vertical uniform circular motion only,

    the normal force or tension is maximum at the bottom of

    the circle.

    the normal force or tension is minimum at the top of the

    circle.

    1s m 0.3 ;m 55.0 ;kg 0.5 vrm

    ca r

    mvmgTE

    2

    0.55

    3.05.09.815.0

    2

    ETE

    gm

    ET

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    50

    Exercise 6.2 :

    Use gravitational acceleration, g = 9.81 m s2

    1. A cyclist goes around a curve of 50 m radius at a speed of

    15 m s1. The road is banked at an angle to the horizontal and the cyclist travels at the right angle with the surface of the road.

    The mass of the bicycle and the cyclist together equals 95 kg.

    Calculate

    a. the magnitude of the centripetal acceleration of the cyclist,

    b. the magnitude of the normal force which the road exerts on

    the bicycle and the cyclist,

    c. the angle .ANS. : 4.5 m s2; 1.02 kN; 24.6

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    51

    Exercise 6.2 :

    2. A ball of mass 0.35 kg is attached to the end of a horizontal

    cord and is rotated in a circle of radius 1.0 m on a frictionless

    horizontal surface. If the cord will break when the tension in it

    exceeds 80 N, determine

    a. the maximum speed of the ball,

    b. the minimum period of the ball.

    ANS. : 15.1 m s1; 0.416 s

    Figure 6.14

    3. A small mass, m is set on the surface of a sphere as shown in Figure 6.14.

    If the coefficient of static friction is s= 0.60, calculate the angle would the mass start sliding.

    ANS. : 31

    m

    O

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    52

    Exercise 6.2 :

    4. A ball of mass 1.34 kg is connected

    by means of two massless string to

    a vertical rotating rod as shown in

    Figure 6.15. The strings are tied to

    the rod and are taut. The tension in

    the upper string is 35 N.

    a. Sketch a free body diagram for

    the ball.

    b. Calculate

    i. the magnitude of the tension

    in the lower string,

    ii. the nett force on the ball,

    iii. the speed of the ball.

    ANS. : 8.74 N; 37.9 N (radially

    inward); 6.45 m s1

    Figure 6.15

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 6

    53

    THE END

    Next ChapterCHAPTER 7 :

    Gravitation

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    1

    CHAPTER 7:

    Gravitation

    (2 Hours)

    ww

    w.k

    ms.m

    atr

    ik.e

    du

    .my/p

    hysic

    s

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    In this chapter, we learns about

    7.1 Gravitational force and field strength

    7.2 Gravitational potential

    7.3 Satellite motion in a circular orbit

    2

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    7.1 Gravitational Force and Field

    Strength

    7.1.1 Newtons law of gravitation

    7.1.2 Gravitational Field

    7.1.3 Gravitational force and field strength

    3

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    4

    At the end of this chapter, students should be able to:

    State and use the Newtons law of gravitation,

    Learning Outcome:

    7.1 Newtons law of gravitation (1 hour)

    2

    21

    r

    mmGFg

    ww

    w.k

    ms.m

    atr

    ik.e

    du

    .my/p

    hysic

    s

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    5

    7.1.1 Newtons law of gravitation

    States that a magnitude of an attractive force between two

    point masses is directly proportional to the product of their

    masses and inversely proportional to the square of the

    distance between them.

    OR mathematically,

    2

    1

    rFg 21mmFg and

    2

    21

    r

    mmFg 2

    21

    r

    mmGFg

    force nalGravitatio:gF2 and 1 particle of masses:, 21 mm

    2 and 1 particlebetween distance: r2211 kg m N x106.67 Constant nalgravitatio Universal: G

    where

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    6

    The statement can also be shown by using the Figure 7.1.

    where

    2

    211221

    r

    mmGFFF g

    1m 2m

    r12F

    Figure 7.1

    21F

    2 particleon 1 particleby force nalGravitatio:12F

    1 particleon 2 particleby force nalGravitatio:21F

    Simulation 7.1

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    7

    Figures 7.2a and 7.2b show the gravitational force, Fg varies with the distance, r.

    Notes:

    Every spherical object with constant density can be reduced to a point mass at the centre of the sphere.

    The gravitational forces always attractive in nature and the forces always act along the line joining the two point masses.

    gF

    r0

    gF

    2

    1

    r0

    21mGmgradient

    Figure 7.2a Figure 7.2b

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    8

    A spaceship of mass 9000 kg travels from the Earth to the Moon

    along a line that passes through the Earths centre and the Moons

    centre. The average distance separating Earth and the Moon is

    384,000 km. Determine the distance of the spaceship from the

    Earth at which the gravitational force due to the Earth twice the

    magnitude of the gravitational force due to the Moon.

    (Given the mass of the Earth, mE=6.001024 kg, the mass of the

    Moon, mM=7.351022 kg and the universal gravitational constant,

    G=6.671011 N m2 kg2)

    Example 7.1 :

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    9

    Solution :

    Given

    kg; 107.35 kg; 106.00 22M24

    E mm

    m 103.84 kg; 0900 8EMs rm

    Em Mmsm

    x

    EMr

    xr EM

    EsF

    MsF

    MsEs F2F

    2EMsM

    2

    sE 2xr

    mGm

    x

    mGm

    ME

    2

    EM

    2

    2m

    m

    xr

    x

    2224

    28

    2

    107.352

    106.00

    103.84

    x

    x

    m 103.32 8x

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    10

    Two spheres of masses 3.2 kg and 2.5 kg respectively are fixed at

    points A and B as shown in Figure 7.3. If a 50 g sphere is placed

    at point C, determine

    a. the resultant force acting on it.

    b. the magnitude of the spheres acceleration.

    (Given G = 6.671011 N m2 kg2)

    Example 7.2 :

    Figure 7.3

    A B

    C

    cm 8kg 3.2 kg 2.5

    g 50

    cm 6

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    11

    Solution :

    a.

    The magnitude of the forces on mC,

    22

    311

    2

    AC

    CAA

    1010

    10503.2106.67

    r

    mGmF

    N 101.07 9AF

    kg 1050kg; .52 kg; 3.2 3CBA mmm

    m 1010m; 106 2AC2

    BC rr

    0.6sin 0.8cos

    A B

    C

    m 108 2-

    m 10 6 2

    m 10 10 2

    AF

    BF

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    12

    Solution :

    22

    311

    2

    BC

    CBB

    106

    10502.5106.67

    r

    mGmF

    N 10.322 9BF

    Force x-component (N) y-component (N)

    AF

    F cosA F sinA

    0.8101.07 910108.56

    0.6101.07 910106.42

    BF

    BF09102.32

    kg 1050kg; .52 kg; 3.2 3CBA mmm

    m 1010m; 106 2AC2

    BC rr

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    13

    Solution :

    The magnitude of the nett force is

    and its direction is

    N 108.56 10 xF

    22

    yx FFF

    N 10.96210.322106.42 9910 yF

    29210 10.962108.56

    N 10.083 9F

    10

    911

    10.568

    10.962tantan

    x

    y

    F

    F

    .973 (254 from +x axis anticlockwise)

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    14

    Solution :

    b. By using the Newtons second law of motion, thus

    and the direction of the acceleration in the same direction of the

    nett force on the mC i.e. 254 from +x axis anticlockwise.

    amF C a39 1050103.08

    28 s m 10.166 a

    3

    9

    1050

    103.08

    a

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    15

    is defined as a region of space surrounding a body that has

    the property of mass where the attractive force is experienced if a test mass placed in the region.

    Field lines are used to show gravitational field around an object

    with mass.

    For spherical objects (such as the Earth) the field is radial as

    shown in Figure 7.4.

    7.1.2 Gravitational Field

    M

    Figure 7.4

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    16

    The gravitational field in small region near the Earths surfaceare uniform and can be drawn parallel to each other as shown in Figure 7.5.

    The field lines indicate two things:

    The arrows the direction of the field

    The spacing the strength of the field

    Figure 7.5

    The gravitational field is a conservative field in which the work done in moving a body from one point to another is independent of the path taken.

    Note:

    New

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    17

    Exercise 7.1 :

    Given G = 6.671011 N m2 kg2

    1. Four identical masses of 800 kg each are placed at the corners

    of a square whose side length is 10.0 cm. Determine the nett

    gravitational force on one of the masses, due to the other three.

    ANS. : 8.2103 N; 45

    2. Three 5.0 kg spheres are located in the xy plane as shown in Figure 7.6.Calculate the magnitude

    of the nett gravitational force

    on the sphere at the origin due to

    the other two spheres.

    ANS. : 2.1108 N

    Figure 7.6

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    18

    Exercise 7.1 :

    3.

    In Figure 8.7, four spheres form the corners of a square

    whose side is 2.0 cm long. Calculate the magnitude and

    direction of the nett gravitational force on a central sphere with

    mass of m5 = 250 kg.

    ANS. : 1.68102 N; 45

    Figure 7.7

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    19

    At the end of this chapter, students should be able to:

    Define gravitational field strength as gravitational force per unit mass,

    Derive and use the equation for gravitational field strength.

    Sketch a graph of ag against r and explain the change in agwith altitude and depth from the surface of the earth.

    Learning Outcome:

    7.1.3 Gravitational force and field strength

    m

    Fag

    g

    2r

    MGa g

    ww

    w.k

    ms.m

    atr

    ik.e

    du

    .my/p

    hysic

    s

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    20

    7.1.3 Gravitational field strength, is defined as the gravitational force per unit mass

    of a body (test mass) placed at a point.

    OR

    It is a vector quantity.

    The S.I. unit of the gravitational field strength is N kg1 or m s2.

    ga

    m

    Fa

    g

    g

    where

    strength field nalGravitatio:ga

    force nalGravitatio:gF

    mass)(test body a of mass:m

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    21

    It is also known as gravitational acceleration (the free-fall acceleration).

    Its direction is in the same direction of the gravitational force.

    Another formula for the gravitational field strength at a point is given by

    m

    Fa

    g

    g and 2g r

    GMmF

    2g r

    GMa

    masspoint and massst between te distance : r

    2g

    1

    r

    GMm

    ma

    where

    masspoint theof mass :M

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    22

    Figure 7.8 shows the direction of the gravitational field strength

    on a point S at distance r from the centre of the planet.

    2r

    GMag

    r

    M

    Figure 7.8

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    23

    The gravitational field in the small region near the Earths

    surface( r R) are uniform where its strength is 9.81 m s2 and its direction can be shown by using the Figure 7.9.

    Figure 7.9

    2R

    GMgag

    Earth theof radius :Rwhere2s m 9.81onaccelerati nalgravitatio : g

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    24

    Determine the Earths gravitational field strength

    a. on the surface.

    b. at an altitude of 350 km.

    (Given G = 6.671011 N m2 kg2, mass of the Earth,

    M = 6.00 1024 kg and radius of the Earth, R = 6.40 106 m)

    Solution :

    a.

