periodic table tutorial chapter 5.4 chapter 14 periodic table periodic table scientists &...

Download Periodic Table Tutorial Chapter 5.4 Chapter 14 Periodic Table Periodic Table Scientists & Definitions Scientists & Definitions Periodic Trends Questions

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  • Slide 1
  • Periodic Table Tutorial Chapter 5.4 Chapter 14 Periodic Table Periodic Table Scientists & Definitions Scientists & Definitions Periodic Trends Questions
  • Slide 2
  • Click on a region of the table to learn more about that region.
  • Slide 3
  • Alkali Metals The alkali metals are the Group 1 metals & include lithium, sodium, potassium and the others in the group. All the alkali metals have an s 1 e - configuration. They are very reactive & want to lose 1 electron to obtain a noble gas configuration. They are part of the s-block.The alkali metals are the Group 1 metals & include lithium, sodium, potassium and the others in the group. All the alkali metals have an s 1 e - configuration. They are very reactive & want to lose 1 electron to obtain a noble gas configuration. They are part of the s-block. Back to Periodic Table Back to Periodic Table
  • Slide 4
  • Alkaline Earth Metals The alkaline earth metals are the Group 2 metals & include beryllium, magnesium, calcium, etc. These metals have an s 2 e - configuration. They are reactive & want to lose 2 electrons to obtain a noble gas configuration. They are part of the s-block.The alkaline earth metals are the Group 2 metals & include beryllium, magnesium, calcium, etc. These metals have an s 2 e - configuration. They are reactive & want to lose 2 electrons to obtain a noble gas configuration. They are part of the s-block. Back to Periodic Table Back to Periodic Table
  • Slide 5
  • Transition Metals The transition metals make up the d- block. Iron, copper, zinc, mercury, gold & silver are all transition metals. Their e - configurations all end in a d sublevel. They are not part of the representative elements and are considered Group B.The transition metals make up the d- block. Iron, copper, zinc, mercury, gold & silver are all transition metals. Their e - configurations all end in a d sublevel. They are not part of the representative elements and are considered Group B. Back to Periodic Table Back to Periodic Table
  • Slide 6
  • Inner-Transition Metals The inner-transition metals make up the f-block. Uranium is an inner- transition metals. Their e - configurations all end in an f sublevel. The are not part of the representative elements & actually belong in the 6 th and 7 th periods, not below the Table.The inner-transition metals make up the f-block. Uranium is an inner- transition metals. Their e - configurations all end in an f sublevel. The are not part of the representative elements & actually belong in the 6 th and 7 th periods, not below the Table. Back to Periodic Table Back to Periodic Table
  • Slide 7
  • Other Metals The other metals include aluminum & lead. They are all in the p-block & their e - configurations therefore end in a p sublevel. Like the rest of the metals, they are good conductors of both heat and electricity.The other metals include aluminum & lead. They are all in the p-block & their e - configurations therefore end in a p sublevel. Like the rest of the metals, they are good conductors of both heat and electricity. Back to Periodic Table Back to Periodic Table
  • Slide 8
  • Semi-Metals (Metalloids) The semi-metals or metalloids are not metals & are not non-metals. They are all in the p-block so their e - configurations end in a p sublevel. Their properties are in between those of metals & nonmetals. Silicon and germanium are metalloids.The semi-metals or metalloids are not metals & are not non-metals. They are all in the p-block so their e - configurations end in a p sublevel. Their properties are in between those of metals & nonmetals. Silicon and germanium are metalloids. Back to Periodic Table Back to Periodic Table
  • Slide 9
  • Other Nonmetals The other non-metals include hydrogen, oxygen & carbon some of the most abundant elements on earth & in the universe! Some, like nitrogen, are gases & some, like carbon, are solids. Hydrogen is the only non-metal not in the p-block.The other non-metals include hydrogen, oxygen & carbon some of the most abundant elements on earth & in the universe! Some, like nitrogen, are gases & some, like carbon, are solids. Hydrogen is the only non-metal not in the p-block. Back to Periodic Table Back to Periodic Table
  • Slide 10
