Orienteering. What is Orienteering? Orienteering is a cross country race in which participants use a highly detailed map and a compass to navigate their.

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<ul><li><p>Orienteering</p></li><li><p>What is Orienteering?</p></li><li><p>What is Orienteering?Orienteering is a cross country race in which participants use a highly detailed map and a compass to navigate their way between checkpoints along an unfamiliar course.</p><p>From the Boy Scout merit badge manual, 2003</p></li><li><p>What is Orienteering?Orienteering is a cross country race in which participants use a highly detailed map and a compass to navigate their way between checkpoints along an unfamiliar course.</p><p>Over hill and dale, through the woods</p></li><li><p>What is Orienteering?Orienteering is a cross country race in which participants use a highly detailed map and a compass to navigate their way between checkpoints along an unfamiliar course.</p><p>This is a timed eventBut how fast you go is a personal choice.</p></li><li><p>What is Orienteering?Orienteering is a cross country race in which participants use a highly detailed map and a compass to navigate their way between checkpoints along an unfamiliar course.</p><p>Folks of all ages, both genders, every walk of life.Alone or in groups.Of all fitness levels and abilities.</p></li><li><p>Suitable for all Ages</p></li><li><p>As Competitive as You Want</p></li><li><p>Alone or in a Group</p></li><li><p>What is Orienteering?Orienteering is a cross country race in which participants use a highly detailed map and a compass to navigate their way between checkpoints along an unfamiliar course.</p><p>A specially prepared mapIn accordance with IOF mapping standardsWith selected features enhancing foot navigation </p></li><li><p>What is Orienteering?Orienteering is a cross country race in which participants use a highly detailed map and a compass to navigate their way between checkpoints along an unfamiliar course.</p><p>You must have a amp to OrienteerYou do not have to have a compass; although it is a valuable aid.Special compasses are made for Orienteering.</p></li><li><p>What is Orienteering?Orienteering is a cross country race in which participants use a highly detailed map and a compass to navigate their way between checkpoints along an unfamiliar course.</p><p>Selecting a route suitable to your abilities (Physical and mental)Following that route, and making improvements and corrections along the way, in order to optimize your overall speed.</p></li><li><p>What is Orienteering?Orienteering is a cross country race in which participants use a highly detailed map and a compass to navigate their way between checkpoints along an unfamiliar course.</p><p>The area between two checkpoints is evaluated for alternative routes.One is selected.Orienteering techniques are implemented along the way.</p></li><li><p>What is Orienteering?Orienteering is a cross country race in which participants use a highly detailed map and a compass to navigate their way between checkpoints along an unfamiliar course.</p><p>The Orienteering Controls are marked with a distinct red &amp; white kite like flag.A unique punch or electronic recording device proves you arrived at each location.</p></li><li><p>What is Orienteering?Orienteering is a cross country race in which participants use a highly detailed map and a compass to navigate their way between checkpoints along an unfamiliar course.</p><p>A course is a series of checkpoints with controls, visited in order.No prior knowledge of the course layout, and frequently the map is permitted in competitive orienteering.