nm daily lobo 120111

of 12 /12
D AILY L OBO new mexico Lakewood see Page 11 December 1, 2011 The Independent Voice of UNM since 1895 thursday Inside the Daily Lobo History gone See Page 2 volume 116 issue 70 49 | 23 TODAY Bus travels See Page 6 by Charlie Shipley [email protected] American Campus Communi- ties said the integration of ACC-run dorms and programs at UNM would be seamless, but one UNM hous- ing official said the term “seamless transition” was used only to keep up appearances. “e University is working with ACC to most effectively make it ap- pear seamless for students, and really that’s all, an appearance,” Interim Di- rector of Student Housing Brian Ward said. “We’re trying to educate them about the different processes which would take place if you either wanted to live on campus or in ACC, or if you wanted to work in ACC or on campus, because they are very separate.” In a November 2010 meeting with ACC representatives, UNM Resi- dence Life representatives expressed concerns about who would manage ACC’s buildings and whether UNM Res Life employees would be out of their jobs as a result of the transition. Residence Hall Association represen- tative Amir Chapel said at that meet- ing that he was worried that ACC’s management team would take over the RHA. “ere’s this scenario where ACC comes onto the campus and initially manages a building or a few buildings and then, over time, they take over the whole housing community,” he said. “Now ACC has their foothold here, and there is a possibility that they could spread and just take over all of Residence Life, as we know it today.” Associate Director of Student Housing Ruth Stoddard said that when ACC’s latest project, Casas Del Rio, opens on main campus in August 2012, it will, along with Lobo Village, be managed by ACC. UNM will man- age Hokona, Laguna/Devargas, Santa Clara, Alvarado, Coronado, Redon- do Village Apartments and the SRC apartments, as well as the student family housing on Buena Vista Road. e ACC has tentative plans to demolish Coronado, Alvarado and Onate Halls, as well as La Posada din- ing hall, and build communities that will house up to 2,100 beds. Walt Miller, associate vice presi- dent for Student Life, said at that meeting that the University had no intention of eradicating RHA, but hadn’t figured out what the man- agement structure for ACC dorms would be. Ward said the terms of the ACC contract weren’t explained very well originally, and it was believed that the transition would be seamless, with one contract and shared assignment functions. “ey can’t do that because that would imply it’s University hous- ing. e minute someone says that, it would change how crediting agencies would look at the University, and the University can’t afford that,” he said. Ward also voiced concerns about the amount of control ACC has. “ey have things in their contract that … let’s say we had a lot of demand and I wanted to build a new building. I can’t do it without ACC approving it,” he said. “We can’t build competitive housing that hurts their product.” Stoddard said Res Life is one of the biggest on-campus employers of students. Financial consequences, Ward said, would include hiring fewer RAs, fewer custodians, fewer maintenance workers and office staff. “Unless more people just decide to live on campus, for every building that they (ACC) build, we’re compet- ing for the same students. We’re in big trouble,” he said. “If we have 200 emp- ty beds, that’s a million dollars.” Stoddard also said staff reductions are a possibility, and that the division was looking at how they could cut costs without sacrificing services. She by Luke Holmen [email protected] Black Student Union President D’Andre Q. Curtis said the recent Title VI discrimination complaint filed against UNM reflects a reality at UNM: African Ameri- cans aren’t treated equally. “I feel discrimination has been an issue for a while (for students),” he said. “I know I’ve had my fair share of ordeals. When you speak out, you feel like your issues are thrown under the rug because professors aren’t as culturally sensitive to what you are going through. Being the minority in college is tough.” Curtis said discrimination at UNM isn’t always intentional, but misunderstandings of minority cul- ture create an environment that negatively affects student learning. “African-American students are not only misunder- stood, they are treated differently,” he said. “Caucasian students are generally more privileged, and that is not necessarily a bad thing, but what we want is fair treat- ment … a level playing field.” Curtis said he doesn’t want to be seen as complain- ing or demanding special treatment. “I don’t want it to be all about African-American cul- ture, because then we are complainers,” he said. “We are not asking for special treatment, we are just asking for the rights we deserve and the things our ancestors have fought for. We aren’t asking for anything for free, we just ask for the same respect.” UNM released an African-American/Black Climate Review Report and an Equity Report in April calling for recruitment, promotion, and retention of African- Americans, but Curtis said the documents have no real commitment behind them. “I want to see something concrete, not just a climate report where nothing gets done,” he said. “I want some- thing with numbers and faculty and a timeline.” DORM DETAILS WORRY STAFF Campus housing contract contains unanticipated changes FANTASTIC CRAFTS Jessikha Williams / Daily Lobo Artist Lewis C. Wilson sits behind his display of glass sculptures at the 48th Annual ASUNM Arts and Crafts Fair on Wednesday in the SUB ballroom. Lewis has been making glass sculptures for more than 37 years and has been involved in the Crafts Fair 28 times. See Page 7 for full story. Dylan Smith / Daily Lobo Former Albuquerque Mayor Martin Chávez discusses environmental law on Wednesday with UNM alumnus Kristina Caffrey while having lunch with students in the SUB. A new student organization, Students for Marty Chávez for Congress, invited Chávez to campus. LUNCH WITH THE FORMER MAYOR see ACC Dispute PAGE 3 ‘We just ask for the same respect’ see Discrimination PAGE 3

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Page 1: NM Daily Lobo 120111

DAILY LOBOnew mexico

Lakewoodsee Page 11

December 1, 2011 The Independent Voice of UNM since 1895thursday

Inside theDaily Lobo

History gone

See Page 2volume 116 issue 70 49 |23

TODAYBus

travels

See Page 6

by Charlie [email protected]

American Campus Communi-ties said the integration of ACC-run dorms and programs at UNM would be seamless, but one UNM hous-ing o� cial said the term “seamless transition” was used only to keep up appearances.

“� e University is working with ACC to most e� ectively make it ap-pear seamless for students, and really that’s all, an appearance,” Interim Di-rector of Student Housing Brian Ward said. “We’re trying to educate them about the di� erent processes which would take place if you either wanted to live on campus or in ACC, or if you wanted to work in ACC or on campus, because they are very separate.”

In a November 2010 meeting with ACC representatives, UNM Resi-dence Life representatives expressed concerns about who would manage ACC’s buildings and whether UNM Res Life employees would be out of their jobs as a result of the transition.Residence Hall Association represen-tative Amir Chapel said at that meet-ing that he was worried that ACC’s management team would take over the RHA.

“� ere’s this scenario where ACC comes onto the campus and initially manages a building or a few buildings and then, over time, they take over the whole housing community,” he said. “Now ACC has their foothold here, and there is a possibility that they could spread and just take over all of Residence Life, as we know it today.”

Associate Director of Student Housing Ruth Stoddard said that when ACC’s latest project, Casas Del Rio, opens on main campus in August 2012, it will, along with Lobo Village, be managed by ACC. UNM will man-age Hokona, Laguna/Devargas, Santa Clara, Alvarado, Coronado, Redon-do Village Apartments and the SRC apartments, as well as the student

family housing on Buena Vista Road.� e ACC has tentative plans to

demolish Coronado, Alvarado and Onate Halls, as well as La Posada din-ing hall, and build communities that will house up to 2,100 beds.

Walt Miller, associate vice presi-dent for Student Life, said at that meeting that the University had no intention of eradicating RHA, but hadn’t � gured out what the man-agement structure for ACC dorms would be.

Ward said the terms of the ACC contract weren’t explained very well originally, and it was believed that the transition would be seamless, with one contract and shared assignment functions.

“� ey can’t do that because that would imply it’s University hous-ing. � e minute someone says that, it would change how crediting agencies would look at the University, and the University can’t a� ord that,” he said.

