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1 Nirma University Institute of Technology M.Tech. in Electrical Engineering (Electrical Power Systems)

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Semester - I
Skill Development
Course Learning Outcomes (CLO): At the end of the course, students will be able to-
1. model various system components, apparatus mathematically
2. analyze effects of changes in any of the model parameter(s)
3. express the system dynamics, mathematically prove it and suggest corrective actions
Syllabus: Teaching Hours: 45
transformation, formulation of State-space equations, transient performance of
synchronous machine, equivalent circuit, representation of saturation for stability
study, synchronous machine representation in stability studies, reactive power
capability curve
Unit-2: Power System Component Modelling 08
Classification and modelling of load - static and dynamic loads, composite load
modelling, performance characteristics of different loads, transmission line modelling
Unit-3: Small Signal Stability Analysis 08
Concept of stability of dynamic systems, eigen-properties of state matrix, dynamic
equivalents, Effect of AVR gains on stability, excitation systems and Philips-Heffron
model, techniques for stability improvement, voltage stability analysis
Unit-4: Excitation system Modelling 08
Schematic diagram with elements of excitation system, D.C. excitation systems, A.C.
excitation systems, Dynamic performance measures, Over excitation and under
excitation limiters
Unit-5: Prime movers and governors modelling 06
Models and transfer function of steam and hydraulic prime mover, Model and transfer
function of speed governor, overview of IEEE models of speed governing mechanism
for dynamic simulation
Self-Study Component: The self-study content(s) will be declared at the commencement of semester. Around 10% of the
questions will be asked from self-study contents.
L T P C
3 0 0 3
3
Suggested Readings: 1. P. S. Kundur, Power System Stability and Control, McGraw Hill Inc., New York
2. P.Sauer and M.A.Pai, Power System Dynamics and Stability, Prentice Hall (I) Ltd.
3. P.M. Anderson and A.A. Fouad, Power system control and stability, Wiley Publishers
4. K.R.Padiyar, Power System Dynamics, Stability and Control, Interline Publishers, Bangalore
5. J. Machowski, J.W. Bialek and J.R. Bumby, Power System Dynamics, Stability and Control, Wiley
publishers
6. R. Ramanujam, Power System Dynamics Analysis and Simulation, PHI Learning Private Limited,
New Delhi
7. K. N. Shubhanga, Power System Analysis – A dynamic perspective, Pearson
L = Lecture, T = Tutorial, P = Practical, C = Credit
w.e.f. academic year 2019-20 and onwards
4
Semester - I
SEMESTER - I
3EE2106 Advanced Power System Operation and Control [3 0 0 3]
Employability and Skill Development
Course Learning Outcome: After successful completion of the course, student will be able to
design the optimal unit commitment schedule
apply constraints / conditions for control of power system parameters
perform the basic state estimation at various buses in a power system and monitor the system
Syllabus:
scheduling systems, power system security, optimal real and reactive power dispatch, state estimation,
load frequency control, energy control center.
Control of voltage, frequency and tie-line power flows, Q-v and P-f control loops. Mechanism of real
and reactive power control. Net interchange tie-line bias control. Optimal, sub-optimal and decentralised
controllers. Discrete-mode AGC. Time-error and inadvertent interchange correction techniques. On-line
computer control. Distributed digital control. Data acquisition systems. Emergency control, preventive
control, system wide optimization, SCADA.
Self Study: The self study contents will be declared at the commencement of semester. Around 10% of the questions
will be asked from self study contents.
References: 1. W. D. Stevenson, Elements of Power System Analysis, McGraw Hill Book Company, New York.
2. S. S. Vadhera, Power System Analysis and Stability, Khanna Publishers, New Delhi.
3. G. W. Stagg and A.H. El-Abiad, Computer Methods in Power Systems Analysis, McGraw Hill
Book Company, New York.
4. O. I. Elgerd, Electric Energy System Theory: An Introduction, TMH Ltd., New Delhi.
5. L. K. Kirchmayer, Economic Operation of Power System, John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New York.
6. S. Mukhopadhyay, Modern Power System Control and Operation, Roorkee Publishing House,
Roorkee.
7. P. S. R. Murty, Power System Operation and Control, TMH Publications, New Delhi.
6
Semester - I
Employability and Skill Development
Course Learning Outcomes (CLO): At the end of the course, students will be able to-
1. judge fault clearing phenomena under abnormal conditions 2. develop mathematical approach towards protection
3. select appropriate algorithm for numerical protection
4. implement various protection schemes and use modern approaches of relaying in power
system protection
Syllabus: Teaching Hours: 45 Unit 1: Review of principles of power system protection 08 Over current protection scheme, directional protection, Differential and Distance protection scheme.
Evolution of digital relays from electromechanical relays, Performance and operational characteristics
of digital protection
Unit 2: Mathematical background to protection algorithms 08 Finite difference techniques, Interpolation formulae, forward, backward and central difference
interpolation, Numerical differentiation, curve fitting and smoothing, Least squares method, Fourier
analysis, Fourier series and Fourier transform, Walsh function analysis
Unit-3: Digital Protection 08 Basic elements of digital protection, signal conditioning: transducers, surge protection, analog filtering,
analog multiplexers, Conversion subsystem: sampling theorem, signal aliasing and digital signal
processing concepts. Introduction to numerical relays, comparison with conventional relays, block diagram and components
of numerical relays, numerical over current protection, numerical distance protection, numerical
differential protection. Important communication protocols for digital protection. Digital relaying algorithm: Fourier analysis, least square technique, Mann Morrison technique,
differential equation based technique for transmission line applications.
Unit-4: Developments in Digital Protection 07 Concepts of modern coordinated control system,fundamentals of travelling wave based relays, adaptive
relaying and carrier-aided protection of transmission lines, application of DSP in numerical
relaying,wide area protection and intelligent protection using ANN and Fuzzy systems.
Unit-5: HVDC Protection Systems Philosophy of HVDC protections, measurement devices, overcurrent and directional protection
systems, etc.
Unit-6: Circuit Breaker and Instrument Transformers 10 Introduction to circuit breaker, Transient recovery voltage (TRV): rating, concepts and IEC/IS standards,
TRV envelopes, Classification of re-striking transients, duties of circuit breakers, Interruptions of short
line faults, interruptions of terminal faults, asynchronous switching etc. SF6 and vacuum circuit breakers,
testing of HV and EHV circuit breakers, recent trends in switchgear, conventional CT – PTs and digital
CTs.
Self-Study Component: The self-study content(s) will be declared at the commencement of semester. Around 10% of the
questions will be asked from self-study contents.
Laboratory Work: This shall consist of at least 08 laboratory experiments / simulations based on the syllabus.
