osha safety

Download OSHA Safety

Post on 18-Nov-2015

220 views

Category:

Documents

5 download

Embed Size (px)

DESCRIPTION

PPT for hand and burn safety

TRANSCRIPT

  • 04/05/2005WMMICOSHA FATAL FACTSHydraulic Pressure

    WMMIC*

  • 04/05/2005WMMICFatal Facts - Hydraulic Pressure and the DangersDescription of the Accident:

    A machine operator was fatally injured while he was attempting to bleed trapped air from a hydraulic cylinder located on an automated forming machine. The injuries occurred when he opened a bleed-to-atmosphere type air-bleed valve located on a hydraulic cylinder, causing high pressure hydraulic oil to be injected into his hand.

    WMMIC*

  • 04/05/2005WMMICThe Dangers of Hydraulic PressureInjection InjuriesDangerous properties of fluid ( toxic )Contact with hot fluidOther material movement ( explosion, whipping hose, etc. )

    WMMIC*

  • 04/05/2005WMMICHigh Pressure Injection Injuries

    WMMIC*

  • 04/05/2005WMMICWhat is an High Pressure Injection Injury?Fluid at pressure that punctures and penetrates the skin and body tissue.The injected substance passes rapidly thru the subcutaneous tissue and enters the tendons and deep spaces of hand / body.

    WMMIC*

  • 04/05/2005WMMICHigh Pressure Injection InjuryA pinhole leak in a hydraulic hose thats under pressure can release toxic fluid at a speed of 600+ feet per second.Close to the muzzle velocity of a gun!Sufficient to penetrate protective equipment depending upon velocity.Penetration recorded in distances of up to four inches between fluid source and skin.

    WMMIC*

  • 04/05/2005WMMICWhere Do You Find?Some type of fluid ( water, paint, oil-based solvents, etc. ) or airMeasured in force exerted upon a surface per unit area

    Usually pounds per square inch ( PSI )

    WMMIC*

  • 04/05/2005WMMICWhere Do You Find?hydraulic linesairless paint sprayers,fluid 100 PSI or above high-pressure fuel injection high-pressure air lines

    high-pressure grease guns,high pressure grease and paint guns most common cause

    60% paint25% grease/oil

    WMMIC*

  • 04/05/2005WMMICHigh Pressure100 PSI to puncture skin3000 - 10000 PSI2000 PSI - 50% amputation7000 PSI - 100% amputationAmputation rates vary between 16 - 48%

    WMMIC*

  • 04/05/2005WMMICSeverity/Prognostic FactorsMaterial injectedgrease - fibrosispaint - necrosisgangrenePaint / paint thinners pain and swelling in few hoursGreases / oils / hydraulic fluid pain in a day or two

    WMMIC*

  • 04/05/2005WMMICToxicologyAbsorption into systemOrganic solventWater based

    WMMIC*

  • 04/05/2005WMMICInjury Info Injection typically occurs when operator is trying to wipe clear a blocked nozzle or when operator is attempting to steady the gun with a free hand during the testing or operation of equipment

    Pad of thumb or index finger ( most common )Palm and long finger ( second most frequent )non dominant handUsually pin hole size Men between 21-59

    WMMIC*

  • 04/05/2005WMMIC

    WMMIC*

  • 04/05/2005WMMIC

    WMMIC*

  • 04/05/2005WMMICBurn InjuriesComplex injuriesBurns effect kidney, liver and cardiovascular function.

    WMMIC*

  • 04/05/2005WMMICDegree of BurnFirst Degree

    Outer layer of skinSecond Degree

    First and second layer of skinThird Degree

    All layers of skinMost serious

    WMMIC*

  • 04/05/2005WMMICInjection BurnsHot liquid injected into body

    Bypassed skin as protective deviceDebreeing of burn must be surgicalToxicity of chemical

    WMMIC*

  • 04/05/2005WMMIC2nd & 3rd Degree Tar Burn

    WMMIC*

  • 04/05/2005WMMICHow to Avoid Injection InjuriesTo check a hose for leaks while pressurized, run a piece of cardboard or paper along the hose, wear gloves, long sleeves, and safety glassesDont crack high pressure connectors or lines to check for pressure and / or flow

    WMMIC*

  • 04/05/2005WMMICHow to Avoid Injection InjuriesShut down all equipment when looking for leaksRelieve pressures ( Hose, etc. )Check to ensure pressure relievedLockout / tagout deactivation to zero energy

    WMMIC*

    *

    *

    *

    *

    *

    *

    *

    *

    *

    *

    *

    *

    *

    *

    *

    *

    *

    *

    *

    *