new whitehorse continuing care facility … (yg), administers senior/elder care, including all home...

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Cornerstone Planning Group 204 – 1551 Johnston St Vancouver, BC V6H 3R9 T (604) 687-5896 F (604) 684-6201 Vancouver Victoria www.cornerplan.com Partners: David Whetter John Kafka Tom Sadleir New Whitehorse Continuing Care Facility FUNCTIONAL PROGRAM August 26, 2014 Table of Contents A. Introduction ................................................................................................................ 1 B. Care Mix ..................................................................................................................... 2 C: Functional Goals and Objectives ................................................................................ 2 D. Program Structure, Definitions, and Graphic Conventions ......................................... 3 E. Spatial Organization Concept ..................................................................................... 7 F. Area Requirements Summary .................................................................................... 8 G. Component Relationships .......................................................................................... 9 H. Phase One Area Requirements ................................................................................ 11 I. Concept Design Guidelines ....................................................................................... 12 1. Site Selection 2. Massing and Image 3. Circulation and Access 4. Outdoor Space and Landscaping 5. Vehicle Access and Parking J. Component Information – Phase One ....................................................................... 15 Village Centre ..................................................................................................... 15 Neighbourhoods A and B .................................................................................... 18 Neighbourhood C ................................................................................................ 21 Neighbourhood D ................................................................................................ 24 Administration and Staff Support ........................................................................ 26 Building Support ................................................................................................. 28 NOTE Proposed Site information is provided under separate cover.

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Page 1: New Whitehorse Continuing Care Facility … (YG), administers senior/elder care, including all home care, respite services, and residential care. The Yukon population presents unique

   

Cornerstone Planning Group � 204 – 1551 Johnston St � Vancouver, BC V6H 3R9 � T (604) 687-5896 � F (604) 684-6201 Vancouver � Victoria � www.cornerplan.com � Partners: David Whetter � John Kafka � Tom Sadleir

New Whitehorse Continuing Care Facility FUNCTIONAL PROGRAM August 26, 2014 Table of Contents A. Introduction ................................................................................................................ 1 B. Care Mix ..................................................................................................................... 2 C: Functional Goals and Objectives ................................................................................ 2 D. Program Structure, Definitions, and Graphic Conventions ......................................... 3 E. Spatial Organization Concept ..................................................................................... 7 F. Area Requirements Summary .................................................................................... 8

G. Component Relationships .......................................................................................... 9 H. Phase One Area Requirements ................................................................................ 11 I. Concept Design Guidelines ....................................................................................... 12

1. Site Selection 2. Massing and Image 3. Circulation and Access 4. Outdoor Space and Landscaping 5. Vehicle Access and Parking

J. Component Information – Phase One ....................................................................... 15 Village Centre ..................................................................................................... 15 Neighbourhoods A and B .................................................................................... 18 Neighbourhood C ................................................................................................ 21 Neighbourhood D ................................................................................................ 24 Administration and Staff Support ........................................................................ 26 Building Support ................................................................................................. 28

NOTE Proposed Site information is provided under separate cover.

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New Whitehorse Continuing Care Facility Functional Program A. Introduction Continuing Care, a division in the Department of Health and Social Services (HSS) of the Yukon Government (YG), administers senior/elder care, including all home care, respite services, and residential care. The Yukon population presents unique challenges for senior/elder care: much of the population is spread into remote communities, complicating the provision of services; also, due to a number of lifestyle-related factors, care utilization rates tend to be higher than in other parts of Canada. Continuing Care is currently provided in four facilities in the Yukon, including Macaulay Lodge, Thomson Centre, and Copper Ridge in Whitehorse, plus McDonald Lodge in Dawson City. The four facilities have a total capacity of 185 beds. There is currently a waiting list for permanent continuing care beds. The demand for beds is expected to continue to grow for the foreseeable future, thereby increasing the scale of the waiting list. The anticipated growth as shown in Figure 1 is based on accommodating projected demand and minimizing waiting lists. The horizontal red line on the chart represents the total number of existing beds, assuming that all existing facilities remain in suitable condition to continue operating. Figure 1: Projected Continuing Care Bed Demand

     

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B. Care Mix In addition to a general shortage of continuing care beds there is a lack of suitable facilities in the Yukon to serve those with more specialized needs. This includes those with some form of mental health issues, those with high acuity medical conditions, and those requiring palliative care. Beds to serve the long term needs for these types of care have therefore been incorporated into Phase 1. The operational assumption is that standard beds will be suitable for dementia clients except those that require the higher level of care and who would be accommodated in the beds designed for mental health residents. The following table indicates the proposed care mix for both phases. Figure 2: Whitehorse Facility Care Mix

