october 3 2013 progress

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READ MORE ONLINE EASTERNPROGRESS.COM T T HE HE E E ASTERN ASTERN P P ROGRESS ROGRESS Independent student publication of Eastern Kentucky University since 1922 www.easternprogress.com Thursday, October 3, 2013 EASTERN LOOKS TO GO TOBACCO FREE NEXT YEAR SOCCER WINS LAST TWO GAMES, B6 CHAIRITY THRIVES ON DONATIONS OF PEANUT BUTTER, B1 PADDLE OUT POLLUTION, A6 EASTERN ALUM DEVELOPS PATENT FOR COLD-WEATHER GEAR, A3 Eastern will be a tobacco-free campus be- ginning in June of next year, President Mi- chael Benson announced last week. e move would add Eastern to a list of nearly 1,200 schools nationwide that have banned tobacco or smoking on their campuses, ac- cording to an American Nonsmoker’s Rights Foundation study published in July. “I was really surprised by how many peo- ple that felt as strong about it as they did,” Benson said. “People wanted to make cam- pus healthier, cleaner and more inviting.” Benson said health risks are the main reason the university is making the change. Nearly 50,000 deaths among adults are linked to second hand smoke exposure, according a fact sheet by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). e same CDC data found that tobacco use is the leading cause of avoidable death in the U.S., contributing to 443,000 lost lives each year. e Kentucky Department for Health and Family Services found that tobacco use the leading cause of preventable death in the state. “ere are so many things in life we can’t control, but the one thing we can control is what we take into our bodies,” Benson said. “is is empowering people to make their own choices, to work and study in an envi- ronment that’s healthy.” Benson said as of 2012, the university dedicated nearly $900,000 to preventable health conditions associated with tobacco use in employee insurance plans. He said that even though there are financial benefits to making the policy change, the university’s goal is to create a healthy campus environ- ment. “I know this is not one of those decisions that will completely be without controversy but this is the right thing to do and I’m will- ing to have it happen under my short tenure so far,” Benson said. Renee Fox, co-chair of the presidential task force investigating the tobacco ban, said her group is developing plans for the ban that should be completed by the end of Oc- tober. She said several members of the task force were on the committee that developed the current tobacco policy, which has been in place since July 1, 2006. Fox said support has been growing for a tobacco-free campus since the previous com- mittee began surveying students, faculty and staff. e most recent survey from 2012 found that 63 percent of people surveyed had positive feelings toward Eastern adopting a tobacco-free policy. Half the people surveyed also said the current policy, which allows for smoking 25 feet away from building entranc- es and walkways, is not effective in reducing exposure to secondhand smoke. “People do not currently follow the policy that we have,” Fox said. “We’ve learned the policy that we have is not effective because there’s still a great amount of second hand smoke on campus.” Fox, who is the health benefits and well- ness coordinator with the university, said the change would create a better environment for people with asthma or smoke allergies. She added that there will be almost instant benefits to quitting smoking, and long term benefits such as better lung capacity, im- proved blood circulation and a lower risk of heart attack, heart disease and cancer. “It’s just neat to know there are immedi- ate benefits that you get, and with removing second hand smoke, we have healthier air for everyone,” Fox said. Fox said that the university will offer smoking cessation options for people who wish to quit, including the free Cooper- Clayton and nicotine replacement therapy, Fox said. She added that the university will provide these services as long as there is a need. “We’re not telling people that they cannot use tobacco, it’s just the effort here is to cre- ate a safe and healthy work and learning en- By WESLEY ROBINSON [email protected] SEE SMOKING, PAGE A3 SGA Senate distributes $20,384 to student organizations at meeting Student wins new car from blood drive promotion Environmental Healthy and Safety says there are no false fire alarms Eastern is participating in a national movement by environmental health and safety professionals. ese professionals are trying to promote more fire safety on and off campus. Bryan Makinen, director of Environmen- tal Health and Safety (EHS), said he hears the term “false alarm” being used too often to describe scenarios in which students have had to leave campus buildings because of fire alarms, mainly residence halls. “ere is no such thing as a false alarm,” Makinen said. “ere is a reason why that fire alarm has been activated. Every alarm is a real alarm.” Makinen said there are many reasons why the alarms can go off, but the cause is unknown until the fire department and po- lice respond. He cited burned food, steam and hairspray as a few reasons why smoke detectors are activated in residence halls. “e No. 1 cause of fire alarms in resi- dence halls is burned food,” Makinen said. “People do not stay with their food when it is cooking.” He also said it doesn’t take long for food to create smoke or fire once it has burned. Corey Lewis, public information officer for the Richmond Fire Department (RFD), said that nationwide, the majority of fire- related fatalities are in off-campus hous- ing. e ultimate goal for the department is to engage students, get them thinking and make sure they are safe off campus. “If you’re looking at off-campus [hous- By JACOB BLAIR [email protected] SEE SAFETY, PAGE A3 Usually students who donate blood re- ceive a T-shirt or a gift card as a perk, but one lucky student turned a few pints of blood into a brand new car. Brent Love, 20, an athletic training sopho- more from Florence, won a 2013 Toyota Pri- us from the Kentucky Blood Center’s (KBC) blood drive summer drive, which took place May 17 through Sept. 13. Love said he has been donating for a while now as often as possible. He said the the most satisfying part about giving blood is knowing that he’s able to save a life, just by donating blood. “I was very excited,” Love said. “I missed the first call because I was in class, but I called them back, and when they said I won, I didn’t believe her at first, cause you know, who wins those kinds of things?” Love said he asked the person from the center if she was joking several times be- cause he was in such disbelief. “My family didn’t believe me either -- more than I couldn’t believe it,” Love said. But then they were all extremely excited for me.” Before the contest, Love had been driving a 1997 Toyota Camry. He gave that car to his grandfather, because he had been looking for a more fuel-efficient car. When compared to his old ride, Love thinks the Prius is much better. He said his favorite thing about the Prius is the fuel effi- ciency and the Bluetooth that is able to con- nect to his phone. Love said that before he had a Prius, he thought they were neat, but wasn’t sure if he would ever buy one. After having the fortune to receive one, he says he would get anoth- er. e Prius is as of yet unnamed, but some suggestions for it have been thrown around. Debra Bowman, executive director of With more than $20,000 worth of funds to give away, the Student Government Associa- tion (SGA) Student Senate held this semester’s SGA appropriations meeting Tuesday night. Registered Student Organizations (RSO) ap- plied for funding from SGA but only 13 out of the 27 RSOs received funding. e appropria- tions meeting gave the RSO’s a chance to ex- plain why they need SGA’s financial help and gave senators a chance to debate the amount of funding appropriated to each organization. Any RSO is allowed to apply for funding by SGA. e RSOs fill out an application speci- fying how much funding they need and what specifically they need it for. SGA Executive Vice President Steven Bradford said that the committee then ranks the organizations. e ranking committee looks at many variables to rank the organizations. “e appropriations chair makes a rank- ing committee (and) they look for what kind of fundraising they’ve done in the past, how much they are asking for, if the organization is benefitting EKU students,” Bradford said. e ranking committee ranks each RSO based on merit. e committee looks for age of the organization, fundraising and member dues, contributions toward the campus as a whole, previous SGA funding and attendance at the mandatory appropriations information- al meeting, as specified in the Student Senate bylaws. e ranking decides what organizations go first during the meeting. e Senate gives out money until the funds run out. erefore, the RSOs ranked at the bottom of the list could re- ceive no funding at all. is was the case for the last 12 RSOs during Tuesday’s meeting. Two other RSOs didn’t receive funding be- cause they didn’t have a representative in at- tendance at the meeting. e Marching Colonels walked away with the most funds, receiving $4,300 after asking for $92,125. ey were ranked third in the ap- propriations process. At the meeting, the RSO’s had a chance to give a 30-second speech and then their Sen- ate representative said a few words about the particular organization. e floor was then opened up for discussion. Senators debated about such budget items as money for gaso- line, hotel rooms, and promotional materials. A pattern started to form at the meeting. Any organization with specifics about their budget and organizations that showed effort in raising their own funds through member dues and fundraisers, received the most funding from SGA. Organizations who did not have representatives attend the meeting were typi- cally not awarded any money. Representatives who did not have specifics about what their group was asking for in their budget received less funding. For example the new Board Game Club knew the exact amount of money they were going to spend on certain games. e repre- sentative explained his process of researching board game prices so they received almost all the funds they requested. e process produced mixed feelings from the RSO representatives. Some thought that they were not given a chance to explain the importance of the funds they were requesting. “I believe most people in SGA didn’t under- KAELI FLETCHER/PROGRESS JACOB BLAIR/PROGRESS Terrence Bayko, an environmental health and safety technician, educates Sullivan Hall residents on residence hall fire safety and what to do if they discover a fire. By KASEY TYRING [email protected] By HEATHER STEPHENS [email protected] BURNT FOOD AND STEAM TOP LIST OF MAIN SOURCES FOR ALARMS GOING OFF IN RESIDENCE HALLS APPROPRIATIONS COMMITTEE FUNDS 13 ORGANIZATIONS OUT OF THE 27 GROUPS REQUESTING MONEY PRESIDENT BENSON ANNOUNCES UNIVERSITY GOAL FOR TOBACCO FREE CAMPUS ON JUNE 1, 2014 WESLEY ROBINSON/PROGRESS Brenda Highbaugh, 18, a psychology major from Louisville, represented the SOS Bridgade during Tuesday’s Appropriations meeting. SEE SENATE, PAGE A6 SEE WIN, PAGE A6 Brent Love, 20, an atheletic training sophmore from Florence, won a 2013 Toyota Prius in Kentucky Blood Center promotion.

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  • READ MORE ONLINEEASTERNPROGRESS.COM

    TTHE HE EEASTERN ASTERN PPROGRESSROGRESSIndependent student publication of Eastern Kentucky University since 1922www.easternprogress.com Thursday, October 3, 2013

    EASTERN LOOKS TO GO TOBACCO FREE NEXT YEAR

    SOCCER WINS LAST TWO GAMES, B6

    CHAIRITY THRIVES ON DONATIONS OF

    PEANUT BUTTER, B1

    PADDLE OUT POLLUTION, A6

    EASTERN ALUM DEVELOPS PATENT

    FOR COLD-WEATHER GEAR, A3

    Eastern will be a tobacco-free campus be-ginning in June of next year, President Mi-chael Benson announced last week. Th e move would add Eastern to a list of nearly 1,200 schools nationwide that have banned tobacco or smoking on their campuses, ac-cording to an American Nonsmokers Rights Foundation study published in July.

