Overview 10 minutes Goals 10 minutes Objectives 10 minutes Performance based approach 10 minutes Complexity 20 minutes Tools Exercise 15 minutes Conclusion

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<p>PowerPoint Presentation</p> <p>Overview10 minutesGoals10 minutesObjectives10 minutesPerformance based approach10 minutesComplexity20 minutesTools Exercise 15 minutesConclusion</p> <p>5 minutes</p> <p>SESSION PLANLow Emissions Land Use Planning Development TeamAcknowledgementsNameAffiliationNameAffiliationDavid Saah; Co-LeadUniversity of San Francisco, SIGPhan Xuan ThieuVinh University, VietnamMohd Zaki Hamzah; Co-LeadUniversity Putra MalaysiaChalita SriladdaUSAID-LEADKhamla Phanvilay, Co-LeadNational University of LaosHoang Thi Thu DuyenVietnam Forestry University, VietnamCao Thuy AnhDalat University, VietnamLadawan PuangchitKasetsart University, ThailandChalermpol SamranpongChiang Mai University, ThailandDo Anh TuanVietnam Forestry University, VietnamPham Thanh NamUSAID LEAF VietnamLyna KhanRoyal University of Phnom Penh, CambodiaPeter StephenUSAID LEAF BangkokLe Ba ThuongVietnam Forestry University, VietnamHoang Vinh PhuVinh University, VietnamNapat JakwattanaUniversity of Phayao, ThailandVipak JintanaKasetsart University, ThailandNur Anishah Binti AzizUniversity Kebangsaan MalaysiaKulala MulungPNG University of TechnologyRatcha ChaichanaKasetsart University, ThailandSomvilay ChanthalounnavongNational University of Laos</p> <p>Sureerat LakanavichianChiang Mai University, ThailandThavrak HuonRoyal University of Agriculture, CambodiaVongphet SihapanyaNational University of LaosAthsaphangthong MunelithUSAID LEAF LaosDavid GanzUSAID LEAF BangkokAttachai JintrawetChiang Mai University, ThailandChi Pham, Project CoordinatorUSAID LEAF BangkokChanin ChiumkanokchaiUSAID LEAF BangkokKent ElliottUS Forest ServiceLam Ngoc TuanDalat University, VietnamBeth LebowUS Forest ServiceMark FennUSAID Vietnam Forests &amp; DeltasGeoffrey BlateUS Forest Service2Low Emission Land Use Planning (LELUP)Section 1. Enabling Environment1.3. Planning &amp; Development Goals &amp; Objectives</p> <p>Regional Climate Change Curriculum DevelopmentIntroduce lecture title 1.3 Development of Goals, Objectives, and Vision</p> <p>3LELUP FrameworkLow Emission Land Use Planning1.1. Regulatory Assessments1.2. Stakeholder Engagement1.3. Planning &amp; Development Goals &amp; Objectives2.1. Environment, Social, &amp; Economic Data Needs2.2. Understanding Historic Land Use Change2.3. Data &amp; Capacity Gap Assessment3.1. Modeling Future Trends3.2. Business as Usual Baseline Construction3.3. Scenario Assessment4.3. Implementation Needs4.2. Priorities &amp; Sequence Implementation Activities4.1. Negotiating Agreement on Options 5.1. Establish M&amp;E Framework5.2. Monitor &amp; Measure Progress5.3. Evaluate, Report &amp; Adapt</p> <p>KEY MESSAGE: Explain link between 1.1 and 1.2 &amp; make linkage into Section 2. Defining goals and objectives may start out early in the planning process as qualitative measures such as increased carbon storage in forested cover types, positive economic growth, and improvement of drinking water quality and accessibility. 4Learning ObjectivesAt the end of this session, learners will be able to:Identify Elements Necessary for LELUPIdentify GOALSIdentify OBJECTIVESKEY MESSAGE: We will learn that your Low Emission Land Use Planning Goals and Objectives need to be set at the beginning of the LUP cycle and continually refined.5Learning DomainsNegotiate and Prioritize Implementation PlanLand Use PlanningLow Emission Development Strategies (LEDS)Conservation PlanningGHG AccountingUnderstanding Historical Land Use ChangeLow Emission Land Use PlanningKEY MESSAGE: Remember from the first lecture, There is NO one way to do LELUP and there is NO one text book to describe all the process. The five learning domains all provide parts of the LELUP puzzle. The 5 learning domains all have their own reference material and information sources that can be found in the guideline document.</p> <p>LEDS: The transition to low carbon economic development resulting in sustained growth in employment and investment, increased financials flows through carbon markets, reduced greenhouse gas (GHG) emission, and other social, economic, and environmental benefits.</p> <p>Conservation Planning: The exercise of identifying areas important for meeting conservation objectives</p> <p>Carbon Accounting: Processes undertaken to measure forest carbon stocks and amounts of CO2e emitted by changes in forest and land use due to one or more drivers.