    Example 7.3 :

    RM

    gaRr g m; 1040.66

    26

    2411

    21040.6

    1000.61067.6

    R

    GMg

    The gravitational field strength is

    1kg N 77.9 g OR 2s m 77.9

    rg

    (Towards the centre of the Earth)

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    25

    Solution :

    b.

    2g r

    GMa

    26

    2411

    1075.6

    106.001067.6

    2g s m 78.8

    a(Towards the centre of the Earth)

    R M

    hRr 36 103501040.6

    m 1075.6 6r

    ga

    h

    r

    The gravitational field strength is given by

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    26

    The gravitational field strength on the Earths surface is 9.81 N kg1.

    Calculate

    a. the gravitational field strength at a point C at distance 1.5R from

    the Earths surface where R is the radius of the Earth.

    b. the weight of a rock of mass 2.5 kg at point C.

    Solution :

    a. The gravitational field strength on the Earths surface is

    The distance of point C from the Earths centre is

    Example 7.4 :

    1kg N 81.9 g

    1

    2kg N 81.9

    R

    GMg

    RRRr 5.25.1

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    27

    Solution :

    a. Thus the gravitational field strength at point C is given by

    b. Given

    The weight of the rock is

    N 93.3W

    2

    Cr

    GMag 25.2 R

    GMag

    225.6

    1

    R

    GM

    gmaW kg 5.2m

    57.15.2

    1kg N 57.181.925.6

    1 ga

    (Towards the centre of the Earth)

    (Towards the centre of the Earth)

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    28

    Figure 8.10 shows an object A at a distance of 5 km from the object

    B. The mass A is four times of the mass B. Determine the location

    of a point on the line joining both objects from B at which the nett

    gravitational field strength is zero.

    Example 7.5 :

    A

    B

    km 5

    Figure 7.10

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    29

    Solution :

    At point C,

    BA3 4 m; 105 MMr

    0nett

    ga

    2B

    23

    B

    105

    4

    x

    M

    x

    M

    m 10.671 3x

    r

    ABC

    xr x

    2ga

    1ga

    21 gg aa

    2B

    2

    A

    x

    GM

    xr

    GM

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    30

    Outside the Earth ( r > R)

    Figure 8.11 shows a test mass which is outside the Earth and at

    a distance r from the centre.

    The gravitational field strength outside the Earth is

    7.1.4 Variation of gravitational field strength on the

    distance from the centre of the Earth

    R

    rM

    Figure 8.11

    2g r

    GMa

    2g

    1

    ra

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    31

    On the Earth ( r = R)

    Figure 7.12 shows a test mass on the Earths surface.

    The gravitational field strength on the Earths surface is

    R

    rM

    Figure 7.12

    2

    2gs m 81.9 g

    R

    GMa

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    32

    R

    r

    M

    'M

    Inside the Earth ( r < R)

    Figure 7.13 shows a test mass which is inside the Earth and at

    distance r from the centre.

    The gravitational field strength inside the Earth is given by

    Figure 7.13

    2g

    '

    r

    GMa

    where

    portion spherical of mass the: 'M radius, ofEarth theof r

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    33

    By assuming the Earth is a solid sphere and constant

    density, hence

    Therefore the gravitational field strength inside the Earth is

    V

    V

    M

    M

    ''

    3

    3

    3

    34

    3

    34'

    R

    r

    R

    r

    M

    M

    MR

    rM

    3

    3

    '

    2

    3

    3

    gr

    MR

    rG

    a

    rR

    GMa

    3g ra g

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    34

    The variation of gravitational field strength, ag as a function of

    distance from the centre of the Earth, r is shown in Figure 7.14.

    Figure 7.14

    R

    ga

    r0 R

    gR

    GMa

    2g

    ra g2g

    1

    ra

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    35

    At the end of this chapter, students should be able to:

    Define gravitational potential in a gravitational field.

    Derive and use the formulae,

    Sketch the variation of gravitational potential, V with distance, r from the centre of the earth.

    Learning Outcome:

    7.2 Gravitational potential ( hour)

    r

    GMV

    ww

    w.k

    ms.m

    atr

    ik.e

    du

    .my/p

    hysic

    s

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    36

    7.2 Gravitational potential

    7.2.1 Work done by the external force

    Consider an external force, F

    is required to bring a test

    mass, m from r1 to r2 ,

    as shown in Figure 7.18.

    At the distance r2 from the

    centre of the Earth,

    The work done by the

    external force through

    the small displacement

    dr is

    m

    M

    1r2r

    F

    gF

    dr

    Figure 7.18

    gFF

    0cosFdrdW drFdW g

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    37

    Therefore the work done by the external force to bring test

    mass, m from r1 to r2 is

    2

    1

    r

    rgdrFdW

    2

    12

    r

    rdr

    r

    GMmW

    2r

    GMmFg and

    2

    1

    1r

    rrGMmW

    2

    12

    1r

    rdr

    rGMmW

    21

    1121 rr

    GMmW rr

    where

    distance final: 2rdistance initial : 1r

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    38

    at a point is defined as the work done by an external force in bringing a test mass from infinity to a point per unit the test mass.

    OR mathematically, V is written as:

    It is a scalar quantity.

    Its dimension is given by

    7.2.2 Gravitational potential, V

    m

    WV

    where

    mass test theof mass :m point aat potential nalgravitatio :V

    mass test a bringingin done work :W point a oinfinity t from

    mW

    V M

    TML 22 V

    22TL V

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    39

    The S.I unit for gravitational potential is m2 s2 or J kg1.

    Another formula for the gravitational potential at a point is given by

    21

    11

    rrm

    GMmV

    m

    WV and

    21

    11

    rrGMmW

    where 1r and rr 2

    rm

    GMmV

    11

    r

    GMV

    where

    point ebetween th distance : rM mass,point theand

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    40

    The gravitational potential difference between point A and B

    (VAB) in the Earths gravitational field is defined as the work done in bringing a test mass from point B to point A per

    unit the test mass.

    OR mathematically, VAB is written as:

    BABA

    AB -VVm

    WV

    where

    A.point toBpoint from

    mass test thebringingin done work :BAW

    Apoint at potential nalgravitatio : AV

    Bpoint at potential nalgravitatio : BV

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    41

    Figure 7.19 shows two points A and B at a distance rA and rBfrom the centre of the Earth respectively in the Earths gravitational field.

    M

    A

    BrA

    rB

    Figure 7.19

    The gravitational potential

    difference between the points A

    and B is given by

    BAAB VVV

    BA

    ABr

    GM

    r

    GMV

    AB

    AB

    11

    rrGMV

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    42

    The gravitational potential difference between point B and A in

    the Earths gravitational field is given by

    The variation of gravitational potential, V when the test mass, mmove away from the Earths surface is illustrated by the graph in Figure 7.20.

    m

    WVVV ABABBA

    R

    R

    GM

    r0

    V

    rV

    1

    Note:

    The Gravitational potential at infinity is zero. 0V

    Figure 7.20

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    43

    When in orbit, a satellite attracts the Earth with a force of 19 kN

    and the satellites gravitational potential due to the Earth is 5.45107 J kg1.

    a. Calculate the satellites distance from the Earths surface.

    b. Determine the satellites mass.

    (Given G = 6.671011 N m2 kg2, mass of the Earth,

    M = 5.981024 kg and radius of the Earth , R = 6.38106 m)

    Solution :

    Example 7.7 :

    R

    gF

    rh

    173 kg J 10455 N; 1019 .VFg

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    44

    Solution :

    a. By using the formulae of gravitational potential, thus

    Therefore the satellites distance from the Earths surface is

    r

    GMV

    m 1032.7 6r

    66 1038.61032.7 h

    m 104.9 5h

    r

    .. 24117 10985106761045.5

    Rhr

    173 kg J 10455 N; 1019 .VFg

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    45

    Solution :

    b. From the Newtons law of gravitation, hence

    2r

    GMmFg

    kg 2552m

    26

    24113

    10327

    10985106761019

    .

    m..

    173 kg J 10455 N; 1019 .VFg

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    46

    At the end of this chapter, students should be able to:

    Explain satellite motion with:

    velocity,

    period,

    Learning Outcome:

    7.3 Satellite motion in a circular orbit ( hour)

    r

    GMv

    GM

    rT

    3

    2

    ww

    w.k

    ms.m

    atr

    ik.e

    du

    .my/p

    hysic

    s

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    47

    7.3 Satellite motion in a circular orbit7.3.1 Tangential (linear/orbital) velocity, v

    Consider a satellite of mass, m travelling around the Earth of mass, M, radius, R, in a circular orbit of radius, r with constant tangential (orbital) speed, v as shown in Figure 7.22.

    Figure 7.22

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    48

    The centripetal force, Fc is contributed by the gravitational force

    of attraction, Fg exerted on the satellite by the Earth.

    Hence the tangential velocity, v is given by

    ccg maFF

    r

    mv

    r

    GMm 2

    2

    r

    GMv

    where

    Earth theof mass :M

    from satellite theof distance :rEarth theof centre the

    constant nalgravitatio universal : G

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    49

    For a satellite close to the Earths surface,

    Therefore

    The relationship between tangential velocity and angular

    velocity is

    Hence , the period, T of the satellite orbits around the Earth is given by

    Rr and 2gRGM

    gRv

    T

    rrv

    2

    r

    GM

    T

    r2

    GM

    rT

    3

    2

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    50

    Figure 8.23 shows a synchronous (geostationary) satellite which stays above the same point on the equator of the Earth.

    The satellite have the following characteristics:

    It revolves in the same direction as the Earth.

    It rotates with the same period of rotation as that of the Earth (24 hours).

    It moves directly above the equator.

    The centre of a synchronous satellite orbit is at the centre of the Earth.

    It is used as a communication satellite.

    7.3.2 Synchronous (Geostationary) Satellite

    Figure 8.23

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    51

    The weight of a satellite in a circular orbit round the Earth is half of

    its weight on the surface of the Earth. If the mass of the satellite is

    800 kg, determine

    a. the altitude of the satellite,

    b. the speed of the satellite in the orbit,

    (Given G = 6.671011 N m2 kg2, mass of the Earth,

    M = 6.001024 kg, and radius of the Earth , R = 6.40106 m)

    Example 7.12 :

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    52

    Solution :

    a. The satellite orbits the Earth in the circular path, thus

    b. The speed of the satellite is given by

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    53

    The radius of the Moons orbit around the Earth is 3.8 108 m and the period of the orbit is 27.3 days. The masses of the Earth and

    Moon are 6.0 1024 kg and 7.4 1022 kg respectively. Calculate

    the total energy of the Moon in the orbit.