    I was really surprised by how many peo-ple that felt as strong about it as they did, Benson said. People wanted to make cam-pus healthier, cleaner and more inviting.

    Benson said health risks are the main reason the university is making the change. Nearly 50,000 deaths among adults are linked to second hand smoke exposure, according a

    fact sheet by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Th e same CDC data found that tobacco use is the leading cause of avoidable death in the U.S., contributing to 443,000 lost lives each year. Th e Kentucky Department for Health and Family Services found that tobacco use the leading cause of preventable death in the state.

    Th ere are so many things in life we cant control, but the one thing we can control is what we take into our bodies, Benson said. Th is is empowering people to make their own choices, to work and study in an envi-ronment thats healthy.

    Benson said as of 2012, the university dedicated nearly $900,000 to preventable health conditions associated with tobacco use in employee insurance plans. He said that even though there are nancial bene ts to making the policy change, the universitys goal is to create a healthy campus environ-ment.

    I know this is not one of those decisions that will completely be without controversy but this is the right thing to do and Im will-

    ing to have it happen under my short tenure so far, Benson said.

    Renee Fox, co-chair of the presidential task force investigating the tobacco ban, said her group is developing plans for the ban that should be completed by the end of Oc-tober. She said several members of the task force were on the committee that developed the current tobacco policy, which has been in place since July 1, 2006.

    Fox said support has been growing for a tobacco-free campus since the previous com-mittee began surveying students, faculty and sta . Th e most recent survey from 2012 found that 63 percent of people surveyed had positive feelings toward Eastern adopting a tobacco-free policy. Half the people surveyed also said the current policy, which allows for smoking 25 feet away from building entranc-es and walkways, is not e ective in reducing exposure to secondhand smoke.

    People do not currently follow the policy that we have, Fox said. Weve learned the policy that we have is not e ective because theres still a great amount of second hand

    smoke on campus.Fox, who is the health bene ts and well-

    ness coordinator with the university, said the change would create a better environment for people with asthma or smoke allergies. She added that there will be almost instant bene ts to quitting smoking, and long term bene ts such as better lung capacity, im-proved blood circulation and a lower risk of heart attack, heart disease and cancer.

    Its just neat to know there are immedi-ate bene ts that you get, and with removing second hand smoke, we have healthier air for everyone, Fox said.

    Fox said that the university will o er smoking cessation options for people who wish to quit, including the free Cooper-Clayton and nicotine replacement therapy, Fox said. She added that the university will provide these services as long as there is a need.

    Were not telling people that they cannot use tobacco, its just the e ort here is to cre-ate a safe and healthy work and learning en-

    By WESLEY [email protected]

    SEE SMOKING, PAGE A3

    SGA Senate distributes $20,384 to student organizations at meeting

    Student wins new car from blood drive promotion

    Environmental Healthy and Safety says there are no false fire alarms

    Eastern is participating in a national movement by environmental health and safety professionals. Th ese professionals are trying to promote more re safety on and o campus.

    Bryan Makinen, director of Environmen-tal Health and Safety (EHS), said he hears the term false alarm being used too often to describe scenarios in which students have had to leave campus buildings because of re alarms, mainly residence halls.

    Th ere is no such thing as a false alarm, Makinen said. Th ere is a reason why that re alarm has been activated. Every alarm

    is a real alarm.Makinen said there are many reasons

    why the alarms can go o , but the cause is unknown until the re department and po-lice respond. He cited burned food, steam and hairspray as a few reasons why smoke detectors are activated in residence halls.

    Th e No. 1 cause of re alarms in resi-dence halls is burned food, Makinen said. People do not stay with their food when it is cooking.

    He also said it doesnt take long for food to create smoke or re once it has burned.

    Corey Lewis, public information o cer for the Richmond Fire Department (RFD), said that nationwide, the majority of re-related fatalities are in o -campus hous-ing. Th e ultimate goal for the department is to engage students, get them thinking and make sure they are safe o campus.

    If youre looking at o -campus [hous-

    By JACOB [email protected]

    SEE SAFETY, PAGE A3

    Usually students who donate blood re-ceive a T-shirt or a gift card as a perk, but one lucky student turned a few pints of blood into a brand new car.

    Brent Love, 20, an athletic training sopho-more from Florence, won a 2013 Toyota Pri-us from the Kentucky Blood Centers (KBC) blood drive summer drive, which took place May 17 through Sept. 13.

    Love said he has been donating for a while now as often as possible. He said the the most satisfying part about giving blood is knowing that hes able to save a life, just by donating blood.

    I was very excited, Love said. I missed the rst call because I was in class, but I called them back, and when they said I won, I didnt believe her at rst, cause you know, who wins those kinds of things?

    Love said he asked the person from the center if she was joking several times be-cause he was in such disbelief.

    My family didnt believe me either -- more than I couldnt believe it, Love said. But then they were all extremely excited for me.

    Before the contest, Love had been driving a 1997 Toyota Camry. He gave that car to his grandfather, because he had been looking for a more fuel-e cient car.

    When compared to his old ride, Love thinks the Prius is much better. He said his favorite thing about the Prius is the fuel e -ciency and the Bluetooth that is able to con-nect to his phone.

    Love said that before he had a Prius, he thought they were neat, but wasnt sure if he would ever buy one. After having the fortune to receive one, he says he would get anoth-er. Th e Prius is as of yet unnamed, but some suggestions for it have been thrown around.

    Debra Bowman, executive director of

    With more than $20,000 worth of funds to give away, the Student Government Associa-tion (SGA) Student Senate held this semesters SGA appropriations meeting Tuesday night. Registered Student Organizations (RSO) ap-plied for funding from SGA but only 13 out of the 27 RSOs received funding. Th e appropria-tions meeting gave the RSOs a chance to ex-plain why they need SGAs nancial help and gave senators a chance to debate the amount of funding appropriated to each organization.

    Any RSO is allowed to apply for funding by SGA. Th e RSOs ll out an application speci-fying how much funding they need and what speci cally they need it for. SGA Executive Vice President Steven Bradford said that the committee then ranks the organizations. Th e ranking committee looks at many variables to rank the organizations.

    Th e appropriations chair makes a rank-ing committee (and) they look for what kind of fundraising theyve done in the past, how much they are asking for, if the organization is bene tting EKU students, Bradford said.

    Th e ranking committee ranks each RSO based on merit. Th e committee looks for age of the organization, fundraising and member dues, contributions toward the campus as a whole, previous SGA funding and attendance at the mandatory appropriations information-al meeting, as speci ed in the Student Senate bylaws.

    Th e ranking decides what organizations go rst during the meeting. Th e Senate gives out

    money until the funds run out. Th erefore, the RSOs ranked at the bottom of the list could re-ceive no funding at all. Th is was the case for the last 12 RSOs during Tuesdays meeting. Two other RSOs didnt receive funding be-cause they didnt have a representative in at-tendance at the meeting.

    Th e Marching Colonels walked away with the most funds, receiving $4,300 after asking for $92,125. Th ey were ranked third in the ap-propriations process.

    At the meeting, the RSOs had a chance to give a 30-second speech and then their Sen-ate representative said a few words about the particular organization. Th e oor was then opened up for discussion. Senators debated about such budget items as money for gaso-line, hotel rooms, and promotional materials.

    A pattern started to form at the meeting. Any organization with speci cs about their budget and organizations that showed e ort in raising their own funds through member dues and fundraisers, received the most funding from SGA. Organizations who did not have representatives attend the meeting were typi-cally not awarded any money. Representatives who did not have speci cs about what their group was asking for in their budget received less funding.

    For example the new Board Game Club knew the exact amount of money they were going to spend on certain games. Th e repre-sentative explained his process of researching board game prices so they received almost all the funds they requested.

    Th e process produced mixed feelings from the RSO representatives. Some thought that they were not given a chance to explain the importance of the funds they were requesting.

    I believe most people in SGA didnt under- KAELI FLETCHER/PROGRESS

    JACOB BLAIR/PROGRESSTerrence Bayko, an environmental health and safety technician, educates Sullivan Hall residents on residence hall fire safety and what to do if they discover a fire.

    By KASEY TYRINGka[email protected]

    By HEATHER [email protected]

    BURNT FOOD AND STEAM TOP LIST OF MAIN SOURCES FOR ALARMS GOING OFF IN RESIDENCE HALLS

    APPROPRIATIONS COMMITTEE FUNDS 13 ORGANIZATIONS OUT OF THE 27 GROUPS REQUESTING MONEY

    PRESIDENT BENSON ANNOUNCES UNIVERSITY GOAL FOR TOBACCO FREE CAMPUS ON JUNE 1, 2014

    WESLEY ROBINSON/PROGRESS

    Brenda Highbaugh, 18, a psychology major from Louisville, represented the SOS Bridgade during Tuesdays Appropriations meeting.

    SEE SENATE, PAGE A6

    SEE WIN, PAGE A6

    Brent Love, 20, an atheletic training sophmore from Florence, won a 2013 Toyota Prius in Kentucky Blood Center promotion.

  • Week of October 39

    THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY

    Homecoming Fashion ShowEasterns Minority Collegiate Con-

    nections club (MCC) is planning its annual homecoming fashion show at 7 p.m. Monday, Oct. 7, in ODonnell Hall in the Whitlock Building.

    Th e topic of the show will be based on the seven deadly sins of fashion. Along with the upcoming fashion show, MCC will also be doing various fundraising for victims of breast can-cer, domestic abuse, and children suf-fering from cancer.

    For more information about the event, contact Eastern MCC President Brooke Butler at [email protected]

    Logan Jones

    THE COLONELS CALENDARTHE COLONELS CALENDAR

    11 a.m.Project Speak OutConference RoomNoel Studio

    7:30 p.m.Plato and a Platypus Walk Into a Bar: The Beauty of Philosophy through JokesODonnell HallWhitlock Building

    7 p.m.The Cultures and Traditions of KenyaKennamer RoomMiddle Powell

    7:30 p.m.Dwight YoakamCenter for the Arts

    All DaySpotlight Day for Admissions

    3 p.m.Volleyballv. Austin PeayClarksville, Tenn.