C. Functional Goals and Objectives The overall goal is to have a facility that will provide a healthy and supportive environment for residents, and be economical to build and operate. This is a relatively large facility. To achieve these goals in a facility of this scale the intention is to adopt a resident-centered philosophy and operating model (e.g. Eden Alternative) that emphasizes:

• integration of facility with overall community (i.e. not isolated) • exposure of residents to range of activities and environments (variety in experiences and

opportunities) • easy access to outdoors (plants, animals, birds, wind, sounds) • frequent exposure to daylight, sun, and views • a comprehensible sense of place • a home-like, non-institutional environment. • a sense of community

Evidence-based design research in health care facilities has amply demonstrated that such features help to reduce stress and promote health and healing (ref: The surprising science behind evidence based hospital design by Vanessa Milne, Sachin Pendharkar & Gord Winkel (http://healthydebate.ca/author/vmspgw)). Healthier residents require less intensive care, which translates into operating cost savings. The design of the facility can create all the aspects of a supportive environment without incurring cost premiums using smart design approaches that capitalize on simple but innovative solutions for circulation, exposure to light, way finding and orientation cues, and creating “places” within the facility.

Standard (incl

dementia)Standard (gases} Bariatric

Mental Health

Palliative (gases)

Higher Acuity (gases) Totals

Phase One Beds 92 24 4 12 12 6 150percentage distribution

61% 16% 3% 8% 8% 4% 100%

Phase Two Beds 143 0 7 0 0 0 150percentage distribution

95% 0% 5% 0% 0% 0% 100%

Total Beds 235 24 11 12 12 6 300percentage distribution

78% 8% 4% 4% 4% 2% 100%

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D. Program Structure, Definitions, and Graphic Conventions Structure The remainder of the functional program is organized to present information from the general level to the more specific.

• E. Spatial Organization Concept • F. Area Requirements Summary • G. Component Information

Definitions The space measurement terminology is used in this program are defined as follows

• Net Area is the area of a space measured to the inside face of enclosing partitions. In the case of

open or screened workstations it is the floor space occupied within the separating screens or a demarcating line used on plan to delineate the area associated with the workstation.

• Component Gross Area is the area within a demarcating line drawn on plan to signify the

boundary of a functionally related set of spaces (i.e. a component). It includes the total area within the demarcating line including the floor area occupied by internal (component only) circulation, and partitions. It excludes public washrooms that are not assigned to the component, major circulation routes (including vertical circulation) that connect components, and building systems spaces such as electrical and mechanical rooms and major structural elements such as outside walls and major columns and ducts. Component gross areas are derived by multiplying the total of the net areas in the component by a grossing factor suitable for the nature of the functions accommodated in the component.

• Total Gross Building Area is the total area of all levels of a building as measured to the outside

face of exterior walls. It includes total Component Gross Area plus allowances for Building Systems and Major Circulation. It is calculated by applying a grossing factor to the Net or Component Gross Area.

• Major Circulation refers to building circulation space that connects major components. This is in addition to internal component circulation. It is typically measured to the faces of the separating partitions or demarcating line on plan. Major Circulation estimates are derived using a discrete gross up factor within the overall Building Gross mark-up. Major Circulation estimates are derived using a discrete gross up factor within the overall Building Gross mark-up.

• Building Systems refers to spaces used for mechanical, electrical, HVAC, communications and

janitorial services and public washrooms (code based). It also includes the plan area occupied by the exterior wall and major structural elements. Building Systems estimates are derived using a discrete gross up factor within the overall Building Gross mark-up.

• Outdoor Areas accommodate specific outside functions (e.g. outdoor patios and landscaping,

outdoor games areas). These areas are not included in Net or Component areas. They are reported separately for site planning and design purposes.

 Graphic Conventions Relationship diagrams are used to illustrate the desirable proximity relationships and access and movement requirements among spaces and/or components. While matrix grids or “bubble” diagrams are sometimes used to indicate relative proximities among spaces or components, it is difficult to illustrate critical access and movement requirements using these conventions. The relationship diagram approach was developed over 30 years ago to enable such requirements to be effectively illustrated in diagrammatic form and has been used successfully in functional programs ever since.