Ward also voiced concerns about the amount of control ACC has.

“� ey have things in their contract that … let’s say we had a lot of demand and I wanted to build a new building. I can’t do it without ACC approving it,” he said. “We can’t build competitive housing that hurts their product.”

Stoddard said Res Life is one of the biggest on-campus employers of students.

Financial consequences, Ward said, would include hiring fewer RAs, fewer custodians, fewer maintenance workers and o� ce sta� .

“Unless more people just decide to live on campus, for every building that they (ACC) build, we’re compet-ing for the same students. We’re in big trouble,” he said. “If we have 200 emp-ty beds, that’s a million dollars.”

Stoddard also said sta� reductions are a possibility, and that the division was looking at how they could cut costs without sacri� cing services. She

by Luke [email protected]

Black Student Union President D’Andre Q. Curtis said the recent Title VI discrimination complaint � led against UNM re� ects a reality at UNM: African Ameri-cans aren’t treated equally.

“I feel discrimination has been an issue for a while (for students),” he said. “I know I’ve had my fair share of ordeals. When you speak out, you feel like your issues are thrown under the rug because professors aren’t as culturally sensitive to what you are going through. Being the minority in college is tough.”

Curtis said discrimination at UNM isn’t always intentional, but misunderstandings of minority cul-ture create an environment that negatively affects student learning.

“African-American students are not only misunder-stood, they are treated di� erently,” he said. “Caucasian students are generally more privileged, and that is not

necessarily a bad thing, but what we want is fair treat-ment … a level playing � eld.”

Curtis said he doesn’t want to be seen as complain-ing or demanding special treatment.

“I don’t want it to be all about African-American cul-ture, because then we are complainers,” he said. “We are not asking for special treatment, we are just asking for the rights we deserve and the things our ancestors have fought for. We aren’t asking for anything for free, we just ask for the same respect.”

UNM released an African-American/Black Climate Review Report and an Equity Report in April calling for recruitment, promotion, and retention of African-Americans, but Curtis said the documents have no real commitment behind them.

“I want to see something concrete, not just a climate report where nothing gets done,” he said. “I want some-thing with numbers and faculty and a timeline.”

DORM DETAILS WORRY STAFFCampus housing contract contains unanticipated changes

FANTASTIC CRAFTS

Jessikha Williams / Daily LoboArtist Lewis C. Wilson sits behind his display of glass sculptures at the 48th Annual ASUNM Arts and Crafts Fair on Wednesday in the SUB ballroom. Lewis has been making glass sculptures for more than 37 years and has been involved in the Crafts Fair 28 times. See Page 7 for full story.

Dylan Smith / Daily LoboFormer Albuquerque Mayor Martin Chávez discusses environmental law on Wednesday with UNM alumnus Kristina Ca� rey while having lunch with students in the SUB. A new student organization, Students for Marty Chávez for Congress, invited Chávez to campus.

LUNCH WITH THE FORMER MAYOR

see ACC Dispute PAGE 3

‘We just ask for the same respect’

see Discrimination PAGE 3

Page 2: NM Daily Lobo 120111

Meet the Authors & Artist!12pm-2pm (Main Campus only)

Michael Ryan, A Kingdom of StargazersEnrique Lamadrid, Amadito & the Hero ChildrenV.B. Price with Nell Farrell, The Orphaned LandChris Wilson with Miguel Gandert & José Zelaya, The Plazas of New MexicoBaker Morrow, The South American Expeditions, 1540-1545G. Emlen Hall, Reining in the Rio Grande

Jana Fothergill, Artist of the Official UNM Ornaments

CELEBRATIONHOLIDAY

annu

al Presented by Your UNM Bookstores

Friday, Dec 2nd | 8am-7pmUNM Bookstore, Main Campus

Friday, Dec 2nd | 8am-5pmUNM Bookstore, North Campus

Up to 50% off select items!Celebrate Savings!Availability may differ at each location. While supplies last.See store for details.

Celebration Giveaways!In-Store drawings at 10am, 12pm, 2pm, & 4pm!Enter to win an iPod Touch and other prizes!

Meet Authors! Dec 2nd

the

V.B. Pricewith Nell FarrellThe Orphaned Land

Baker MorrowThe South American Expeditions,1540-1545

Michael RyanA Kingdom ofStargazers

Chris Wilson with Miguel Gandert & José ZelayaThe Plazas ofNew Mexico

G. Emlen HallReining in theRio Grande

Enrique LamadridAmadito & theHero Children

An autographed book makes a great gift!

12pm- 2pmMain CampusUNM Bookstore

Meet the Artist!

For more info visit: bookstore.unm.edu

Please join the traditional Hanging of the Greensat 5:45pm in front of the Main Campus Bookstore!

Jana Fothergill - 12pmArtist of the OfficialUNM Ornaments. (Main Campus only)

Holiday Shopping!Free Gift Wrapping!

Cookies & Cider - 11am(Main & North Campus)UNM Jazz Choir -12pm

(Main Campus only)

PAGETWONEW MEXICO DAILY LOBOTHURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2011

volume 116 issue 70Telephone: (505) 277-7527Fax: (505) [email protected]@dailylobo.comwww.dailylobo.com

The New Mexico Daily Lobo is an independent student newspaper published daily except Saturday, Sunday and school holidays during the fall and spring semesters and weekly during the summer session. Subscription rate is $75 per academic year. E-mail [email protected] for more information on subscriptions.The New Mexico Daily Lobo is published by the Board of UNM Student Publications. The editorial opinions expressed in the New Mexico Daily Lobo are those of the respective writers and do not necessarily re� ect the views of the students, faculty, sta� and regents of the University of New Mexico. Inquiries concerning editorial content should be made to the editor-in-chief. All content appearing in the New Mexico Daily Lobo and the Web site dailylobo.com may not be reproduced without the consent of the editor-in-chief. A single copy of the New Mexico Daily Lobo is free from newsstands. Unauthorized removal of multiple copies is considered theft and may be prosecuted. Letter submission policy: The opinions expressed are those of the authors alone. Letters and guest columns must be concisely written, signed by the author and include address and telephone. No names will be withheld.

PRINTED BY SIGNATURE

OFFSET

Editor-in-ChiefChris Quintana Managing EditorElizabeth ClearyNews EditorChelsea ErvenAssistant News EditorLuke HolmenStaff ReporterCharlie ShipleyPhoto EditorDylan Smith

Culture EditorAlexandra SwanbergAssistant Culture EditorNicole PerezSports EditorNathan FarmerAssistant Sports EditorCesar DavilaCopy ChiefCraig DubykMultimedia EditorJunfu Han

Design DirectorJackson MorseyDesign AssistantsConnor ColemanJason GabelElyse JalbertStephanie KeanSarah LynasAdvertising ManagerShawn JimenezSales ManagerNick ParsonsClassified ManagerRenee Tolson

DAILY LOBOnew mexico

Photo essay: Scary no more

Dylan Smith / Daily Lobo

The Werner Gilchrist House at Silver and Cornell is gone. Wrecking crews arrived at one of Albuquerque’s first suburban homes Nov.17 to begin demolishing the property. The home, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, has been slowly decaying since its last owner died in 1981.

Page 3: NM Daily Lobo 120111

New Mexico Daily lobo

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Application Deadline: Monday, February 13, 2012 by 5 p.m.Questions? Please contact Alexandra Blodget at

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Instead of reading it, Shawnwould rather wear the Daily Lobo as a hat...

Shawn is a moron.

new mexicoDAILY LOBOdo you like my hat?

news Thursday, december 1, 2011 / Page 3

said that when Casas Del Rio opens next year, levels of maintenance work-ers and custodial staff would have to be evaluated based on occupancy.

“We just don’t have the revenue, the cash that we had when all our beds were full,” Ward said.