    6 p.m.Footballv. Austin PeayRichmond, Ky.

    6 [email protected] Libraries: Prezi for StudentsLibrary 204D

    All DayGolf (M)Bearcat InvitationalHebron, Ky.

    10 a.m.KBC Blood DriveKennamer RoomMiddle Powell

    9 p.m.Student Life BingoPowell Underground

    5 p.m.Energy Options for Ky.Carter Building 18

    6 p.m.Backcountry Cooking WorkshopAP Base CampPresnell Building

    2 p.m.Crimes of the HeartGifford Theater

    2 p.m.Soccerv. Eastern IllinoisCharleston, Ill.

    BEATPOLICEBEATPOLICE

    Sept. 25 Eastern Police and the Richmond Fire

    Department responded to an alarm at the Ault Building, part of the Whalin Com-plex at 10:31 a.m. Upon arrival, respond-ers found the alarm was not sounding. After investigation, the responders discov-ered SimplexGrinnell technicians working on the alarm system.Sept. 26

    An o cer was on patrol at 12:36 a.m. and spotted a man walking north on Kit Carson Drive. Th e o cer stopped William Lawson, Jr., from Richmond, and asked him what he was doing. Lawson told the o cer he had been scrapping, looking for copper and wire, according to the police report. Th e o cer asked to see his identi- cation and found that Lawson had been agged for a bench warrant. Th e o cer searched Lawson and found wire cutters, screwdrivers, a box cutter and a ashlight.

    Th e o cer detained Lawson because of the bench warrant and also cited him with possession of burglary tools. Lawson was transported to the Madison County De-tention Center. Bail was set at $203.

    An o cer went to Commonwealth Hall at 10 p.m. after a report of a female student being physically harassed. Th e student said she was harassed while walk-ing on Kit Carson Drive to return to her residence hall.Sept. 27

    An o cer stopped a Chevrolet truck at 2:10 a.m. after the driver made a left turn on red on Kit Carson Drive. Brad Staple-ton, 21, from Richmond, also failed to pro-duce an insurance card and accurate regis-tration plates during the stop. Th e o cer also smelled alcohol coming from the ve-hicle, according to the police report. Th e o cer told Stapleton to step out of the vehicle and then Stapleton underwent eld sobriety tests. Stapleton failed the tests and was transported to the Madison County Detention Center.

    Eastern police stopped Jake Schneider, 19, from Independence, at 3:30 a.m. after he ran a red light on Lancaster Avenue. Schneider told the o cer that he had a few

    beers. Th e o cer performed eld sobriety tests on Schneider. Schneider failed the tests and was transported to the Madison County Detention Center for operating a vehicle under the in uence of alcohol.Sept. 28

    A student reported his chrome detail-ing missing from his Chevrolet pickup truck parked at the Lancaster Lot at 1 p.m. Th e value of the chrome detailing is esti-mated at $100.

    An o cer responded to the report of a re alarm at the New Residence Hall at 4:52 p.m. Th e o cer heard no alarms and the control panel did not show an active alarm. Richmond Fire Department arrived and inspected the area and could not nd a cause of alarm.

    Eastern Police responded to Clay Hall at 11:23 p.m. after a man entered saying he wanted access to the 11th oor. Th e police report said the o cer met Zachary Brady, 20, from Covington, inside the lobby. Th e o cer said Brady smlled like alcohol. Brady was asked to take eld sobriety tests and he failed. Brady was then charged with alcohol intoxication in a public place and transported to the Madison County Detention Center.

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    A2 The Eastern Progress, Thursday, October 3, 2013

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    ing], the rst thing to check is the smoke alarm, Lewis said. A non-working smoke alarm is typically a precursor to other issues that may arise.

    Richmond Fire Department was on campus every Wednesday in September with freebies to promote re safety. Some of the items were branded with Fire Safe Colonel or Campus Fire Safety Month.

    Makinen said the Richmond Fire De-partment helps with unannounced re drills conducted in the residence halls ev-ery semester.

    Th e true purpose of re drills is so people know what their alarm sounds like, to practice evacuation and meeting areas and to do a small educational ses-sion, Makinen said.

    He said that according to state codes, every residence hall on campus has to have a re drill each semester.

    One thing Makinen said he notices during building evacuations is that stu-dents typically dont use the emergency exits. If the re alarm activates, he said youre allowed to use the emergency exit doors to leave the building.

    Makinen said if the re alarm is acti-vated, stop what youre working on and leave the building as quickly, e ciently and safely as possible.

    He also said that if there is smoke present or re, use the pull station to ac-tivate the alarm and leave the building. If your smoke detector activates and there is no smoke or re, call Police, step into the hallway and wait for them to respond to the area. If you hear a smoke detec-tor in another room, call Eastern Police at (859) 622-1111 and let dispatch know what room the alarm is coming from.

    SAFETYCONTINUED FROM A1

    Students and sta are invited to attend and participate in several events and dem-onstrations coordinated for the month of October in honor of EKUs annual Disabili-ties Awareness Month.

    Nationally, October has been designated as the month to raise awareness for disabil-ities in America. Citizens with disabilities face challenges every day that can prove to be extremely di cult.

    According to its mission statement, the O ce of Services for Individuals with Dis-abilities (OSID) is dedicated to ensure that all students, faculty and sta with disabili-ties at Eastern Kentucky University are pro-vided equal access to the campus at large; including work and educational environ-ments, the physical campus and access to university related programs and activities.

    Andrew Tinsley, chair of the ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) Accessi-bility Awareness Committee, is in charge of planning and coordinating disability-relat-ed events for the month.

    Individuals with disabilities are all around, functioning in the same way as those without. It can be very di cult and challenging to complete certain things and its our job on the committee to make sure people are aware of what we do and how important it is that accommodations are made, Tinsley said.

    Library resources on ADA accessibility will be showcased in the Main Library for the entire month so that students and sta can be better informed about disability ac-commodation. In addition to the showcas-ing, there are several events including lec-tures and demonstrations throughout the month. Th e ADA Accessibility Awareness Committee has worked in association with the Chautauqua lecture series to invite mo-tivational speaker, author, and lmmaker,

    Mark Wellman to Eastern. Wellman will demonstrate adaptive

    climbing equipment in the Fitness and Wellness Center from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. and then conduct the Chautauqua lecture in ODonnell Hall of the Whitlock Building entitled: Climbing back: No limits to the Beauty of the Outdoors at 7:30 p.m., on Th ursday, Oct. 10.

    Jon Shumate, 21, junior criminal justice major from Ross, Ohio, identi es with the disabilities o ce as a student with dyslexia.

    Out of every university I looked at, while transitioning from high school to col-lege, Eastern had the most to o er in terms of accommodation, but for some reason they didnt have the recognition or accredi-tation as the others, Shumate said.

    Easterns OSID manages several di er-ent programs and accommodations from project SUCCESS, a two week emersion program that brings high-school students with disabilities onto campus for a crash course, and outreach programs that sent two transition specialists around to 51 dif-ferent counties in Kentucky.

    Easterns OSID manages several di er-ent programs and accommodations includ-ing Project SUCCESS, a program that out-lines a plan to graduate and o ers tutoring, focus groups and other disability tools like note-taking devices and electronic books.

    Th ere are over 600 students that self-identify with the o ce here, which means that they come in on their own accord to ac-cess our services, said Teresa Belluscio, di-rector of the disabilities o ce, Project SUC-CESS and Co-Chair of the ADA taskforce. We really strive to be the best, working here is fantastic; best job anyone could ever have; this month should re ect our work.

    Other events scheduled for October in-clude Disabilities Awareness day on Pow-ell Corner with informational booths and wheelchair mobility demonstrations be-tween 9 a.m. and 2 p.m.

    A recent Eastern graduate has devel-oped a product to keep people warm far longer than any product by Under Ar-mour, Nike or any other leading brand.

    Dwaine Evans is the creator of a new, potentially groundbreaking cold weather shirt called for his company PODZ GEAR. Th e shirt strategically places heating packs on key points of the human core to ensure warm blood is constantly spread-ing through the circulatory system.

    No ones ever thought to use the blood as a means to heat or cool the body, Ev-ans said. I never thought that basic con-cept would come to [where its at now.]

    Th e 24-year-old Flatwoods native said he came up with idea back in 2009 while he was on a paintball trip in Georgia with Easterns student club.

    I thought, theres got to be a better way, Evans said recalling the frigid win-ter day. [When I got back] I put the ideas on paper and thought this could work.

    Unlike current products on the market, Evans said the patent-pending technology uses the blood to keep the body warm. He added that the looser, more comfortable t make the product something more bene -cial to the general population.

    Th e company launched a 45-day Kick-starter campaign to raise $30,000. which ends Nov. 8. As of Wednesday Oct. 2, PODZ Gear had raised $4,259.

    Jeremy Brown joined in on the project after taking with Evans, who was a fre-quent customer at the bank Brown man-aged. Brown said over time Evans began to explain his idea for creating the shirt and eventually the two became business

    partners. I said lets pursue it, Brown said. We

    developed a rapport and over six months we nally decided to make it a reality.

    He said he was drawn to PODZ GEAR-by the many uses the product could have for athletes, re ghters, military person-nel, construction workers and beyond.

    I know how cold I got as a coach, pitcher and player in the early spring, late fall during the season and working out in the winter, Brown said. You dont want to wear too many layers and look like the Michelin Man on the eld as a coach.

    Brown, who handles PODZ GEARs -nances, said he and Evans added partners to the company to help develop the busi-ness. Each one of the four partners is an Eastern graduate.

    Brown said the company is trying out Kickstarter as a way to market the product and gain potential investors. Th e Kickstart-er page features videos of the product in ac-tion, the science behind the shirt and perks for people who donate, such as wristbands, car stickers and a free shirt.

    Its kind of a hybrid of many di er-ent things, Brown said of the Kickstarter campaign. We wanted to try it rst be-fore going the traditional method.

    After the fundraising campaign, Ev-ans and Brown said the company will be-gin manufacturing the shirt and start a direct sales campaign.

    Evans, who received a degree in indus-trial safety and risk management works as chemical operator by day. He said he spends at least 40 hours a week on devel-oping PODZ GEAR.

