ochww@sxsw trends and takeaways

Download OCHWW@SXSW Trends and Takeaways

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  1. 1. Trends and Takeaways Matt Balogh | G. Kofi Annan | Martha Walz 2015 OCHWW @SXSW
  2. 2. IT STARTED WITH WAITING IN LINE
  3. 3. ...MORE LINES FOR EVERY SESSION...
  4. 4. AND IT ENDED WITH MEAT EVERY NIGHT
  5. 5. HIGH-LEVEL TRENDS
  6. 6. FORGET MOBILE FIRST THINK PATIENT FIRSTMyFitnessPal cuts the data it collects to understand why people are doing what they are doing and then adjusts the experience to help them meet their specific needs
  7. 7. ASK THE RIGHT QUESTIONSBe thoughtful about what you are trying to accomplish Start by understanding the questions you are trying to answer Be willing to challenge your own position
  8. 8. CONNECTED HEALTH IS HERE TO STAYCurrent EMRs show one instance of a patients health Patient-generated health data shows a patients health over time Many wearable devices let you see your data, but dont let you download it How do we get patient-generated health data into EMRs for a holistic view of a patients health? We have the opportunity to reinvent how interactions in healthcare happen
  9. 9. 1. TEST EVERYTHING 2. REPEATYou cant get the answers from people who sit in conference rooms and are not your target audience Patient communities trade in information and experiences. They may not be 100% accurate, but they play a key role in vetting information and figuring out which questions to ask
  10. 10. ACCELERATION OF IMMERSIVE VIDEO EXPERIENCES Meerkat app jumpstarted the real-time disposable video trend Stories are being told according to time (real vs. stored) and screen size (small, big, surround)
  11. 11. HUMAN AND MACHINE COEXISTENCEMachines are advancing, but capabilities will continue to be limited Quest to better understand how human brain works and value vs. machine Artificial intelligence is the next interface Virtual reality is fueling a move towards heightened experiences
  12. 12. SESSION DETAILS
  13. 13. RADICAL HEALTHCARE: WHAT DO CONSUMERS WANT? How can diverse sectors like gaming, e-commerce, and academia inform better design for healthcare decisions in a world where the statement "healthcare is broken" has become cliche? In this panel of outside healthcare experts Alejandro Foung, Jason Oberfest, Vinnie Ramesh, and Jennifer Cheung apply their learnings to healthcare to focus on patient-centric design. FORGET ABOUT MOBILE FIRST, THINK ABOUT YOUR USERS FIRST Overview
  14. 14. RADICAL HEALTHCARE: WHAT DO CONSUMERS WANT? Key Points Real innovation needs to be focused on the user, not just on specific parts of the journey, making peoples lives better every day Wearables quantify parts, but humans are not just beacons of data they have to be factored into the equation You are not the consumer. You need to have empathy for the user but, for instance, if you've never had cancer before, it's harder to relate to that than for something like commerce FORGET ABOUT MOBILE FIRST, THINK ABOUT YOUR USERS FIRST
  15. 15. UNCERTAINTY: PREDICTIVE ANALYTICS IN HEALTHCARE Overview Venture funding for predictive analytics has grown >50% annually over the last 4 years totaling over $2 billion. Taking advantage of growing sets of healthcare data, new entrants are building predictive models in an attempt to not only influence patient behavior, but also change how physicians make diagnosis and treatment decisions. WHAT REALLY MAKES A DIFFERENCE TO ACHIEVING GOALS IS THE CONSISTENCY OF TRACKING OVER TIME
  16. 16. UNCERTAINTY: PREDICTIVE ANALYTICS IN HEALTHCARE Key Points EHRs represent an interaction with the system. Doctors want to marry EHR data with patient-generated data and genomics data for a wider view of the patient Delicate balance: asking a doctor to put structured data in EHR. Don't want to change the nature of physician's work with menial processes MyFitnessPal cuts the data to find the needs and creates features that help meet those needs Streaking the number of days in a row you log in is one of the most engaging features Always reduce it to the simplest, most digestible form so they come back tomorrow Consider the 45 year old mom in Wyoming with 3 kids and a partner that works, has no easy access to good fruits and vegetables, and who has been over weight for the last 25 years WHAT REALLY MAKES A DIFFERENCE TO ACHIEVING GOALS IS THE CONSISTENCY OF TRACKING OVER TIME
  17. 17. MIT HACKING MEDICINE: HACK-IN-A-BOX This session took us through MIT Hacking Medicines hack-a-thon and healthcare innovation model and how hack-a-thons can inspire diverse stakeholders to enter healthcare as entrepreneurs to help chip away at the broken healthcare system. HACKING IS TRADITIONALLY VIEWED AS HIGHLY TECHNICAL, BUT IT TAKES DIVERSITY TO SUCCEED AT INNOVATION Overview
