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  • ORDI

    NARY

    PEO

    PLE

    DOIN

    G EX

    TRAO

    RDIN

    ARY

    THIN

    GS S

    OUTH

    EAST

    ASI

    A AN

    NUAL

    REP

    ORT

    2012

    Didit Majalolo/ Greenpeace

  • YOU ARE AT THE HEART OF EVERYTHING WE DO

    02 l MESSAGE FROM THE BOARD

    03 l FOREWORD

    04 l YOUR SUPPORT IS THE KEY TO OUR SUCCESS

    06 l GROWTH OF SUPPORTERS

    08 l SUPPORTERS AND VOLUNTEERS

    12 l CAMPAIGN PROBLEM STATEMENTS

    14 l OUR CAMPAIGNS

    16 l ENERGY REVOLUTION

    18 l FORESTS

    20 l OCEANS

    22 l TOXIC-FREE FUTURE

    24 l SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE

    26 l SOLUTIONS WORK

    27 l FUNDING

    28 l BEARING WITNESS Ulet Ifansasti/ Greenpeace

    Christopher Allbritton/ Greenpeace

  • FOREWORDMESSAGE FROM THE BOARD

    Environmental awareness globally is now at an all-time high, which is a testament to the sustained efforts and campaigning by environmental groups to make the environment our priority. Sadly, it is also a reflection of the immensity and complexity of the ecological dilemmas that we now face. We are nearing a climate threshold that could lead to far-reaching and irreversible changes to life on the planet as we know it. The state of our environment has become a survival issue for millions of people worldwide yet governments and corporations around the world are still operating as if its business-as-usual.

    We are still sleepwalking into disaster, destroying and consuming this planet as if we have another planet to go to. The window for effective action to prevent runaway climate change from occurring is narrowing down pretty fast.

    Greenpeace is committed to help ensure that the fundamental changes we need happen now

    We are doing our best to ensure the emerging economies of Southeast Asia take a green, sustainable development pathway that does not rely on the

    mindless and irreversible destruction of the natural environment. We do not need to repeat the mistakes and tragedies associated with industrialisation in the West, but rather we need to learn from those errors and leapfrog the technology ladder, to developing clean and safer alternatives.Development does not need to mean environmental destruction. It is possible for our region to protect the environment and progress at the same time. For a region that is considered one of the critical arenas where we need to win the important environmental challenges of our times, such re-invention of the meaning of progress is vital.

    Moreover, the biggest challenge is still the predominant mindset in our societies which views environmental environmental activists as economic saboteurs or even worse, as terrorists, especially in places where the spaces for legitimate protest and democratic participation are absent if not shrinking.

    Nonetheless I remain optimistic about the future because of the many successes that our campaigns have had in Southeast Asia over the last

    decade. Our solutions-oriented record speaks for itself, and the work we have done in 2012 captures that winning and enterprising spirit. Our campaigns have already resulted in a number of key local and national victories which involve not only stopping a polluting waste incinerator, a coal energy plant or a nuclear power proposal, but also mainstreaming safer alternatives such as in the areas of renewable energy, zero deforestation, sustainable agriculture and zero waste. Our initiatives have likewise catalysed and resulted in landmark policy victories in the countries where we operate.

    But perhaps more importantly, we are making progress in revising the climate of opinion on many of the issues we are working on, and to me that makes for real and lasting change.

    All of this would not be possible without the hard work and commitment of all of our staff across the region. I appreciate your loyalty, your creativity and most of all your belief that another world is possible. I look forward to another rewarding and productive year of working with all of you.

    2012 was the year in which the reality of dangers to our environment - and the imperative to take immediate action to protect it - became more obvious than ever before.

    We saw massive climate-related disasters around the world, from Typhoon Pablo in the Philippines to Super Storm Sandy in the United States.

    The long term effects of incidents such as Fukushima and the Gulf oil spill continued to play out in 2012, as it became apparent that it is not possible to simply mop-up these kinds of disasters. The effects on human health, food stocks, soil and water will be felt for decades to come.