    Its my dream, Evans said. Im going to do everything I can to make it succeed.

    He said he continues to work with Easterns Business and Technology Ac-celerator at the university to help re ne his original idea to where it is now.

    To support PODZ Gears Kickstartart-er campaign visit podzgear.com.

    Campus office informs students about resources for those with disabilities

    Alumni launches Kickstarter campaign for new business

    By CALEB [email protected]

    By WESLEY [email protected]

    vironment for all people, Fox said.Benson said the new policy isnt targeting

    smokers or trying to make people quit smok-ing. Referencing New York Mayor Michael Bloombergs bans on soft drinks and king sized candy bars, Benson said the university would not take the policy too far.

    Th is is not about infringing on peoples right to do what they want to do with their own health and bodies, Benson said. Were limiting what people can do on campus. We dont want people doing things that a ect [other peoples health negatively] on campus. Not to be glib, but we arent taking away diet sodas.

    Brian Kinker, 23, a psychology major from Landstuhl, Germany, said he does not support the ban, but agrees that it helps non-smokers. He said people would probably vio-late the policy and doesnt think there is a way to control people smoking.

    Its my decision to smoke and Im re-sponsible for what I put in my own body, Kinker said.

    I do like the programs to help people stop smoking but then again its our own choice to go to the programs.

    While on a tour of Eastern, Megan Du , 18, from Harlan County, said she was not pleased with the new policy and questioned

    why there wouldnt be any designated areas for smoking on campus.

    I still plan on coming [to Eastern] but Im de netly going to try and sneak a smoke on campus, Du said. When I come here next fall, [the tobacco ban] will not in uence me to quit.

    Fox said the task force is working the Uni-versity of Kentucky to make a seamless tran-sition from the current policy to a tobacco-free campus. UK implemented its smoking policy in 2009 and Fox said its helpful to have help from a university that has already made the change. Fox also said the task force has divided into subgroups to address some is-sues of the new policy, including its language, enforcement and communications, but will still continue to receive feedback from the university community.

    We de nitely are going to be soliciting feedback from faculty, sta and students and getting input for how to overcome barriers and make this a smooth transition, Fox said.

    Benson said a key part of enforcement will be getting people to be respectful of each others rights, but he said that he is con- dent the Eastern community will meet the challenge.

    I know we can put together a policy that will work, Benson said. Th eres no reason not to say we cant do it. Were part of a big Eastern Kentucky family. Weve addressed problems before and I know we can do it.

    News Editor Kasey Tyring contributed to this news story.

    TOBACCOCONTINUED FROM A1

    RECENT GRADUATE USES WEBSITE TO HELP RAISE MONEY FOR OUTDOOR PERFORMANCE GEAR

    Eastern graduate Dwaine Evans developed a shirt that keeps its wearer warm through strategically placed heating pads on a persons core. Blood flow remains warm because of the heating packs.

    PHOTO SUBMITTED

  • Have an opinion?

    Kasey TyringNews editor

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    Opinions expressed herein are those of student editors or other signed writers and do not necessarily represent the views of the university. Student editors also decide the news and informational content.

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    Whistleblowers, journalists preserve freedom

    NSA surveilance erodes trust between government and people

    DanielDanielKlaphekeKlapheke

    Over the last several months, U.S. citizens have been sent into a sort of privacy paranoia over the scale of the National Security Agencys (NSA) surveillance pro-gram.

    Th e issue began when whistle-blower Edward Snowden, a former computer specialist under con-tract for the NSA, sat down for a seven-minute interview. He re-vealed that the NSA is capable of tapping in to any Internet, text, or call records of any U.S. citizens phone. Th e sheer scale of what the agency is capable of is astounding, including the fact it requires no prior authority to search a citizens private phone.

    Since then Snowden has been

    granted asylum in Russia and is currently under the guard of Rus-sian security. It is di cult not to appreciate the irony in the U.S. criminalizing whistleblowing while the former Soviet Union protects a U.S. citizen.

    Th ere is a great moral contradic-tion revolved around the situation, as Snowden has been criticized for leaking government information, but also praised for protecting his country. He has been given many titles since the incident, ranging from traitor to hero.

    Th e most appropriate title would be a good citizen.

    Th ink a moment about your av-erage day. Most college students will check their email for private messages, text various friends, make a post on Facebook or Twit-ter over the opinions we are en-titled to, or simply socialize over systems like Skype and Xbox. Th ere is certainly information you would not share with the public over these media, but it is now ap-parent we have no say as to what

    we consider private information. Th e NSA has access to any in-

    formation on any of the previously listed social media, and have been able to monitor our activity from the minute we signed up for a spe-ci c account. We nally know that the feeling that someone is watch-ing us is not a ghost, but our own government.

    Th e people of any government have the right to privacy, and the right to know if that privacy is be-ing violated. Th e duty of the U.S. government is to protect and make decisions that are in the best inter-est of its people, while the duty of its citizens is to make sure those decisions truly are in their best in-terest.

    In the case of the NSA, the gov-ernment has been in direct vio-lation of the right to privacy, so Snowden carried out his duty as a citizen and showed the world that our own government has been committing crimes against us.

    Since the incident, President Obama and other government o -

    cials have said the government has no spying operation against U.S. citizens, but at this point a person would be foolish not to question the honesty of our leaders.

    Prior to Snowdens testimo-ny, National Intelligence direc-tor James Clapper blatantly lied to Congress, claiming that the gov-ernment was not wittingly col-lecting private information. If lies were being told only months ago, what should lead us to believe that any truth is being told now?

    Th e most important part of this scandal is that the NSA has violat-ed the fourth amendment right to unreasonable search or seizures. To do so requires a warrant, which the NSA does not possess in searching through private information. Th is sort of unrestricted power is what the U.S. has fought against since the birth of our nation.

    Regardless of the motive, this is unconstitutional, which is rst and foremost the deciding factor on whether or not the NSA has the right to continue its mass surveil-

    lance programs.In the aftermath of the NSA

    scandal, we as citizens are left with a great distrust in our government. Th ere is sure evidence of unre-stricted surveillance on U.S. citi-zens, and our government has lied about its existence. It is not pos-sible to know whether other pro-grams of this nature are in opera-tion, or if the NSA power extends past what we know already.

    Many computer and phone companies have buckled down on the issue and o ered increased se-curity, but the ability of the NSA to break down security walls has kept up with the advancements.

    Th e NSA is a threat to U.S. se-curity and our way of life and needs to have its power scaled back. Citizens need to know that their private information and ac-tivity is safe when they go online or turn on their phone, but that as-surance is currently only a dream.

    In order for the government to regain our trust, our o cials must prove they are worthy of it.

    Whistleblowers are the Robin Hoods of today.Th ey steal classi ed information from the powerful and

    give it to the masses. Julian Assange, Edward Snowden, and Chelsea Manning

    are catalysts in the push for government transparency and in-dividual privacy.

    In June, Edward Snowden, a 25-year-old a computer spe-cialist for the NSA and CIA, leaked documents to the British magazine Th e Guardian, showing the scope of NSAs drag-net of surveillance and data collection. Th e extent of the data mining is still relatively unknown, although its appears to be vast, including everything from emails and browsing history to phone records the type of information that can be used to piece together the activities of daily life.

    Snowdens revelations prompted the American Civil Lib-erties Union to sue the NSA to release certain documents re-lated to the collection of phone records gathered by the NSA under Section 215 of the Patriot Act. Th e ACLU argued that the NSAs actions constituted a privacy invasion as well as suppression of free speech.

    Th e Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court sided with the ACLU in early September saying the NSA is required to re-lease all documentation requested by the ACLU under the Freedom of Information Act. NSA has been releasing a steady stream of documents since. Th e information contained in these documents reads like the script of the Shia LaBeouf thriller Eagle Eye with the government tracking the phone calls and other online data of thousands of American citi-zens.

    Another lawsuit is just as alarming, particularly to pro-fessional journalists and news organizations. Th e Associated Press sued the Department of Justice in May after it was re-vealed that the FBI had invoked the same clause of the Patri-ot Act to authorize its wiretaps of more than 20 phone lines to track a source who had been in contact with the AP. Don-ald Sachtleben, 55, bomb technician was convicted and sen-tenced on September 24. Th e FBIs choice to sidestep Fourth Amendment search and seizures laws raises concerns about a news organizations right to protect its sources and the valid-ity of American laws that protect whistleblowers, known as shield laws.

    What is going on around here? America spying on its own citizens in the name of national security is no shocker, but didnt we learn anything from the McCarthy Era? It appears not.

    Some people might say, Who cares if the NSA pours over my daily activities? Im doing nothing wrong.

    But the concern over this type of surveillance isnt about the type of information collected but rather the basic con-stitutional right to privacy, which the Fourth Amendment search and seizure laws are intended to protect.

    Th e Freedom of Information Act has been a critical tool for reporters seeking information from government sources. Th e future Edward R. Murrows take their roles as members of the Fourth Estate very seriously. Its refreshing that FOIA has not lost its weight as an invaluable tool in what is often an

    uphill battle for transparency in the government and corpo-rate sectors.

    Th eres no question that some national security issues come under protection and must remain classi ed. Th e re-lease of troop movements, for instance, should fall under the protection of national security and remain classi ed.

    According to the FISA court, the type of documents the NSA denied the ACLU in its information requests posed no clear and present danger. Th e documents requested, it turns out, were more just controversial than posing any danger.

    Th e Obama administration has promised appropriate re-forms but have o ered no clear suggestions to date. Th e ad-ministration also insists that government leaks have led to the current mistrust in the government.

    Edward Snowden continues to release documents, the lat-est on September 3, showing the United States secretly in-tercepted presidential phone transmissions from Brazil and Mexico. Th e latest NSA documents show American data was shared with Israel. Th ese latest developments just serve to broaden the mistrust of the United States on a global front

    where the US struggles to gain favorable opinion. Th e ACLU has led a similar case ACLU v. Clapper chal-

    lenging the NSA to release document regarding their mass cell-tracking program. On June, 5 Th e Guardian released a story about how the NSA requests personal phone records and metadata on a daily basis from the Verizon Business Net-work Service. Th e case is set to be heard on Nov. 1.

    October 4 is the deadline FISA set for the NSA to release all documents requested by the ACLU.