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Spatial Hierarchy Diagrams are used to describe relationships at different levels of detail. At a detailed space planning level, diagrams can indicate the relationships among Elements such as furniture and equipment. Spatial Relationship Diagrams indicate individual spaces. Where applicable the diagrams will cluster functionally related spaces, which are referred to as Components. The diagrams indicate desirable proximities among the spaces as well as relationships to internal circulation within a component. Component Relationship Diagrams indicate components in terms of relative proximities as well as relationships to Major Circulation, which is considered a component, given the importance of this part of a facility in terms of functionality and suitability. This program includes Component Relationship and Spatial Relationship diagrams. More detailed diagrams may be generated during the design process if required.

Figure 3: Spatial Hierarchy Logic

Component Relationship Diagrams The diagrams are two-dimensional representations of spatial and functional relationships. However, they are not “floor plans” and do not imply that a single-storey design is required. The major circulation routes represent a zone /pathway that allows movement of people and materials to the components. In a multi-level design the routes would include stairwells and elevators as well as the corridors on each level. Figure 4: Component Relationship Diagram Example

Parts of Main Circulation may have different functional roles. For example, a “main route” would typically provide access to those components that have a higher volume of traffic or need to be readily accessible. A secondary route typically refers to a route that is used to provide access to components that do not

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require as high a level of accessibility and/or connect functions that benefit from being clustered away from higher volumes of movement. Similarly, some parts of Main Circulation may require controls on entry and exit to a set of functions. These variations in Main Circulation are denoted using different colours or line weights. Entrances to a facility are denoted with arrows that typically connect to a circulation route but may be directly into a component. Components are represented as rectangles that provide an approximate indication of the relative size (area) of the components in that diagram but are not at a specified scale. The small connecting lines between a component and Main Circulation indicate access to the component. Round circles with an X symbol signify that controlled access is required between different sections of Main Circulation or between Main Circulation and a component. The clustering and placement of the Component rectangles illustrate desired proximities among components and/or to entrances or routes. The relationships in the example diagram can be interpreted as follows:

• Components A and B should be located close to each other and to the Main Entry • Component C can be further away from the Main Entry but should be close to Component B • Component D can be even further away from the Main Entry but needs to be accessible from the

Main Route • Components E, F, G, and H should be grouped and accessible from a Secondary Route that

connects to the Main Route • Component L should be close to the Service Entry and Secure Route but needs to be accessible

from the Main Route • Components J and K should be grouped and accessible from the Loading Entry and a Secure

Route that connects to the Main Route. Spatial Relationship Diagrams These diagrams are also two-dimensional representations of spatial and functional relationships. They are not “floor plans” and do not necessarily imply that all spaces must be accommodated on a single floor, although at this level of detail the functionally related set of spaces usually need to be on the same level and contiguous in order to meet functional requirements. The following example diagram relates to Component A in Figure 4 and shows a hypothetical set of spaces associated with that component. Figure 5: Spatial Relationship Diagram Example (Component A)

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Following similar conventions to the component diagrams, spaces in spatial relationship diagrams are represented as rectangles that provide an approximate indication of the relative size (area) of the space in that diagram but are not at a specified scale. Each space is assigned an identifier that denotes the associated component as well as a unique number for that space. This practice facilitates tracking of spaces and correlation to area tables. The diagram indicates that the internal circulation route (i.e. within the component) connects to the Main Route of Major Circulation. The small connecting lines between a space and internal circulation indicate access to the space. As in Figure 4 round circles with an X symbol signify that controlled access to the space is required. The clustering and placement of the space rectangles illustrate desired proximities among spaces and/or to entrances or routes. The relationships in the example diagram can be interpreted as follows:

• Spaces A1 and A4 should be located close to each other and to the intersection with Main Circulation.

• Spaces A2 and A3 C should be located as a group with A1 and A4 but can be further away from the intersection.

• Spaces A5 to A7 should be located as a group and can be further away from the intersection. • Spaces A9 to A12 should be located as a group and do not have to be close to Spaces A5 to A7.