Suggested Readings: 1. L. P. Singh, Digital Protection, New Age International (P) Ltd., New Delhi
2. R. P. Singh, Digital Power System Protection, Prentice-Hall, New Delhi
3. A. G. Phadke and J. S. Thorp, Computer Relaying for Power Systems, John Wiley and
Sons
4. S.R. Bhide, Digital Power System Protection, PHI Learning Pvt.Ltd.2014
5. A.T. Johns and S. K. Salman, Digital Protection of Power Systems, IEEE Press
6. Gerhard Zeigler, Numerical Distance Protection, Siemens Publicise Corporate
Publishing
7. B. Ram, Power System Protection and Switchgear, Tata McGraw Hill
8. Y. O. Paithankar, Fundamentals of Power System Protection, PHI Publication
9. BHEL, Handbook of Switchgears, TMH publishers
10. R. D. Garzon, High Voltage Circuit Breaker: Design and Applications
11. B. Bhalja, R.P. Maheshwari, N.G.Chothani, Protection and Switchgear, Oxford University
Press.
w.e.f. academic year 2019-20 and onwards
8
Semester - I
3EE2108 EHV AC and HVDC Transmission [4 0 1 5]
Employability and Skill Development
Course Learning Outcome: After successful completion of the course, student will be able to
critically evaluate AC and DC transmission system with all aspects
perform in depth converter analysis, faults, protections, harmonic considerations, grounding
system
Syllabus:
EHV AC Transmission: Introduction to EHV transmission, transmission line trends and preliminaries,
calculation of line and ground parameters, Corona effects including power loss and audible noise, radio
interference, series and shunt compensations, Design of EHVAC transmission, Electrostatic and
magnetic fields of EHV lines.
HVDC Transmission: D.C power transmission technology, thyristor valve, analysis of HVDC converter,
converter and HVDC system control, converter faults and protection, smoothing reactor and DC line,
reactive power control, harmonics and filters, multi-terminals HVDC systems, component models for
the analysis of AC/DC systems, simulation of HVDC system, Power flow analysis in AC/DC systems.
Self Study: The self study contents will be declared at the commencement of semester. Around 10% of the questions
will be asked from self study contents.
Laboratory Work: It will consist of at least 10 experiments on High Voltage testing of various Electrical Equipments.
References: 8. Rakosh Das Begamudre, Extra High Voltage AC Transmission Engg., New Age international (P)
Ltd, New Delhi.
9. S. Rao, EHV-AC, HVDC Transmission and Distribution Engineering, Khanna Publishers, Delhi.
10. K. R. Padiyar, HVDC Power Transmission Systems: Technology and System Interactions, New
Age International (P) Ltd.
11. Kuffel, Zangle, Kuffle, High Voltage Engineering, Newnes Publications.
12. M.S. Naidu and V. Kamaraju, High Voltage Engineering, TMH Publications.
9
Semester - I
Course Title Power System Analysis
Skill Development, Employability and Entrepreneurship
Course Learning Outcomes (CLO): At the end of the course, students will be able to-
1. select and apply the most appropriate algorithm for load–flow and short circuitstudies.
2. formulate and solve problems related with economic operation of power system.
3. demonstrate understanding about complex issues related to security and state estimation of
power system.
Syllabus: Teaching Hours: 45
Unit-1: Basics of Power System Analysis 04 Need for power system planning and operational studies, Overview of different power
system studies, Basic modelling of power system components,Reviewing
construction of Y-Bus and Z-Bus matrices.
Unit-2: Power Flow Analysis for large systems 08 Classification of Buses, Load flow problem and its solution techniques, various
constraints, Static Load Flow Equations (SLFE), Gauss method, Gauss-Seidel
method, Newton-Raphson method, Fast decoupled method, DC Load Flow Method,
Load flow with power electronics control, AC-DC system power flow analysis-
Sequential and simultaneous solution algorithms, Matrix sparsity and computer
techniques for the analysis
Unit-3: Short Circuit Analysis 08 Symmetrical and asymmetrical faults, Short circuit analysis of large power systems
using Z-bus, Analysis of open circuit faults, Computer aided short circuit analysis,
Impact of renewable energy sources penetration short circuit analysis
Unit-4: Economic operation of power system 10 Economic sharing of loads between different plants, Unit Commitment, Optimal
power flow and solution techniques(Gradient method, NR method etc.), Optimal
hydro-thermal scheduling, Concepts of AI based economic operations
Unit-5: Security studies and State Estimation 10 Contingency analysis, Addition and removal of multiple lines in power systems,
Concepts of current injection distribution factor and line outage distribution factor,
Contingency Selection, Power system security, Static security analysis at control
centres
State estimation – Errors, Detection and identification of bad measurements,
Application of power system estate estimation, PMU and WAMS data for state
estimation
Unit 6: Voltage Stability 05 Voltage collapse, P-V curve, multiple power flow solution, continuation power flow,
optimal multiplies load flow, voltage collapse proximity indices.
L T P C
3 0 2 4
Self-Study Component: The self-study content(s) will be declared at the commencement of semester. Around 10% of the
questions will be asked from self-study contents.
Laboratory Work: It will consist of at least 08 experiments / simulations based on above syllabus.
Suggested Readings:
1. John Grainger and W. D. Stevenson, Power System Analysis, McGraw Hill
2. G.W.Stagg and A.H.El-Abiad, Computer Methods in Power System Analysis, McGraw Hill
3. Pai, M.A., Computer Techniques in Power System Analysis, Tata McGraw hill, New Delhi
4. Allen Wood and B. Wollenberg, Power Generation, Operation and Control, Wiley
5. D.P. Kothari and I. J. Nagrath, Modern Power System analysis, McGraw Hill
6. S. S. Vadhera, Power System Analysis and Stability, Khanna Publishers
7. S. Sivanagparaju and G. Sreenivasan, Power System Operation and Control, Pearson
L = Lecture, T = Tutorial, P = Practical, C = Credit
w.e.f. academic year 2019-20 and onwards
11
Semester - I
Employability, Skill Development, Entreneurship
Course Learning Outcomes (CLO): At the end of the course, students will be able to-
1. illustrate the operation and control of power electronic converters
2. devise the control of static VAR compensators
3. analyse different power quality issues
4. acquire knowledge about the harmonics, harmonic introducing devices, effect of harmonics on system
equipment & loads and harmonic filtering
Syllabus: Teaching Hours: 45
Unit-1: Power Electronic Devices & High Power Converters 05 Construction and characteristics of power electronic devices, controlled rectifiers,
DC-DC converters
Unit-2: Inverters 09 Two-level voltage source inverters, multi-level voltage source inverters – diode-
clamped, flying capacitor and cascaded, PWM techniques for inverters
Unit-3: Control of FACTS Devices 06 Control of thyristor switched & thyristor controlled SVCs, STATCOM control,
control of thyristor switched & thyristor controlled series compensators, Control of
UPFC & IPFC
Unit-4: Power Electronic Converters for Renewable Energy System 06 MPPT, topologies of grid-tied inverters used for PV and Wind energy systems,
control of grid-tied inverters
Unit-5: HVDC Technology 10 Development of HVDC Technology, DC versus AC Transmission, types of HVDC
links, Selection of converter configuration, Control of HVDC converters and
Systems – principles of dc-link control, converter characteristics, individual phase
control, equidistant pulse control
Unit-6: Power Quality Improvement Devices 09 Power quality, harmonics, sources & effects of harmonics, Types of filters - Passive
filers and active power filters, Shunt active filters, Series active filters, Hybrid filters,
Active power factor controlled front end converters, Dynamic voltage restorer
Self-Study Component:
12
The self-study content(s) will be declared at the commencement of semester. Around 10% of the
questions will be asked from self-study contents.