</p></li><li><p>Types of Orienteering</p><p>Cross CountryDone in orderRoute ChoiceUSOF sub classes ShortMiddle - classicLong</p></li><li><p>Types of Orienteering</p><p>ScoreMany ControlsValuesTime LimitPenaltyIndividual/TeamROGAINEsGrueling6, 8, 12, 24 hour events</p></li><li><p>Types of Orienteering</p><p>Sprint Orienteering</p><p>RelaysFASTO Series</p></li><li><p>Types of Orienteering</p><p>Line Orienteering</p><p>Follow Line drawn on mapTimedPenalty for missed controls</p></li><li><p>Types of Orienteering</p><p>Route Orienteering</p><p>Follow route marked on groundMark location of found controls on mapTimedPenalty for inaccuracy</p></li><li><p>Types of Orienteering</p><p>Window/Corridor-OMemory-OTrail-OBike-OStreet-ONight-OSki-OCommand-O</p><p>History-OCanoe-ORadio-OGoatsOther gamesPokerDeclining score</p></li><li><p>Levels of Orienteering</p><p>4 levels of difficultyBeginnerAdvanced BeginnerIntermediateAdvanced</p></li><li><p>Levels of Orienteering</p><p>4 lengths of advanced Age graduated To suite the needs of all</p></li><li><p>Levels of Orienteering</p><p>Color Coded</p><p>WhiteYellowOrangeBrownGreenRedBlue</p><p>Novice1-2 kmBeginner2-3 kmIntermediate3-5 kmAdvanced3-4 kmAdvanced4-5 kmAdvanced 6-8 kmAdvanced7-12 km</p></li><li><p>Levels of Orienteering</p><p>Course Design</p><p>WhiteYellowOrangeBrownGreenRedBlue</p><p> on trails off trails catching features, attack pointsBGRB No Holds Barred</p></li><li><p>Levels of Orienteering</p><p>Map HikingVersusCompetitive Orienteering</p></li><li><p>An AdventureOrienteering can be enjoyed as a leisurely walk in the woods or as a competitive race. </p></li><li><p>An Orienteering CourseConsists of a start, a series of control sites to be visited in order, and a finish. </p></li><li><p>ControlsThe circles are centered on the feature to be found.A control marks the location. The description sheet describes the control placements and codes.</p></li><li><p>PunchingTo verify a visit, the orienteer uses a punch hanging next to the flag to mark his or her control card.</p></li><li><p>TechniquesAttack PointsHandrailsCatching featuresAiming OffCollecting features Checking offMap to terrainTerrain to mapConnecting features making a virtual pathwayContouringMap simplification</p></li><li><p>Attack PointsIt is a featurenear by the control That is easier to findthan the control itselfIt is typically 50 to 100 meters awayand seldom more than 150 meters.Whenever possibleattack from above.</p></li><li><p>Handrails</p><p>Grasp it by the hand. Let it guide you safely to your destination.A linear featureYou may follow it directlyas on a path.You may travel along side it such as a fence.You can travel near itknowing that it will stop you from crossing over, like a guardrail. </p></li><li><p>Orienteering Cincinnati, 2005Hand Rail White Course. </p></li><li><p>Orienteering Cincinnati, 2005Hand Rail Yellow course. </p></li><li><p>Orienteering Cincinnati, 2005Hand Rail Orange course. </p></li><li><p>Orienteering Cincinnati, 2005Catching Feature Is usually a linear featurethat is easy to notice, that resides just before or just beyond the controlUse catching features toalert yourself that the control is coming up very soon or that you have just passed it.May also use catching features inaiming off. </p></li><li><p>Orienteering Cincinnati, 2005Catching Feature Traveling from 2 to 3 (cliff on the top) the orienteer has drifted to the left (north).The fence is as a catching feature. The alert orienteer is caught by the catching feature.In this example the fence is followed to the hill top and a new attack is taken to the cliff top.</p></li><li><p>Orienteering Cincinnati, 2005Aiming OffDeliberately aiming to one side of a linear feature; to avoid guessing which way to turn</p></li><li><p>Collecting features Checking offMap to terrainTerrain to map</p><p>Observing the features that you pass byNoting them on your map.</p><p>Noting features on the map that you should seeLooking for them in your run</p></li><li><p>Connecting featuresMaking a virtual pathway</p></li><li><p>ContouringAdvantageMaintain height, energyUse contour as a handrailDisadvantageRarely a straight lineEasy to gain, lose height if not skilledSteep slopes are very slow to traverse (steepness and vegetation grows at odd angles)Tops of hills often open, easy runningGeneral Rule: 10m climb = 100m flat</p></li><li><p>Orienteering Cincinnati, 2005Map Simplification Ignore the less useful abundance of detail.Look for the major features; handrails and catching features.Identify the attack point and minimum detail to get there.