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E. Spatial Organization Concept The residents in the proposed Whitehorse facility will have a range of physical and cognitive capabilities. Some will be able to move about on their own while others will need assistance, but it is considered important that residents are able to participate in daily activities that will engage their senses and intellect to whatever level their condition allows. Given that the facility will accommodate 150 to 300 residents, we have adopted a hierarchical model of clustering space, movement, and activity that is based on a “Village” concept, to facilitate way finding and orientation. Figure 6: Spatial Organization Diagram

At the most private level of the spectrum is the “House”. This grouping of spaces and activities is intended to create a homelike environment that is the home base for residents. Each house includes a group of resident rooms plus a range of family spaces that accommodate activities such as meals, reading, and socializing. The door to the house is associated with the family spaces so that visitors enter into the shared common area rather than into the private room area. This door is the “address” of the house within the Neighbourhood. Houses are connected via neighbourhood circulation, which is akin to a local street in a village. This route connects with “Neighbourhood Squares” where residents from two or more houses can socialize informally in a seating alcove and gardening area, organize family get-togethers and obtain services such as physiotherapy, medical examinations, or counseling. This is a “semi-public” place away from the more active setting of the Village Centre. The “Village Centre” is the focal point for a range of activities that serve all residents, visitors, community programs, and the general public. The main entrance to the facility will connect directly to the Village Centre, which will be configured as an entry lobby surrounded by a variety of shops, services, and program rooms. The objective is to concentrate daily activity in a manner that will provide optimal opportunities for residents to interact actively or passively with the broader community. Routes connecting to the Neighbourhood Squares will lead off from the Village Centre. These routes (“village circulation”) are akin to main roads in a village.

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F. AREA REQUIREMENTS SUMMARY Total 300 Bed Development The total building gross area required for the full 300-bed facility is estimated at approximately 21,900 square metres. Phase One includes 150 beds plus Building Support and Staff Support spaces for the full 300-bed facility. Phase Two will involve adding another 150 beds. Constructing the full complement of support facilities in Phase One will minimize disruption to residents and ongoing operations during construction of Phase Two. It also avoids having to reconfigure existing space to expand support facilities in Phase Two, which would incur higher costs than constructing in one stage. Figure 7: Total Area Requirements Summary

Parking Pending further discussion with the City, parking requirements based on bylaw requirements would be 169 stalls in Phase One and 149 in Phase Two for a total of 318 stalls.

TOTAL FOR BOTH PHASESPHASE ONE PHASE TWO TOTAL FOR 300 BEDS

Total nsm beds

Component Gross

(CGSM) Total nsm beds

Component Gross

(CGSM) Total nsm beds

Component Gross

(CGSM)VILLAGE CENTRE 909.5 1,111.0 0.0 0.0 909.5 1,111.0ALL NEIGHBOURHOODS 6,000.0 150 7,620.0 6,066.5 150 7,703.0 12,066.5 300 15,323.0STAFF SUPPORT 418.0 501.5 0.0 0.0 418.0 501.5BUILDING SUPPORT 833.0 1,052.0 0.0 0.0 833.0 1,052.0TOTALS 8,160.5 150 10,284.5 6,066.5 150 7,703.0 14,227.0 300 17,987.5

Major Circulation 1,632.1 1,213.3 1.20 2,845.4Building Systems 650.6 426.1 1.08 1,076.7

TOTAL Building Gross (gsm) 12,567.2 9,342.4 21,909.6Component to Building Gross Factor 1.26 1.27 1.26

Net to Gross Factor 1.54 1.54 1.54

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G. COMPONENT RELATIONSHIPS The Component Relationship Diagram illustrates key access, circulation, and proximity requirements for the full 300-bed facility. Consistent with the phasing strategy, Phase Two is indicated as a set of neighbourhoods connected to the Village Centre via Village circulation. The colour code used to identify the Components and types of Major Circulation is shown in the adjoining legend. Key Patterns

• Village Centre components should be located with main lobby area that connects to main entry and village circulation routes leading to neighbourhoods and support components.

• Neighborhood components should be grouped to help establish recognizable focal points that assist in orientaion and sense of place.

Figure 8: Component Relationships Diagram

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• Administration and Staff Support components should be centrally located to serve both Phases and

be accessible from the Village Centre area via Major Circulation. • Building Support components should be centrally located to serve both Phases and close to the

Service Entry with connections to the Village Centre and Neighbourhood components via Major Circulation.

• A ground level location is required for most of the Visitor Centre components, Neighbourhoods C and D, and most of Building Support components.

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H. Phase One Area Requirements Phase One requirements include seven components.

• Village Centre

• Neighbourhood A (2 standard 24 bed Houses)

• Neighbourhood B (2 standard 24 bed Houses)

• Neighbourhood C (1 standard 24 bed House and 1 Mental Health House – 12 bed)

• Neighbourhood D (1 House --12 bed Palliative Care and 6 beds High Acuity Care)

• Administration and Staff Support

• Building Support The major groupings within each component represent clusters of functionally related spaces. A breakdown of these spaces is provided with the descriptions for each component.