Laboratory Work: This shall consist of at least 08 laboratory experiments / simulations based on the syllabus.
Suggested Readings: 1. M. H. Rashid, Power Electronics: Circuits, Devices and Applications, Pearson Education
2. N. Mohan, T. M. Undeland and W. P. Robbins, Power Electronics: Converters, Applications and
Design, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York
3. L. Umanand, Power Electronics, Essentials & Applications, Wiley India
4. N. G. Hingorani, Laszlo Gyugyi, Understanding FACTS: Concepts and Technology of Flexible
AC Transmission Systems, Standard Publishers Distributors.
5. IEEE Std. 519-2014 (ANSI), IEEE Recommended Practices and Requirements For Harmonic
Control In Electrical Power Systems.
6. Math H. J. Bollen, Understanding Power Quality Problems: Voltage Sags and Interruptions”,
Standard Publishers Distributors
7. E. Acha, V. G. Agelidis, O. Anaya Lara, and T. J. E. Miller, Power Electronic Control in Electrical
Systems”, Elsevier Science
8. P. S. R. Murty, Operation and Control in Power Systems, B S Publication
9. K. R. Padiyar, FACTS controllers in power transmission and distribution, New Age International
Publishers
10. C. Kim, V. K. Sood, G. Jang, S. Lim, S. Lee, HVDC Transmission: Power Conversion
Applications in Power Systems, John Wiley & Sons (Asia) Pte Ltd.
11. V. K. Sood, HVDC and FACTS Controllers: Applications of Static Converters in Power Systems,
Springer US.
12. K. Padiyar, HVDC Power Transmission Systems: Technology and System Interactions, New Age
International (P) Limited Publishers.
13. S. Chakraborty, M. G. Simoes, W. E. Kramer, Power Electronics for Renewable and Distributed
Energy Systems: A source book of Topologies, Control and Integration, Springer
14. Recent research papers of IEEE Trans. on Power Electronics, Industrial Electronics, Industry
Applications, Power Systems, Power Delivery etc.
L = Lecture, T = Tutorial, P = Practical, C = Credit
w.e.f. academic year 2019-20 and onwards
13
Semester-I
Skill Development, Entrepreneurship, Employability
Course Learning Outcomes (CLO): At the end of the course, students will be able to-
1. interpret the economics of renewable energy systems 2. conceptualize and design photovoltaic system 3. acquire knowledge about different types of solar and wind energy conversion technology and its grid interface
Syllabus: Teaching Hours: 45 Unit-1: Energy Scenario 02 Man and energy, World’s production and reserves of commercial energy sources, India’s population
and reserves, energy alternatives
Unit-2: Photovoltaic System 06 PV cell characteristics and equivalent circuits, model of pv cell, various parameters of pv cell and its
datasheet study, effect of temperature on pv cell, fill factor, series and parallel connection of pv cell,
interconnection of non-identical pv modules in series and parallel, Introduction to solar irradiance
and insolation, solar geometry, incident solar energy estimation on flat plate and tilted flat plat
collector, solar insolation with atmospheric effects, airmass, clearness index
Unit-3: Design of Photovoltaic System 06 Sizing of PV system without battery, battery introduction and various battery parameters, battery
selection, load calculation, days of autonomy and recharge, PV system design with battery, PV array
design and selection, MPPT technique, MPPT algorithms, input impedance model of power
converters for MPPT, direct PV and battery connection, charge controller, battery charger design
Unit-4: Applications of PV in Thermal Engineering and Water Pumping 03 Peltier cooling, Peltier element datasheet study, Peltier refrigeration, radiation and mass transport,
water pumping principle, total dynamic head calculation, Colebrook formula, different types of
pumps in pumped hydro applications.
Unit-5: Wind Energy System 04 Wind in the world, wind energy scenario in India, speed and power relations, power extracted from
wind, wind speed distribution, Weibull probability distribution, wind system components – tower,
turbine blades, yaw control and speed control
Unit-6: Wind Generator Technologies 06 Grid connected and self-excited induction generator operation, constant voltage and constant
frequency generation, variable voltage and variable frequency generation, Double fed induction
generator working principle and its operation, permanent magnet synchronous generator working
principle and its operation
Unit-7: Renewable to Grid Interface 06 Grid connection principle, pv and wind to grid topologies, three phase d-q controlled grid connection
ac to dc and dc to ac transformations, three phase grid controlled connection, single phase grid
controlled connection, space vector pulse width modulation technique
Unit-8: Impact of Distributed Generation 09 Distributed generation overview, radial distribution system protection, distribution system loading,
line drop model, loop and secondary network distribution, impact of distributed generation, relaying
and protection, intentional and unintentional islanding, various issues in power converter design,
costing and life cycle, low voltage ride through capability
Unit-9: Life Cycle Costing 03 Life cycle costing - growth models, annual payment and preset worth factor, various examples and
case studies
14
Self-Study Component: The self study contents will be declared at the commencement of semester. Around 10% of the questions
will be asked from self study contents.
Laboratory Work: This shall consist of at least 08 laboratory experiments / simulations based on the syllabus.
Suggested Readings: 1. Chetan Singh Solanki, Solar Photovoltaics: Fundamentals, Technologies and Applications,
Prentice Hall India.