    Th e documents provide further evidence that secret and one-sided judicial review is not an adequate check on the NSAs surveillance practices, Alex Abdo, sta attorney with the ACLU National Security Project told ACLU o cials, ac-cording to the ACLUs website.

    As concerns grow, the government has to eventually o er a clear and justi able response for their sweeping and inva-sive methods of investigation under the NSA. Until then, its up to our modern-era Robin Hoods and Edward R. Murrows to champion the Freedom of Information Act and ght for the rights of those who dont hold the reins of power.

    Zeynab Day, Editor The Eastern Progress | www.easternprogress.com Thursday, October 3, 2013 Zeynab Day, Editor The Eastern Progress | www.easternprogress.com Thursday, October 3, 2013 A4A4

    PPERSPECTIVESERSPECTIVES

    KATIE BROOKS

  • The Eastern Progress, Thursday, October 3, 2013 Perspectives 5

    Campus Sound Off

    It would be cool to be in a zip lining contest over the Grand Canyon. Whoever got the farthest would win and the prize would be a free trip to the moon!

    Aus n LunsfordHometown: Woodford CountyMajor: NursingYear: Sophomore

    A knowledge of twerking contest! I basically know every dance there is to know. The winner would receive a free vaca on, preferably a cruise to the Carib-bean.

    Jasmine WilsonHometown: LondonMajor: PsychologyYear: Sophomore

    I would want to win an ac ng contest, like an Oscar. A great prize would be a life long contract.

    Kristain HartHometown: ParisMajor: EnglishYear: Freshman

    If I could win any contest it would be a dunk contest. I would want to win a beach house with a corve e parked in the driveway.

    Manny AlfordHometown: BardstownMajor: Communica onsYear: Senior

    If you could win any contest what would it be and what would you like to win?

    Campus newspaper serves as university suggestion box

    Wesley Wesley RobinsonRobinson

    I would de nitely compete in a cereal ea ng contest! The prize would have to be a car, mostly because I dont have one right now and dont see one in my near future.

    Gina YocumHometown: NicholasvilleMajor: Middle school educa onYear: Junior

    A camping gear contest. A free one man tent would be amazing.

    Laura KelleyHometown: Baghdad Major: BiologyYear: Junior

    Usually when I sit down to write these types of pieces I have wonderfully profound ideas, but by the time I actually put pen to paper (or more often ngers to keys) I realize I wasted my time and the time of anyone who reads the nal product. Its not that the writing is bad -- I just

    would rather read what other people have to say.

    Im not so self-righteous to the point I think I have all of the answers. I see how great discus-sion can start because of some-thing I wrote and I see that oth-ers are capable of creating the same spark.

    Take this edition for example: We received two letters about whether Eastern should use the Colonel as a mascot going for-ward with its new brand. Both letters were a direct response to a submission last week urging the university to consider drop-ping its current namesake.

    Th e discussion has been inter-esting thus far and has shed light on the topic in a way I hadnt considered. More than that, I know for a fact university o -cials are taking note of the issue.

    Why? Once an idea is pub-lished it gains a higher level of credibility and Id say that level of public visibility adds a higher level of importance to the issue. I could be wrong, but history shows us the power of the press.

    I usually get cooped up in Th e Progress o ce and as a transfer student, I havent experienced dorm life at Eastern and dont really have an idea of how this

    university operates socially or in regards to certain details. For me its great to have letters to the editor, comments, news tips and other submissions because I honestly dont know a lot about this campus.

    Furthermore, we spend so much time covering speci c is-sues and beats, we can often miss out on the news people tell me they want to see on our pages.

    Just like President Michael Benson has a presidential sug-gestion box, Th e Progress has an email account and a letter to the editor section dedicated to understanding campus issues.

    It doesnt take a lot of e ort to write and share ideas. Not only that, it goes a long way to help the university look more like a place the represents its students, faculty and sta .

    If youve ever met me and ex-hibited any type of strong opin-ion on anything, youve prob-ably heard me tell you to write for Th e Progress. Im all for free speech and the sharing of ideas. I genuinely want to see as many divergent ideas and perspectives within our pages because I know makes us a better paper, which helps the university community as a whole.

    Letters to the Editor

    I enjoyed William Elliss letter to the editor in last Th ursdays Progress (Uni-versity Should Consider Mascot Change Sept. 26, A5). He suggested Eastern drop the old Colonel as the athletic mascot and as our university symbol.

    I agree with Dr. Ellis 100 percent.Ellis has deep roots at Eastern, as do

    I. I served for six years as news editor for Easterns Division of Public Informa-tion. So Im familiar, at least somewhat, with the needs and goals of university advancement. I also earned a masters degree from Eastern in 1990 in English. And, of course, Im currently a senior lecturer in the Department of English and Theatre. So I have every interest in helping Eastern advance into the new century.

    One important way to help Eastern advance is to dump the Colonel mascot.

    In the first place, the Colonel was taken from another Kentucky institu-tion, Centre College, so were trading in stolen goods, so to speak.

    Secondly, the symbolism invokes im-ages a distant, and unpleasant past. East-ern shouldnt associate itself in any way with symbols of the Old South. We want to be looking forward to the futurea future that is totally different from the image that were projecting now.

    Ellis ended his letter by saying, Why dont we say goodbye to the old Colonel and get a new branding that will have a wider appeal.

    Why not indeed! And I have a sugges-tion of just how to do that.

    Lets get a mascot, say, a bulldog, and have this dog run out on the eld with the Colonel for the rest of this academic year. Let everyone see him at every game: foot-ball, soccer, basketball, softball, and base-ball, and have the dog become the living mascot for the university.

    Gradually, we retire that dusty (and, in fact goofy) Colonel costume, and next year, or the year after have the cheer squad lead the dog out on the field for every game, with no Colonel anywhere in sight. The universitys graphic brand-ing could be changed gradually also. Wed include the dog with the Colonel on logos this year, and slowly make the Colonel disappear.

    The branding change would empha-size the strength, courage, and loyalty of the bulldog, and not the anachronistic racism and hatred of the Old South.

    Long live Eastern! Goodbye to the Colonel!

    Mason Smith, senior lecturer, Department of English and Theatre

    I always pick up the Progress on Th ursday between classes, mostly for the Police Beat or to see whatever liberal rant has been published.

    Last weeks edition took me by sur-prise. In the letters to the editor, one en-titled University should consider mas-cot change made me ponder how far some may be willing to go with this re-branding.

    I understand the forward thinking and support President Michael Benson in his endeavors to have Eastern join the ranks of other schools, such as the Uni-versities of Louisville or Kentucky.

    However, I see a line that should be drawn.

    If we are to no longer be the Eastern Kentucky University Colonels (as sug-gested in the earlier letter), then why dont we drop the name of Eastern Ken-tucky?

    If nothing is held sacred, we could also add a few buildings in Th e Ravine, and tear down the historic Keen John-son building and other areas that give the Campus Beautiful its title. Maybe these changes will attract the hordes of students who had their sights set on Ivy League or larger conference schools.

    I am extremely proud to be an East-ern Kentucky Colonel, no matter how anachronistic it may be.

    I intend to be the 12th person in my family to graduate as a Colonel, and hope that one day I have children who will do the same.

    I wish to see the university continue in its successes with the removal of out-dated and unaesthetic buildings and re-placing them with modern centers, as well as the increased standards for ad-mission and some of the other ideas that were introduced at President Bensons Convocation. Th ese are all well-over-due changes that are highly noticeable to a prospective student. With the right strategic goal-set, Eastern will not have any issue re-establishing itself as a stan-dard for collegiate campuses in this re-gion.

    Let us look to the future, as East-ern Kentucky Colonels, and do so with pride. We have an illustrious past, and the makings of a ne foundation for an even better university than we could en-vision.

    Kyle NicholasAviation junior

    Mascot change much needed Colonel honors university tradition and core values

  • Th e Eastern Progress, Th ursday, October 3, 2013A6

    A group of 18 students took advantage of their time o from classes on Friday to ca-noe in the Kentucky River and pick up litter in and along its banks.

    Th e biannual Paddle Out Pollution event took place during the Assurance of Learn-ing Day so students could participate. Par-ticipants traveled to Fort Boonesborough for a day of canoeing where they paddled across a portion of the Kentucky River and kept an eye out for trash along the bank and in the river.

    Its technically no ones job to clean up the banks of the river, said Becca Williams, a 21-year-old, recreational therapy major from Nashville, Tenn. We help the state out by providing the people to do it for them.

    Eastern has sent students to clean up the river twice a year since 2010. Williams said that every year there has been a noticeable change in the amount of trash.

    For next year were probably going to have to move to a di erent section of the riv-er since weve done the same one so many times. Williams said.

    Williams said the O ce of Community Service has put on the event several times

    because the program has been popular with the students.

    Th is is my second time doing it and Ive loved it even more than the rst time, said Levi Isaacs,21, computer information sys-tems major from Berea.

    Isaacs said that through the event he has made a lot of new friends and developed a lot of sore muscles. Isaacs also said he dis-covered a lot of interesting trash from his canoe.

    We found a lot of cool stu on the shore, Isaacs said. We found a fridge, a stu ed bunny rabbit, and a whole couch that we couldnt even t in the canoe.

    Williams hopes that the participants got a sense of accomplishment by enhanc-ing their community and themselves from cleaning up the river.

    I want people to feel passionate about this being in our community, Williams said, Th e pollution of the river does e ect our campus and all closer rivers.

    Th e next Paddle Out Pollution is in the spring and Williams wants to encourage students to sign up for the event.

    Its a fun project that doesnt feel like youre doing service, Williams said. It gives you a rst taste of what you can get into in serving the area around Richmond.

    Students go canoeing to help clean the Kentucky River banksBy TOPHER [email protected]

    TOPHER PAYTON/PROGRESS

    KAELI FLETCHER/PROGRESS

    Becky Monarch, 21, public relations senior from Paris, and other students canoe away from Fort Boonesboro during Paddle Out Pollution. The goal of the canoeing trip was to help clean up the Kentucky River.

    Brent Love, 20, atheletic training sophomore from Florence won a new car through a local blood-drive.

    Giles Gallery to feature award-winning cartoons by President Bensons brother

    Th e Giles Gallery recently introduced new artwork which included some pieces from a member of Easterns rst family.