    Solution :

    The period of the satellite is

    The tangential speed of the satellite is

    Example 7.13 :

    s m 50.9 kg; 120 m; 1050.8 26 gmr

    T

    rv

    2

    13 s m 1024.4 v

    36005.3Ts 12600T

    12600

    1050.82 6

    v

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    54

    Solution :

    A satellite orbits the planet in the circular path, thus

    cg FF

    2

    2 r

    mv

    r

    GMm

    s m 50.9 kg; 120 m; 1050.8 26 gmr

    r

    GMv 2 and

    2gRGM

    r

    gRv

    22

    6

    223

    1050.8

    50.91024.4

    R

    m 1001.4 6R

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    55

    Exercise 7.2 :

    Given G = 6.671011 N m2 kg2

    1. A rocket is launched vertically from the surface of the Earth

    at speed 25 km s-1. Determine its speed when it escapes from

    the gravitational field of the Earth.

    (Given g on the Earth = 9.81 m s2, radius of the Earth ,

    R = 6.38 106 m)

    ANS. : 2.24104 m s1

    2. A satellite revolves round the Earth in a circular orbit whose

    radius is five times that of the radius of the Earth. The

    gravitational field strength at the surface of the Earth is

    9.81 N kg1. Determine

    a. the tangential speed of the satellite in the orbit,

    b. the angular frequency of the satellite.

    (Given radius of the Earth , R = 6.38 106 m)

    ANS. : 3538 m s1 ; 1.11104 rad s1

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    56

    Exercise 7.2 :

    3. A geostationary satellite of mass 2400 kg is placed

    35.92 Mm from the Earths surface orbits the Earth along a circular path.

    Determine

    a. the angular velocity of the satellite,

    b. the tangential speed of the satellite,

    c. the acceleration of the satellite,

    d. the force of attraction between the Earth and the satellite,

    e. the mass of the Earth.

    (Given radius of the Earth , R = 6.38 106 m)

    ANS. : 7.27105 rad s1; 3.08103 m s1; 0.224 m s2;

    537 N ; 6.001024 kg

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 7

    57

    THE ENDNext Chapter

    CHAPTER 8 :

    Simple Harmonic Motion

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  • 1PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    CHAPTER 8: CHAPTER 8: Rotational of rigid bodyRotational of rigid body

    (8 Hours)(8 Hours)

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    2

    At the end of this chapter, students should be able to: At the end of this chapter, students should be able to: a) Define and describea) Define and describe::

    angular displacement (angular displacement ()) average angular velocity (average angular velocity (avav)) instantaneous angular velocity (instantaneous angular velocity ()) average angular acceleration (average angular acceleration (avav) ) instantaneous angular acceleration (instantaneous angular acceleration (). ).

    b) Relate b) Relate parameters in rotational motion with their corresponding parameters in rotational motion with their corresponding quantities in linear motion.quantities in linear motion. Write and use Write and use ::

    c) c) UseUse equations for rotational motion with constant angular equations for rotational motion with constant angular acceleration.acceleration.

    Learning Outcome:

    8.1 Rotational Kinematics (2 hour)

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    s=r ; v=r ;a t=r ;ac=r2= v

    2

    r

    =0t =0 t12 t

    2 2=022

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    3

    8.1 Parameters in rotational motion8.1.1 Angular displacement, is defined as an angle through which a point or line has an angle through which a point or line has

    been rotated in a specified direction about a specified axis.been rotated in a specified direction about a specified axis. The S.I. unit of the angular displacement is radian (rad)radian (rad). Figure 8.1 shows a point P on a rotating compact disc (CD)

    moves through an arc length s on a circular path of radius r about a fixed axis through point O.

    Figure 8.1Figure 8.1

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    4

    From Figure 8.1, thus

    Others unit for angular displacement is degree (degree ()) and revolution (rev)revolution (rev). Conversion factor :

    Sign convention of angular displacement : PositivePositive if the rotational motion is anticlockwiseanticlockwise. NegativeNegative if the rotational motion is clockwiseclockwise.

    1 rev=2 rad=360

    = sr OR s=rwhere : angle angular displacement in radian

    s : arc lengthr : radius of the circle

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    5

    Average angular velocity, Average angular velocity, avav is defined as the rate of change of angular displacementthe rate of change of angular displacement. Equation :

    Instantaneous angular velocity, Instantaneous angular velocity, is defined as the instantaneous rate of change of angular the instantaneous rate of change of angular

    displacementdisplacement. Equation :

    8.1.2 Angular velocity

    av=21t2t1

    = t

    = limitt 0

    t =

    ddt

    where 2 : final angular displacement in radian

    t : time interval1 : initial angular displacement in radian

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    6

    It is a vector quantityvector quantity. The unit of angular velocity is radian per second (rad sradian per second (rad s-1-1)) Others unit is revolution per minute (rev minrevolution per minute (rev min11 or rpm) or rpm)

    Conversion factor:

    Note : Every partEvery part of a rotating rigid body has the same angular same angular

    velocityvelocity.Direction of the angular velocityDirection of the angular velocity Its direction can be determine by using right hand grip ruleright hand grip rule

    where

    1 rpm =260 rad s1=

    30 rad s

    1

    ThumbThumb : direction of angular velocityangular velocityCurl fingersCurl fingers : direction of rotationrotation

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    7

    Figures 8.2 and 8.3 show the right hand grip rule for determining the direction of the angular velocity.

    Figure 8.2Figure 8.2

    Figure 8.3Figure 8.3

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    8

    The angular displacement, of the wheel is given by

    where in radians and t in seconds. The diameter of the wheel is 0.56 m. Determine

    a. the angle, in degree, at time 2.2 s and 4.8 s,b. the distance that a particle on the rim moves during that time interval,c. the average angular velocity, in rad s1 and in rev min1 (rpm), between 2.2 s and 4.8 s,d. the instantaneous angular velocity at time 3.0 s.

    Example 8.1 :

    =5t2 t

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    9

    Solution :Solution :

    a. At time, t1 =2.2 s :

    At time, t2 =4.8 s :

    r=d2=0 .56

    2 =0 . 28 m

    1=5 2. 22 2.2

    1=22 rad

    2=5 4 .824 .8

    2=110 rad

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    10

    Solution :Solution :

    b. By applying the equation of arc length,

    Therefore

    c. The average angular velocity in rad s1 is given by

    r=d2=0 .56

    2 =0 . 28 m

    s=rs=r=r 21 s=0 . 28 11022

    av=t=21t2t1

    av=11022 4 . 82. 2

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    11

    Solution :Solution :c. and the average angular velocity in rev min1 is

    d. The instantaneous angular velocity as a function of time is

    At time, t =3.0 s :

    av=33 . 9 rad1 s 1 rev2 rad 60 s1 min

    = ddt5t2t

    =ddt

    =10 t1

    =10 3 .0 1

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    12

    A diver makes 2.5 revolutions on the way down from a 10 m high platform to the water. Assuming zero initial vertical velocity, calculate the divers average angular (rotational) velocity during a dive.(Given g = 9.81 m s2)Solution :Solution :

    Example 8.2 :

    u y=00=0

    10 m

    water1=2. 5 rev

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    13

    Solution :Solution :From the diagram,Thus

    Therefore the divers average angular velocity is

    1=2.52=5 rads y=10 m

    s y=u y t12 gt

    2

    10=0129 . 81 t 2

    av=10

    t

    av=501 . 43

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    14

    Average angular acceleration, Average angular acceleration, avav is defined as the rate of change of angular velocitythe rate of change of angular velocity. Equation :

    Instantaneous angular acceleration, Instantaneous angular acceleration, is defined as the instantaneous rate of change of angular the instantaneous rate of change of angular

    velocityvelocity. Equation :

    8.1.3 Angular acceleration

    av=21t2t1

    = t

    = limitt 0

    t =

    ddt

    where 2 : final angular velocity

    t : time interval1 : initial angular velocity

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    15Figure 8.4Figure 8.4

    It is a vector quantityvector quantity. The unit of angular acceleration is rad srad s22. Note:

    If the angular acceleration, is positivepositive, then the angular velocity, is increasingincreasing.

    If the angular acceleration, is negativenegative, then the angular velocity, is decreasingdecreasing.

    Direction of the angular accelerationDirection of the angular acceleration If the rotation is speeding upspeeding up, and in the same directionsame direction

    as shown in Figure 8.4.

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    16

    Figure 8.5Figure 8.5

    If the rotation is slowing downslowing down, and have the opposite opposite directiondirection as shown in Figure 8.5.

    Example 8.3 :The instantaneous angular velocity, of the flywheel is given by

    where in radian per second and t in seconds. Determinea. the average angular acceleration between 2.2 s and 4.8 s,b. the instantaneous angular acceleration at time, 3.0 s.

    =8t3t 2

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    17

    Solution :Solution :a. At time, t1 =2.2 s :

    At time, t2 =4.8 s :

    Therefore the average angular acceleration is

    1=8 2 . 2 32 . 22

    1=80 . 3 rad s1

    2=8 4 .8 34 . 8 2

    av=21t 2t1

    av=86280 .34 . 82. 2

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    18

    Solution :Solution :b. The instantaneous angular acceleration as a function of time is

    At time, t =3.0 s :

    = ddt8t3 t2

    = ddt

    =24 3 . 0 22 3 . 0

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    19

    Exercise 8.1 :1. If a disc 30 cm in diameter rolls 65 m along a straight line

    without slipping, calculatea. the number of revolutions would it makes in the process,b. the angular displacement would be through by a speck of

    gum on its rim.ANS. : 69 rev; 138ANS. : 69 rev; 138pipi rad rad2. During a certain period of time, the angular displacement of a

    swinging door is described by

    where is in radians and t is in seconds. Determine the angular displacement, angular speed and angular accelerationa. at time, t =0,b. at time, t =3.00 s.

    ANS. : ANS. : 5.00 rad, 10.0 rad s5.00 rad, 10.0 rad s11, 4.00 rad s, 4.00 rad s22; 53.0 rad, 22.0 rad s; 53.0 rad, 22.0 rad s11, , 4.00 rad s4.00 rad s22

    =5 . 0010 . 0t2. 00 t2

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    20

    8.1.2 Relationship between linear and rotational motion 8.1.2 Relationship between linear velocity, v and

    angular velocity, When a rigid body is rotates about rotation axis O , every

    particle in the body moves in a circle as shown in the Figure 8.6.

    v

    s

    y

    x

    rP

    O

    Figure 8.6Figure 8.6

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    21

    Point P moves in a circle of radius r with the tangential velocity v where its magnitude is given by

    The directiondirection of the linear (tangential) velocitylinear (tangential) velocity always tangent to the circular pathtangent to the circular path.