Figure 9: Phase One Area Summary

PHASE ONE: 150 Bed Facility with Support for 300

Total nsm beds

Component Gross

(CGSM)VILLAGE CENTREReception and Meetings Centre 424.0Shops and Services 210.5Adult Day Program 192.5Resident Activities Space 82.5Village Centre Total 909.5 1,111.0NEIGHBOURHOOD A (House 1: 24 std; House 2: 24 std)Neighbourhood Square 54.5HOUSE 1 Resident Rooms 589.0 24HOUSE 1 Family Space 277.0HOUSE 2 Resident Rooms 576.0 24HOUSE 2 Family Space 277.0Shared House Support Space 93.0Total 1,866.5 2,370.5NEIGHBOURHOOD B (House 3: 24 std; House 4: 24 std)Neighbourhood Square 54.5HOUSE 3 Resident Rooms 589.0 24HOUSE 3 Family Space 277.0HOUSE 4 Resident Rooms 576.0 24HOUSE 4 Family Space 277.0Shared House Support Space 93.0Total 1,866.5 2,370.5NEIGHBOURHOOD C (House 5: 24 std; House 6: 12 Mental Health)Neighbourhood Square 54.5HOUSE 5 Resident Rooms 589.0 24HOUSE 5 Family Space 277.0HOUSE 6 Mental Health Resident Rooms 308.0 12HOUSE 6 Family Space 159.0Shared House Support Space 79.0Total 1,466.5 1,862.5NEIGHBOURHOOD D (House 7: 12 Pallaitive, 6 High Acuity)Neighbourhood Square 51.5HOUSE 7 Resident Rooms 513.0 18HOUSE 7 Family Space 171.0Shared House Support Space 65.0Total 800.5 1,016.5TOTAL ALL NEIGHBOURHOODS 6,000.0 150 7,620.0ADMINISTRATION & STAFF SUPPORTAdmin & Staff Support Total 418.0 501.5BUILDING SUPPORTMaterials Management 435.0Workshops 70.0Food Services 238.0Central Laundry 90.0Building Support Total 833.0 1,052.0

TOTAL NASM and CGSM 8,160.5 10,284.5Major Circulation 1.20 1,632.1Building Systems 1.08 650.6

TOTAL Building Gross (PHASE 1) 12,567.2Component to Building Gross Factor 1.26

Net to Gross Factor 1.54

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I. CONCEPT DESIGN GUIDELINES The following guidelines are intended to inform pre-concept test fit analysis and deal with aspects affecting the overall design of the facility. Guidelines relating to particular components and/or spaces are included in the Component Descriptions section. This section includes guidelines on:

1. Site Selection 2. Massing and Image 3. Circulation and Access 4. Outdoor Space and Landscaping 5. Vehicle Access and Parking

1. Site Selection The site that has been selected for the project is described under separate cover. The following guidelines were established as planning assumptions through discussions with the Steering Committee and were used in selecting the preferred site for the new facility The site:

• must have sufficient land to accommodate the 20-year projected requirements for new beds. • must have immediate access to public transportation. • must have opportunities for resident ambulatory activities like neighbourhood walking. • should provide opportunities for academic programs/students to integrate with the continuing care

facilities. • must provide continuity between indoor space and outdoor space, subject to seasonal

restrictions. Activities compatible with the current season must be accommodated. • must have low likelihood of encountering project delays due to zoning or community issues as

time is of the essence for this project. • should be in an established community with public amenities such as parks and commercial

services. • should not be in a community under development because of the disruption that would occur with

blasting and construction noise. The following site features were frequently noted as desirable in the Community Care Standards that were reviewed during the study (See Appendix A in Final Business Plan Report).

• Close to community services, residential, public transport, shopping, senior centres • Provides active observable interest such as schools or parks • Easy access to other services - doctors, dentists, therapists • Safe for pedestrians

2. Massing and Image Based on a review of relevant standards (Appendix A - Final Business Plan Report) the preferred arrangement for Continuing Care facilities is a single-storey building solution with ample outdoor space for residents at grade or a 2 storey building solution with grade level entry for both levels. This arrangement appears to be generally associated with facilities that are in the 50 to 100-bed range. In larger facilities, such as that being proposed for Whitehorse (300 beds in two phases), a single storey approach can make it challenging to provide reasonable travel distances for residents to access central shared services and for the transporting of food and supplies to and from Houses. The proposed spatial organization concept emphasizes the idea of a Village Centre and Neighbourhood Squares to reinforce an appropriate sense of scale. This implies relatively shorter lengths of corridor and should be feasible to apply in a multi-story context. There are also concerns that a multi-storey building of two or three levels may present a more institutional external appearance. However, the exterior