</p> <p>Addressing Drivers of forest change: A process to assess, prioritize and set intervention strategies that address drivers of forest change. </p> <p>6Key referencesNegotiate and Prioritize Implementation PlanLand Use PlanningLow Emission Land Use PlanningLand Use PlanningWehrmann, B. (2011), Land Use Planning. Concepts, Tools and Applications, February 2011, Published by GIZ, Eschborn, Germany.The Land Portal a web resourceKey Message: An iterative process based on the dialogue amongst all stakeholders aiming to define sustainable land uses in rural areas. It also implies the initiation and monitoring of measures to realize the agreed land uses</p> <p>7Key referencesLow Emission Development PlanningLow Emission Development Strategy Gateway a web resourceLow Emission Capacity Building Program a web resourcePlatform for Climate-Smart Planning a web resource </p> <p>Negotiate and Prioritize Implementation PlanLow Emission Development Strategies (LEDS)Low Emission Land Use PlanningKEY MESSAGE: The transition to low carbon economic development resulting in sustained growth in employment and investment, increased financials flows through carbon markets, reduced greenhouse gas (GHG) emission, and other social, economic, and environmental benefits.</p> <p>8Key referencesNegotiate and Prioritize Implementation PlanConservation PlanningConservation Measures Partnership (2013), Open Standards for the Practice of Conservation, Version 3.0/April 2013The Open Conservation Measures Partnership a web resourceConservation PlanningLow Emission Land Use PlanningKEY MESSAGE: The exercise of identifying areas important for meeting conservation objectives</p> <p>9Key referencesGHG AccountingLow Emission Land Use PlanningCarbon AccountingThe LEAF project tools and guidance documents: LEAFs Tools and Resources.Key references include:Walker, S., Swalis, E., Petrova, S., Goslee, K. Casarim, F. Grais, A. and Brown, S. (2012), Technical Guidance on Development of a REDD+ Reference Level, Developed by Winrock International the LEAF Project.KEY MESSAGE: Processes undertaken to measure forest carbon stocks and amounts of GHG emitted by changes in forest and land use due to one or more drivers.</p> <p>10Learning DomainsUnderstanding Historical Land Use ChangeLow Emission Land Use PlanningLEAF (2013), ARKN-FCC Decisions Support Tool Identifying and Addressing Drivers of Deforestation and Forest Degradation, Prepared by Climate Focus for AFKN-FCC (Unpublished).Kissinger, G., M. Herold, V. De Sy. Drivers of Deforestation and Forest Degradation: A Synthesis Report for REDD+ Policymakers. Lexeme Consulting, Vancouver Canada, August 2012.KEY MESSAGE: A process to assess, prioritize and set intervention strategies that address drivers of forest change. </p> <p>11Identify GoalsGoals are formal statements that detail the desired impact of the plan and are: Linked to targetsImpact orientatedSpecificMeasurableTime limited (generally 10 years or more)</p> <p>KEY MESSAGE: Goals are Strategic</p> <p>What is the desired state or ultimate condition that the low emission plan is expected to contribute to? </p> <p>What is the time frame of the low emission plan and the anticipated impact of the plan within this time frame?</p> <p>What will be the process to develop the goals and objectives for the low emission forest and land use plan? 12Identify ObjectivesObjectives are formal statements detailing the desired outcomes of the plan and are: Results orientatedPracticalSpecificMeasurableTime limited (generally three to ten years)</p> <p>KEY MESSAGE: Objectives tend to be tactical.</p> <p>What are likely to be broad objectives and criteria to measure carbon and non-carbon benefits (social, economic and environmental benefits)?13Results Based ManagementResults-based management is a strategic management approach used to plan, cost, implement, monitor and measure the changes from cooperation, rather than just the inputs provided or activities conducted. </p> <p>Key Message: Performance based approach is sometimes used to describe RBM. We will learn more about the details of this in section 5. A couple of key points 1) need to define measures, and need to define targets. </p> <p>Results-based management is a strategic management approach used to plan, cost, implement, monitor and measure the changes from cooperation, rather than just the inputs provided or activities conducted. </p> <p>Using RBM, the UNCT ensures that its cash, supply and technical assistance contribute to a logical chain of results that increase in complexity and ambition as you rise up the chain: outputs, outcomes and impacts which are MD/MDG related national priorities. RBM depends on critical assumptions about the programme environment and risk assessments, clearly defined accountabilities and indicators for results, and performance monitoring and reporting.14Results Based Management</p> <p>Source: UN+REDD Vietnam, 2013Key Message: Performance based approach is sometimes used to describe RBM. We will learn more about the details of this in section 5. A couple of key points 1) need to define measures, and need to define targets. </p> <p>Results-based management is a strategic management approach used to plan, cost, implement, monitor and measure the changes from cooperation, rather than just the inputs provided or activities conducted. </p> <p>Using RBM, the UNCT ensures that its cash, supply and technical assistance contribute to a logical chain of results that increase in complexity and ambition as you rise up the chain: outputs, outcomes and impacts which are MD/MDG related national priorities. RBM depends on critical assumptions about the programme environment and risk assessments, clearly defined accountabilities and indicators for results, and performance monitoring and reporting.15</p> <p>Rules of the GameObjective:Rules of the GameFOOTBALL EXAMPLE</p> <p>Key Message: Here is an example, The Goal is to win the league, the objective is to win an individual game within the rules of the game (no hands except for the Golie). The boundaries can include the soccer field, fan base. The resources can be the Advertising sponsor, ticket sales, and the talent of your players. Your performance is measured by the number of goals you make or shirts you sell with your name on it.