    Every particle on the rigid body has the same angular speedsame angular speed (magnitude of angular velocity) but the tangential speedtangential speed is notnot the samesame because the radiusradius of the circle, rr is changing changing dependdepend on the position of the particleposition of the particle.

    v=dsdtv=r ddt

    s=r

    v=r

    and

    Simulation 7.1

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    22

    at

    aca

    x

    y

    P

    O

    If the rigid bodyrigid body is gaining the angular speedgaining the angular speed then the tangential velocitytangential velocity of a particle also increasingincreasing thus twotwo component of accelerationacceleration are occurredoccurred as shown in Figure 8.7.

    8.1.2 Relationship between tangential acceleration, at and angular acceleration,

    Figure 8.7Figure 8.7

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    23

    The components are tangential acceleration, tangential acceleration, aatt and centripetal acceleration, centripetal acceleration, aacc given by

    but

    The vector sum of centripetal and tangential accelerationvector sum of centripetal and tangential acceleration of a particle in a rotating body is resultant (linear) acceleration, resultant (linear) acceleration, aa given by

    and its magnitude,

    a t=dvdt

    a t=rddt

    a t=r

    v=rand

    ac=v2

    r=r2=v

    a=a taca=a t2ac2

    Vector formVector form

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    24

    8.1.3 Rotational motion with uniform angular acceleration Table 8.1 shows the symbols used in linear and rotational

    kinematics.

    Table 8.1Table 8.1

    Linear motion Quantity

    Rotational motion

    s DisplacementDisplacementu 0Initial velocityInitial velocityv Final velocityFinal velocitya AccelerationAccelerationt tTimeTime

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    25

    Table 8.2 shows the comparison of linear and rotational motion with constant acceleration.

    Linear motion Rotational motion

    a=constant

    v=uat

    =constant=0t

    s=ut12 at2 =0 t

    12 t

    2

    v2=u22 as 2=022

    s=12vu t =12 0 t

    where in radian. Table 8.2Table 8.2

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    26

    A car is travelling with a velocity of 17.0 m s1 on a straight horizontal highway. The wheels of the car has a radius of 48.0 cm. If the car then speeds up with an acceleration of 2.00 m s2 for 5.00 s, calculatea. the number of revolutions of the wheels during this period,b. the angular speed of the wheels after 5.00 s.Solution :Solution :a. The initial angular velocity is

    and the angular acceleration of the wheels is given by

    Example 8.4 :

    u=17 . 0 m s1 , r=0 . 48 m , a=2 . 00 m s2 , t=5 . 00 su=r0

    17 . 0=0 . 48 0

    2 . 00=0 . 48 a=r

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    27

    Solution :Solution :a. By applying the equation of rotational motion with constant angular acceleration, thus

    therefore

    b. The angular speed of the wheels after 5.00 s is

    =0 t12 t

    2

    =229 rad

    u=17 . 0 m s1 , r=0 . 48 m , a=2 . 00 m s2 , t=5 . 00 s

    =35 . 4 5 . 0012 4 . 17 5 . 002

    =0t=35 . 44 . 17 5 . 00

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    28

    The wheels of a bicycle make 30 revolutions as the bicycle reduces its speed uniformly from 50.0 km h-1 to 35.0 km h-1. The wheels have a diameter of 70 cm.a. Calculate the angular acceleration.b. If the bicycle continues to decelerate at this rate, determine the time taken for the bicycle to stop. Solution :Solution :

    Example 8.5 :

    =302=60 rad , r=0 .702 =0 . 35 m ,

    u=50 . 0 km1 h 10

    3 m1 km 1 h3600 s =13 . 9 m s1 ,

    v=35 .0 km1 h 10

    3 m1 km 1 h3600 s =9 . 72 m s1

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    29

    Solution :Solution :a. The initial angular speed of the wheels is

    and the final angular speed of the wheels is

    therefore

    b. The car stops thus Hence

    u=r013 .9=0 .35 0

    v=r9 . 72=0 . 35

    2=022

    27 . 8 2=39 . 722 60

    =0 0=27 .8 rad s1

    and=0t0=27 .8 2. 13 t

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    30

    A blade of a ceiling fan has a radius of 0.400 m is rotating about a fixed axis with an initial angular velocity of 0.150 rev s-1. The angular acceleration of the blade is 0.750 rev s-2. Determinea. the angular velocity after 4.00 s,b. the number of revolutions for the blade turns in this time interval,c. the tangential speed of a point on the tip of the blade at time, t =4.00 s,d. the magnitude of the resultant acceleration of a point on the tip of the blade at t =4.00 s.Solution :Solution :

    a. Given t =4.00 s, thus

    Example 8.6 :

    r=0 . 400 m , 0=0. 1502=0 .300 rad s1 ,

    =0 .7502=1. 50 rad s2

    =0t=19 . 8 rad s1= 0 . 3001 .50 4 .00

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    31

    Solution :Solution :b. The number of revolutions of the blade is

    c. The tangential speed of a point is given by

    =0 t12 t

    2

    =41. 5 rad=0 . 300 4 . 0012 1 .50 4 . 00

    2

    v=rv=0 . 400 19 . 8

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    32

    Solution :Solution :d. The magnitude of the resultant acceleration is

    a=ac2at2

    a=v 2r 2r 2a=7 .9220 . 400 2 0 . 4001. 50 2

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    33

    Calculate the angular velocity ofa. the second-hand,b. the minute-hand andc. the hour-hand,of a clock. State in rad s-1.d. What is the angular acceleration in each case?Solution :Solution :a. The period of second-hand of the clock is T = 60 s, hence

    Example 8.7 :

    =2T =260

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    34

    Solution :Solution :b. The period of minute-hand of the clock is T = 60 min = 3600 s, hence

    c. The period of hour-hand of the clock is T = 12 h = 4.32 104 s, hence

    d. The angular acceleration in each cases is

    =23600

    =24 . 32104

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    35

    A coin with a diameter of 2.40 cm is dropped on edge on a horizontal surface. The coin starts out with an initial angular speed of 18 rad s1 and rolls in a straight line without slipping. If the rotation slows down with an angular acceleration of magnitude 1.90 rad s2, calculate the distance travelled by the coin before coming to rest.Solution :Solution :

    The radius of the coin is

    Example 8.8 :

    d=2 . 40102 m

    0=18 rad s1

    s

    =1 .90 rad s2=0 rad s1

    r=d2=1 .20102 m

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    36

    Solution :Solution :The initial speed of the point at the edge the coin is

    and the final speed isThe linear acceleration of the point at the edge the coin is given by

    Therefore the distance travelled by the coin is

    u=r0u=1 . 20102 18

    v=0 m s1

    a=ra=1. 20102 1. 90

    v2=u22as0=0 .216 22 2 .28102 s

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    37

    Exercise 8.2 :1. A disk 8.00 cm in radius rotates at a constant rate of 1200 rev

    min-1 about its central axis. Determinea. its angular speed,b. the tangential speed at a point 3.00 cm from its centre,c. the radial acceleration of a point on the rim,d. the total distance a point on the rim moves in 2.00 s.

    ANS. : ANS. : 126 rad s126 rad s11; 3.77 m s; 3.77 m s11; 1.26 ; 1.26 10 1033 m s m s22; 20.1 m; 20.1 m

    2. A 0.35 m diameter grinding wheel rotates at 2500 rpm. Calculatea. its angular velocity in rad s1,b. the linear speed and the radial acceleration of a point on the

    edge of the grinding wheel.ANS. : ANS. : 262 rad s262 rad s11; 46 m s; 46 m s11, 1.2 , 1.2 10 1044 m s m s22

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    38

    Exercise 8.2 :3. A rotating wheel required 3.00 s to rotate through 37.0

    revolution. Its angular speed at the end of the 3.00 s interval is 98.0 rad s-1. Calculate the constant angular acceleration of the wheel.

    ANS. : ANS. : 13.6 rad s13.6 rad s22

    4. A wheel rotates with a constant angular acceleration of 3.50 rad s2.a. If the angular speed of the wheel is 2.00 rad s1 at t =0, through what angular displacement does the wheel rotate in 2.00 s.b. Through how many revolutions has the wheel turned during this time interval?c. What is the angular speed of the wheel at t = 2.00 s?

    ANS. : ANS. : 11.0 rad; 1.75 rev; 9.00 rad s11.0 rad; 1.75 rev; 9.00 rad s11

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    39

    Exercise 8.2 :5. A bicycle wheel is being tested at a repair shop. The angular

    velocity of the wheel is 4.00 rad s-1 at time t = 0 , and its angular acceleration is constant and equal 1.20 rad s-2. A spoke OP on the wheel coincides with the +x-axis at time t = 0 as shown in Figure 8.8.

    a. What is the wheels angular velocity at t = 3.00 s?b. What angle in degree does the spoke OP make with the positive x-axis at this time?

    ANS. :ANS. : 0.40 rad s0.40 rad s11; 18; 18

    Figure 8.8Figure 8.8

    x

    y

    PO

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    40

    At the end of this chapter, students should be able to: At the end of this chapter, students should be able to: Define and use Define and use torque. torque.

    State and use State and use conditions for equilibrium of rigid body:conditions for equilibrium of rigid body:

    Learning Outcome:

    8.2 Equilibrium of a uniform rigid body (2 hour)

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    === 0 , 0 , 0 FF yx

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    41

    8.2.1 Torque (moment of a force), The magnitude of the torquemagnitude of the torque is defined as the product of a the product of a

    force and its perpendicular distance from the line of action force and its perpendicular distance from the line of action of the force to the point (rotation axis)of the force to the point (rotation axis).OR

    Because ofwhere r : distance between the pivot point (rotation

    axis) and the point of application of force.Thus

    Fd =

    force theof magnitude :Farm)(moment distancelar perpendicu : d

    torque theof magnitude : where

    sinrd =

    sin Fr=rF

    and between angle : where

    OR Fr

    =

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    42

    It is a vector quantityvector quantity. The dimension of torque is

    The unit of torqueunit of torque is N mN m (newton metre), a vector productvector product unlike the joule (unit of work)joule (unit of work), also equal to a newton metre, which is scalar productscalar product.

    Torque is occurred because of turning (twisting) effects of turning (twisting) effects of the forces the forces on a body.

    Sign convention of torque: PositivePositive - turning tendency of the force is anticlockwiseanticlockwise. NegativeNegative - turning tendency of the force is clockwiseclockwise.

    The value of torque dependstorque depends on the rotation axisrotation axis and the magnitude of applied forcemagnitude of applied force.

    [ ] [ ][ ] 22TMLdF ==

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    43

    Case 1 :Case 1 : Consider a force is applied to a metre rule which is pivoted at

    one end as shown in Figures 8.9a and 8.9b.

    Figure 8.9aFigure 8.9a

    F

    F

    Figure 8.9bFigure 8.9b

    Pivot point (rotation axis)

    Fd =

    rd sin=

    FrFd sin==

    (anticlockwise)

    (anticlockwise)r

    Point of action of a force

    Line of action of a force

    d

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    44

    O

    Figure 8.10Figure 8.102

    Case 2 :Case 2 : Consider three forces are applied to the metre rule which is

    pivoted at one end (point O) as shown in Figures 8.10.