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appearance of the larger facilities visited during the site tours tended to convey a residential (apartment) image, indicating that it is feasible to avoid an institutional image through appropriate design. . One of the determinants of the number of levels is the number of functions for which a ground level location is either imperative or highly desirable. The area required for such functions will determine the ground level configuration and the optimal building footprint. The remainder of the functions that do not require ground level access can then be located on upper levels. The number of levels required will depend on the capacity of the site to accommodate the building footprint, parking, outdoor spaces and landscaping, and roadways and pathways. For the Whitehorse Continuing Care Facility a ground level location is required for most of the Visitor Centre components, Neighbourhoods C and D, and most of Building Support components. 3. Circulation and Access The circulation system is one of the larger components in the building and is one that directly impacts all activities. How well it functions is a major determinant of how well the building will function to meet the needs of occupants. The design of the circulation system is particularly important in continuing care facilities in that it serves a variety of users including residents with a range of physical and cognitive abilities, staff, and visitors. It also serves a variety of purposes beyond the movement of people and materials including: socializing, exercise, exposure to outdoor views and sunlight, and creation of activity focal points as recognizable locations.

a) Main Entry The main entrance should be easily identified upon approach to the facility. While access and egress needs to be controlled, this must be achieved without creating an “institutional” impression. An outdoor area at the main entry can be treated as the “front porch” of the facility – a place where residents can go to observe the comings and goings and a place that neighbours from the surrounding community can feel comfortable dropping in to visit with residents. It also must function as a vehicular pick-up and drop off point. Like the rest of the facility the main entry area must have barrier free access. b) Village Centre Lobby The main entrance should connect directly to the Village Centre lobby, which is the main crossroads of major routes (streets) that connect to the residential neighborhoods and provides access to a variety of programs and services that serve residents and visitors (further described in the Component Information section). The concentration of activities in the lobby (’plaza”) will serve as an interior “front porch” that can be used during the winter when the exterior Main Entry area may not be suitable for extended periods of occupancy.

c) Village Circulation Main Circulation routes leading from the Village Centre to neighbourhoods are akin to main roads. Various shared programs and services should be accessible from Village Circulation either directly or via supplementary routes. Public washrooms should be accessible from Village Circulation. The routes should allow for informal socializing and provide views to the outdoors wherever feasible, specifically in strategic spots that will help with way finding and orientation.

d) Neighbourhood Circulation Neighbourhood Circulation that connects Neighborhood Squares with Village Circulation and provides access to Houses, should have features that differentiate it from Village Circulation in terms of scale, finishes, views, etc. Creating a unique identity for each Neighbourhood Square is perceived as highly desirable and this approach could be extended to the Neighborhood Circulation.

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e) Access Security All facility entrances will need to have controllable access and egress. The manner in which this is achieved will depend on the nature of her entrance. The main entrance will need to at least be monitored. The degree to which residents can freely leave and enter the building at the main entry will depend to some degree on how the facility is zoned internally. At minimum allowances should be made to have the entry doors visually monitored and controlled remotely and/or by security fob. All other entrances will be locked and accessible to authorized personnel or visitors, such as family members of palliative or high acuity residents that may require all-hours access to a specific House.

f) Way Finding A sense of independence has been identified as an important factor in resident well-being, which is not only desirable for the residents but also reduces the intensity of care required. Being able to find one’s way within the facility contributes greatly to this sense of independence. As many residents will have some degree of cognitive limitations, it is important to provide visual and/or acoustic reference points that make it easier to identify a specific location or route within the facility. This can be achieved using relatively inexpensive techniques such as views of particular outdoor or indoor features, variations in surface finishes and/or colours, and creation of an identity for particular areas through thematic selections of artwork.

g) Materials Movement The transport of food and laundry between houses and central support facilities is a daily routine. It should be possible to carry out these activities efficiently and without creating a “hospital-like” image. While creating a separate circulation route for such services is one option, the design challenge would be to do so within the overall gross area target. Other options might involve consideration of equipment appearance alternatives and/or scheduling strategies.