Stoddard said she thinks ACC’s growing presence will emphasize the student focus of UNM Res Life, which she said is hard to come by with privatization.

Isaac Romero, ASUNM Housing Committee chairman, said at a Sen-ate meeting Nov. 16 that it is now clear ACC’s residence programs and UNM’s Res Life will be two separate entities. Students applying to be resident ad-visers must choose to apply either through UNM, to work in existing stu-dent dorms, or through ACC, to work

in new ACC dorms such as Lobo Vil-lage and Casas Del Rio. Students must go through separate application pro-cesses based on whether they want to work for ACC or UNM Res Life.

Romero also said that Res Life em-ployees would not be able to use ACC facilities to program events, and ACC employees would likewise be unable to use Res Life facilities.

Ward compared the ACC facilities to an independent, off-campus apart-ment complex built on campus.

“There’s no shared paperwork, contract or leasing. We have all differ-ent arrangements and agreements,” he said.

He said the separation is a con-tractual issue because the University chose not to spend its own money on the new dorms, instead hiring ACC to

fund and run the buildings.Stoddard said compensation will

be different between ACC and UNM, another reason for the break.

“The RAs will be compensated differently with UNM Residence Life and Student Housing, as they would with (ACC),” she said. “Based upon compensation, you can’t just put ev-erybody into a candidate pool and de-cide where they’re going to live. That’s a very crucial part of the puzzle.”

Stoddard said that Res Life com-pensation includes a free room, $975 toward an on-campus meal plan, and $2,700 for the academic year, which is about a $300 paycheck per month. ACC representatives refused to com-ment and did not respond to requests for comment on wages and compen-sation for their student RAs.

ACC Dispute from page 1

Discrimination from page 1

The Albuquerque chapter of the NAACP, in conjunction with the Minister’s Fellowship of Albuquer-que and Vicinity, filed a complaint Nov. 10 with the Justice Department and the federal Department of Edu-cation which claims UNM is biased against African Americans.

The complaint says African Amer-icans have been excluded from up-per administration positions, that African-American women have not been placed in positions of authority within UNM and that African-Amer-ican faculty face salary disparities. The complaint specifically targeted UNMH, where Bishop David C. Coo-per, who helped file the complaint, said African-American doctors, teachers and nurses were forced to work in a hostile environment.

In a statement issued jointly by UNM President David Schmidly and Health Sciences Center Chan-cellor Paul Roth on Tuesday, the administration denied the accusa-tions of discrimination.

“We do not discriminate against African Americans,” it said. “We do not discriminate against any indi-vidual or group based on race, reli-gion, sexual orientation, age, gender or ability.”

Schmidly has refused to com-ment on the complaint since he re-leased statement.

Faculty Senate President Tim Ross said he isn’t aware of any discrimination.

“In my direct observations and in anything reported to me as the Faculty Senate President, I had not heard anything about unfair treat-ment until I read the news reports on this matter over a week ago,” he said. “In my 25 years at UNM, I have not seen any unfair or mis-directed behaviors toward African Americans.”

Ross said attracting minority pro-fessors and administrators at UNM is a difficult task.

“It is still not easy to get faculty from various underrepresented

groups to come to UNM. … not many individuals from these groups stay in school long enough to earn the terminal degree in their fields, usually a PhD,” he said. “Second, when we do identify faculty of color or female faculty in fields like engineering or the hard sciences, where the numbers are really scant, we have to compete on a national level to get them to come to UNM. We struggle to match the salaries or the ‘start-up packages’ that other more affluent schools can provide.”

ASUNM President Jaymie Roybal said she is not sure if the claims are true, but said promoting and retaining individuals from multiple cultural backgrounds is vital to education at UNM.

“Having a diverse staff is impor-tant for a number of reasons: It’s im-portant for students, it’s important for staff and it’s important for the over-arching University environ-ment,” she said.

Page 4: NM Daily Lobo 120111

[email protected] Independent Voice of UNM since 1895LoboOpinionLoboOpinion Thursday

December 1, 2011

Page

4

by Carrie CutlerDaily Lobo Columnist

I think almost all the TAs I know get the same expression when a student asks why they can’t use a random website as a source for a paper. It’s somewhere between a hor-rified cringe and frustration. I am not con-vinced that students know why asking if they can use a general website causes such a strong reaction, even when I explain the peer review process and talk about having a paper anonymously reviewed by a panel of experts. I’ve even taken to referring to it in class as training a homemade bullshit detector, but from the sometimes very con-fused expressions and students who persist in citing WebMD or Google answers, I get the feeling that their confusion persists.

The short answer to why you can’t use just anything as a source is accuracy: In or-der to be considered a useful source for re-search at the formal level, the source has to be as accurate as possible. There are a few reasons why, in general, peer reviewed sources are more accurate than random sites off the Internet. The first of these has to do with the review process. When some-one wants to publish a paper on some-thing they’ve researched, they have to go through a series of steps to ensure that it can be published.

First, if they are a graduate student or not a full professor, they very likely have a committee to whom they are responsible for the data and the paper. That commit-tee has to approve of the paper, topic, data collection methods and data in order for the paper to advance to the stage where it is able to be submitted. Full professors are responsible to their funding committees; research is expensive, and not something most can afford out of pocket.

Once the person who wants to publish that paper has the approval to publish,

and remember, this is after approval from the Institutional Research Board (IRB) at UNM and at whatever institution is fund-ing the research, they have to find a pub-lication which has the correct focus and in which they feel they are prestigious enough to publish. The more prestigious the mag-azine, the fewer papers the magazine will publish. Many publications are extraordi-narily specialized and require the papers submitted to be equally specialized. Many times, the person who wants to publish also has to pay for the ability to be considered for publication, as well, so people who want to publish do not manage to publish often.

At the point where the research paper can be submitted, the publication will take a copy, remove the submitter’s name and send copies to at least three reviewers who are specialists with years of experience and professional degrees. These three review-ers are paid a stipend to render that paper down as far as they can; the default is rejec-tion, though some places are nice enough to invite you to resend, if you make all of the lists of corrections they stipulate. For prestigious publications, all three review-ers have to agree. Some publications will allow two out of three. At any time in this process, that paper will have been looked over by at least six people, all of whom are

strongly motivated by both pay and by the desire to keep their field as accurate as possible, to find inaccuracies, bad writing, bad ideas or anything they think is unwor-thy of the field.

At this point, at least one student will point out that he or she has heard of a time when science (the nebulous science) has changed its mind, or a scientist has been wrong. It’s true; papers can get through this process and still manage to be wrong, be-cause everyone in the field is wrong or be-cause the reviewers are wrong in the same way the paper is wrong.

However, the process favors accuracy. It favors accuracy both because of the multiple layers of editors and gatekeepers who are mo-tivated to get rid of inaccuracies, and because it is modeled after the scientific method.

I always do a lecture about the scientific method when I lecture about source accu-racy. I can boil it down to the idea, with the scientific method, that everything bears re-testing. Scientific principles, to be considered accurate, have to be tested and retested. As long as the conditions are the same, the sci-entific principle has to keep working.

If it doesn’t work, it must be taken apart to find out why, and something must be learned from the process. Nothing is safe from being retested, and though scientists may be the only people capable of retesting it, they will. Often, the facilities needed to retest an idea are expensive enough to prevent the general public from being able to retest it themselves. That is, in fact, how many things in science are taught. Students are made to reproduce the effect for themselves.

Contrast this, and I say this as someone who is fond of Wikipedia, with the instant publication of one’s thoughts on Facebook, a blog or the comments on a news story. That is why your teacher keeps asking you to use peer-reviewed sources.

I wince because I care.