2. S. N. Bhadra, D. Kastha, S. Banerjee, Wind Electrical Systems, Oxford Publications.
3. S. M. Muyeen, Wind Energy Conversion Systems: Technology and Trends, Springer
4. S. P. Sukhatme, J. K. Nayak, Solar Energy: Principles of Thermal Collection and Storage,
Mcgraw Hill, India
5. Joshua Earnest, Wind Power Technology, Prentice Hall, India
6. Math H. Bollen, F. Hassan, Integration of Distributed Generation in Power System, Wiley- IEEE
press
7. Loi Lei Lai, Tze Fun Chan, Distributed Generation – Induction and Permanent Magnet
Generators, Wiley-IEEE press
8. Roger A. Messenger, Jerry Ventre, Photovoltaic System Engineering, Wiley
9. Arthur R. Bergen, Vijay Vittal, Power System Analysis: Prentice Hall India
10. M. H. Rashid, Power Electronics: Circuits, Devices and Applications, Pearson Education
11. N. Mohan, T. M. Undeland and W. P. Robbins, Power Electronics: Converters, Applications and
Design, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York
12. L. Umanand, Power Electronics, Essentials & Applications, Wiley India
13. S. Chakraborty, M. G. Simoes, W. E. Kramer, Power Electronics for Renewable and Distributed
Energy Systems: A source book of Topologies, Control and Integration, Springer
14. Recent research papers of IEEE Trans. on Sustainable Energy, Photovoltaics, Power Electronics,
Industrial Electronics, Industry Applications, Power Systems, Power Delivery etc.
L = Lecture, T = Tutorial, P = Practical, C = Credit
w.e.f. academic year 2019-20 and onwards
15
Semester – II
Employability and Skill Development
Course Learning Outcome: After successful completion of the course, student will be able to
understand various causes and effects of different types of power system (in)stability and it's
mitigation methods
apply and adapt the applications of mathematics and engineering tools in the analysis of
instability problems
modelling the dynamic behaviors of system components under small and large disturbances
discuss and suggest possible solution after analyzing the causes and effects of various power
system instability
Detailed machine modelling: Modeling of turbine-generator and associated systems, excitation
systems and PSS, transient stability and small signal stability for large systems, SSR and system
modelling for SSR studies
Voltage stability: P-V and Q-V curves, static analysis, sensitivity and continuation method; Dynamic
analysis, local and global bifurcations, control area, margin prediction, stability of AC-DC systems.
Self Study: The self study contents will be declared at the commencement of semester. Around 10% of the questions
will be asked from self study contents.
References: 13. E.W. Kimbark, Power System Stability, John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New York.
14. S.B. Crary, Power System Stability, Vol.I & II, John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New York.
15. P.M. Anderson and A. A. Fouad, Power System, Control and Stability, The Iowa State University
Press, Ames, Iowa, U.S.A
16
Semester – II
Employability and Entrepreneurship
Course Learning Outcome: After successful completion of the course, student will be able to
apply the electrical concepts in designing the substation understand the protection aspects pertaining to equipments and human safety in the substation gain knowledge about substation automation, integration and communication protocols apply advanced technology in improving the overall performance of a substation
Syllabus:
innovative substation design, site acquisition, design, construction and commissioning process, Selection
and location of site for substations, Air-insulated substations, Gas-insulated substations, High voltage
switching equipments, High voltage power electronic substations, Interface between automation and the
substation, Substation Integration and automation, SCADA, Oil-filled equipments in substation, Oil spill
prevention techniques, Substation grounding and design criteria, Grounding and lightning, Substation
fire protection, Substation communications, Key diagrams of typical substations
Self Study: The self study contents will be declared at the commencement of semester. Around 10% of the
questions will be asked from self study contents.
References: 17. J. D. McDonald (Ed)., Electric Power Substations Engineering, CRC Press.
18. P. S. Satnam and P. V. Gupta, Substation Design and Equipment, Dhanpat Rai and Sons.
19. M. S. Naidu, Gas Insulated Substations, I. K. International Publishing House Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi.
20. Recent Journal Papers.
SEMESTER - II
3EE2208 Computer Aided Power System Analysis [3 0 1 4]
Skill Development
Course Learning Outcome: After successful completion of the course, student will be able to
employ computer techniques to determine various power system studies
develop generalized algorithms and verify them logically on standardized test systems
use matrix and power system properties to simplify and speedy evaluation of the analysis
Syllabus:
Loadflow for AC systems, fast decoupled load flow, optimal power flow.
Z - matrix for short circuit studies.
State estimation, LO algorithm, fast decoupled state estimation.
Security and contingency studies. Unit Commitment. Load frequency control. AI applications.
Self Study: The self study contents will be declared at the commencement of semester. Around 10% of the questions
will be asked from self study contents.
Laboratory Work: It will consist of at least 10 experiments based on above syllabus.
References: 21. O. I. Elgerd, Electric Energy Systems Theory, McGraw Hill.
22. G.W.Stagg and A.H. El-Abiad, Computer Methods in Power System Analysis, McGraw Hill.
23. L. Kusic, Computer Aided Power Systems Analysis, Prentice Hall.
24. I. J. Nagrath and D. P. Kothari, Modern Power Systems Analysis, Tata McGraw Hill.
25. A. J. Wood and B. F. Wollenberg, Power Generation, Operation and Control, John Wiley.
18
Semester – II
Skill Development
Course Learning Outcome: After successful completion of the course, student will be able to
understand different software pertaining to power system
designing and model different electrical equipments used in power system
simulate and analyze the behavior of power system networks under various kind of disturbances
Laboratory Work: Modeling of power system components: Modeling of generators, governors, exciters, transformers,
transmission lines, shunt capacitors and reactors, static load as per IEEE/IEC standard
Simulation of modern power systems: Modern power systems operation and control, power system
deregulation, static and dynamic modeling, load flow and stability studies
There shall be at least 10 laboratory assignments based on the above syllabus.
19
Semester - II
Employability and Entrepreneurship
Course Learning Outcome (CLO): At the end of the course, students will be able to -
1. explore specific renewable generation technology for use and related economics
2. design microgrid for a standalone system, integration with grid and solve related issues
3. perform system studies for distributed power generation
Syllabus:
stages, Convergence of utility companies, Need and impact of distributed generation (DG)
03
Unit-2: Distributed Generation Plants DG technologies and their models – IC engines, Combined heat and power plants, Micro-
turbines, Solar photovoltaic power plant, Wind generators, Fuel cells, Bio-mass and bio-
gas
04
Operation, Stabilization, Control, Reliability aspects and market participation, Grid
interconnection, Smart grids, Power Quality issues with microgrid and smart grid
12
operating on a single-phase power system, Distribution system economics, Planning of
DGs, Distributed resource interconnection considerations, System control, Parallel and
grid-independent operation, Islanded operation, Protection systems for DG based systems,
Issues of DG integration on system protection schemes and remedies
13
Unit-5: System Studies and considerations for Distribution Generation Load flow studies, Symmetrical and unsymmetrical fault analysis, Fault current
calculations, Fault limiters, Protection of distributed generation, Adequacy of supply,
Voltage control and voltage support, Harmonics and power quality issues, Reliability of
DG based systems, Pricing of distributed network in distributed generation, Impact of high
penetration of DGs in grid, Standards for DG integration
13
Self – Study Component: The self-study content(s) will be declared at the commencement of semester. Around 10% of
the questions will be asked from self-study contents.