4. Outdoor Space and Landscaping Resident view of, and access to, outdoor areas and landscaping is considered a mandatory requirement throughout the facility. Specific requirements are noted in the component information section. This feature is particularly true for residents with various degrees of physical disabilities. Even those who might not be able to see or hear find that feeling a breeze on their face or the warmth of the sun helps to maintain a connection with the world beyond the walls of the facility and thereby contributes to their well-being. 5. Vehicle Access and Parking It must be feasible for private cars and group transport vehicles to pick up and drop-off passengers at the main entry. Visitor parking should be located near the main entry. Ambulances should be able to use both the Main Entry and the secondary entrance to the Neighbourhood D (palliative and high acuity residents). The service entry should be located so that deliveries and pick-ups do not interfere with access to the main entrance.

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J. COMPONENT INFORMATION – PHASE ONE VILLAGE CENTRE The functions and spaces associated with the Village Centre Lobby reinforce this locale as the focus of activity for residents and for people from the surrounding community. It is the most “public” part of the facility and will therefore be instrumental in creating the impression that is perceived by the community and visitors. The following relationship diagram illustrates the grouping and access patterns associated with this component. The numbers shown in the rectangles are the space numbers shown on the space list. Figure 10: Village Centre Relationship Diagram

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Sub Component Design Guidelines

Reception and Meetings Centre The Village Lobby (“plaza”) should be within a short walking distance from the main entry and reception area. Reception functions should be located at the Main Entry and placed so that staff can monitor the entrance and be easily located by visitors unfamiliar with the premises. The main entry and the Lobby (plaza) should have a view of accessible outdoor green space. Meeting spaces (VC4 to VC10) should be grouped and configured in a manner that will enable spaces to be connected and/or expandable with minimum disruption if needed to accommodate changes in use patterns. The meeting spaces will be used for a number of activities that can involve residents, staff, and/or various community and school groups. The Multi-purpose Room (VC10) should be accessible directly from Village Circulation. The other meeting spaces can be accessed off a secondary route.

Shops and Services This group of functions helps to reinforce the sense of the Village Centre as the “downtown” area. At minimum, the Coffee Seating Area, Central Physiotherapy, Hair Dresser and Foot Care, and Gift Shop should all be accessible from the Lobby. Personal services such as the physiotherapy “clinic” and hair dresser serve all residents and therefore increase opportunities for residents to come in contact with people from other houses. The gift shop and the coffee seating area attract visitors as well as serving residents and provide a setting that encourages socializing. Both the gift shop and coffee service area can be managed and run by volunteers drawn from residents and/or the broader community. Providing residents with an opportunity to take on regular “duties” is considered a very effective means of contributing to a resident’s sense of self worth and independence, which appears to have a positive impact on overall health and well being. Adult Day Program The Adult Day Program spaces should be grouped and conveniently accessible from the Village Centre Lobby. The Day Program Room (VC19), and Day Program Tub Room (VC23) should be accessible directly from Village Circulation. These programs generate a lot of daily activity and involve people from the broader community in activities that may also be open to participation by some residents. Having the spaces to accommodate these programs located with the Village Centre adds to the daily ebb and flow of people that contributes to the “downtown” ambiance. It also makes these programs accessible without necessitating non-resident movement through the more private Neigbourhood areas. Resident Activities Space The Arts and Crafts Studio (VC26), the Gardening Room (VC27), and the Woodworking Shop (VC28) primarily serve resident programs but are located with the Village Centre to promote cross over contacts among residents from different Houses as well as accommodating non-resident or day program participants when applicable. The Gardening Room should have direct (secure) access to an outdoor area.

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Area Requirements Figure 11: Village Centre Space List

000000CORNERSTONE 0000001

nsm No. of Units Total nsm Conversion

Factor

Component Gross

(CGSM)VILLAGE CENTREReception and Meetings Centre

VC 1 Main Entrance/Vestibule 12.0 1 12.0VC 2 Reception Workstation and Counter 28.0 1 28.0VC 3 Reception Lobby Waiting (12) 17.0 1 17.0VC 4 Volunteer Room 24.0 1 24.0VC 5 Systems Training Room 25.0 1 25.0VC 6 Religious/Devotional Space 15.0 1 15.0VC 7 FN Healing Room 35.0 1 35.0VC 8 Conference / Board Room (15) 35.0 1 35.0VC 9 Family Group Meeting Room (10) 24.0 1 24.0VC 10 Multi Purpose Room 200.0 1 200.0VC 11 Public Area Washrooms 4.5 2 9.0

SubTotal 424.0 1.20 509.0Shops and Services

VC 12 Central Physiotherapy Spaces 75.0 1 75.0VC 13 Shared Office Space & Exam Room