Peer review process improves accuracy

Editor,

I am writing to request a small amend-ment to the online article, “Childlessness helps marriage last,” by Jason Darensburg. I am the communications manager for the study— Understanding Society— quoted in the article, and I notice that the article says that “the survey tracked 40,000 house-holds over two decades.” This is not correct. The study tracks 40,000 and was launched in 2008. A smaller, longitu-dinal study, also known as the British Household Panel Study, which is incor-porated into Understanding Society, has been going for more than two decades. We appreciate your organization using the Understanding Society findings in the arti-cle, which I enjoyed.

Victoria Morrisroe Economic and Social Research Council

Longitudinal Communications Manager

Column

Study misquoted, but article appreciated

letters

Nothing is safe from being retested, and

though scientists may be the only people

capable of retesting it, they will.

Question: How many copy editors does it take to run the Daily Lobo?

Answer: More than we got.

Come to the

Copy Edit Open HouseMonday, Dec 5

@7 p.m.

Editor,

Just a few decades ago, the media in this country seemed to be trying to keep us informed of all sides on all the is-sues, so that we could make our own in-formed decisions. Today, the media in this country seem to be trying to keep us only informed of what the top 1 percent want us to think is accurate, so that we will make the decisions they want us to.

Robert GardinerUNM community member

Media inaccurate, manipulates public

Letter submission PoLicy

n Letters can be submitted to the Daily Lobo office in Marron Hall or online at DailyLobo.com. The Lobo reserves the right to edit letters for content and length. A name and phone number must accompany all letters. Anonymous letters or those with pseudonyms will not be published. Opinions expressed solely reflect the views of the author and do not reflect the opinions of Lobo employees.

editorial Board

Chris QuintanaEditor-in-chief

elizabeth ClearyManaging editor

Chelsea ervenNews editor

See below for answer!

Page 5: NM Daily Lobo 120111

Thursday, december 1, 2011 / Page 5New Mexico Daily lobo advertisement

Page 6: NM Daily Lobo 120111

[email protected] Editor / Alexandra Swanberg The Independent Voice of UNM since 1895

ThursdayDecember 1, 2011

Page

6Culture Editor / Alexandra Swanberg

LoboThe Independent Voice of UNM since 1895The Independent Voice of UNM since 1895The Independent Voice of UNM since 1895The Independent Voice of UNM since 1895

Culture

by Nicole Perez

[email protected]

A white-haired woman sits on the bus surrounded by plastic gro-cery bags as the robotic female voice says, “Stop requested.” Her arm in a splint, she realizes her cigarette is still lit from outside and presses the charred, glowing end onto her out-stretched tongue in order to put it out. Who knows why she opted for this method, but for Albuquerque bus drivers, scenes like these are just part of the everyday grind.

Bus driver Ted Silvers has driven Route 66 for two and half years, and he said drunks are the most common problem he encounters. If they cause a disturbance, he said, it’s his job to kick them off.

“I have had some heated argu-ments with people who don’t want to get off; they always have some nice parting words,” he said. “I don’t think I want to repeat them, but I al-ways say, ‘Have a nice day.’”

Silvers said he tries to avoid kick-ing people off the bus by not letting them on in the first place.

“I try to nip it in the bud right away,” he said. “If I’m pulling up to a stop and the people getting up from the bench are stumbling around, I know eventually that’s going to be a problem for me, so I won’t let them on. Or if they come in and can’t even get their money in the slot because they’re so drunk, then they’re not go-ing to ride my bus.”

Jeremy Perea, who has been driv-ing the bus for about one year, said he was threatened at gunpoint once when he was trying to break up a fight in the back of the bus.

“He pulled the gun on me and the guy who was in the fight, and I was like, ‘Hey, man, why can’t we just be friends,’” Perea said. “The other guy got off, and he just sat down and said he was ready to go. I said ‘I’ll take you

wherever you need to go, you know.’ You’re not allowed to carry guns on the bus, but I can’t search people.”

Another time, Perea said a drunk man tried to board the bus, but Perea decided the man was too drunk to ride. The man became so angry that he pulled out a knife.

“He got in my face, so I took off my seat belt, popped the brig, and pushed him out the door. I had se-curity on the bus, so I tangled him up. The security guard was hitting him with the baton, and boom, a cop pulled up. It was pretty sweet.”

Both of those incidents happened during late-night hours on the 66, but Perea said his job isn’t just to kick people off of the bus. He has EMT certification from UNM, so he can help people with medical needs. One night, Perea said he saved a man’s life.

“This man had four seizures in a row on the bus. He was peeing, throwing up all over the place,” he said. “I picked him up and put him on the floor. When they go into a sei-zure, you don’t want them to hurt themselves, so I just tried to hold his head up so he wouldn’t swallow his tongue. I did my best and called 911.”

While most drivers haven’t wit-nessed such traumatic events, they have their fair share of stories.

Bus driver Diane Atacus, a former school bus driver and grant writ-er, said not only has she seen peo-ple using drugs on the bus, but she has seen people having sex as well. She said they made no effort to hide themselves or do it discreetly.

“A lot of people are surprisingly open,” she said.

She said driving the 66 is more difficult than driving a school bus, but she still enjoys it.

“With kids, you can tell them to sit down and behave, but you can’t tell adults anything,” Atacus said.

Tramway

Juan Tabo

Eubank

Wyoming

Louisiana

San Pedro

San Mateo

Carlisle

Yale

University

Broadway

5th Street

6th Street

Rio Grande

Atrisco

Coors

Unser

Adria Malcolm / Daily Lobo

Fidel Padilla does not own a car for environmental reasons, and chooses to ride the bus, his scooter or his bike every day to get around. He used to work in UNM’s Physical Plant Department and now focuses on his artwork.

Note: Not to scale

Rout

e 66

/Cen

tral A

venu

eRo

ute

66/C

entra

l Ave

nue

Rout

e 66

/Cen

tral A

venu

e

Route 66 Bus Facts- The bus runs from 5:30 in the morning until 12:30 at night.

- The bus stops every quarter mile along Central Avenue.

- UNM students ride for free.

- Bus fare for adults is $1 for a single trip or $2 for a full day.

Bus drivers see it all, from seizures to brawls

For more public transit information and an online trip

planner, visit: cabq.gov/transit

Adria Malcolm / Daily LoboJael Garcia is a student at both UNM and CNM, majoring in music education and culinary arts respectively. She rides the Route 66 bus every day, commuting to school from the West Side because of rising gas prices.

driverconfessions

Page 7: NM Daily Lobo 120111

Thursday, december 1, 2011 / Page 7New Mexico Daily lobo culture

$2.99 Grand SlamIncludes 2 eggs, 2 pancakes,

2 sausage, 2 bacon.Bring in this ad. Show Student ID.

With this discount, no other discounts apply.