    Caution : If the line of action of a force is through the rotation axisline of action of a force is through the rotation axis

    then

    1F

    1

    111 rd sin=

    321 ++= OTherefore the resultant (nett) torque is

    3F

    2F 1r

    0sin === 333333 rFdF

    222 rd sin=

    111111 rFdF sin==222222 rFdF sin==

    2r

    2211 dFdF = OFr sin=

    0=and 0=

    Simulation 5.1

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    45

    Determine a resultant torque of all the forces about rotation axis, O in the following problems.a.

    Example 8.9 :

    m 5

    N 10=2Fm 5 N 30=1F

    m 3

    m 3

    N 20=3F

    m 10

    m 6O

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    46

    b.Example 8.9 :

    m 5

    N 10=2F

    m 5

    N 30=1F

    m 3

    m 3

    N 25=4F

    N 20=3F

    m 10

    m 6O

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    47

    m 5m 5

    m 10

    m 6O

    Solution :Solution :a.

    Force Torque (N m), o=Fd=Frsin

    1F ( ) ( ) 90330 =

    2F ( )( ) 50510 +=+

    N 10=2FN 30=1F

    N 20=3F

    m 3=1d

    m 5=2d

    3F

    0The resultant torque:

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    48

    m 5

    m 10

    m 3

    m 6

    m 5

    Solution :Solution :b.

    Force Torque (N m), o=Fd=Frsin

    1F ( ) ( ) 90330 =

    2F

    ( )( )( ) 51.50.515520sin ==rF33F

    0 The resultant torque:

    N 10=2F

    N 30=1F

    0.51553

    3sin22

    =

    +=

    O

    N 20=3F

    N 25=4F

    m 3=1dm 5=r

    4F

    0

    3d

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    49

    8.2 Equilibrium of a rigid body8.2.1.1 Non-concurrent forces is defined as the forces whose lines of action do not pass the forces whose lines of action do not pass

    through a single common point. through a single common point. The forces cause the rotational motionrotational motion on the body. The combination of concurrent and non-concurrent forces cause

    rolling motionrolling motion on the body. (translational and rotationaltranslational and rotational motion)

    Figure 8.11 shows an example of non-concurrent forces.

    2F

    3F

    1F

    Figure 8.11Figure 8.11

    4F

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    50

    8.2.1.2 Equilibrium of a rigid body Rigid bodyRigid body is defined as a body with definite shape that a body with definite shape that

    doesnt change, so that the particles that compose it stay in doesnt change, so that the particles that compose it stay in fixed position relative to one another even though a force is fixed position relative to one another even though a force is exerted on itexerted on it.

    If the rigid body is in equilibriumrigid body is in equilibrium, means the body is translational and rotational equilibriumtranslational and rotational equilibrium.

    There are two conditionstwo conditions for the equilibrium of forces acting on a rigid body. The vector sum of all forces acting on a rigid body must The vector sum of all forces acting on a rigid body must

    be zero.be zero. == 0nettFFOR

    === 0 , 0 , 0 zyx FFF

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    51

    The vector sum of all external torques acting on a rigid The vector sum of all external torques acting on a rigid body must be zero about any rotation axisbody must be zero about any rotation axis.

    This ensures rotational equilibriumrotational equilibrium. This is equivalent to the three independent scalar

    equations along the direction of the coordinate axes,

    Centre of gravity, CG Centre of gravity, CG is defined as the point at which the whole weight of a body the point at which the whole weight of a body

    may be considered to actmay be considered to act. A force that exerts on the centre of gravityexerts on the centre of gravity of an object will

    cause a translational motiontranslational motion.

    == 0nett

    === 0 , 0 , 0 zyx

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    52

    Figures 8.14 and 8.15 show the centre of gravity for uniformcentre of gravity for uniform (symmetric) objectobject i.e. rod and sphere

    rodrod refer to the midway point between its endmidway point between its end.

    spheresphere refer to geometric centregeometric centre.

    2l

    2l

    CG

    CGl

    Figure 8.12Figure 8.12

    Figure 8.13Figure 8.13

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    53

    8.2.4 Problem solving strategies for equilibrium of a rigid body

    The following procedure is recommended when dealing with problems involving the equilibrium of a rigid body: Sketch a simple diagramSketch a simple diagram of the system to help

    conceptualize the problem. Sketch a separate free body diagramSketch a separate free body diagram for each body. Choose a convenient coordinate axesChoose a convenient coordinate axes for each body and

    construct a tableconstruct a table to resolve the forces into their components and to determine the torque by each force.

    Apply the condition for equilibrium of a rigid bodyApply the condition for equilibrium of a rigid body :

    SolveSolve the equationsequations for the unknowns.

    = 0xF = 0yF; and = 0

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    54

    A hanging flower basket having weight, W2 =23 N is hung out over the edge of a balcony railing on a uniform horizontal beam AB of length 110 cm that rests on the balcony railing. The basket is counterbalanced by a body of weight, W1 as shown in Figure 8.14. If the mass of the beam is 3.0 kg, calculatea. the weight, W1 needed,b. the force exerted on the beam at point O.(Given g =9.81 m s2)

    Example 8.10 :

    1W2W

    A BO35 cm 75 cm

    Figure 8.14Figure 8.14

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    55

    Solution :Solution :The free body diagram of the beam :

    Let point O as the rotation axis.

    N 23 ;kg 3 == 2Wm

    0.75 mA B

    OCG

    1W

    2W

    N

    gm

    0.35 m

    0.55 m 0.55 m

    0.20 m0.20 m

    Force y-comp. (N) Torque (N m), o=Fd=Frsin1W

    1W

    gm ( )( )9.813 ( ) ( ) 5.880.2029.4 =

    ( ) 11 WW 0.750.75 =2W

    23 ( )( ) 8.050.3523 =+

    N

    N 029.4=

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    56

    Solution :Solution :Since the beam remains at rest thus the system in equilibrium. a. Hence

    b. 0= yFand

    = 0O05.888.050.75 =+ 1W

    029.423 =+ NW1( ) 029.4232.89 =+ N

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    57

    A uniform ladder AB of length 10 m and mass 5.0 kg leans against a smooth wall as shown in Figure 8.15. The height of the end A of the ladder is 8.0 m from the rough floor.a. Determine the horizontal and vertical forces the floor exerts on the end B of the ladder when a firefighter of mass 60 kg is 3.0 m from B.b. If the ladder is just on the verge of slipping when the firefighter is 7.0 m up the ladder , Calculate the coefficient of static friction between ladder and floor.(Given g =9.81 m s2)

    Example 8.11 :

    A

    B

    smooth wall

    rough floorFigure 8.15Figure 8.15

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    58

    Solution :Solution :a. The free body diagram of the ladder : Let point B as the rotation axis.

    kg 60 ;kg 5.0 == fl mm

    A

    B

    CG

    gm f

    1N

    gml

    2N

    m 8.0m 10

    m 3.0

    m 5.0

    Force x-comp. (N)y-comp.

    (N)Torque (N m),

    B=Fd=Frsingml

    1N1N

    0.8108sin ==

    sf

    gm f

    49.1 0.6106sin ==

    2N

    sf

    0

    5890

    2N

    0

    0

    m 6.0

    ( ) ( ) sin5.049.1

    147=

    0

    ( ) ( ) sin3.05891060= ( ) N1 sin10

    1N8=0

    0 sf

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    59

    Solution :Solution : Since the ladder in equilibrium thus

    0= B081060147 =+ 1N

    N 151=1N0= xF0= s1 fN

    Horizontal force:Horizontal force:

    0= yF058949.1 =+ 2N

    Vertical force:Vertical force:

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    60

    m 10

    A

    B

    m 8.0

    m 6.0

    m 5.0

    Solution :Solution :b. The free body diagram of the ladder : Let point B as the rotation axis.

    0.6sin 0.8;sin ==

    gm f

    gml

    sf

    m 7.0

    Force x-comp. (N)y-comp.

    (N)Torque (N m),

    B=Fd=Frsingml

    1N1N

    2s N

    gm f

    49.1

    2N

    sf

    0

    5890

    2N

    0

    0

    ( ) ( ) sin5.049.1

    147=

    0

    ( ) ( ) sin7.05892474= ( ) N1 sin10

    1N8=0

    0

    2N

    1N

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    61

    Solution :Solution : Consider the ladder stills in equilibrium thus

    0= B082474147 =+ 1N

    N 328=1N

    0= xF0= 2s1 NN

    0= yF058949.1 =+ 2N

    N 638=2N

    ( ) ( ) 0638328 = s

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    62

    Figure 8.16Figure 8.16

    A floodlight of mass 20.0 kg in a park is supported at the end of a 10.0 kg uniform horizontal beam that is hinged to a pole as shown in Figure 8.16. A cable at an angle 30 with the beam helps to support the light.a. Sketch a free body diagram of the beam.b. Determine i. the tension in the cable, ii. the force exerted on the beam by the pole.(Given g =9.81 m s2)

    Example 8.12 :

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    63

    Solution :Solution :a. The free body diagram of the beam :

    b. Let point O as the rotation axis.

    kg 10.0 ;kg 20.0 == bf mm

    Force x-comp. (N) y-comp. (N) Torque (N m), o=Fd=Frsingm f ( )l1960 196

    O CG

    gm f

    gmb

    T

    S

    30

    ll0.5

    gmb ( )( ) ll 49.10.598.1 =0 98.1

    T

    TlTl 0.530sin =30cosT 30sinT

    S

    xS yS 0

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    64

    Solution :Solution :b. The floodlight and beam remain at rest thus i.

    ii.

    0= O00.549.1196 =+ Tlll

    0= xF0cos =+ xS30T

    N 424=xS0= yF030sin98.1196 =++ yST

    N 49.1=yS

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    65

    Solution :Solution :b. ii. Therefore the magnitude of the force is

    and its direction is given by

    2y

    2x SSS +=

    ( ) ( ) 22S 49.1424 +=

    =

    x

    y

    SS

    1tan

    =

    42449.1tan 1

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    66

    Exercise 8.3 :Use gravitational acceleration, g = 9.81 m s21.

    Figure 8.17 shows the forces, F1 =10 N, F2= 50 N and F3= 60 N are applied to a rectangle with side lengths, a = 4.0 cm and b = 5.0 cm. The angle is 30. Calculate the resultant torque about point D.

    ANS. : -3.7 N mANS. : -3.7 N m

    D

    A B

    C

    1F

    3F

    2F

    Figure 8.17Figure 8.17

    a

    b

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    67

    Figure 8.18Figure 8.18

    Exercise 8.3 :2.