    Beginning Monday, Sept. 30, Giles Gal-lery is presenting works from artists such as Jan Ru Wans ber and textile pieces, Tina Gebharts ceramics and Steve Ben-sons editorial cartoons.

    Steve Benson is a Pulitzer Prize-win-ning editorial cartoonist and has worked as the sta editorial cartoonist for the Ari-zona Republic for more than 30 years. He is the brother of President Michael Benson. On Wednesday, Oct. 16 at 5pm, Benson will give a gallery presentation followed by a reception in his honor.

    Th e idea for the exhibit came from Pres-ident Michael Benson and was carried out by Herbert Goodman, chair of the EKU Department of Art and Design.

    Ive followed Steves career for a while now and to nd out the president was his brother was surprising, Goodman said.

    Bensons gallery work will not appeal speci cally to art students.

    He has won many awards and his work touches on numerous topics such as poli-tics and journalism, Goodman said.

    During his career, Benson has not only been a Pulitzer Prize winner (1993) for ed-itorial cartooning, but has also received other awards and recognitions. He was a Pulitzer Prize nalist in 1984, 1989, 1992 and 1994. Benson has also been nationally syndicated by Th e Washington Post Writ-ers Group, Tribune Media Services, United Feature Syndicate, and Creators Syndicate and served as president of the Association of American Editorial Cartoonists (AAEC). In addition to his cartoons, he has also published ve books entitled I Am Ap-palled, Fencin with Benson, Evan-ly Days, Back at the Barb-B-Que and Where Do You Draw the Line?

    Th e exhibit will contain a few piec-es of his editorial cartoon work. Students can visit the Giles Gallery in the Camp-bell Building between Sept. 30 and Oct. 17. Viewing hours for the gallery in the Fall 2013 semester are Mondays and Wednes-days, 10:30 a.m.-5 p.m.; Tuesdays and Th ursdays, 11 a.m.-4:30 p.m.; and Fridays, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

    By BRIANNA [email protected]

    SENATECONTINUED FROM A1

    stand why we needed certain things for our budget. said Brenda High-baugh, 18, psychology major from Louisville and the president of the SOS Brigade. A lot of our members are at-risk students. Th ats why we dont ask for member dues.

    Th e SOS Brigade received $450 from appropriations but originally asked for $1,504. Th e senators debat-ed why they should award so much money to an organization that does not pay member dues and did not have any fundraisers planned.

    Th ough the Appropriations pro-cess is done for this semester, there are still grants available for RSOs through SGA. Th eses grants include the Aramark, diversity and informa-tion technology grants. For more in-formation, stop by the SGA O ce in the Powell Building.

    RSO (ranked in descending order) Requested Received

    Minority Collegiate Connections 662.50 580Public Media Student Journalist Association 300 280Marching Colonels 92125 4300Boardgame Club 505 445American Association of Airport Executives 29 0Green Crew 1472 1272Agriculture Club 1750 850Alpha Phi Sigma 6773 3821Alpha Psi Omega 300 0Powerhouse Colonels 3170 2960SOS Brigade 1504 450EKU Kendo Club 6200 3000Saddle Club 1003 610American String Teachers Association 2766 1265Ice Hockey 2940 540NAFME 5097 0PRSSA 4282 0Opera Guild 2766 0Fencing Club 704 0ISA 4035 0Golden Key international Honor Society 1620 0NOVA stars 2990 0ESSA 3095 0Sport Club Council 3577 0Pershing Rifl es 4724 0Skeet and Trap 11555 0Beta Theta Pi 10000 0

    FALL 2013 APPROPRIATIONS

    WINCONTINUED FROM A1

    quality and regulatory af-fairs with the KBC, said the center plans bigger give-aways for the summer when people are less likely to do-nate.

    We normally do things to encourage donating, like giving out concert tickets, or T-shirts, or gift cards. Our biggest drives are at schools during the school year, so we need a bigger prize to moti-vate people to come out and donate during the summer.

    Th e Kentucky Blood Cen-ter will be on campus again from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tues-day and Wednesday, Oct. 8 and 9 in the Powell Building.

  • SEE GUITARIST, PAGE B3

    Mark Kroos is not a musician who came to fame overnight, he worked to get to where he is today.

    Kroos grew up in Lansing, Mich., where bad weather gave him the plenty of time to practice playing the guitar, he said.

    Artists such as Michael Hedges, a famous composer and songwriter inspired Kroos. He rst picked up a guitar in the seventh-grade when he was 12.

    What you fall in love with in junior high is what you fall in love with for the rest of your life, Kroos said.

    Kroos began playing shows to start up his ca-reer, but had a rough start.

    A lot of people start their music careers on YouTube, Kroos said. I just started playing shows. I actually lived out of my car for about a year because I couldnt a ord the rent for an apartment.

    He started his career playing shows at local churches, and then he went on to playing shows at colleges such as Piedmont Community Col-lege, Charlotte, N.C. and Toledo School for the Arts, Toledo, Ohio.

    Kroos then got a boost in popularity after winning the Guitar Players Magazines, 2011 In-ternational Competition. He then received en-dorsements from companies such as Ovation Guitars, D-Addario strings and Kyser Capos. Ky-ser is making a signature Mark Kroos model of their capos.

    Playing music for a living is awesome, its

    Peanut butter. Its great between two slices of bread, as the mid-

    dle to a Reeses cup, or added to a milk-shake. Who would have thought it could also be something to help combat world hunger?

    Last September a handful of Eastern students went on a mission trip to Haiti. On the plane ride home, the students agreed that they wanted to do every-thing possible to help the Haitian people in the villages of La Digue and Barbancourt. These two remote villages have no elec-tricity or running water, so living conditions are poor.

    One of the ways we found that would be pretty sim-ple would be a peanut butter drive, said India Barger, 20, psychology major from Hyden, who serves as the Student Alumni Ambassadors (SAA) vice president of external affairs. Each jar of peanut butter has enough protein to sustain one child for one month. So its easy, effective, and we just ran with it.

    Barger said Easterns peanut butter drive has collect-ed between 800 and 1000 jars so far. Many students got the high schools and churches in their hometowns in-volved by asking them to collect as much peanut butter as possible.

    Weve taken it on as a challenge for the state of Ken-tucky since there are multiple drives going on at other campuses, Barger said.

    The effort is headed by SAA and aided by Campus Outreach, the political science department, Cru, EKU Gurus, Lambda Sigma, and the Department of Health Promotion and administration.

    The peanut butter drive is open to anyone who would like to participate and donate, and will be going on in-definitely.

    PHOTO SUBMITTED

    SEE DONATE, B3

    Th e Grand Th eft Auto games, since the rst release in 1997, have been the poster child for the dark side of video game culture. Th e promiscuous artwork, and the fact that the main action of the game and its identity is asso-ciated with criminal o enses.

    When a game franchise is around as long as the GTA se-ries, it has the ability to grow into a pop culture phenomenon not only rival but obliterat blockbust-er movies in terms of sales.

    GTA V, released on Sept. 17, cost around $270 million to make and in the rst 24 hours of going on sale it had already made $800 million. Th e game trounced pre-vious records set by the likes of Call of Duty: Black Ops which sold more than $200 million in about a week.

    Th e e ect this game has on the population is immediately apparent, as numbers dont lie. Grand Th eft Auto V has instant-ly become one of the best-selling games of all time.

    So, is it deserving of its suc-

    cess? Or is it just an overblown uke of titanic proportions?

    GTA V is the latest installment to the massive series, created by Rockstar Games and subsequent branch Rockstar North, and fea-tures similar gameplay and at-mosphere from previous titles.

    An open world advertised as being three times larger than any other map the team has de-veloped, a do whatever you want action game, with guns, cars, planes, bikes, and numerous ac-tivities ranging from skydiving to tennis, all tied together by a co-herent narrative.

    Th e story itself puts the play-er in the shoes of three separate protagonists who live in the c-tional state of San Andreas and the city of Los Santos, which mir-ror California and Los Angeles respectively.

    Th eres Franklin, the black youth whos tired of the small time gang banger shtick and has something to prove; Michael, the retired big time criminal whose materialistic family is driving him insane; and nally Trevor, one of the most deranged, fright-ening, and nasty videogame characters to date.

    As light hearted as the GTA series may seem this entry espe-

    SEE GTA, PAGE B3

    KaLeigh Underwood, Editor The Eastern Progress | www.easternprogress.com Thursday, October 3, 2013 KaLeigh Underwood, Editor The Eastern Progress | www.easternprogress.com Thursday, October 3, 2013 B1B1

    FFEATURESEATURESPutting peanut butters protein power to work in impoverished nations

    PHOTO SUBMITTED

    EASTERNS STUDENT ALUMNI AMBASSADORS ORGANIZE A PEANUT BUTTER DRIVETO BENEFIT TWO VILLAGES IN HAITI

    Mark Kroos demonstrates his own brand of finger plucking style on his Ovation double-headed guitar. He will be performing at 7:30 p.m Thursday, Oct. 3 in the Pearl Buchanan Theater.

    By WYATT [email protected]

    By KALEIGH [email protected]

    Guitarist showcases his two-hand tapping style

    WITHIN 24 HOURS, GAME TROUNCES RECORDS WITH $800 MILLION IN SALES

    VISITING PERFORMER TO TEACH MASTER CLASS AND GIVE VIRTUOSO GUITAR SHOW ON OCT. 3

    Grand Theft Auto V breaks skulls and records

    By MICHAEL [email protected]

    COURTESY OF USGAMER.NET

  • Hit SinglesWay Out Here Wont Be Lonely LongBeer On The Table

    JOSHTHOMPSON

    Saturday Oct. 5, 2013

    7 BANDS!AND

    Friday Oct. 4, 2013

    Sundy Best

    Galaxy Bowling Center showed its support for dis-

    covering a cure for Alzheimers last Wednesday by sponsoring a

    bowling night for Th e Place to Be program.

    Th e Place to Be program was cre-ated by Easterns Department of Occupa-

    tional Th erapy in order to create a support-ive environment for adults with memory loss.