2608 CENTRAL SE 266-5113Free wi-fi Expires December 31, 2011 Open 24hrs

Thanks For Voting Denny’sfor Best Student Discounts

in Lo Mejor

Ask a Librarian 505-277-9100

Center for Southwest Research

& Special Collections

Centennial Science and Engineering

Library

Fine Arts and Design Library

Parish Memorial

Library for Business and

Economics

Zimmerman Library

CHAT IS ONLY M-F, 8am-5pm

MAGIC HOURS M-F, 10am-4pm

VALID UNM ID REQUIRED 10pm-7am

Tue, Dec 6 Open 24 hrs 9am-7pm 8am-9pm 8am–9pm 8am-11pm Open 24 hrs

Wed, Dec 7 Open 24 hrs 9am-7pm 8am-9pm 8am-9pm 8am-11pm Open 24 hrs

Thurs, Dec 8 Open 24 hrs 9am-5pm 8am-9pm 8am-9pm 8am-11pm Open 24 hrs

Fri, Dec 9 Open 24 hrs 9am-5pm 8am-6pm 8am-6pm 8am-11pm Open 24 hrs

Sat, Dec 10 Open 24 hrs Noon-4pm 10am-6pm 10am-6pm 10am-6pm Open 24 hrs

Sun, Dec 11 Open 24 hrs Closed 10am-6pm Noon-8pm Noon-11pm Open 24 hrs

Mon, Dec 12 Open 24 hrs 9am-5pm 8am-9pm 8am-9pm 8am-11pm Open 24 hrs

Tue, Dec 13 7am-2am 9am-7pm 8am-9pm 8am-9pm 8am-11pm 7am-2am

Wed, Dec 14 7am-2am 9am-7pm 8am-9pm 8am-9pm 8am-11pm 7am-2am

Thurs, Dec 15 7am-2am 9am-5pm 8am-9pm 8am-9pm 8am-9pm 7am-2am

Fri, Dec 16 7am-6pm 9am-5pm 8am-6pm 8am-6pm 8am-6pm 7am-6pm

Sat, Dec 17 9am-7pm Closed Closed 10am-6pm Closed 9am-7pm

University LibrariesFINALS HOURSDecember 6 – 17, 2011

elibrary.unm.edu Zimmerman Library will stay open 24/7

from 7am on Tuesday, Dec. 6th

until 2am on Tuesday, Dec. 13th.

dailylobo.com

by Nicole [email protected]

The 48th annual ASUNM Arts and Crafts Fair weaves its way into the SUB once again, with prod-ucts ranging from native honey to chain mail.

Among the established artists there, some of the vendors are students. Chain mail artist and sophomore public relations student Genevieve Sparks is selling chain mail belts, bracelets and earrings, but also has a chain mail skirt and bra on display to pique interest in the art. She said the bra idea originated when a man who wore a full chain mail suit to class made her one, and she just continued to wear it.

“It doesn’t pinch, it’s really cold, and it’s supporting,” she said. “And it’s more like I had had problems with self-image and such. The chain mail bra made me feel so much better in my own skin. It really helped me.”

She said she sometimes uses the bra as advertising for herself.

“I usually wear this (chain mail bra) at craft shows because peo-ple look at it and go ‘What is she wearing?’ and then they come over to my booth.”

Sparks said the craft fair isn’t as lucrative as other events she attends, but she still really enjoys it, especial-ly because she isn’t looking to make a career out of the chain mail.

“I think it’s harder being on a campus because all the college stu-dents are poor,” she said. “It’s defi-nitely for fun. I make enough money to justify me continuing this hobby.”

Jeffrey Nibert, a senior photog-raphy major, said pottery is a more permanent mode of expression than photography.

“A glitch on your computer, you’re down thousands of photos,” he said. “Thousands of years — that pot will be there. It’s really my way of leaving my mark on time.”

Nibert said he loves working with clay, and all of the pieces he makes are equally challenging.

“You get dirty. I mean, who doesn’t love getting dirty?” he said. “Bigger pieces are harder to make because it’s just more force you have to work with, but small, finicky things can be really meticulous to handle.”

Graham Chouteau-Lathrop, a senior majoring in chemistry, par-ticipated in a collective booth sell-ing everything from feathered hair adornments to tooth diamonds, a

jewel that can be fastened to your tooth with dental glue. He was sell-ing informal art pieces, as well as small cacti. He said he saw a need for plants.

“It’s come to my attention that throughout the years, people tend to sell really nice pots that have holes in the bottom for plants, but the plants are a little lacking,” he said.

He said the first cactus he bought was local, and others spawned from that.

“The mother cactus came from a cactus shop that has since closed,” he said. “It was next to the Kelly’s brew patio.”

Everything in the fair must be handmade, and it features more than 75 artisan booths.

BOX:48th Annual ASUNM Holiday

Arts and Crafts FairRuns through Friday10 a.m. to 6 p.m.SUB ballrooms

Homemade goods for sale in SUB

48th Annual ASUNMHoliday Arts

and Crafts Fair

Runs through Friday10 a.m.- 6 p.m.SUB ballrooms

Page 8: NM Daily Lobo 120111

Page 8 / Thursday, december 1, 2011 New Mexico Daily lobothe haps

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Dirty Bourbon Dance Hall & Saloon

Line Dancing Lessons start at 6pm

Ladies Night

Redneck opens for Charlie Lucas

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Holiday BowlCollege Night Karaoke

9:30pm to 2:00am $20 gets 2 hours of bowling, Pitcher of

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Friday

Outpost Performance SpaceSusan McKeown

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Dirty Bourbon, Dance Hall & SaloonRedneck performing at 8:30pm

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Korean BBQ/Sushi and SakeOpen 11:30-2:30; 5-10

Burt’s Tiki Lounge *Animals In The Dark CD Release!* *Venus Bogardus* *Adam Hook and

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$3.50 U-Call-ItsHalf Priced Appetizers

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Imbibe$5 Jose Cuervo Margs + Happy Hour till 7pm: $2 Draft, $3 Well, $4 Wine,

$4 Long Island & $5 MartinisDJ 10pm

Maloney’sHappy Hour 3-7pm: $1 off drinks (exept bottled beer and features)

Patio Party 9pm to close: $5 Pucker Vodka Shots $6 Bombers.

Spotlight Specials: $4 off Smirnoff Flavors 10pm-Close.

Downtown Distillery$2.75 Jager

$4.75 Jager Bombs

Saturday

Dirty Bourbon, Dance Hall & SaloonRedneck opening up for Jason

Meadows$5 Cover

Burt’s Tiki Lounge *Sense and Change* *People’s Republic* *Jungle One* *Merican

Slang*

Korean BBQ/Sushi and SakeOpen 11:30-2:30; 5-10

The Library Bar & GrillOpen 11am for lunch!

DJ Justincredible spinning 10pm-2am!

ImbibeHappy Hour till 7pm: $2 Draft, $3 Well, $4 Wine, $4 Long Island & $5 Martinis

DJ 10pm

Page 9: NM Daily Lobo 120111

Thursday, december 1, 2011 / Page 9New Mexico Daily lobo the haps

ALL YOU CAN EAT LUNCHDINNER

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Downtown Distillery$2.75 Jager

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Sunday

Dirty Bourbon, Dance Hall & SaloonSIN Night

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Downtown DistilleryFree Pool

$2.75 Jager$4.75 Jager Bombs

Sunshine TheaterNot Silent Night

The Airborne Toxic EventThe Drowning Men

Tuesday

Dirty Bourbon, Dance Hall & SaloonAnthony Leon performing 8pm-

MidnightTwo-Step Dance Lessons starts at

6:30pm$2 Tuesdays

$2 Cover, $2 well drinks, $2 wines, $2 domestic bottles, and $3.50 domestic

aluminums$2 Cover after 7pm

Korean BBQ/Sushi and SakeOpen 11:30-2:30; 5-9:30

Burt’s Tiki Lounge*Tiki Tuesdays!* *The Dreaming*

*Gusher* *REDRUM* *The Bruisers* *$4 Tiki Drinks All Night*

The Library Bar & GrillHappy HOUR!!! Drink Specials

ImbibeCOLLEGE NIGHT with DJ Automatic & Drummer Camilio Quinones 9pm$1 Select Draft, $3 Well & $3 Long

Island Tea

Maloney’sHappy Hour 3-7pm: $1 off drinks (exept bottled beer and features)

WEdnesday

Dirty BourbonWest Coast Swing Dance Lessons

begins at 6:30pm

Korean BBBQ/ Sushi SakeOpen 11:30-2:30, 5-9:30

Burt’s Tiki Lounge *Vinyl and Verses* *Underground

Hip Hop* *UHF B-Boy Crew* *$2.50 Select Pints*

The Library Bar & GrillSalsa Night with DJ Quico - 9pmThe BEST Salsa Night in Town!