    A see-saw consists of a uniform board of mass 10 kg and length 3.50 m supports a father and daughter with masses 60 kg and 45 kg, respectively as shown in Figure 8.18. The fulcrum is under the centre of gravity of the board. Determinea. the magnitude of the force exerted by the fulcrum on the

    board,b. where the father should sit from the fulcrum to balance the system.

    ANS. : 1128 N; 1.31 mANS. : 1128 N; 1.31 m

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    68

    3.

    A traffic light hangs from a structure as show in Figure 8.19. The uniform aluminum pole AB is 7.5 m long has a mass of 8.0 kg. The mass of the traffic light is 12.0 kg. Determine a. the tension in the horizontal massless cable CD, b. the vertical and horizontal components of the force exerted by the pivot A on the aluminum pole.

    ANS. : 248 N; 197 N, 248 NANS. : 248 N; 197 N, 248 N

    Figure 8.19Figure 8.19

    Exercise 8.3 :

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    69

    4.

    A uniform 10.0 N picture frame is supported by two light string as shown in Figure 8.20. The horizontal force, F is applied for holding the frame in the position shown.a. Sketch the free body diagram of the picture frame.b. Calculate i. the tension in the ropes, ii. the magnitude of the horizontal force, F .

    ANS. : 1.42 N, 11.2 N; 7.20 NANS. : 1.42 N, 11.2 N; 7.20 N

    Exercise 8.3 :

    Figure 8.20Figure 8.20

    F

    50.0

    cm 15.0

    cm 30.0

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    70

    Learning Outcome:

    8.3 Rotational dynamics (1 hour)

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    At the end of this chapter, students should be able to: At the end of this chapter, students should be able to: Define Define the moment of inertia of a rigid body about an axis,the moment of inertia of a rigid body about an axis,

    State and useState and use torque, torque,

    =

    =

    n

    1iiirmI2

    I =

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    71

    8.3.1 Centre of mass, moment of inertia and torque8.3.1.1 Centre of mass (CM) is defined as the point at which the whole mass of a body the point at which the whole mass of a body

    may be considered to be concentratedmay be considered to be concentrated. Its coordinate ((xxCMCM, , yyCMCM)) is given the expression below:

    xCM=i=1n

    mi xi

    i=1

    n

    mi ; y CM=i=1n

    mi y i

    i=1

    n

    mi where mi : mass of the i

    th particlex i : x coordinate of the i

    th particley i : y coordinate of the i

    th particle

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    72

    Two masses, 3 kg and 5 kg are located on the y-axis at y =1 m and y =5 m respectively. Determine the centre of mass of this system.Solution :Solution :

    Example 8.13 :

    0

    1 m

    y=

    5 mm1=3 kg; m2=5 kg

    m1

    m2

    yCM=i=1

    2

    mi y i

    i=1

    2

    mi

    =m1 y1m2 y2

    m1m2

    yCM=3 1 5 5

    35

    CM3 . 5 m

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    73

    A system consists of three spheres have the following masses and coordinates :

    (1) 1 kg, (3,2) ; (2) 2 kg, (4,5) and (3) 3 kg, (3,0).Determine the coordinate of the centre of mass of the system.Solution :Solution :The x coordinate of the CM is

    Example 8.14 :

    m1=1 kg; m2=2 kg; m3=3 kg

    xCM=i=1

    3

    mi x i

    i=1

    3

    mi

    =m1 x1m2 x2m3 x3

    m1m2m3

    xCM=1 3 2 4 3 3

    123

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    74

    Solution :Solution :The y coordinate of the CM is

    Therefore the coordinate of the CM is

    yCM=i=1

    3

    mi y i

    i=1

    3

    y i

    =m1 y1m2 y2m3 y3

    m1m2m3

    yCM=1 2 2 5 3 0

    123

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    75

    Figure 8.21 shows a rigid body about a fixed axis O with angular velocity .

    is defined as the sum of the products of the mass of each the sum of the products of the mass of each particle and the square of its respective distance from the particle and the square of its respective distance from the rotation axisrotation axis.

    8.3.1.2 Moment of inertia, I

    m1

    m2mn

    m3

    r1r 2

    r3r n

    O

    Figure 8.21Figure 8.21

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    76

    OR

    It is a scalar quantityscalar quantity. Moment of inertia, Moment of inertia, II in the rotational kinematics is analogousanalogous

    to the mass, mass, mm in linear kinematics. The dimensiondimension of the moment of inertia is M LM L22. The S.I. unitS.I. unit of moment of inertia is kg mkg m22. The factorsfactors which affect the moment of inertia, I of a rigid body:

    a. the massmass of the body,b. the shapeshape of the body,c. the positionposition of the rotation axisrotation axis.

    I=m1 r12m2r2

    2m3 r32. .. mn rn

    2=i=1

    n

    mi ri2

    I : moment of inertia of a rigid body about rotation axism : mass of particler : distance from the particle to the rotation axis

    where

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    77

    Moments of inertia of various bodiesMoments of inertia of various bodies Table 8.3 shows the moments of inertia for a number of objects

    about axes through the centre of mass.

    Shape Diagram Equation

    I CM=MR2

    I CM=12 MR

    2

    Hoop or ring or thin cylindrical

    shell

    Solid cylinder or disk

    CM

    CM

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    78

    CM

    Moments of inertia of various bodiesMoments of inertia of various bodies Table 8.3 shows the moments of inertia for a number of objects

    about axes through the centre of mass.

    Shape Diagram Equation

    I CM=1

    12 ML2

    Uniform rod or long thin rod with

    rotation axis through the

    centre of mass.

    CM

    I CM=25 MR

    2Solid Sphere

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    79

    Moments of inertia of various bodiesMoments of inertia of various bodies Table 8.3 shows the moments of inertia for a number of objects

    about axes through the centre of mass.

    Shape Diagram Equation

    I CM=23 MR

    2Hollow Sphere or thin spherical

    shellCM

    Table 8.3Table 8.3

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    80

    Four spheres are arranged in a rectangular shape of sides 250 cm and 120 cm as shown in Figure 8.22.

    The spheres are connected by light rods . Determine the moment of inertia of the system about an axisa. through point O,b. along the line AB.

    Example 8.15 :

    250 cm

    60 cm

    60 cm

    2 kg 3 kg

    4 kg5 kg

    OA B

    Figure 8.22Figure 8.22

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    81

    Solution :Solution :a. rotation axis about point O,

    Since r1= r2= r3= r4= r thus and the connecting rods are light therefore

    m1=2 kg; m2=3 kg; m3=4 kg; m4=5 kg

    r1 0 . 6 m

    m1 m2

    m3m4

    O

    r 2

    r 4 r31. 25 m

    r=0 . 6 21 .25 2=1 .39 mI O=m1 r1

    2m2 r22m3 r3

    2m4 r 42

    I O=r2 m1m2m3m4 =1 .39

    2 2345

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    82

    Solution :Solution :b. rotation axis along the line AB,

    r1= r2= r3= r4= r=0.6 m therefore

    m1=2 kg; m2=3 kg; m3=4 kg; m4=5 kg

    I AB=m1 r12m2 r 2

    2m3 r32m4 r4

    2

    I AB=0 . 6 2 2345

    m1 m2

    m3m4

    A B

    r1 r 2

    r 4 r3

    I AB=r2 m1m2m3m4

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    83

    Relationship between torque,Relationship between torque, and angular acceleration, and angular acceleration, Consider a force, F acts on a rigid body freely pivoted on an

    axis through point O as shown in Figure 8.23.

    The body rotates in the anticlockwise direction and a nett torque is produced.

    8.3.2 Torque,

    m1

    m2

    mn r1

    r 2

    r nO

    a1

    ana2

    F

    Figure 8.23Figure 8.23

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    84

    A particle of mass, m1 of distance r1 from the rotation axis O will experience a nett force F1 . The nett force on this particle is

    The torque on the mass m1 is

    The total (nett) torque on the rigid body is given by

    F1=m1 a1F1=m1 r1

    a1=r1 and

    1=r1 F1 sin 90

    1=m1 r12

    =i=1n

    mi ri2

    =m1r12 m2 r22.. .mn r n2

    =Ii=1

    n

    mi ri2=Iand

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    85

    From the equation, the nett torquenett torque acting on the rigid body is proportionalproportional to the bodys angular accelerationangular acceleration.

    Note :

    Nett torque , =I

    Nett force, F=mais analogous to the

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    86

    Forces, F1 = 5.60 N and F2 = 10.3 N are applied tangentially to a disc with radius 30.0 cm and the mass 5.00 kg as shown in Figure 8.24.

    Calculate,a. the nett torque on the disc.b. the magnitude of angular acceleration influence by the disc.( Use the moment of inertia, )

    Example 8.16 :

    Figure 8.24Figure 8.24

    I CM=12 MR

    2

    F1

    O30 .0 cm

    F2

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    87

    Solution :Solution :a. The nett torque on the disc is

    b. By applying the relationship between torque and angular acceleration,

    R=0 . 30 m ; M=5 . 00 kg

    =1 2 =RF1RF2=R F1F2 = 0 . 30 5 .6010 . 3

    =12 MR2 =I1. 41=12 5 .00 0 . 30 2

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    88

    A wheel of radius 0.20 m is mounted on a frictionless horizontal axis. The moment of inertia of the wheel about the axis is0.050 kg m2. A light string wrapped around the wheel is attached to a 2.0 kg block that slides on a horizontal frictionless surface. A horizontal force of magnitude P = 3.0 N is applied to the block as shown in Figure 8.25. Assume the string does not slip on the wheel.

    a. Sketch a free body diagram of the wheel and the block.b. Calculate the magnitude of the angular acceleration of the wheel.