    Southeast Asia was not exempt, with massive flooding in Manila and Jakarta an acting as an omen of the future urban climate risks faced by our regions mega-cities: risks for which the urban poor and vulnerable disproportionately bear the brunt.

    Our oceans which provide food and livelihoods for so many of our people - faced the continued onslaught of pollution, global warming and destructive fishing practices.

    But it is not all is not doom and gloom. We are making an impact: we are changing the way big companies do

    business; we are changing the way consumers spend; and most importantly we are making ordinary people stop, think, and realize that the power to protect the planet is in their hands.

    Thailand became the first country to register a victory in the KFC campaign, which urged the fast-food giant to cut unsustainable paper companies out of their supply chain.

    After a protracted battle, Asian Pulp and Paper the world's third biggest paper company -has committed to stop deforestation in Indonesia, and help to restore the habitats of the Sumatran tiger and the orangutan. We will be closely monitoring their progress to ensure they keep their promises.

    In the Philippines, Greenpeace was part of a successful group of petitioners which asked the Supreme Court to grant a Writ of Kalikasan to stop field trials of the genetically-modified organism (GMO) Bt eggplant.

    All of this raises the question: Why is Greenpeace here? And why do we do the work that we do?

    Simply put, we are here to achieve social and environmental justice. As the board, our role is to ensure that Greenpeace delivers on its goals in a manner that is transparent and accountable, and that all

    staff and volunteers conduct themselves with integrity.

    Every single volunteer, supporter and staff member is living up to Gandhi's call to "be the change you wish to see in the world".

    As you will see in other sections of this report, Greenpeace is about creating positive change in Southeast Asia and empowering each person to be part of the movement to create positive change.

    I am thrilled to see that the spirit of volunteerism is alive and well in GPSEA and that so many Southeast Asians are active citizens, coming together to take collective action to create the kind of world they want to live in.

    To quote Howard Zinn:

    There is a power that can be created out of pent-up indignation, courage, and the inspiration of a common cause, and that if enough people put their minds and bodies into that cause, they can win. It is a phenomenon recorded again and against in the history of popular movements against injustice all over the world.

    The battle for environmental justice is the defining struggle of our times. With your continued commitment I am sure we can continue to make great strides in our battle to save the planet.

    Von Hernandez Executive Director of Greenpeace Southeast Asia (GPSEA)

    Suzy HutomoHead of the Greenpeace Southeast Asia boards Regional Affairs Committee

    2 3

  • In recent years we realized we needed to expand our people power potential. It became clear that the only way to save the planet was to reach out and ask everyday people to join us.

    To do this we set up a Mobilisation department whose focus is to connect ordinary people with extraordinary change. The focus is not simply to win minor policy changes but to build a mass movement of people who will act together to protect our environment for ourselves and for generations after us.

    The changing social and technological landscape provides us with an opportunity to lead efforts for change, help win campaigns and raise financial support for our work. This is particularly important in a region like Southeast Asia, where many of the key battles against environmental threats are being waged.

    Through this department we are integrating innovative social media and digital campaigning work with our strong grassroots and coalition building work; taking the battle to save the planet to new virtual and geographic frontiers.

    YOUR SUPPORT IS THE KEY TO OUR SUCCESS

    Ordinary people. Doing extraordinary things.

    Thank you

    We are grateful to each and every one of our supporters who made our work possible in 2012.

    You are at the heart of everything we do.

    We rely entirely on voluntary donations from individual supporters, and on grant support from foundations. We don't accept money from governments, political parties or corporations.

    Your support for Greenpeace means we can act rapidly and independently. Our independence gives us credibility and helps make our work successful.

    We value your trust and do not take it for granted. We are committed to sustaining and strengthening that trust by ensuring our work is transparent and that we are accountable to you. Most importantly we strive to ensure that all our work has a measurable impact, not just for the environment but for the communities that rely on it.

    Watch video: Why we work for Greenpeace

    Jonas Gratzer/ Greenpeace

    Nigel

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