  18. 18. MIT HACKING MEDICINE: HACK-IN-A-BOX Key Points Hacking is a creative application of engineering, but the people who attend should be diverse in background: engineers, healthcare professionals, designers, entrepreneurs Hack-a-thon is 48 hours of dedicating to a cause structured as problem pitching, mingling, solutions pitching, team formation, hacking and mentoring , and final presentations There are many reasons to organize a health hack-a-thon: Address specific healthcare challenges Bridge silos and build an ecosystem of innovation Develop your workforce or leverage as an informal interview HACKING IS TRADITIONALLY VIEWED AS HIGHLY TECHNICAL, BUT IT TAKES DIVERSITY TO SUCCEED AT INNOVATION
  19. 19. WOULD YOU TORTURE A ROBOT? Robots are just machines, or are they? Cruelty to robots seems like a strange topic, and at first glance people tend not to consider it an issue. But can humans have an affinity for a machine? Studies suggest that people often feel uncomfortable when watching social robots tortured or harmed. Why is this? And what role can something like this play in healthcare? TO REALLY CREATE AN AFFINITY WE NEED TO ADD CONTEXTUAL VALUE, WHICH COMES FROM RESEARCH AND PLENTY OF TESTING Overview
  20. 20. WOULD YOU TORTURE A ROBOT? Key Points Case after case of research show people can have an affinity for a machine, whether its their car, a robotic dog, or even a simple toy How can we leverage this research to create affinity for mHealth or remote doctor presence? Both elder- and child-care robots have the ability to become both companions and data collectors that better enable caregivers Simple acts, such as giving things a human name, can create affinity TO REALLY CREATE AN AFFINITY WE NEED TO ADD CONTEXTUAL VALUE, WHICH COMES FROM RESEARCH AND PLENTY OF TESTING
  21. 21. WEB-SIDE MANNER: HOW THE INTERNET SAVED MY LIFE Overview In a world where healthcare professionals have less time to spend with their patients, social media has become the bedside resource patients are so hungry for. And can we blame them? Its no longer an exaggeration: the internet is saving lives. But what does that mean for a patients journey through sickness when they can now take their health into their own hands thanks to Dr. Google and social media? PATIENTS DONT NEED ANOTHER COMMUNITY, THEY NEED BETTER INFORMATION AND CROSS- COMMUNICATION BETWEEN THOSE THAT EXIST ALREADY
  22. 22. WEB-SIDE MANNER: HOW THE INTERNET SAVED MY LIFE Key Points The patient journey is entirely different than 5 years ago, 1 year ago, even a month ago Communities on the web are tight and self-policing they trade in information and experiences, and they are less filtered than doctors Social communities may not be 100% accurate in their information, but they play a role in helping to understand what questions to ask, sharing what works and what doesnt back in the day we relied on doctors for this information To outsiders, living out loud is putting too much information on the Internet, but for patients its a conversation with those that are closer and more supportive than family because theyve been there HCPs can go MIA, or only cross the patient journey sometimes, social communities are always there In healthcare today its too difficult for a doctor and patient to build the kind of relationship they need to direct a patients life and have the right outcome in a 7.5 minute conversation.PATIENTS DONT NEED ANOTHER COMMUNITY, THEY NEED BETTER INFORMATION AND CROSS- COMMUNICATION BETWEEN THOSE THAT EXIST ALREADY
  23. 23. RAPID ITERATION ON MOBILE Mobile is an increasingly important channel, but doing it right requires iteration which can be difficult compared to web. Higher cost developers and designers, complicated technologies, and longer development times are all working against you. But the numbers are also against you. 22% of apps are only opened one time, and 62% of users stop using an app within a month. Just the development of an iOS app can cost up to $60k but average revenue is only $4k. Android numbers are worse. HEALTHCARE IS COMPLEX, WHICH IS WHY ITERATIVE PROTOTYPING EARLY AND OFTEN IS IMPORTANT Overview
  24. 24. RAPID ITERATION ON MOBILE Key Points The first step is always finding the right questions for the prototype to ask Most people actually think about wireframes when they say prototype but wireframes answer design questions, not experience questions The best first questions are experiential: Will people use it? Will they come back to it? Will they potentially pay for it? HEALTHCARE IS COMPLEX, WHICH IS WHY ITERATIVE PROTOTYPING EARLY AND OFTEN IS IMPORTANT
  25. 25. RAPID ITERATION ON MOBILE Key Points A Core Loop is a game developer term meaning those main set of actions that will make both you and your users successful and are usually only 3 steps, even for complex engagements FarmVille: buy seeds, grow seeds, buy seeds DropBox: get space, fill space, earn space Amazon: read reviews, buy products, leave reviews After youve created a core loop add and evolve features that support the core loop DropBox: add au