    Example 8.17 :

    Figure 8.25Figure 8.25

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    89

    Solution :Solution :a. Free body diagram :

    for wheel,

    for block,

    R=0 . 20 m ; I=0 .050 kg m 2 ; P=3 .0 N; m=2 .0 kg

    W

    TS

    NT

    W b

    P

    a

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    90

    Solution :Solution :b. For wheel,

    For block,

    By substituting eq. (1) into eq. (2), thus

    =IRT=I T= IR

    (1)

    F=ma PT=ma (2)

    R=0 . 20 m ; I=0 .050 kg m 2 ; P=3 .0 N; m=2 .0 kg

    a=RP IR =ma andP IR =mR

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    91

    An object of mass 1.50 kg is suspended from a rough pulley of radius 20.0 cm by light string as shown in Figure 8.26. The pulley has a moment of inertia 0.020 kg m2 about the axis of the pulley. The object is released from rest and the pulley rotates without encountering frictional force. Assume that the string does not slip on the pulley. After 0.3 s, determinea. the linear acceleration of the object,b. the angular acceleration of the pulley,c. the tension in the string,d. the liner velocity of the object,e. the distance travelled by the object. (Given g = 9.81 m s-2)

    Example 8.18 :

    Figure 8.26Figure 8.26

    R

    1.50 kg

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    92

    Solution :Solution :a. Free body diagram :

    for pulley,

    for block,

    W

    a

    T

    S =IRT=I = aRandRT=I aR

    T= IaR2

    (1)T

    m g

    F=mamgT=ma (2)

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    93

    Solution :Solution :

    a. By substituting eq. (1) into eq. (2), thus

    b. By using the relationship between a and , hence

    mg IaR2 =maR=0 .20 m ; I=0 . 020 kg m 2 ; m=1 . 50 kg;u=0; t=0 .3 s

    a=R

    1 .50 9 .81 0 .020 a0 . 20 2 =1 .50 a7 . 36=0 . 20

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    94

    Solution :Solution :

    c. From eq. (1), thus

    d. By applying the equation of liner motion, thus

    e. The distance travelled by the object in 0.3 s is

    R=0 .20 m ; I=0 . 020 kg m 2 ; m=1 . 50 kg;u=0; t=0 .3 s

    v=uatv=0 7 .36 0 . 3

    T= IaR2

    T= 0 . 020 7 . 36 0 .20 2

    s=ut12 at2

    s=0127 . 36 0 .3 2

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    95

    Exercise 8.4 :Use gravitational acceleration, g = 9.81 m s21. Three odd-shaped blocks of chocolate have following masses

    and centre of mass coordinates: 0.300 kg, (0.200 m,0.300 m); 0.400 kg, (0.100 m. -0.400 m); 0.200 kg, (-0.300 m, 0.600 m).Determine the coordinates of the centre of mass of the system of three chocolate blocks.

    ANS. : ANS. : (0.044 m, 0.056 m)(0.044 m, 0.056 m)2. Figure 8.27 shows four masses that are held at

    the corners of a square by a very light frame. Calculate the moment of inertia of the system about an axis perpendicular to the planea. through point A, andb. through point B.

    ANS. : ANS. : 0.141 kg m0.141 kg m22; 0.211 kg m; 0.211 kg m22

    80 cm

    80 cm

    150 g 150 g

    70 g

    70 g

    40 cm

    A

    B

    Figure 8.27Figure 8.27

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    96

    2 . 00 m s2

    T 2

    T 1

    Exercise 8.4 :3. A 5.00 kg object placed on a

    frictionless horizontal table is connected to a string that passes over a pulley and then is fastened to a hanging 9.00 kg object as in Figure 8.28. The pulley has a radius of 0.250 m and moment of inertia I. The block on the table is moving with a constant acceleration of 2.00 m s2.a. Sketch free body diagrams of both objects and pulley.b. Calculate T1 and T2 the tensions in the string.c. Determine I.

    ANS. : 10.0 N, 70.3 N; 1.88 kg mANS. : 10.0 N, 70.3 N; 1.88 kg m22

    Figure 8.28Figure 8.28

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    97

    At the end of this chapter, students should be able to: At the end of this chapter, students should be able to: Solve problem related to :Solve problem related to :

    kinetic energy, kinetic energy,

    work, work,

    power, power,

    Learning Outcome:8.4 Work and Energy of Rotational Motion (2 hours)

    K r=12 I

    2

    P=

    W=

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    98

    8.4 Rotational kinetic energy and power8.4.1 Rotational kinetic energy, Kr Consider a rigid body rotating about the axis OZ as shown in

    Figure 8.29.

    Every particle in the body is in the circular motion about point O.

    m1

    m2

    mn

    m3

    r1r 2

    r3

    r nO

    v1v2

    v3vn

    Z

    Figure 8.29Figure 8.29

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    99

    The rigid body has a rotational kinetic energy which is the total total of kinetic energy of all the particles in the bodyof kinetic energy of all the particles in the body is given by

    K r=12 m1 v1

    212 m2 v2

    212 m3 v 3

    2.. .12 mn vn2

    K r=12 m1 r1

    2212 m2 r 22 212 m3 r3

    2 2. .. 12 mn rn2 2

    K r=12

    2 m1r12m2r 22m3r32. . .mn rn2

    K r=12 I

    2

    K r=12

    2i=1n

    mi r i2 i=1

    n

    mi r i2=Iand

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    100

    From the formula for translational kinetic energy, Ktr

    After comparing both equations thus

    For rolling body without slippingrolling body without slipping, the total kinetic energy of total kinetic energy of the body, the body, KK is given by

    K tr=12 mv

    2

    is analogous to vvII is analogous to mm

    K=K trK rK tr : translational kinetic energyK r : rotational kinetic energy

    where

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    101

    A solid sphere of radius 15.0 cm and mass 10.0 kg rolls down an inclined plane make an angle 25 to the horizontal. If the sphere rolls without slipping from rest to the distance of 75.0 cm and the inclined surface is smooth, calculatea. the total kinetic energy of the sphere,b. the linear speed of the sphere,c. the angular speed about the centre of mass.(Given the moment of inertia of solid sphere is and the gravitational acceleration, g = 9.81 m s2)

    Example 8.19 :

    I CM=25 mR

    2

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    102

    Solution :Solution :

    a. From the principle of conservation of energy,

    R=0 .15 m ; m=10 . 0 kg

    E i= E fmgh=K

    K=mgs sin 25K=10 . 0 9 . 81 0 . 75 sin 25

    s=0 . 75 m

    h=ssin 25

    v CM 25

    R

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    103

    Solution :Solution :b. The linear speed of the sphere is given by

    c. By using the relationship between v and , thus

    R=0 .15 m ; m=10 . 0 kg

    K=K trK r K=12 mv

    212 I

    2 = vRand

    K=12

    mv212 25 mR2 vR

    2

    K= 710 mv2

    31 .1= 71010 . 0 v2

    v=R 2 .11=0 .15

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    104

    The pulley in the Figure 8.30 has a radius of 0.120 m and a moment of inertia 0.055 g cm2. The rope does not slip on the pulley rim. Calculate the speed of the 5.00 kg block just before it strikes the floor. (Given g = 9.81 m s2)

    Example 8.20 :

    2 .00 kg

    5 . 00 kg

    7 . 00 m

    Figure 8.30Figure 8.30

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    105

    Solution :Solution :The moment of inertia of the pulley,

    m1=5 .00 kg ;m2=2.00 kg; R=0 .120 m; h=7 . 00 m

    I= 0 . 055 g 1 cm2103 kg1 g 104m2 1 cm2 =5 . 5109 kg m2

    m2

    m1

    7 . 00 m

    Initial

    m2

    m17 . 00 m

    v

    v

    Final

    E i=U1 E f =K tr 1K tr 2K rU2

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    106

    Solution :Solution :

    By using the principle of conservation of energy, thus

    E i= E fU1=K tr1K tr 2K rU2

    m1 gh=12 m1 v

    212 m2 v

    212 I

    2m2 gh

    m1m2 gh=12

    v2 m1m2 12

    I vR 2

    5 . 002 . 00 9 . 81 7 . 00=12

    v 2 5 . 002. 00 125 . 5109 v0 . 120

    2

    m1=5 . 00 kg ;m2=2. 00 kg; R=0 .120 m;h=7 . 00 m; I=5 .5109 kg m2

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    107

    Consider a tangential force, F acts on the solid disc of radius R freely pivoted on an axis through O as shown in Figure 8.31.

    The work done by the tangential force is given by

    8.4.2 Work, W

    Figure 8.31Figure 8.31

    F

    ds

    O

    dRR

    dW=FdsdW=FRd dW=1

    2 d W=12 d

    ds=Rdand

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    108

    If the torque is constant thus

    Work-rotational kinetic energy theorem states

    W= 21W=1

    2 d

    W=

    : torque : change in angular displacement

    where

    W : work done

    W=K r= K r f K r iW=12 I

    212 I0

    2

    is analogous to the W=Fs

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    109

    From the definition of instantaneous power,

    Caution : The unitunit of kinetic energy, work and powerkinetic energy, work and power in the

    rotationalrotational kinematics is samesame as their unitunit in translational translational kinematics.

    8.4.3 Power, P

    P=dWdt dW=dand

    P= ddtP=

    ddt =

    and

    is analogous to the P=Fv

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    110

    A horizontal merry-go-round has a radius of 2.40 m and a moment of inertia 2100 kg m2 about a vertical axle through its centre. A tangential force of magnitude 18.0 N is applied to the edge of the merry-go- round for 15.0 s. If the merry-go-round is initially at rest and ignore the frictional torque, determinea. the rotational kinetic energy of the merry-go-round,b. the work done by the force on the merry-go-round,c. the average power supplied by the force.(Given g = 9.81 m s2)Solution :Solution :

    Example 8.21 :

    FR=2 . 40 m

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    111

    Solution :Solution :

    a. By applying the relationship between nett torque and angular acceleration, thus

    Use the equation of rotational motion with uniform angular acceleration,

    Therefore the rotational kinetic energy for 15.0 s is

    =IRF=I 2 . 40 18 . 0 =2100

    =0t=0 2 .06102 15 .0 =0 .309 rad s1

    K r=12 I

    2 K r=122100 0 .309 2

    R=2 . 40 m ; I=2100 kg m2 ; F=18 . 0 N;t=15 .0 s; 0=0

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    112

    Solution :Solution :

    b. The angular displacement, for 15.0 s is given by

    By applying the formulae of work done in rotational motion, thus

    c. The average power supplied by the force is

    W=

    =0 t12 t

    2

    Pav=Wt

    W=2 . 40 18 . 0 2 . 32

    R=2 . 40 m ; I=2100 kg m2 ; F=18 . 0 N;t=15 .0 s; 0=0

    =0122. 0610215 . 0 2

    W=RF

    Pav=10015 . 0

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    113

    At the end of this chapter, students should be able to: At the end of this chapter, students should be able to: Define and useDefine and use angular momentum, angular momentum,

    State and useState and use the principle of conservation of angular the principle of conservation of angular momentummomentum

    Learning Outcome:

    8.5 Conservation of angular momentum (1 hour)

    L=I

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  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    114

    8.5 Conservation of angular momentum8.5.1 Angular momentum, is defined as the product of the angular velocity of a body the product of the angular velocity of a body

    and its moment of inertia about the rotation axisand its moment of inertia about the rotation axis. OR

    It is a vectorIt is a vector quantity. Its dimension is M LM L22 T T11 The S.I. unit of the angular momentum is kg mkg m22 s s11.

    L

    where

    L=IL : angular momentumI : moment of inertia of a body : angular velocity of a body

    is analogous to the p=mv

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    115

    The relationship between angular momentum, L with linear momentum, p is given by vector notation :

    magnitude form :

    Newtons second law of motion in term of linear momentum is

    hence we can write the Newtons second law in angular form as

    and states that a vector sum of all the torques acting on a a vector sum of all the torques acting on a rigid body is proportional to the rate of change of angular rigid body is proportional to the rate of change of angular momentummomentum.

