peer to peer

Click here to load reader

Post on 21-Jan-2016

21 views

Category:

Documents

0 download

Embed Size (px)

DESCRIPTION

Peer to Peer. David Strom, [email protected] PC Expo/ eBiz presentations June 2001. Summary. What is P2P? Learning from Napster, Groove Business models Motivations for using P2P Technology examples Corporate strategies. What is P2P?. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

TRANSCRIPT

  • Peer to PeerDavid Strom, [email protected] Expo/ eBiz presentationsJune 2001

    (c) David Strom Inc. 2001

  • SummaryWhat is P2P?Learning from Napster, GrooveBusiness modelsMotivations for using P2PTechnology examplesCorporate strategies

    (c) David Strom Inc. 2001

  • What is P2P?Sharing computing resources, such as files, CPU cycles, and applicationsApps are both server and client on a distributed networkMakes some use of Internet protocols/standards

    (c) David Strom Inc. 2001

  • Examples of P2P technologiesSimplest example is Windows/Mac built-in file sharing: remember WfW?Napster/Gnutella/Aimster/etc.Chat products like ICQ, AIM, Bantu, OMNI, etc.

    (c) David Strom Inc. 2001

  • Other [email protected] (search for ET)Globus.org (distributed science)McAfee ASAP (anti-virus protection)Lightshare (desktop auctions) Groove Networks (P2P Notes)Uroam (remote access)Roku, VxPort (file sharing) OpenCola (info collection)

    (c) David Strom Inc. 2001

  • How does P2P leverage the existing Internet infrastructure?Builds on ftp, http, etc. so can pass information freely through routers and firewallsDoesnt require new domain name services or other authentication processesMay make use of email and chat protocols as wellNo specialized knowledge to setup new servers and servicesNo network administrators and other IT resources involved

    (c) David Strom Inc. 2001

  • What is Napster?Easy to share digital music files Uses http and ftp protocolsEach user's PC acts as client and serverIt creates a community of users with common goals and interests It builds upon P2P services to increase the overall value of the system

    (c) David Strom Inc. 2001

  • How did we obtain music before?Go to record storeDeal with surly underaged clerksTry to find the right CDTake it home, play on our stereos

    (c) David Strom Inc. 2001

  • Enter MP3 downloadsLocate an ftp server with music on itTry to connect to the server (often busy)Upload a few songs firstThen hopefully find the right song and download itAnd much more work to host your own music ftp server!

    (c) David Strom Inc. 2001

  • Problems with the old methodftp sites often busyHad to learn the ins and outs of ftp client softwareUploading requirement was onerousSearch tools crude, could often only find ftp sites, not songsSetting up servers painful too.

    (c) David Strom Inc. 2001

  • Shirkys list of lessons learned from NapsterCentralize what you need to make your business model workA poor user interface isnt an issue, especially if people can still get things doneIt routes around network admins/firewallsIt allows people to create their own namespaces without specialized knowledge

    (c) David Strom Inc. 2001

  • How do you share info now?Mydocsonline or similar Internet hard diskPGP secure email, maybeYahoo Calendars or similarWebAddressBook.comMaybe even a web-based Office suite like TeamOn, FreeDesk or Blox

    (c) David Strom Inc. 2001

  • Problems Motley collection difficult to manageNot everyone is willing to work with multiple toolsAuthentication is difficult multiple loginsStill need to download lots of software, despite 100 % browser emphasisTiresome email exchanges of documentsSecurity by obscurity

    (c) David Strom Inc. 2001

  • Enter Groove NetworksAuthentication is always onDifferent workspaces for different collections of peopleSetup is easyNo browser, email file swapping neededSupports a wide variety of tools and information sharing modelsGreat for sharing files between home and work PCs

    (c) David Strom Inc. 2001

  • How distributed does your network have to be?Napster: central server to authenticate and track usersGnutella: everything is distributedAimster: uses AOL IM directory to authenticate/track users

    (c) David Strom Inc. 2001

  • What business models make sense?AdvertisingUser chargesCorporate site licensesCore technology licensesISP/ASP volume purchases

    (c) David Strom Inc. 2001

  • Dale Doughertys thoughts on business modelsAll the P2P players are hoping that their research leads them to establish a new way of doing things. At that point, the winner will be obvious and the business model will be crystal clear.

    (c) David Strom Inc. 2001

  • Signs that P2p is maturingPorn industry file swapping services (PornDigger, PORN.com)Already seeing downside articles in the press

    (c) David Strom Inc. 2001

  • Motivations for implementing P2PAdd intelligence to network edge devicesConvenience and controlAltruismFree up bandwidth

    (c) David Strom Inc. 2001

  • Motivations: the network edgeRight now network edge devices are underused or dumb when it comes to working with the network fabric itselfP2P adds intelligence, increased utilization at the edgeMakes it easier for people to get more work done, just like c. 1981 PCs

    (c) David Strom Inc. 2001

  • Controlling your own network destinyAsk your IT department for the capability to have real-time conversations with Internet users directly from your PC, that you wanted this set up within the hour, and that you had no budget for it.Now imagine being laughed out of the room. (from Shirky)

    (c) David Strom Inc. 2001

  • Advantages of ICQNo need for setting up IP addresses, DNS configuration, firewall rules, web server hosting co-location agreements, IT policy pronouncements, lengthy approvals up the IT command structure, IT R&D review, IT rollouts, Do you detect a pattern here?

    (c) David Strom Inc. 2001

  • Motivations: convenience and controlStress-testing web sites over the Internet, from Exodus/United DevicesShared-processing model frees up resources in their test lab for other projects, also provides more realism for test scenarios

    (c) David Strom Inc. 2001

  • Motivations: altruismMy goal was to harness wasted CPU cycles that to me were just warming the air. I also liked the fact that I would be participating in an interesting community and doing some good science." -- SETI user

    (c) David Strom Inc. 2001

  • Motivations: bandwidthMcAfee ASAP uses P2P to download virus pattern files from local users, saving on wide-area connectionsThe more you distribute the network, the less bandwidth you need from any centralized locations

    (c) David Strom Inc. 2001

  • Drawbacks to P2PSecurity loopholesLoss of control over desktop activitiesSome companies dont like to share and play with others

    (c) David Strom Inc. 2001

  • Corporate strategiesDownload and try Napster or uRoamCompare with downloading music or PC/Anywhere for functionalityExamine your own programs for file transfer components that could benefit from peeringExamine whether you can benefit from shared processing models Setup a trial Groove workgroup and project team

    (c) David Strom Inc. 2001

  • Places for more informationOReilly P2P conference: www.openP2P.com/pub/a/P2P/conference/My review of Groove: strom.com/pubwork/varbiz.html

    (c) David Strom Inc. 2001