20
Suggested Readings: 5. H. Lee Willis and Walter G. Scott, Distributed Power Generation: Planning and Evaluation, Marcel
Decker Press
6. Ann-Marie Borbely and Jan F. Kreider, Distributed Generation: The Power Paradigm for the New
Millennium, CRC Press
8. Stuart Borlase, Smart Grid: Infrastructure Technology Solutions, CRC Press
9. Loi Lei Lai and Tze Fun Chan, Distributed Generation: Induction and Permanent Magnet Generators,
IEEE Press
10. N. Jenkins, J. B. Ekanayake and G. Starbac, Distributed Generation, IET Renewable Energy Series,
Landon, United Kingdom
L = Lecture, T = Tutorial, P = Practical, C = Credit
w.e.f. academic year 2019-20 and onwards
21
Semester - II
L T P C 3 0 0 3 Course Code 3EE22D302 Course Title Smart Grid Technologies
Employability and Entrepreneurship
Course Learning Outcome (CLO):
At the end of the course, students will be able to - 1. select grid architecture(s) and evaluate implementation aspects / issues
2. offer integration of smart technologies into electric power grid and provide deployment solution(s) 3. examine impact of policies and market framework for smart grid
Syllabus: Teaching Hours: 45 Unit-1: Introduction to Smart Grid Introduction to smart grid, Background and history of Smart grid evolution, Definition and characteristics of the
Smart Grid, its benefits and realization, Comparison between Smart grid and conventional electrical networks,
Attributes of the smart grid, Concept of robust and self-healing grid
2
Unit-2: Smart Grid to Evolve a Perfect Power System Introduction, overview of the perfect power system configurations, device level power system, building integrated
power systems, distributed power systems, fully integrated power system, Smart grid infrastructure, Composition
of the Smart grid, Plug in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEV), Vehicle to Grid and Grid to Vehicle communications;
Energy storage systems – types and characteristics, mitigation of power fluctuations, Smart storage like Battery,
SMES, Pumped Hydro, Compressed Air Energy Storage; Smart transmission grid, synchrophasor measurement,
Power electronics for bulk power flows
10
Unit-3: DC Distribution and Smart Grid AC vs DC sources, benefits of DC power delivery systems, powering equipment and appliances with DC, data
centers and information technology loads, future neighbourhood
5
Unit-4: Smart Grid communication system and its cyber security Classification of power system communication according to their functional requirements, Existing electric power
system communication infrastructure and its limitation, Smart Grid communication system infrastructure,
Standards for information exchange, Fiber Optical Networks, WAN based on Fiber optical networks, IP based Real
Time data Transmission, Bluetooth, ZigBee, GPS, Wi-Fi, Wi-Max based communication, Wireless Mesh Network,
Cyber security for Smart Grid, Broadband over Power line (BPL), IP based protocols, Cyber security of power
systems and Cyber security standards, Layered architecture and protocols - The ISO/OSI model, TCP/IP; Smart
Grid interoperability standards
10
Unit-5: Smart System for Smart Grid Introduction to smart meters, real time prizing, smart appliances, Smart metering and demand-side integration,
Automatic Meter Reading (AMR), Communications infrastructure and protocols for smart metering, Outage
Management System (OMS), smart sensors, home & building automation, smart substations, substation automation,
Substation communication network, Home Area Network (HAN), Neighbourhood Area Network (NAN), Wide
Area Network (WAN), feeder automation. Geographic Information System (GIS), Intelligent Electronic Devices (IED) & their application for monitoring &
protection, Wide Area Measurement System (WAMS), Phase Measurement Unit (PMU), Smart protection devices
and communication systems
management
4
3
Self-Study Component: The self-study content(s) will be declared at the commencement of semester. Around 10% of the
questions will be asked from self-study contents.
22
Suggested Readings: 1. Salman K. Salman, Introduction to the Smart Grid : Concepts, Technologies and Evolution, IET
2. Janaka Ekanayake, Kithsiri Liyanage, Jianzhong Wu, Smart Grid: Technology and Applications,
Wiley
3. James Momoh, Smart Grid: Fundamentals of Design and Analysis, Wiley IEEE
4. Clark W. Gellings, The Smart Grid, Enabling Energy Efficiency and Demand Response, CRC Press
5. Ali Keyhani, Design of smart power grid renewable energy systems, Wiley IEEE
6. A.G. Phadke, Synchronised Phasor Measurement and their Applications, Springer
7. Recent Research Publications, reports, white papers and standards
L = Lecture, T = Tutorial, P = Practical, C = Credit
w.e.f. academic year 2019-20 and onwards
23
Semester - II
Employability Entrepreneurship and Skill Development
Course Learning Outcomes (CLO): At the end of the course, students will be able to -
1. decide appropriate insulating material for HV applications
2. prepare specifications, design the circuit for the HV insulation test systems
3. apply pulse power technology for insulation testing and societal benefits
4. choose proper test method for non-destructive testing of HV apparatus
Syllabus: Teaching Hours: 45
Unit 1: Insulation System Design 09 Concept of electrostatic field, field geometry, corona ring and its usage, importance
of field distribution in insulation design; the theories of gaseous, vacuum, solid and
liquid insulation breakdown, composite materials, improvement in the insulation
preparation – use of nano particles and their impact on field distribution etc.
Unit-2: High Voltage Generation and Measurements 12 Concepts of high voltage generation – DC, AC and impulse voltage, generation of
high current, circuits for voltage and current generation
Measurement of HV DC, AC and Impulse voltages and currents, circuits –
limitations and possible improvements; digital measuring devices – their usage,
benefits and errors, relevant standards
Unit-3: Pulsed Power Systems and Applications 12 Introduction about pulsed power systems, Energy storage, Marx generators, Basic
pulsed power energy transfer stage, Opening and closing switches, Pulse Forming
networks, High voltage power supplies, Applications of pulsed electromagnetic
fields
Unit-4: Non-destructive testing of electrical apparatus 12 Dynamic properties of dielectrics, Modelling of dielectric properties, DC resistivity
measurement, Complex permittivity, Dielectric loss (tan delta) and capacitance
measurements, RIV measurement, SFRA technique - concept, Procedure, Inference,
Partial Discharge (PD) concept, Apparent charge, Measurement circuits, Concept of
Dissolved Gas Analysis (DGA) – key gas method, Duval’s triangle; Measurement
and interpretations of these properties, relevant standards
Self-Study Component: The self-study content(s) will be declared at the commencement of semester. Around 10% of the
questions will be asked from self-study contents.