</p> <p>ASK Student to add to the example.16Group DiscussionWhy is it important to set Goals and Objectives for a Low Emission Land use Planning (LELUP) process?What might be a goal and objective for a LELUP process?</p> <p>KEY MESSAGE: If you dont set goals and objectives you will never know if you have succeeded or failed. Without setting Goals and Objectives means you can not measure progress.</p> <p>Group discussion:Why are Goals and Objectives ImportantWhat are some examples of LELUP Goals and Objectives.</p> <p>Make sure students use their knowledge gained so far to respond to both questions. They should use knowledge from 1.1 and 1.2 to integrate with lesson learned from 1.3</p> <p>TEXT From Open Standards MeasureWithout more rigorous measurement of effectiveness and disciplined recording of our efforts, how will we know if we are progressing as rapidly as needed to achieve our conservation goals? How will we become more efficient? How will we learn from one another? And how will we be able to demonstrate our achievements so that we can build public and political will and thus expand our resources to truly meet the challenges we face?</p> <p>17Negotiate and Prioritize Implementation PlanFactors that should be considered For Goals and ObjectivesUnderstanding CONTEXTA future VISION of the landscape.Description of CRITICAL FACTORS.Establish CRITERIA.</p> <p>Key Message: Stakeholders should define goals and objectives for the planning area. Many of these goals may already be set at higher planning levels but these may need to be elucidated to allow locally specific goals (and visions for the social landscape) to both direct and refine the planning process.</p> <p>A clear understanding of the environmental, social, and economic context for the land use plan currently being constructed.</p> <p>A vision for the landscape under consideration that is agreed upon by all stakeholders.</p> <p>A narrative description of the critical influences (i.e., opportunities, limitations, and threats) that should be considered in the land use plan.</p> <p>Ability to establish criteria that will assist stakeholders in evaluating how well proposals meet their interests.</p> <p>18Objective 1Understand that will have many objectivesMaximize positive impactMinimize negative impactOptimize all impactMulti-objectiveObjective 2Objective 3KEY MESSAGE: When establishing a goal, there will generally be multiple objectives set. We should make sure that these multiple objectives work together, and combined will allow the goal to be reached.19Qualitative versus QuantitativeEarly in the Planning Process</p> <p>Increased carbon storagePositive economic growthImproved drinking water accessibilityLater in the Planning Process</p> <p>10% increase over 3 years2.5% growth increase per year2 new wells in remote villages per year</p> <p>KEY MESSAGE: 1) The resolution of the goals will change as the planning process progresses.2) LELUP is an iterative process, so the more work that is done will mean greater knowledge that allows better quantification of Objectives.</p> <p>Stakeholders should define goals and objectives for the planning area. </p> <p>Many of these goals may already be set at higher planning levels but these may need to be elucidated to allow locally specific goals (and visions for the social landscape) to both direct and refine the planning process.</p> <p>20Accommodating higher level goalsSome goals may already be established by an existing plan at a higher level</p> <p>NationalProvinceDistrictKEY MESSAGE: Some times goals are pushed down. Therefore the LELUP process must respond to this higher level goals.</p> <p>Example National Level GHG emission reduction targets.21Accommodating lower level plansSome goals may already be established by an existing plan at a lower level</p> <p>CommuneProvinceDistrictKEY MESSAGE: Sometime goals are reported up.</p> <p>Example: We need a certain amount of NTMP for our villagers 22Vertical &amp; Horizontal Harmonization in Lam Dong Province, VietnamProvincial SEDP: increase annual GDP from 12-15% </p> <p>National Vietnam Policy: maintain 60% forest coverProvincial SEDP: reduce population growth to 1.3%Bao Lam SFC: actively manage 17,300 ha production forestLocal Communities: PFES contracting to protect specific forest areasLam Dong Province Land Use PlanKEY MESSAGE: Goals and objectives must be linked to policy and regulations that are consistent both vertically and horizontally.This however is often hard to achieve.23Lam Dong Province Case Study GoalsNational Influe...</p>