Free Salsa Lessons

Maloney’sHappy Hour 3-1pm: $1 off drinks

(exceptt bottled beer and features)DJ Kamo on the Patio 9:30pm-CloseKareokee: 9:30pm-1:30am with $1 off

Absolut & Aboslut Flavors

ImbibeWORLD OF POKER SERIES -

Games at 6 & 9pm+ WINE DOWN w/Tastings &

Appetizers 6pmHappy Hour ALL DAY: $2 Draft, $3

Well, $4 Wine, $4 Long Island Tea & $5 Martinis

Downtown DistilleryFree Pool

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CHECK OUTTHE HAPS

EVERY THURSDAY!

Page 10: NM Daily Lobo 120111

Page 10 / Thursday, december 1, 2011 New Mexico Daily loboculture

e, or clearance items.

CAMPUS EVENTSChangeling the LostStarts at: 8:00pmLocation: SUB, Santa Ana A&BPlay a character as part of White Wolf Pub-lishing’s ongoing official worldwide chronicle.Please call Marco at 505 453 7825 for infor-mation/confirmation.

COMMUNITY EVENTSMannheim SteamrollerStarts at: 7:30pmLocation: Santa Ana Star CenterThe group’s annual Christmas tour, celebrating its 25th anniversary, has become a tradition right along with decorating the tree, exchanging pres-ents and spending time with friends and family.

LOBO LIFEDAILY LOBOnew mexico

Event Calendarfor December 1, 2011

Planning your day has never been easier!

Placing an event in the Lobo Life calendar:

1. Go to www.dailylobo.com2. Click on “Events” link near the top of the page.3. Click on “Submit an Event Listing” on the right

side of the page.4. Type in the event information and submit!

Please limit your description to 25 words (although you may type in more, your description will be edited to 25 words. To have your event published in the Daily Lobo on the day of the event, submit at least 3 school days prior to the event . Events in the Daily Lobo will appear with the title, time, location and 25 word description! Although events will only publish in the Daily Lobo on the day of the event, events will be on the web once submitted and approved. Events may be edited, and may not publish on the Web or in the Daily Lobo at the discretion of the Daily Lobo.

Future events may be previewed at www.dailylobo.com

by Nicole [email protected]

Some of Albuquerque’s danc-ers are break dancing while break-ing down stereotypes.

Sisterz of the Underground is an all-female break dancing and hip-hop group founded in San Francisco 10 years ago. The Al-buquerque chapter, founded by Cassaundra “Sassy” Bustamante, started just last May.

Group member and CNM student Jordyn Gutierrez said the group tries to reach out to younger women through its performances, one of which is a calendar release party at Warehouse 508 this Saturday.

Gutierrez said pop culture can have a negative effect on kids, and hip-hop could help if it didn’t have such a bad reputation in the media.

“(A) perfect example is Brit-ney Spears,” Gutierrez said. “If we could show little girls they can be cool by breaking instead of shaking their booties, I would feel accomplished. What I hope audience members gain is that hip-hop isn’t a bad thing. It’s ac-tually a good thing, and we come together as a unit without vio-lence, to express ourselves posi-tively and creatively.”

Group member Helin “La Mooxie” Montgomery said the group is hip-hop focused, but dab-bles in a variety of artistic media.

“It’s not just spray painting. It’s expressing yourself in a hip-hop kind of way,” she said. “Even outside of hip-hop. We have a fire dancer in our group. We have graf-fiti artists. We have DJs, MCs and photographers. The only require-ment is that you have to be female.”

Montgomery said many of the dancers grew up break-dance bat-tling each other in high school, so an intense animosity developed, es-pecially between female dancers.

“No one was ever like, ‘Let’s get together and go out of town and battle these cats,’” she said. “Now, finally, everybody’s like, ‘Okay we’re over a lot of this stuff.’ There’s hardly any girls anyway, so why are we hating each other?”

SOTU unites the community’s break dancers, while giving back as well. All the proceeds from the group’s upcoming shows will be donated to Warehouse 508 and Young Women United, a local community for women of color. Most of the dancers were part of the Albuquerque hip-hop scene before gravitating to the group. Group member Natane “Soula” Lim said she took up the dance style because of the freedom it allows.

“I hated jazz. I tried tap. I tried ballet. My mom put me in gym-nastics, and I hated all of them,” Lim said. “They were too girly, or

they were like, ‘Do this. You have to practice the same move every single day,’ and breaking was free. It was open. You could be who you wanted to be in the dance. You didn’t have to look like somebody else. You could be yourself.”

Lim, a Chicago-native and a preschool teacher, said she had seen break dancers in Chicago but wasn’t inspired to start until she saw a battle at the Sunshine Theater when she was visiting Al-buquerque for the Gathering of Nations Powwow.

“I came back, and my brother and I just set up our garage with a slab of linoleum that was super small,” she said. “We gangster-ed it from somebody down the street, and I was like, ‘We’re just going to train together.’”

Bustamante said Albuquerque has a unique but strong hip-hop community.

“People from bigger cities are just like robots,” she said. “They see people in videos on Youtube, and they’re just trying to mimic them. They’re wearing the same clothes. Around here, we all have our own style. We use a lot of na-tive steps that they use in Native (American) dancing. The whole style is really Native-influenced.”

Montgomery said the danc-ers present themselves as role models.

“That’s reflected in the calen-dar pictures,” she said. “Nobody is like half-naked, with body pieces popping off.”

Saturday’s event includes a dance performance, a gallery showing of Montgomery’s photog-raphy, a video presentation, ven-dors and the release of the group’s new calendar, which features each group member somewhere on the UNM campus and all the pro-ceeds will benefit Warehouse 508 and Young Women United.

Bustamante said anyone is wel-come to check out the group, even if they have no previous experi-ence. They have an open dance session at Warehouse 508 every Thursday from 6-8:30 p.m.

BOX: B-Girl 2012 Calendar Release

PartySaturday, 6-9 p.m.Warehouse 508508 First Street N.W.

Break dancers aim to empower, inspire

B-Girl 2012 Calendar Release Party

Saturday, 6-9 p.m.

Warehouse 508

508 First Street N.W.

Page 11: NM Daily Lobo 120111

Thursday, december 1, 2011 / Page 11New Mexico Daily lobo

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SPONSORTHE DAILY LOBO

CROSSWORD505.277.5656

SPONSOR THISSUDOKU

Get your name out there with the Daily Sudoku505.277.5656

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

FOR RELEASE DECEMBER 1, 2011

ACROSS1 Up in the air6 Runner’s woe

11 “Very funny” TVstation

14 Instrument for themusicallychallenged

15 Panting, perhaps16 Art, now17 1-Down follower19 Ad __20 *Public

distribution21 Subject to debate22 *2011 NBA finals

runner-up25 Mao follower?26 Garden

purchases27 A pop28 “Golly!”31 *Loose32 Routes for two-

wheelers36 1962 NASA

launch38 Hairstyle with an

appendage ofsorts

40 Moderninformationsources

42 “Java” jazzman43 *Bond, for one44 Scratched (out)45 Hightails it48 Stephen of

“Citizen X”51 Causes of grins

and groans52 *Champagne,

e.g.53 Wall-mounted

safety device56 Baby carrier57 Prevailing

tendencies61 72, at Augusta

National62 Door support63 Time piece?64 Take a shot65 Of yore66 Stage device

DOWN1 Letters before a

17-Across2 __ Cruces

3 Wt. units4 21-Down group5 Heavy reading?6 Yields7 Went ape8 Turkish titles9 Unit of cultural

information10 Fix opening11 Chevy SUV12 Group of chicks13 Doctrinal

offshoots18 “The Book of __”:

2010 film21 Interview show

since 1947 ... andwhat this puzzle’sstarred answersdo in two ways

22 Test by lifting23 Dog-__ page24 Speedy Amtrak

train26 Relief for a

commuter29 “Take it!”30 3.0 and 4.0: Abbr.32 Pig movie33 Founding

member ofOPEC

34 17-syllable work35 Emergency

indicator37 Puts out, in a way39 Old Fords41 Adjective for

Ripley45 Won all the

games46 Gag that might

explode47 Explosive

49 Clampett player50 NYC dance

troupe53 Author Godwin54 Fruit cover55 Met excerpt57 Old reciprocal

electrical unit58 “__ always say

...”59 Pie material?60 Reference word

Wednesday’s Puzzle SolvedBy Don Gagliardo and C.C. Burnikel 12/1/11

(c)2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc. 12/1/11

Dilbert

dailysudoku Level 1 2 3 4

dailycrossword

Solution to yesterday’s puzzle

Page 12: NM Daily Lobo 120111

Page 12 / Thursday, december 1, 2011 New Mexico Daily lobo

AnnouncementsNOT IN CRISIS? In Crisis? Agora listens about anything. 277-3013. www.agoracares.com

Lost and FoundART KIT FOUND outside of apartment complex. To describe call 505-506- 0308.

FOUND IN LADIES Room in Zimmer- man basement. Women’s silver ring. Email [email protected] to describe ring.

PRESCRIPTION GLASSES LOST with transition lenses. Left in Ortega Hall week of 11/7/11. Contact Luis at [email protected]

ServicesTUTORING - ALL AGES, most subjects. Experienced Ph.D. 265-7799.

PAPER DUE? FORMER UNM instruc- tor, Ph.D., English, published, can help. 254-9615. MasterCard/ VISA.

MATHEMATICS, STATISTICS TUTOR. Billy Brown PhD. College and [email protected], 401-8139.

TYPING- ANY SUBJECT, including te- chinical. Word Center, 512 Yale SE 842- 9800.

MATH/ CHEMISTRY TUTOR. Excellent communicator. K-College. 505-205-9317.

ABORTION AND COUNSELING Ser- vices. Caring and confidential. FREE PREGNANCY TESTING. Curtis Boyd, MD, PC: 522 Lomas Blvd NE, 242-7512.

Health and WellnessBIRTHRIGHT CARES. FREE pregnancy tests, help. 262-2235.

Your SpaceLOOKING FOR HARD working, dedi- cated bassist to add keyboard/ effects, for local rock band currently doing paid gigs, ages 18-25. Must be willing to travel. Call 575-302-1142.

TYPE 3 PAGES for $5. Call now. 702- 7269.

ApartmentsAPARTMENT HUNTING? www.keithproperties.com

BLOCK TO UNM. Large. Clean. Gated. 1BDRM. $600/mo. Includes utilities. No pets. Move in special. 255-2685.

FREE UNM PARKING. 1BDRM, clean, quiet. Nob Hill. Starting at $490/mo. No pets. Move-in special. 366-8391.

CLEAN, QUIET, AFFORDABLE, 2BDRM $750/mo utilities included. 3 blocks to UNM, no pets. Move in spe- cial. 262-0433.

UNM NORTH CAMPUS- 1BDRM $515/mo. Clean, quiet, remodeled. No pets allowed. Move in special! 573-7839.

TANDCMANAGEMENT.COM

STUDIOS 1 BLOCK UNM, Free utilities. $455/mo. 246-2038. Holiday Special. 1515 Copper NE. www.kachina-prop erties.com

WWW.UNMRENTALS.COM Awesome university apartments. Unique, hardwood floors, FP’s, court- yards, fenced yards. Houses, cottages, efficiencies, studios, 1, 2 and 3BDRM’s. Garages. 843-9642. Open 7 days/week.

UNM/CNM STUDIOS, 1BDRM, 2BDRMS, 3BDRMS, and 4BDRMS. William H. Cornelius, Real Estate Con- sultant: 243-2229.

1700 COAL SE. 2BDRM, remodeled, wood floors, W/D, $750/mo + utilities, $300dd. No pets please. 453-9745.

DuplexesUNM 2 BLOCKS, 1BDRM with: wood floors, fenced yard. $440/mo +utilities, available 12/1, 216 Mesa. Call 720- 4926.

Houses For Rent3BDRM, W/D, BASEMENT, lots of park- ing. $1000/mo + $400 deposit. Does not include gas or electric. 2 blocks from UNM. 881-3540.

HOUSE FOR RENT 3BDRM 1.75BA. Garage. W/D. Located across the street from UNM, 1629 Roma NE. $1000/mo. 203-1633.

2BDRM 1BA NOB Hill area. W/D, garage, backyard. $850/mo +deposit, +utilities. 804-5093.

Rooms For RentFULLY FURNISHED, NEAR north cam- pus. $410/mo +1/4 utilities. High speed Internet. Pictures available. Gated com- munity. Access I-40 & I-25. [email protected]

1 BLOCK SOUTH of UNM, $350/month, util. included, WD, for viewing call 261- 6102.

FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED. 5BDRM, 2BA, $450/mo +1/5 gas +elec. 5 min walk to Zimmerman. House fur- nished. Free parking. Available immedi- ately. Call/ text 303-587-3453.

AZTEC STORAGE ABSOLUTELY the BEST PRICE on storages.All size units.24 Hour video surveillance.On site manager.10 minutes from University.3rd month free.884-1909.3201 Aztec Road NE.

ROOM AT LOBO Village. Female. Sophomore or older. Available for spring semester. $500/mo +electric. Very nice. Call/ text 575-613-5635.

3BDRM HOUSE LOOKING for female roommate. House shared with two other females, shared bathroom, rent is $520, utilities included, plenty of park- ing. 505-310-1529.

PetsTWO TOY POODLES males $300, fe- males $350, Cocker Spaniel fem. $350, OBO. Adorable, playful, healthy. 1st shots/ dewormed. Call 505-907-7411

For SaleBRADLEY’S BOOKS INSIDE Winning Coffee. MWF, occasionally Saturdays.

CAP & GOWN (Bachelor). 5’7 to 5’9. $25 cash. Text 505-379-4793.

Vehicles For Sale1968 FORD MUSTANG white, runs well, 4 barrel carburetor, v8 engine, new starter, battery and tires. Asking $10,000obo. Call Sam at 505-916-7064.

Jobs Off CampusEARN $1000-$3200 A month to drive our brand new cars with ads. www.FreeCarJobs.com

!!!BARTENDING!!!: $300/DAY potential. No experience necessary, training avail- able. 1-800-965-6520ext.100.

TALIN IS NOW hiring for seafood depart- ment, cashier, tea bar, and produce de- partment. Apply online at talinmarket. com or pick up application at 88 Louisiana Blvd SE.

TALIN IS LOOKING for store supervi- sor. Retail experience and leadership skills required. Please apply at talinmar ket.com or pick up application at 88 Louisiana Blvd SE.

P/T AD SALES representative needed for new publication. Commission based pay. Must be a motivated self-starter. Send resume to [email protected]

THE PUEBLO OF Isleta is recruiting for a FITNESS PERFORMANCE NUTRI- TIONIST: The Fitness Performance Nu- tritionist is responsible for nutritional needs assessment and nutrition/fitness education and counseling of the clients of the Diabetes Prevention Programs of the Pueblo of Isleta. Life Style Weight Management Consultant (LWMC) Certi- fication A Plus+. For complete position description log on to www.isletapueblo. com Career Section of the Home Page. Fax: 869-2812, or email Application to: [email protected] Closing date: Until Filled. The Pueblo of Isleta is a drug-free Employer. Drug Testing and Criminal Background completed prior to employment.