Laboratory Work: This shall consist of at least 08 laboratory experiments / simulations based on the syllabus.
L T P C
3 0 2 4
Suggested Readings: 1. Kuffel, Zaengl and Kuffel, High Voltage Engineering Fundamental, Newnes Publications
2. Wadhwa C L, High Voltage Engineering, New Age Publications
3. Alston L L, High Voltage Technology, Oxford University Press
4. A. Haddad and D. F. Warne (Ed)., Advances in High Voltage Engineering, IET Publication
5. Hansjoachim Bluhm, Pulsed Power Systems - Principles and Applications, Springer Publishers
6. Abdul Salem M A, Anis H, et al., High Voltage Engineering - Theory and Practice, Marcel Dekker
7. Begamudre R D, High Voltage Engineering Problems and Solutions, New Age International
Publishers
8. Naidu M S and Kamraju V, High Voltage Engineering, Tata McGraw Hill Publications
9. Relevant standards and research publications
L = Lecture, T = Tutorial, P = Practical, C = Credit
w.e.f. academic year 2019-20 and onwards
25
Semester - II
Course Title Applications of AI and Optimization in Power Systems
Employability, Entrepreneurship and Skill Development
Course Learning Outcomes (CLO): At the end of the course, students will be able to-
1. Make use of classical and advanced techniques in optimization
2. apply knowledge of optimization theory in electrical power systems
3. develop AI / optimization based solutions for power system problems
Syllabus Teaching Hours: 45 Unit-1: Fundamentals of Optimization Techniques Definition - classification of optimization problems-Unconstrained and constrained optimization -
Optimality conditions - classical optimization techniques (Lamda Iteration method, Linear
programming)
03
Unit-2: Lamda Iteration Method Brief introduction to lamda iteration method, formulation of Lagrange function, Lamda iteration
method to solve optimal dispatch problem
04
Unit-3: Linear Programming Fundamentals of linear programming, simplex method I, weak and strong duality theorems, integer
programming, network flow, develop a linear programming model from problem description
04
fundamentals of genetic algorithm, working principle, principles of genetic algorithm - genetic
operators, selection, crossover and mutation fitness function, GA operators, similarities and
differences between GA and traditional methods, unconstrained and constrained optimization using
Genetic Algorithm
discrete and combinatorial
04
Unit-6: Fuzzy Logic Introduction, Concepts in Fuzzy logic and relevance with the power system problems, approaches
and types of fuzzy logic systems, typical actions in Fuzzy systems, Integration of fuzzy systems with
evolutionary techniques
Learning in neural networks, feed forward and feedback neural networks, backpropagation training
algorithm, Hopfield network, Boltzmann machine
07
Unit-8: Applications in Power Systems Applications to Power System Scheduling - algorithms and flow chart of various optimization
techniques for solving economic load dispatch and hydro-thermal scheduling problem; Model
Identification - Dynamic Load Modeling, Short-Term Load Forecasting; Distribution system
applications - Network reconfiguration for loss reduction, Optimal protection and switching devices
placement, Prioritizing investments in distribution networks; Applications to system planning;
Solving optimal power flow problems; etc.
12
Self-Study Component: The self-study content(s) will be declared at the commencement of semester. Around 10% of the
questions will be asked from self-study contents.
Laboratory Work:
26
This shall consist of at least 08 simulations / laboratory experiments based on the syllabus.
Suggested Readings:
1. S. S. Rao, Engineering Optimization Theory and Practice, John Wiley & Sons
2. K. Y. Lee and M.A. El-Sharkawi (eds.), Modern Heuristic Optimization Techniques with
Applications to Power Systems, IEEE Press
3. D. E. Goldberg, Genetic Algorithm in Search, Optimization and Machine Learning, Wesley
Longman Publishing Co., Inc. Boston, MA, USA
4. S.N. Sivanandam, S. N. Deepa, Principles of Soft Computing, Wiley India Pvt. Ltd.
5. Chaturvedi Devendra K., Soft Computing Techniques and Applications in Electrical
Engineering, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg
6. Jizhong Zhu, Optimization of Power System Operation, John Wiley & Sons
7. Edwin K. P. Chong, Stanislaw H. Zak, An Introduction to Optimization, John Wiley & Sons
L = Lecture, T = Tutorial, P = Practical, C = Credit
w.e.f. academic year 2019-20 and onwards
27
Semester - II
Skill Development, Employability, Entrepreneurship
Course Learning Outcomes (CLO): At the end of the course, students will be able to-
1. apply different techniques to analyse electrical distribution system
2. design distribution management system and distribution system automation
3. solve distribution system problems with optimization
Syllabus: Teaching Hours: 45 Unit 1: Distribution System Basics 04 Distribution feeder configurations and substation layouts, Nature of loads, Load forecasting, Distribution
management system
Unit-2: Distribution System Analysis 15 Modelling of distribution system components, Computation of transformer and feeder loading, Voltage
drop and power loss calculations, Distribution of loads and various geometric configurations, Load flow
analysis and short circuit analysis
Unit-3: Distribution System Improvements 12 Distribution system voltage regulation, Effects of series and shunt capacitors, Procedure to determine
optimum capacitor size and location, Optimal feeder reconfiguration for loss minimization and service
restoration, Incorporation of Distributed Generations (DGs) in operation and planning
Unit-4: Trends in Distribution System Implementation 11 Distribution Automation, Definitions, Communication Sensors, Supervisory Control and Data
Acquisition Systems (SCADA) applied to distribution automation, Consumer Information Service (CIS),
Geographical Information System (GIS), Automatic Meter Reading (AMR) and its implementation
Self-Study Component: The self-study content(s) will be declared at the commencement of semester. Around 10% of the
questions will be asked from self-study contents.
Suggested Readings: 5. Turan Gonen, Electric Power Distribution System Engineering, CRC Press
6. A.S. Pabla, Electric Power Distribution, Tata McGraw Hill
7. Anthony J. Pansini, Electrical Distribution Engineering, CRC Press
8. William.Kersting, Distribution Modelling and Analysis, CRC Press
9. James A Momoh, Electric Power Distribution Automation Protection and Control, CRC Press
10. James J. Burke, Power Distribution Engineering: Fundamentals and Applications, CRC Press L = Lecture, T = Tutorial, P = Practical, C = Credit
w.e.f. academic year 2019-20 and onwards
L T P C
3 0 0 3
Employability and Entrepreneurship
Course Learning Outcome: After successful completion of the course, student will be able to
understand the needs & concepts of energy management and audit understand the various aspects of the energy efficiency in different electrical systems identify and analyze the energy performance assessments of various equipments and utility systems
Syllabus:
Energy Scenario: Commercial and Non-commercial energy, primary energy resources, commercial energy production,
final energy consumption, energy needs of growing economy, long term energy scenario, energy pricing, energy sector
reforms, energy and environment, energy security, energy conservation and its importance, re-structuring of the energy
supply sector, energy strategy for the future, air pollution, climate change, Energy Conservation Act-2001 and its features.