    L=rp=rm v

    L=rpsin =mvr sin where

    :the angle between {r with {v r : distance from the particle to the rotation axis

    F=Fnett=d pdt

    = nett=dL

    dt

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    116

    states that a total angular momentum of a system about an a total angular momentum of a system about an rotation axis is constant if no external torque acts on the rotation axis is constant if no external torque acts on the systemsystem.OR

    Therefore

    8.5.2 Principle of conservation of angular momentum

    I=constant

    =d Ldt =0d L=0

    If the =0

    dL= L f Li L i= L f

    and

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    117

    A 200 kg wooden disc of radius 3.00 m is rotating with angular speed 4.0 rad s-1 about the rotation axis as shown in Figure 8.32 . A 50 kg bag of sand falls onto the disc at the edge of the wooden disc.

    Calculate,a. the angular speed of the system after the bag of sand falling onto the disc. (treat the bag of sand as a particle)b. the initial and final rotational kinetic energy of the system. Why the rotational kinetic energy is not the same?(Use the moment of inertia of disc is )

    Example 8.22 :

    0

    Before

    R

    After

    R

    Figure 8.32Figure 8.32

    12 MR

    2

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    118

    Solution :Solution :a. The moment of inertia of the disc,

    The moment of inertia of the bag of sand,

    By applying the principle of conservation of angular momentum,

    R=3 . 00 m ;0=4 . 0 rad s1 ; mw=200 kg; mb=50 kg

    I w=12 mw R

    2=12200 3. 00 2

    I w 0=I wI b

    I b=mb R2= 50 3 . 002

    L i= L f

    I w=900 kg m2

    I b=450 kg m2

    900 4 .0 = 900450

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    119

    Solution :Solution :b. The initial rotational kinetic energy,

    The final rotational kinetic energy,

    thus It is because the energy is lost in the form of heat from the the energy is lost in the form of heat from the friction between the surface of the disc with the bag of friction between the surface of the disc with the bag of sand.sand.

    R=3 . 00 m ;0=4 . 0 rad s1 ; mw=200 kg; mb=50 kg

    K r i=12 I w 0

    2=12900 4 .0 2

    K r f=12 I wI b

    2=12900450 2 . 672

    K r i=7200 J

    K r iK r f

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    120

    A raw egg and a hard-boiled egg are rotating about the same axis of rotation with the same initial angular velocity. Explain which egg will rotate longer.Solution :Solution :The answer is hard-boiled egghard-boiled egg.

    Example 8.23 :

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    121

    Solution :Solution :ReasonReasonRaw egg : When the egg spins, its yolk being denser moves away from the axis of rotation and then the moment of inertia of the egg increases because ofFrom the principle of conservation of angular momentum,

    If the I is increases hence its angular velocity, will decreases.

    Hard-boiled egg :The position of the yolk of a hard-boiled egg is fixed. When the egg is rotated, its moment of inertia does not increase and then its angular velocity is constant. Therefore the egg continues to spin.

    I=mr2

    I=constant

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    122

    A student on a stool rotates freely with an angular speed of 2.95 rev s1. The student holds a 1.25 kg mass in each outstretched arm that is 0.759 m from the rotation axis. The moment of inertia for the system of student-stool without the masses is 5.43 kg m2. When the student pulls his arms inward, the angular speed increases to 3.54 rev s1. a. Determine the new distance of each mass from the rotation axis.b. Calculate the initial and the final rotational kinetic energy of the system.Solution :Solution :

    Example 8.24 :

    0=2 .95 rev1 s 2 rad1 rev =18 . 5 rad s1

    =3 . 54 rev1 s 2 rad1 rev =22. 2 rad s1

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    123Before

    0

    After

    r a r a

    Solution :Solution :

    r br bmm

    m=1. 25 kg ; 0=18. 5 rad s1 ; I ss=5. 43 kg m

    2 ;r b=0 .759 m ; =22. 2 rad s

    1 ;

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    124

    Solution :Solution :

    a. The moment of inertia of the system initially is

    The moment of inertia of the system finally is

    By using the principle of conservation of angular momentum, thus

    I i=I ssI m I i=I ssmrb2mrb2 =I ss2 mrb2I i=5 .43 2 1 .25 0 .759

    2=6 . 87 kg m2

    I f=I ss2 mr a2= 5 .43 2 1.25 ra2

    I i 0=I f Li= Lf

    6 . 87 18 .5 =5 .432 .5r a222 .2

    m=1. 25 kg ; 0=18. 5 rad s1 ; I ss=5. 43 kg m

    2 ;r b=0 .759 m ; =22.2 rad s

    1 ;

    I f =5 . 432 .5r a2

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    125

    Solution :Solution :

    b. The initial rotational kinetic energy is given by

    and the final rotational kinetic energy is

    K r i=12 I i 02

    =126 .87 18 . 52

    K r i=1 .18103 J

    K r f=12 I f

    2

    =125 . 432 .5 0 .344 222. 2 2

    m=1. 25 kg ; 0=18. 5 rad s1 ; I ss=5. 43 kg m

    2 ;r b=0 .759 m ; =22.2 rad s

    1 ;

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    126

    Exercise 8.5 :Use gravitational acceleration, g = 9.81 m s21. A woman of mass 60 kg stands at the rim of a horizontal

    turntable having a moment of inertia of 500 kg m2 and a radius of 2.00 m. The turntable is initially at rest and is free to rotate about the frictionless vertical axle through its centre. The woman then starts walking around the rim clockwise (as viewed from above the system) at a constant speed of 1.50 m s1 relative to the Earth.a. In the what direction and with what value of angular speed

    does the turntable rotate?b. How much work does the woman do to set herself and the

    turntable into motion?ANS. : ANS. : 0.360 rad s0.360 rad s11 ,U think; 99.9 J ,U think; 99.9 J

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    127

    Exercise 8.5 :2. Determine the angular momentum of the Earth

    a. about its rotation axis (assume the Earth is a uniform solid sphere), andb. about its orbit around the Sun (treat the Earth as a particle

    orbiting the Sun). Given the Earths mass = 6.0 x 1024 kg, radius = 6.4 x 106 m

    and is 1.5 x 108 km from the Sun.ANS. : ANS. : 7.1 x 107.1 x 103333 kg m kg m22 s s11; 2.7 x 10; 2.7 x 104040 kg m kg m22 s s11

    3. Calculate the magnitude of the angular momentum of the second hand on a clock about an axis through the centre of the clock face. The clock hand has a length of 15.0 cm and a mass of 6.00 g. Take the second hand to be a thin rod rotating with angular velocity about one end. (Given the moment of inertia of thin rod about the axis through the CM is )

    ANS. : ANS. : 4.71 x 104.71 x 1066 kg m kg m22 s s11

    112 ML

    2

  • PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    128

    Linear Motion Relationship Rotational MotionSummary:

    m

    v=r =ddt

    a=dvdt =ddt

    F=ma =I

    W=Fs W=

    v=dsdt

    a=r

    =rF sin

    P=Fv P=

    p=mv L=IL=rpsin

    II=i=1

    n

    mi ri2

  • 129

    PHYSICS CHAPTER 8

    THE ENDNext Chapter

    CHAPTER 9 :Simple Harmonic Motion (SHM)

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    Slide 1Kinematics of linear motion Learning Outcome:2.1. Linear motion (1-D)Slide 5Slide 6Slide 7Slide 8Slide 9Slide 10Slide 11Slide 12Slide 13Slide 14Slide 15Slide 16Slide 17Slide 18Slide 19Slide 20Slide 21Slide 22Slide 23Slide 24Slide 25Slide 262.2. Uniformly accelerated motionSlide 28Slide 29Slide 30Slide 31Slide 32Slide 33Slide 34Slide 35Slide 36Slide 37Slide 38Slide 39Slide 402.3. Free falling bodySlide 42Slide 43Slide 44Slide 45Slide 46Slide 47Slide 48Slide 49Slide 50Slide 51Slide 52Slide 532.4. Projectile motionSlide 55Slide 56Slide 57Slide 58Slide 59Slide 60Slide 61Slide 62Slide 63Slide 64Slide 65Slide 66Slide 67Slide 68Slide 69Slide 70Slide 71Slide 72Slide 73Slide 74Slide 75Slide 76Slide 77Slide 78Slide 79Slide 1Slide 2Learning Outcome:Slide 43.1.2 Impulse, Slide 6Slide 7Slide 8Slide 9Slide 10Slide 11Slide 12Slide 133.2 Conservation of linear momentum Slide 15Slide 16Slide 17Slide 18Slide 19Slide 20Slide 21Slide 223.2.2 CollisionSlide 24Slide 25Slide 26Slide 27Slide 28Slide 29Slide 30Slide 31Slide 32Slide 33Slide 34Slide 1Learning Outcome:7.1 Parameters in rotational motionSlide 47.1.2 Angular velocitySlide 6Slide 7Slide 8Slide 9Slide 10Slide 11Slide 12Slide 137.1.3 Angular accelerationSlide 15Slide 16Slide 17Slide 18Slide 19Slide 20Slide 21Slide 22Slide 237.3 Rotational motion with uniform angular acceleration Slide 25Slide 26Slide 27Slide 28Slide 29Slide 30Slide 31Slide 32Slide 33Slide 34Slide 35Slide 36Slide 37Slide 38Slide 39Slide 405.3.2 Torque (moment of a force), Slide 42Slide 43Slide 44Slide 45Slide 46Slide 47Slide 48Slide 495.3.3 Equilibrium of a rigid bodySlide 51Slide 525.3.4 Problem solving strategies for equilibrium of a rigid bodySlide 54Slide 55Slide 56Slide 57Slide 58Slide 59Slide 60Slide 61Slide 62Slide 63Slide 64Slide 65Slide 66Slide 67Slide 68Slide 69Slide 707.4 Centre of mass, moment of inertia and torqueSlide 72Slide 73Slide 747.4.2 Moment of inertia, ISlide 76Slide 77Slide 78Slide 79Slide 80Slide 81Slide 827.4.3 Torque,Slide 84Slide 85Slide 86Slide 87Slide 88Slide 89Slide 90Slide 91Slide 92Slide 93Slide 94Slide 95Slide 96Slide 977.5 Rotational kinetic energy and powerSlide 99Slide 100Slide 101Slide 102Slide 103Slide 104Slide 105Slide 1067.5.2 Work, WSlide 1087.5.3 Power, PSlide 110Slide 111Slide 112Slide 1137.6 Conservation of angular momentumSlide 1157.6.2 Principle of conservation of angular momentumSlide 117Slide 118Slide 119Slide 120Slide 121Slide 122Slide 123Slide 124Slide 125Slide 126Slide 127Summary:Slide 129