TALIN MARKET IS looking for morning stocker. Hours from 6am- 10am Mon- day-Friday. Starting pay at $9/hr. Please apply online at talinmarket.com or pick up application at 88 Louisiana Blvd SE.

PIANO MUSICIAN FOR Lutheran Church. Substitute, could lead to weekly work. Evening auditions 899- 3016.

PT PROGRAMMER – DRC Solutions, Inc. is hiring a part-time programmer with a background in computer science or related field to develop commodity and stock market price analysis and modeling software. Must have solid foundation in object oriented coding preferably with C++, C#, or Java. Send resume to [email protected] or call 505-237-1600.

VETERINARY ASSISTANT/ RECEP- TIONIST/ Kennel help. Pre-veterinary student preferred. Ponderosa Animal Clinic: 881-8990/ 881-8551.

PUEBLO OF ISLETA is recruiting for an EHS HOME VISITOR. Responsible for providing comprehensive Early Head Start Services to children and families in a Native American Community, Pre- natal to 3 Years through 90- minute home visits. AA in EARLY CHILD- HOOD EDUCATION A MUST. For com- plete position descriptions, log on to www.isletapueblo.com, career section of the home page. Closing dates: Until Filled. PUEBLO OF ISLETA IS A DRUG FREE EMPLOYER. Drug Test- ing and Criminal Background com- pleted prior to employment. Fax to: 505- 869-2812, or email to [email protected]

SANDIA PEAK SKI Area Hiring Fair De- cember 3rd. Service oriented personnel needed for FT and PT seasonal posi- tions for lift operators, snowmaking/ grooming/ mechanic, rental shop, cashiers, food service, retail shop, jani- torial, parking lot attendants, & CDL li- censed drivers (passenger endorse- ment) for ski shuttle. Apply in person only at the ski area base lodge. All appli- cants must bring current driver’s license and social security card. 9am to 3pm, Saturday December 3.

!BARTENDER TRAINING! Bartending Academy, 3724 Eubank NE.www.newmexicobartending.com 292- 4180.

PUEBLO OF ISLETA is recruiting for a WORKFORCE PROGRAM COORDI- NATOR. Responsible for coordinating employment development needs for the Pueblo of Isleta Adult and Youth. For complete position descriptions, log on to www.isletapueblo.com, career sec- tion of the home page. Fax to: 505-869- 2812, or email to poi70103@isleta pueblo.com Closing dates: Until Filled. PUEBLO OF ISLETA IS A DRUG FREE EMPLOYER. Drug Testing and Criminal Background completed prior to employment.

Volunteers

UNM IS LOOKING for adult women with asthma for asthma research study. If you are interested in finding out more about this study, please contact Teresa at [email protected] or 269- 1074 (HRRC 09-330).

ADVERTISE TO STUDENTS HERE!505-277-5656.

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• Come to Marron Hall, room 107, show your UNM ID and receive FREE classifi eds in Your Space, Rooms for Rent, or any For Sale Category.

• Phone: Pre-payment by Visa, Discover, MasterCard or American Express is required. Call 277-5656• Fax or Email: Pre-payment by Visa, Discover, MasterCard or American Express is required. Fax ad text, dates and catergory to 277-7530 or email to classifi [email protected]• In person: Pre-payment by cash, money order, check, Visa, Discover, MasterCard or American Express. Come by room 107 in Marron Hall from 8:00am to 5:00pm.• Mail: Pre-pay by money order, in-state check, Visa, Discover, MasterCard or American Express. Mail payment, ad text, dates and catergory.

CLASSIFIED INDEX

Find your way around the Daily Lobo ClassifiedsAnnouncements

AnnouncementsAuditions

Event RentalsFun, Food, Music

Health and WellnessLooking for YouLost and Found

ServicesTravel

Want to BuyYour Space

HousingApartmentsCo-housing

CondosDuplexes

Houses for RentHouses for SaleHousing WantedProperty for SaleRooms for Rent

Sublets

For SaleAudio/VideoBikes/Cycles

Computer StuffDogs, Cats, Pets

For SaleFurniture

Garage SalesTextbooks

Vehicles for Sale

EmploymentChild Care JobsJobs off CampusJobs on Campus

Jobs WantedVolunteers

Research Assistant/Tutor/Re-cruitment AssistantSchool of Law Admin-istration03-01-12$9-14/hr

Sales As-sistantBookstore03-01-12$7.50/hr

ShelverUniversity

Libraries03-01-12$7.50/hr

Admin-istrative AssistantNew Mexico Union Ad-ministration01-06-2012$7.50/hr

Teaching AssistantTheatre and Dance03-01-2012$11/hr

Program Support StaffUME Teacher De-velopment 03-01-2012$8.50/hr

Office As-sistantStudent Accounts Receivable Cashier03-01-2012$8.25/hr

Language Lab Atten-dant (Web Specialist)Language Learning Center02-14-2012$10/hr

Office As-sistant Contract Grant Ac-

counting Main02-29-2012$8/hr

A/C Monitor PrintmakingArt History02-29-2012$7.75/hr

Library As-sistantHS Library and In-formatics Center02-29-2012$7.50/hr

Administra-tive SupportStudent Pub-lications12-09-2011$7.50/hr

Under-graduate Research AssistantChemistry

Department02-29-2012$10/hr

CFA Peer MentorCollege of Fine Arts Administra-tion02-29-2012$7.50/hr

Office As-sistantStudent Health and Counseling02-27-2012$8.25/hr

Peer MentorTitle V02-23-2012$11/hr

Mesa del Sol Research AssistantArt History02-22-2012$12/hr

Check out a few of the Jobs on Main Campus available through

Student Employment!Listed by: Position Title Department Closing Date Salary

For more information about these positions, to view all positions, or to apply visit

https://unmjobs.unm.eduCall the Daily Lobo at 277-5656 to find out how your job can be the Job of the Day!!

Job of the Day

Student Field Agent

IT Customer Services

02-29-2012

$12.00-14.00/Hr.

DOE

JOIN US FOR UNM’S OLDEST STUDENT RUN TRADITION

JOIN US FOR UNM’S JOIN US FOR UNM’S OLDEST STUDENT OLDEST STUDENT RUN TRADITIONRUN TRADITION

Hangingof the Greens

Meet in front of the UNM Bookstore for hot chocolate & cookies! Families are encouraged to attend!

Questions? Call 277-4706 • People are encouraged to come to campus and pick up luminarias entirely free-of-cost!

Please do not drive on sidewalks!

Dec. 2nd

5:45pm

CAN’T TOLERATEIRON PILLS?If you have Iron Deficiency Anemia and cannot take iron pills, talk to your doctor about a clinical research study with intravenous (IV) iron.

18 years of age or older Diagnosed with anemia due to low levels of iron (Iron

Deficiency Anemia) Cannot take or have had an unsatisfactory response

to iron pills (i.e., you are anemic despite taking iron pills; you experience side effects that prevent you from taking iron pills; or, you cannot take iron pills for other reasons)

(Female participants) Not pregnant, breast feeding, or planning to become pregnant within the 7 weeks following the start of the clinical research study

To learn more and find out if you may qualify:

Visit www.IV-Iron.com

Call toll free: 1-866-267-3094

Email: [email protected]

You may be eligible if you meet the following criteria:

These are just some of the criteria. There are other reasons volunteers may not be eligible to participate.

DS-0203-0611

Call David at Albuquerque Clinical Trials505-224-7407 ext. 238

LARRY’S HATSBEST HATS FOR ANY OCCASION

HIKE - TRAVEL - WEDDINGCUFFLINKS AND ACCESSORIES

3102 Central Ave SE 266-2095

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