Energy management approach: Understanding energy costs, bench marking, energy performance, matching energy use to
requirement, maximizing system efficiencies, optimizing the input energy requirements, fuel and energy substitution, energy
audit, need, types of energy audit, energy audit instruments.
Energy Monitoring and Targeting: Defining monitoring and targeting, elements of monitoring and targeting, data and
information-analysis, techniques – energy consumption, production, cumulative sum of differences (CUSUM).
Energy efficiency in electrical utilities: Energy efficiency in electrical system, electric motors, compressed air system,
fans and blowers, pumps and pumping system, lighting system.
Energy efficient technologies in electrical system: Energy efficient motors, electronic ballast, automatic power factor
controllers, soft starters with energy savers, energy efficient lightning controls.
Environmental Aspects of Energy and Pollution Control: Definitions, pollution from use of energy, electrostatic
precipitator (ESP), greenhouse effect and global warming. Energy performance assessment for equipment and utility systems: Performance assessment of equipment like boilers,
furnaces, co-generation, turbines, heat exchangers, electric motors, variable speed drives, fans and blowers, water pumps,
compressors, lightning systems.
Self Study: The self study contents will be declared at the commencement of semester. Around 10% of the questions will be asked from self study contents.
References:
1. Hand Book of Energy Audit and Management by Tata Energy Research Institute.
2. National Accreditation for Energy Audit and Management Volume I to IV by National Productivity Council.
3. S. Rao, Energy Technology, Khanna Publishers.
4. B. R. Gupta, Generation of Electrical Energy, Eurasia Publishing House (P) Ltd.
5. Farooq Khan, Energy Management: Issues and Challenges in the Twenty-first Century, Anmol Publications Pvt.
Ltd.
29
Semester - II
Course Learning Outcomes (CLO): After successful completion of the course, student will be able to -
1. broadly select the area / sub – domain of choice to pursue research
2. develop hands – on expertise on a relevant electrical engineering software / hardware
3. analyze performance of a specific electrical network with a detailed insight into its various
functional components / models
4. evaluate any electrical network problem / issue with domain related applications
Description: A student is required to carry out a project work. It can be a modeling of the system, an analytical
formulation, a problem analysis based on the software tool, a hardware prototype, data processing and
inference, etc. or any relevant topic in the domain or interdisciplinary area.
At the end of the semester, student will be required to submit a report of work done and will defend
his/her work carried out before examiners.
L = Lecture, T = Tutorial, P = Practical, C = Credit
w.e.f. academic year 2019-20 and onwards
L T P C
0 0 10 5
Semester - II
Employability and Skill Development
Course Learning Outcomes (CLO): At the end of the course, students will be able to-
1. articulate causes and effects of different types of power system stability
2. apply and adapt the applications of mathematics and engineering tools in the analysis of stability
problems
Syllabus Teaching Hours: 45
Unit-1: Power System Stability –Elementary Analysis Stability of simple system-Fundamental concepts, system stability and energy of a system, Power System
Stability: definition, manifestation of power system instability, cause, nature and effects of disturbance,
characterization of rotor angle stability, basic assumptions made in stability studies, rotor dynamics and
the swing equations
06
Unit-2: Small Signal Stability Analysis of Power Systems Introduction, formal solution method, small signal stability of classical model, The effect of field circuit
dynamics, excitation, power system stabilizer, TCSC, SVC and Damper windings on small signal stability
of SMIB system, small signal stability analysis of a multi machine system
08
Unit-3: Power System Stabilizer Introduction, control signals, Power System Stabilizer, structure – Stabilizer based on shaft speed signal
(delta omega) – Delta P-Omega stabilizer, Frequency based stabilizers, digital stabilizer, designing
methods of stabilizer, recent development and trends in PSS. Role of Power system stabilizer in
multimachine small signal stability analysis
05
Unit-4: Sub synchronous and torsional Oscillations Introduction to sub synchronous resonance (SSR), methods of analysis of SSR, mitigation techniques of
SSR computation of torsional natural frequencies, effect of degree series compensation on network natural
frequency
06
Unit-5: Transient stability analysis of power systems Concept of transient stability, response to a step change in mechanical power input, Swing equation, multi-
machine analysis, factors influencing transient stability, numerical integration method, Euler method, R-
K method (4th order), critical clearing time and angle, methods for improving transient stability.
07
Unit-6: Reactive power control and voltage stability Relation of Reactive power with voltage, governing effect of reactive power on steady state operation of
a power system, sensitivity of voltage to the reactive power in power system, reactive power requirement
for controlling the line voltage, characteristics of reactive power compensating devices, voltage stability:
Basic concept, transmission system characteristics, generator characteristics, load characteristics, PV
curve, QV curve and PQ curve, voltage stability limit, voltage stability indices, Voltage collapse and
prevention of voltage collapse
Self-Study Component: The self-study content(s) will be declared at the commencement of semester. Around 10% of the
questions will be asked from self-study contents.
Laboratory Work: This shall consist of at least 08 simulations / laboratory experiments based on the syllabus.
Suggested Readings:
1. P. S. Kundur, Power System Stability and Control, McGraw Hill Inc., New York
2. Debasish Mondal, Abhijit Chakrabarti, Aparajita Sengupta, Power System Small Signal
Stability Analysis and Control, Academic Press
3. R. Ramanujam, Power System Dynamics Analysis and Simulation, PHI Learning Private
Limited, New Delhi
4. Anil M. Kulkarni and K. R. Padiyar, Dynamics and Control of Electric Transmission and
Microgrids, Wiley – IEEE Press
5. K. N. Shubhanga, Power System Analysis – A dynamic perspective, Pearson
6. P.Sauer and M.A.Pai, Power System Dynamics and Stability, Prentice Hall (I) Ltd.
7. P.M. Anderson and A.A. Fouad, Power system control and stability, Wiley Publishers
8. K.R.Padiyar, Power System Dynamics, Stability and Control, Interline Publishers,
Bangalore
9. J. Machowski, J.W. Bialek and J.R. Bumby, Power System Dynamics, Stability and
Control, Wiley publishers
10. Dynamic Models for Steam and Hydro Turbines in Power System Studies, IEEE
Committee Report on Turbine Governor Model, IEEE Trans., vol. PAS-92, pp. 1904-
1915
w.e.f. academic year 2019-20 and onwards
32
Semester - II
Course Outcomes (COs): At the end of the course, students will be able to -
1. Formulate a research problem for a given engineering domain.
2. Analyse the available literature for given research problem.
3. Develop technical writing and presentation skills.
4. Comprehend concepts related to patents, trademark and copyright.
Syllabus: Teaching Hours:
UNIT I: Introduction Introduction to research problem, sources of finding a research problem, characteristics of a
research problem, pitfalls in selecting a research problem, scope and objectives of research
problem, approaches of investigation of solutions for research problem.