  • Halogens The halogens are some of the most reactive elements on earth. They include: fluorine & chlorine (gases), bromine (a liquid) and iodine (a solid). They are not found alone in nature and commonly form salts with metals such as sodium (i.e. NaCl) They all end in a p 5 configuration.The halogens are some of the most reactive elements on earth. They include: fluorine & chlorine (gases), bromine (a liquid) and iodine (a solid). They are not found alone in nature and commonly form salts with metals such as sodium (i.e. NaCl) They all end in a p 5 configuration. Back to Periodic Table Back to Periodic Table
  • Slide 11
  • Noble Gases The noble gases include helium, neon & argon. Helium has a 1s 2 e - configuration & all the others end in a p 6 configuration. This makes them completely stable & unreactive with all the other elements. They are also called the inert gases.The noble gases include helium, neon & argon. Helium has a 1s 2 e - configuration & all the others end in a p 6 configuration. This makes them completely stable & unreactive with all the other elements. They are also called the inert gases. Back to Periodic Table Back to Periodic Table
  • Slide 12
  • Scientists There were two scientists who designed the periodic table Mendeleev arranged the elements in order of atomic mass. Later, Moseley used atomic number this is the table we use today! They were able to predict properties of the missing elements based on where they were in the table.There were two scientists who designed the periodic table Mendeleev arranged the elements in order of atomic mass. Later, Moseley used atomic number this is the table we use today! They were able to predict properties of the missing elements based on where they were in the table.
  • Slide 13
  • Groups & Periods The modern periodic table is arranged in families or groups (vertical columns), & periods (horizontal rows). The period number corresponds to the main energy level being filled with electrons. Groups are numbered 1 - 18. Groups 1, 2, & 13- 17 are the representative elements.The modern periodic table is arranged in families or groups (vertical columns), & periods (horizontal rows). The period number corresponds to the main energy level being filled with electrons. Groups are numbered 1 - 18. Groups 1, 2, & 13- 17 are the representative elements.
  • Slide 14
  • Blocks There are 4 blocks of the periodic table. The s-block consists of the first two groups. All the s-block elements have an s sublevel e - configuration. The p- block is made of groups 13-18. They end in a p sublevel e - configuration.There are 4 blocks of the periodic table. The s-block consists of the first two groups. All the s-block elements have an s sublevel e - configuration. The p- block is made of groups 13-18. They end in a p sublevel e - configuration.
  • Slide 15
  • Blocks The transition metals make up the d- block. These elements end in a d sub- level configuration. Finally, the f-block consists of the inner-transition metals. They end in an f sub-level configuration. The d-block and f-block are the group B elements.The transition metals make up the d- block. These elements end in a d sub- level configuration. Finally, the f-block consists of the inner-transition metals. They end in an f sub-level configuration. The d-block and f-block are the group B elements.
  • Slide 16
  • Metals vs. Non-Metals There are 3 main categories for the elements. Metals are found on the left side of the table, have a luster & conduct heat and electricity. Nonmetals are on the right hand corner, are dull & are not good conductors. The final designation is metalloid or semi-metal.There are 3 main categories for the elements. Metals are found on the left side of the table, have a luster & conduct heat and electricity. Nonmetals are on the right hand corner, are dull & are not good conductors. The final designation is metalloid or semi-metal.
  • Slide 17
  • Metalloids Metalloids have intermediate properties between metals and non- metals. They are semi-conductors, which makes them great for use in computer technology. There are only 7 metalloids.Metalloids have intermediate properties between metals and non- metals. They are semi-conductors, which makes them great for use in computer technology. There are only 7 metalloids.
  • Slide 18
  • Periodic Trends As you move across a period, the chemical & physical properties of the elements change in a predictable way. Each period repeats this change. This is the Periodic Law. We can determine the properties of the elements based on where they are in the table. There are 3 trends to analyze.As you move across a period, the chemical & physical properties of the elements change in a predictable way. Each period repeats this change. This is the Periodic Law. We can determine the properties of the elements based on where they are in the table. There are 3 trends to analyze.
  • Slide 19
  • Atomic Radius Atomic radius is the size (length) of an atom. As you go down, the radius increases due to an