    Th e program allows adults with Alzheimers and other forms of dementia to interact with stu-

    dents enrolled in service learning programs. Th e program has been connecting families of Al-

    zheimers patients and friends for more than 20 years. Th e members of the program are trying to raise the self-

    esteem of Alzheimers victims by teaching valuable skill sets and helpful guidelines in an attempt to slow the rapid

    memory loss. According to www.alz.org, Alzheimers disease is the sixth

    leading cause of death in the U. S. to date and is currently the only cause of death among the top 10 that cannot be prevented, cured

    or slowed. More than 5 million Americans living in the U.S. are diag-nosed with Alzheimers disease. Th is means that every 68 seconds, someones parent, sibling, grand-

    parent, husband or wife is diagnosed with the fatal disease. Th e Alzheimers Awareness Association is focused on changing those statistics. Th e Galaxy Bowling Alley o ered its support by only charging $10 for two

    hours of bowling as well as providing free shoe rental in support of the cause. Baked goods were also provided by the members of the Occupational Th erapy De-

    partment.

    T h e b a k e d goods in-cluded pump-kin spice puppy chow , chocolate chip brownies, no-bake cookies as well as chocolate chunk cookies .

    Th e event was small with around 17 to 20 people bowl-ing throughout the night. East-ern student Bridget Stidham, 20, Spanish and political science major from Winchester, attended the event because she said that she felt so strongly about Th e Place to Be program and all that they have done for di erent families.

    I think its awesome that Alzheimers aware-ness is making such progress on campus, Stidham said. She said that she saw a ier for the bowling night posted in the hallway of her dorm, Clay Hall, and decid-ed that it would be a fun event to attend. She met many in-teresting people throughout the night and made a couple of new friends.

    I discovered I am really bad at bowling but the pumpkin spice puppy chow that I ate made losing to my roommate every game a little better, Stidham said. She has known victims of Alzheimers and fully understand the emotional impact that caregivers and family mem-bers face on a day-to-day basis.

    Th e Place to Be program is currently accepting donations through the Alzheimers Association website. To donate, visit alz.org and enter team name: Th e Place to Be. No donation or contribution is too small in the ght to end Al-zheimers.

    B2 The Eastern Progress, Thursday, October 3, 2013

    In todays pop culture world, technol-ogy has in uenced many artists to cre-ate new sounds incorporating heavy base lines and strong, repeating drum beats. Th is electronic, dubstep movement has gained prominence on the radio and continues to top national music charts.

    On Easterns campus, Jayde Boll-man, 19, a pre-med biology major from Corbin, allows the music to not only influence his lifestyle, but also to help others in need.

    Bollman began creating a music style he calls clubstep at the age of 15 when a close friend needed beats to put be-hind his rap lyrics.

    I played guitar for 12 years and pi-ano for six years, Bollman said. After a while, guitar got old. I wanted to dive into something completely new.

    Bollman began taking inspiration from such artists as Skrillex and Zom-boy. He soon incorporated the easy-to-dance-to aspect of dubstep with the repetition of electronic music to create his clubstep.

    After Bollman grew in his newfound hobby, he decided he should share his sound with other technology-based mu-sic fans. He signed up for an online, music promotion site called ReverbNation.com and began to produce and publish music regularly.

    Through the website, he found that he could also donate a portion of what-ever proceeds he made to the Sweet Re-lief for Musicians Fund.

    This charity helps starving artists in larger cities to stay off the streets and stay fed, Bollman said.

    Th e organization helps to establish soup kitchens for those struggling to make it in the music industry as well as those artists who struggle with disabilities.

    For every online play that Bollman registers on ReverbNation, the web-site donates half of what he receives to Sweet Relief.

    Ive only been on ReverbNation for almost a year and a half. Already, Ive made $700 for myself and $700 for Sweet Relief, Bollman said.

    Two of his favorite original songs are Bouncin and Goin Down which can be found on his website.

    To find out more about the Sweet Relief for Musicians Fund, visit www.sweetrelief.org. Bollmans music can be found at www.reverbnation.com/Jay-Bollman.

    COURTNEY TURNER/PROGRESS

    Bollman said he made $700 profit and raised $700 for the Sweet Relief for Musicians Fund.

    Students dubstep music raises money for charity

    By COURTNEY [email protected]

    Richmond bowling alley sponsors social eventfor those suffering from Alzheimers disease

    By MEGAN [email protected]

    CALLS HIS STYLE CLUBSTEP AND RAISES MONEY THROUGH LISTENS ON REVERB NATION WEBSITE

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    what I like to do, Kroos said. I really en-joy the composition part of it, and you get to travel a lot, I also really like performing for people.

    Kroos is no stranger to Eastern, he taught a master class last semester in a lec-ture where he explained his music career.

    While playing a show at Natashas Bis-tro in Lexington, Dennis Davis, associ-ate professor of the Department of Music, heard of Kroos. Davis then called Kroos and asked him to teach a master class.

    I didnt even know who Mark Kroos was until then, Davis said.

    Kevin Case, 23, music education senior, attended Krooss master class last semester at Eastern and said that it was interesting to learn from a successful guitarist.

    It was neat learning that what he liked to do [ nger tapping style] was market-

    able, Case said.Cody Lester, 24, music education ju-

    nior from Danville, also was a student in Kroos class.

    He appeals to pretty much everyone. Hes ashy and his style di ers from the norm, Lester said.

    I was writing a song and didnt have enough room on the neck to play it, Kroos said. So I set one up at and played it with my right hand while I played the other with my left hand.

    Kroos will be teaching another mas-ter class, on how he composes his music Th ursday Oct. 3, from 10 a.m. until noon.

    He will also be performing on campus the same night at 7:30 p.m. in the Pearl Buchanan Th eater. Tickets will be $10 for general admission and $5 for students.

    Mark Kroos will be selling a compila-tion DVD at the concert, which is not yet released to the public. His new album titled Down Along the Line of Joy, along with his rst release, Th e Sound of Snow, will also be on sale.

    Marvels Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., a hyped new series based on char-acters from the 2012 hit lm Mar-vels Th e Avengers, delivered with tons of action and drama last week. Th e S.H.I.E.L.D team conists of characters from the 2012 hit lm, came soaring in with mind-blow-ing planes, advanced technology and humor to save the world.

    Marvels Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D serves as a bridge from TV to the existing universe of various Mar-vel lms. It also anticipates up-coming projects for fans and au-diences who cant get enough of Marvels superheroes.

    Created by Joss Whedon, Jed Whedon and Maurissa Tancha-roen, the new series explores the behind-the-scenes stories of a team that has popped up as cam-eos in many lms like The Aveng-ers, Iron Man, Th or, Captain America: Th e First Avenger, Th e Incredible Hulk and its sequels. Th e S.H.I.E.L.D team is led by newly-resurrected Agent Coul-son (Clark Gregg) as he and his new team of specialized agents are assigned and equipped with advanced technology to nd in-dividuals with superhero abili-

    ties throughout the world before they either become a threat to the world or a threat to themselves.

    Along with Coulson, the se-ries also follows Skye (Chloe Ben-net), a computer hacker who is in-troduced as a civilian standing against the idea of S.H.I.E.L.D, Agent Grant Ward (Brett Dalton), a black-op specialist, Agent Me-linda May (Ming-Na Wen), who serves as the pilot for S.H.I.E.L.D and weapons expert, Agent Leo Fitz (Iain De Caestecker), special-izing in weapon technology and Agent Jemma Simmons (Elizabeth Henstridge), who specializes in life sciences of human and alien.

    Th e pilot really sets the foun-dation for the series. Whedon provides the audience with like-able characters who are interest-ing enough with depth and cha-risma. But he also instills a fun atmosphere, much like his pre-vious television shows, Bu y the Vampire Slayer and Dollhouse. Th e characters are memorable with a diversity and acting tech-nique that adds color to the show. Skye, however, easily comes o as the scene stealer with her sarcasm and chemistry with the team. Bennet brings a fresh take to the role with her spot-on wit and her dynamic ability to shift from seri-ous to perky, all while remaining

    tough adds a certain complexity to the character.

    Coulson leading the team is a surprise for those who have seen Th e Avengers. Returning from his assumed death in the lm, (which ultimately brought the Avengers together), Coulson shines bright as he unites the new S.H.I.E.L.D team while tracking down super-heroes. Th e full explanation on why and how Coulson returned back from the dead opens doors for later episodes.

    Marvels Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D also brings a larger scale of ac-tion than the current television shows that are airing this fall. Ex-plosions, huge planes and Coul-sons Lola (a car that ies) are a few things that premiered in the pilot. Much of the advanced technol-ogy the agents are equipped with makes perfect sense to have while living in the same universe as Iron Man, Th or, Captain America and the Hulk. Each week, the team will be given a new assignment as they continue to discover people with superhero abilities.

    Appearances from Maria Hill (Cobie Smulders), and mysteries re-volving around S.H.I.E.L.D re ect the current comics that Marvels Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D is based on.

    Marvels Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D airs at 8 p.m. on Tuesdays on ABC.

    Our absolute minimum goal is 2000 jars. Thats what is required to fill a pal-let to ship it, Barger said.

    Th e organization even had a tractor-trailer truck donated to transport the peanut butter to an air force base where the air force will ship it directly to the Childrens Lifeline organization in Haiti.

    Were not going to stop at 2,000 jars, were hoping to get way more than that. Even after we send our first shipment, we hope to continue sending shipments as students continue to travel back.

    The group plans to continue send-ing the peanut butter as long as they

    can continue to get enough jars to ship and is currently being stored at differ-ent churches, with the bulk of the do-nations going to the Childrens Lifeline Headquarters in Clay City.

    There are roughly 150 million or-phans in the world. At first glance, that number doesnt seem as big to us. But if you lined up every orphan child shoul-der to shoulder, they would stretch around the perimeter of the United States three times. We as Americans and college students have ample re-sources to share with these children, and if the least we can do is send a jar of peanut butter, then I think its a great opportunity, Barger said.

    For more info on how to help, please contact India Barger at [email protected] or (606) 275-0632.

    cially needs a gigantic red, Not For Chil-dren or the Squeamish, sticker plastered on the box art.

    GTA V has intense scenes of gory vio-lence, exten-sively horrid language and an un-ironic handling of the satirized ma-terial found in games like these.

    But amidst the vulgar sto-ry and presen-tation there is a beauti-fully realized game. Th e city of Los Santos feels alive with the chatter of NPCs, sounds of sirens, mu-sic and driving cars makes you feel like youre living in the world. Driving and handling vehicles in the game has been incredibly improved from the more realistic driv-ing found in titles like GTA IV. Th e graph-ics are top notch, as the game squeezes every last bit of power out of the PS3 and Xbox 360. Buyer, beware though since this working of both systems has led to some major graphical issues.