04
04
UNIT III: Technical Writing and Presentation Effective technical writing, thesis writing, research proposal writing, research paper writing,
presentation skills, tools for technical writing and presentation.
04
UNIT IV: Intellectual Property Rights Introduction and significance of intellectual property rights, types of Intellectual Property
Rights, copyright and its significance, introduction to patents and its filing, introduction to
patent drafting, best practices in national and international patent filing, copyrightable work
examples.
04
UNIT V: Patent Rights Patents and its basics, patentable items, designs, process of filing patent at national and
international level, process of patenting and development, technological research and patents,
innovation, patent and copyright international intellectual property, procedure for grants of
patents, need of specifications, types of patent applications, provisional and complete
specification, patent specifications and its contents, trade and copyright.
07
UNIT VI: New Developments in Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) Administration of patent system in India, India’s stand in the world of IPs, new developments
in IPR at national and international level, prosecution (filing) PCT / international filing, national
phase filing, scope of patent rights, licensing and transfer of technology, patent information and
databases, geographical indications, basic laws related to patent filing, case studies- IPR of
Hardware, computer software.
33
The self-study contents will be declared at the commencement of semester. Around 10% of the
questions will be asked from self-study contents.
Suggested Readings:
1. Stuart Melville, Wayne Goddard, Research Methodology: An Introduction for Science and
Engineering Students, Juta & Co Ltd.
2. Ranjit Kumar, Research Methodology: A Step by Step Guide for Beginners, Pearson.
3. Halbert, Resisting Intellectual Property, Taylor and Francis Ltd.
4. Asimov, Introduction to Design, Prentice Hall.
5. T. Ramappa, Intellectual Property Rights Under WTO: Tasks Before India, S. Chand.
L = Lecture, T = Tutorial, P = Practical, C = Credit
34
Semester - II
Employability and Entrepreneurship
Course Learning Outcomes (CLO): At the end of the course, students will be able to -
1. apply the electrical concepts in designing and operation of substations
2. plan the protection aspects pertaining to equipment and human safety in the substation
3. suggest approaches for substation automation, be familiarise about integration and
communication protocols
innovative substation design, Site acquisition, Design, construction and commissioning process, Selection
and location of site for substations, Key diagrams of various substations, Latest trends in substation
06
transformer
03
Unit-3: Gas Insulated Substation Introduction, Sulphur hexafluoride insulating gas, Construction and service life of gas insulated substation,
Economics of AIS and GIS, Selection and ratings of various equipments for a particular substations
03
Unit-4: Substation Protection Substation grounding, Various methods of neutral grounding, Equipment grounding Permissible Body
current limits, Tolerable voltages, Substation ground grid design criteria, Selection of electrodes and
conductors for grounding system, Design of gantry and earth wire, Oil-filled equipments in substation,
Containment selection consideration as per IEEE, Oil spill prevention techniques, Fire protection objectives
and philosophies, Fire Hazards, Typical Fire protection measures
09
inside the substation, Substation integration and automation System Functional Architecture, New vs.
existing substations, Equipment condition, Substation integration and automation technical issues, Protocol
fundamentals, Protocol considerations, Choosing the Right Protocol, Communication Protocol Application
Areas
09
Unit-6: Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition Introduction and evolution of SCADA, Functions and benefits of SCADA, Various architecture of SCADA.
Modules and components of SCADA, SCADA Hardware, RTU IED & SAS Architectures, SCADA
Software, IEC618950 and GOOSE Protocol, Configurations of SCADA, RTU (Remote Terminal Unit)
Connections, SCADA Communication requirements, Protocols: Past Present and Future, Security for
Substation Communications, Electromagnetic environment, Communications media applications of
SCADA
10
works, Reliability and availability
Self-Study Component: The self-study content(s) will be declared at the commencement of semester. Around 10% of the
questions will be asked from self-study contents.
Suggested Readings: 1. J. D. McDonald (Ed)., Electric Power Substations Engineering, CRC Press
2. P. S. Satnam and P. V. Gupta, Substation Design and Equipment, Dhanpat Rai and Sons
3. M. S. Naidu, Gas Insulated Substations, I. K. International Publishing House Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi
4. Gordon Clarke, Deon Reynders, Edwin Wright, Practical Modern SCADA Protocols: DNP3,
60870.5 and Related Systems, Elsevier
5. David Bailey, Edwin Wright, Practical SCADA for Industry, Elsevier
6. Stuart A. Boyer, SCADA-Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition, Instrument Society of
America Publication
L = Lecture, T = Tutorial, P = Practical, C = Credit
w.e.f. academic year 2019-20 and onwards
36
SEMESTER – III
3EE2301 Major Project: Part – I [0 0 0 15] Employability Entrepreneurship and Skill Development
Course Learning Outcome: After successful completion of the course, student will be able to
understand the issues related with the recent trends in the field of engineering and its
applications
formulate the problem definition, analyze and do functional simulation of the same
design, Implement, test and verify the engineering solution related to problem definition
compile, Comprehend and Present the work carried out
manage Project
The Major Project Part-I is aimed at training the students to analyze independently any problem in the
field of power systems. The project may be analytical or computational or experimental or combination
of them based on the latest developments in area mentioned.
At the end of the semester, the students will be required to submit detailed report. It should consist of
objectives of study, scope of work, critical literature review and preliminary work done pertaining to the
project undertaken and will defend his/her work carried out before the examiners at the time of final
evaluation.
37
SEMESTER – IV
3EE2401 Major Project: Part – II [0 0 0 15] Employability, Entrepreneurship, Skill Development,
Course Learning Outcome: After successful completion of the course, student will be able to
understand the issues related with the recent trends in the field of engineering and its applications
formulate the problem definition, analyze and do functional simulation of the same
design, Implement, test and verify the engineering solution related to problem definition
compile, Comprehend and Present the work carried out
manage Project
Major Project Part-II is a continuation of the work done by the student during Semester III. The student is
required to submit the project report (thesis) as a partial fulfilment of the M. Tech. degree. The project report
should include the work of Major Project Part-I, which is completed before. In addition, the project report
should consist of the detailed study of the project undertaken, concluding remarks, future scope of work, if
any. The project report is expected to show clarity of thought and expression, critical appreciation of the
existing literature and analytical computation and experimental aptitude of the student, as applicable.
At the end of the semester, the students will be required to submit a detailed report and will defend his/her