</p><p>An orienteer takes a detailed map and visualizes a simplified version in the mind. Only the details relevant to moving between controls 4 and 5 are focused upon in the simplified metal map. </p></li><li><p>Reading AheadWhen the navigating on the current leg is simple; use the time to prevue the next leg.</p><p>Know what you will do before you need to know.</p></li><li><p>RelocationInvest a few minutes to save a lot</p><p>5 minutes now could save 20 or 30.Lose contact with map STOPOrient the map with the compass. Match the terrain around you to the features on the map.Find a plausible route from last known location to here</p><p>Otherwise, identify nearest definite guaranteed locationReturn to the last place of known location or bail out to a linear feature. </p></li><li><p>Systematic OrienteeringOrienting the MapAlign Orienting arrow with needleFind your current locationOrienting the map/person togetherCheck and know the scale and contour intervalStudy the next controlIdentify potentialAttack PointsHandrailsCatching &amp; Collecting features</p><p>Select your best routeBe extra careful with the first several legsBuild confidence and familiarity withMapTerrainSelfRead ahead plan Exit from controlNext routeCheck of features along the way</p></li><li><p>Route Choicechanges with experienceJudging Physical versus Mental aspects of choiceNavigational skillsPhysical abilitySafe versus Risky</p><p>Negative ConsiderationsClimbObstaclesDistanceDifficultiesVegetationOut of boundsPositive considerationsLandmarks HandrailsFeatures catching, collectingAttack points</p></li><li><p>Description Sheets</p></li><li><p>Description Sheets</p></li><li><p>Rough vs Fine OrienteeringRoughGeneral knowledge of loactionUsually a high rate of speed.Gurenteed Catching featuresPlanning and reading ahead</p><p>FinePrecise Knowledge of locationA little to a lot slowerAvoiding riskFocused</p></li><li><p>Distance JudgmentMeasuring on a mapUsing compass and map scalesDead reckoningSubjective and limited usePace Counting - A learned skill</p></li><li><p>Pace CountingEstablishing ones paceUsing Pace CountingRough OrienteeringFine OrienteeringAiming OffNegative effects on Pace CountClimb15m climb ~ 100m level ~ @30secondsFatigueObstacles vegetation/featuresSlope contouringPersonal growthInjurySpeed Walk/Run</p></li><li><p>Orienteering Cincinnati, 2005Pace CountingUsing pace countCount in the backgroundMake a perpetual habitAlways will have a rough distance traveledReset at all known locationsAccuracy dwindles with distanceUse toGage when short or longKnow where you have hit a crossing catching feature</p></li><li><p>Strategies</p><p>Avoiding unnecessary climbKeeping the high groundAttacking from the high groundAiming offUsing a trail to read aheadInvesting a bit of unnecessary time with safer routes to guarantee no lost time</p></li><li><p>Mistakes</p><p>Parallel errorsDirectional errorsDistance errorsLosing contact with the mapIgnoring &amp; misinterpreting features</p></li><li><p>Orienteering Rules</p><p>No prior Knowledge of the courseNo mechanical or electronic aid (GPS)No assistance navigate aloneNo following (mass start exceptions)Be quietHelp the injuredDo not damageNo trespassingReport to the finish</p></li><li><p>Orienteering PreparednessClothesShoesNutritionHydrationTemperaturePrecipitationWindTerrainDurationEye protection</p></li><li><p>Post OrienteeringTick checkScratch and wound cleaningClean dry warm clothesDraw routeEvaluate and compare route choicesIdentify mistakes and better choices</p></li><li><p>Orienteering Opportunities</p><p>Events schedule TROLSaturdays (&amp;Sundays) now through MarchWebsitehttp://ocin.orgContact info Pat Meehan513-728-5688pat@ocin.org</p></li></ul>

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