    On the PS3 the game will randomly

    crash or become corrupted to the point of being unplayable and requires a reinstall of the game data which can take up to 10 to 20 minutes at a time.

    As for the Xbox 360 the game has to install the data from one disc and play it on a separate disc just to keep up, and if you install both discs the game will lag to a third of the games actual speed. Th e PC version couldnt come sooner.

    But when the game is play-ing successful-ly its easy to get lost in the world as you switch between the di erent characters and commit to dif-ferent missions, the highlight of which are the Bank heists that allow you to plan out from di erent an-gles and let you make your own team to per-form the job.

    As GTA games and sandbox games in general go this is the gold

    standard. While the story and character dialogue is hit or miss the game as a whole is fantastic, lled with time sinking side missions, a whole city to explore and three di erent perspectives in which to enjoy it GTA V does indeed deserve its phenom-enal success.

    GRADE: A

    GTACONTINUED FROM B1

    COURTESY OF COMICBOOKMOVIE.COM

    COURTESY OF DIRTYPIXELGAMING.BLOG.COM

    The Eastern Progress, Thursday, October 3, 2013 B3

    GUITARISTCONTINUED FROM B1

    DONATECONTINUED FROM B1

    Marvels Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D delievers action and dramaBy JUSTIN [email protected]

  • Sports B4 The Eastern Progress, Thursday, October 3, 2013

    First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)

    412 W Main StreetMinisters: Glenn Birkett

    & Bob VickersCall for a ride - Kathy 200-4092

    Liturgical Worship & Progressive Thinking

    First Presbyterian Church330 W. Main St.

    Richmond, KY 40475859-623-5323

    Sundway Worship: 11 amFree Wednesday Night

    Dinner: 6 pmrichmondfpc.com

    First United Methodist Church

    401 West Main StreetRichmond, KY 40475

    www.richmondfumc.org859-623-3580

    Service times- 8:30 am and 10:45am

    Sunday School- 9:40 am (including college class)

    Free Meals Wednesday night at 5:15pm

    Wednesday night bible study classes at 6:30pm

    Northridge ChurchMailing Address: PO Box 1374,

    Richmond, KY 40476Physical Address:

    399 W Water St Richmond, KY 40475

    Sunday Service: 11:00 AM2IFHCell: (770) 656-8560

    Website: www.northridgecommunity.orgEmail: [email protected]

    gmail.comPastor: Jared Lathem

    A Congregation of the United Methodist Church

    Red House Baptist Church2301 Red House Road (Hwy

    388) North of Richmond (859) 623-8471

    College/Career Study: 9:30amSunday School: 9:30am Early

    Morning Worship: 8:15am, Sunday Worship: 10:45 am, Evening Worship: 6:00 pm,

    Mid-week evening meal: 5:15pm,

    Prayer Meeting & Study: 6:30pm, Pre-school/Children &

    Youth Activities: 6:30 pm. [email protected]

    RedHouseBaptistChurch.org

    Chuch on the Rock1049 Richmond Rd. N.

    Berea, KY859-986-1899

    Transportation ProvidedHome Cooked Dinner

    WKHUVW6XQGD\HDFKPRQWKprovided by the C-4 Ministry (College & Career Ministry)

    Sunday School 9:45 amSunday Worship 10:45 amSunday Evening 6:00 pm

    Wednesday 7:00 pmPastor Mark Sarver

    www.churchontherock.us

    Episcopal Church of Our Saviour

    oursaviourky.org2323 Lexington RoadRichmond, KY 40475

    859.623.1226Sunday Holy Eucharist 8:30

    am (spoken), 11:00 am (choral)

    Wednesday Evening Prayer/Healing 7:00 pmSecond Sunday

    Concerts 2:00 pmScience and Faith Series

    Quarterly 1:00 pm (free lunch)

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    Faith Baptist ChurchPresents

    LifeBuilders Adult MinistrySunday Morning @ 10 am

    Sunday Evening @ 6:30 pmWednesday @ 7 pm

    Come out and enjoy a free home-cooked breakfast as we answers lifes greatest questions from the Word of

    God. Transportation provided when you call 859-779-0765.

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    com Pastor Dan Bottrell & Associate Pastor Jeff Davis

    Faith Created Assembly315 Fourth Street

    Richmond, Ky. 40475(859) 623-4639

    Sunday Service: 10:45Wed Bible Study/ Youth

    7:00pmPastor Garrick D. Williams

    [email protected]

    WORSHIPDIRECTORY | This is a PaidAdvertisementRichmond Church of Christ

    1500 Lancaster RoadRichmond, KY 40475

    859-623-8535Free Meal for College Students Wednesdays

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    www.richmondcc.orgfacebook.com/colonels4christ

    Rosedale Baptist Church

    As Christ Welcomes all to the Cross, All are Welcome at

    Rosedale411 Westover Ave

    Richmond, KY 40475 859-623-1771

    rosedalebaptist.net Transportation available for all

    activities Sunday School 9:30 (including college class)

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    St. Thomas Lutheran Church

    Sunday Service: 9:30am Sunday School: 11:00am

    [email protected]

    1285 Barnsmill Rd., Richmond, Ky 40475

    (859) 623-7254

    Unity Baptist 1290 Barnes Mill Road,

    Richmond, Ky859-624-9464

    http://www.unitybaptist.org/[email protected]

    bellsouth.netServices:

    Sunday School 9:30 am Morning Worship 10:45am

    Evening Worship 6pmWednesday: 6:30 pm Bible

    StudyThursday: 6 pm College

    Ministry Group

    Vineyard Community Church

    830 Eastern BypassRichmond Mall (Main Entrance)

    Pastor: Joe Wood(859) 661-2319 or [email protected]

    vineyardrichmond.comServices: Sunday at 9:30am

    and 11:15am

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    Easterns volleyball team (7-9, 1-1 OVC) split a pair of weekend of matches as they opened Ohio Valley Confer-ence (OVC ) play against Tennessee State University and Belmont University in Tennessee.

    Tennessee State University The Colonels took on Tennessee State (3-9,

    OVC 0-2) Friday and came away with a 3-0 win against the Tigers.

    With winning scores of 25-22, 25-21, and 25-20, Eastern combined defense and offense to capitalize on Tennessee State.

    Everyone worked so well together, senior Ashley Edmond said. It was like a system. Our defense and offense were working very well to-gether and thats what made us win.

    Edmond led the Colonels with 10 kills, 11 digs, three aces, and three blocks. Sophomore Rachel Vick as-sisted Eastern with five blocks.

    Eastern had less kills than Tennessee State but re-corded seven more aces than the Tigers.

    During the first set, the Colonels led Tennessee by seven after a kill from freshman Johanna Boyer.

    With back-to-back aces and an Eastern error, Ten-nessee came within two points of the Colonels. A kill from Edmond ended the set, keeping the win in East-erns possession.

    Tennessee led 18-17 during the second set when the Colonels scored five straight to take the lead. Vick made a kill for Eastern, putting the team ahead of Tennessee.

    An error on Tennessees end helped Eastern gain a two-point lead at the end of the set.

    In the third set, Eastern went on an 8-1 run to break the 15-15 tie with the Tigers. A kill from Boyer ended the final set and match, with Eastern coming out on top 23-16.

    BelmontIn the second match of the weekend East-

    ern failed to pull out the win against Belmont (7-10, OVC 0-1), instead ending the match

    with a 0-3 loss. The score for Saturdays match was 25-22,

    25-15, and 25-18. Theres so many distractions at Tennessee State and

    I felt like our team did a really good job of keeping those distractions away from their ability to focus, head

    coach Lori Duncan said. Then I felt we were very well positioned for what came next. But we could see just from the moment they walked out on the court, the mo-ment they started warming up; there wasnt this sense of urgency. It was kind of laid back.

    Edmond added that the team carried a lazier energy against Belmont, which aided in the loss.

    Junior Alexis Plagens scored a match best 13 kills for Eastern while junior Dena Ott tied for a match-high 14 digs.

    Eastern was outblocked 11.5-4, while posting a .056 attack percentage versus Belmonts .248 attack percent-age.

    Plagens said the team struggled to step up in key ar-eas of play, such as putting the ball away.

    Coach Duncan said she felt the team performed well overall, despite the split outcome.

    Winning on the road isnt easy and you have to work hard to steal every win you can get, Duncan said. We didnt get both of them but to be 500 after the first week-end is a big plus. So now weve got to go on the road this week and steal some wins again.

    The Colonels will travel back to Tennessee at 3 p.m. on Oct. 5 to take on Austin Peay State University.

    Volleyball splits weekend with win against Tennessee and loss to BelmontBy ASHLEY OWENS [email protected]

    victory. Sunday was not a conference

    game so I think there was a di erent mentality going into the game since it wasnt conference and since we did play so well on Friday. Barnes said.

    Smith scored the Colonels rst goal early in the game with Alabama A&M following with its rst goal 15 minutes into the rst half. Eastern entered the second half tied with Alabama A&M, with junior Whit-ney Wallace recording the second goal around the 53-minute mark.

    Junior Kaylynn Brown added an-other goal for the Colonels 62 min-utes into the game . Eastern kept a 3-1 lead up until the 77 minute mark when Alabama A&M added its second and nal goal.

    Wolfer made two saves for East-

    ern during her 90 minutes of play in the goal.

    Smith led the team with a total of seven shots, with Donnelly and sophomore Amani Th omas adding four shots of their own. Th e Colo-nels outshot their opponents with 24-9.

    We had games earlier in the sea-son where we outshot teams and werent able to put the ball in the back of the net, Barnes said. So to outshoot both opponents and put the ball in the net was really excit-ing.

    Eastern continues its conference play on the road at 8 p.m. on Fri-day, Oct. 4 against Southern Illinois University- Edwardsville.

    Both of these teams this week-end are signi cant opponents, Barnes said. So I think both of these teams will be a challenge for our girls. Th ey know no team in conference can be underestimated or taken lightly.

    SOCCERCONTINUED FROM B6

    ond round and shot 218 over-all. Sophomore Daniel Deluca (53) shot a 228 overall with a low round of 73.

    Witt said the te