(Physician, Nurse Practitioner, Psychiatrist)

30.0 1 30.0

VC 14 Gift Shop 15.0 1 15.0VC 15 Coffee Seating Area (15 capacity) 30.0 1 30.0VC 16 Hair Dresser and Foot Care Services 20.0 1 20.0VC 17 Social Worker & FN Shared Office Space 18.0 2 36.0VC 18 Public Washroom 4.5 1 4.5

SubTotal 210.5 1.20 252.5Adult Day Program

VC 19 Day Program Room 90.0 1 90.0VC 20 Food Servery 15.0 1 15.0VC 21 Day Program Storage 15.0 1 15.0VC 22 Day Program Nap Room 20.0 2 40.0VC 23 Day Program Tub Room 19.0 1 19.0VC 24 Day Program Office 9.0 1 9.0VC 25 Public Washroom 4.5 1 4.5

SubTotal 192.5 1.27 244.5Resident Activities Space

VC 26 Arts and Crafts Studio 40.0 1 40.0VC 27 Gardening Room 18.0 1 18.0VC 28 Woodworking Shop 20.0 1 20.0VC 29 Public Washroom 4.5 1 4.5

SubTotal 82.5 1.27 105.0 Village Centre Total 909.5 1.22 1111.0

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NEIGHBOURHOODS A and B (Two 24 room Houses in each - Standard Rooms) Neighbourhoods A and B both include two 24 bed Houses, each with their own set of Family spaces. The two Houses in each Neighbourhood share a set of Support Spaces. The Neighbourhood Squares represents a “portal” to each Neighbourhood and link to the front doors of the two Houses in that neighbourhhod. Figure 12: Neighbourhood A Relationship Diagram

Sub Component Design Guidelines

Neighbourhood Square The Neighbourhood Squares A and B would each have their own distinctive identity reinforced by configuration and/or appearance. View of an outdoor green space is required. Access to an outdoor space from the Square is desirable. The seating alcove and gardening area is envisioned as a non-enclosed space with seating and a small contiguous planting area that able residents could voluntarily tend as feasible. House 1 Resident Rooms Access from the House entrance to the circulation corridors serving the resident rooms should be via the Family Space area and not directly from the entrance to the House. One of the 24 rooms is sized to accommodate a Bariatric resident and have suitable overhead lift capabilities. All remaining rooms have in-suite bathrooms with wheelchair accessible showers and an overhead lift that facilitates

Page 20: New Whitehorse Continuing Care Facility … (YG), administers senior/elder care, including all home care, respite services, and residential care. The Yukon population presents unique

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movement from the bed to the bathroom. The intention is to allow residents to bring their own furniture as long as suitable accessibility is maintained for cleaning and mobility equipment (as applicable). The standard room allowance 24 nsm is based on providing a full 18sm for furniture and activities plus 6 nsm for the bathroom. Configurations in which entry vestibule space reduces the useable area to less than 18sm are not acceptable. This same proviso regarding entry vestibule space applies to all other room types as well.

Figure 13: Room Configuration Guideline

Minimum Space Allocation

Unacceptable Space Allocation

Wall mounted memory boxes and/or other means of personalizing room entrances are required for each room to facilitate way finding. All rooms require a window with a view of the outdoors, preferably green space in close proximity.

House 1 Family Space A set of group activity spaces form the core of the Family Spaces. The Living, Dining, and Activity Room spaces should be configured in a manner that reinforces the sense of visual connection among these spaces and to the outdoors. View and access to an outdoor green space directly from these activity spaces is required. The remaining family spaces should be located so that they are conveniently accessible from House Circulation but can be further removed from the main activity area. The Quiet Room should be located with the Resident Rooms.

House 2 Resident Rooms House 2 has the same requirements as House 1 although there is no bariatric resident room in this set of 24 rooms. House 2 Family Space The requirements are the same as in House 1. Shared House Support Space A set of support spaces serving both Houses and must be accessible by staff from both Houses via a secured staff circulation route.

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Area Requirements (Neighbourhoods A and B are identical)

000000CORNERSTONE 0000001

nsm No. of Units Total nsm Conversion

Factor

Component Gross

(CGSM)NEIGHBOURHOOD A (House 1: 24 std (1 bariatric); House 2: 24 std)Neighbourhood Square A

NA 1 Seating Alcove & Gardening Area 7.0 1 7.0NA 2 Family Meeting with Kitchenette 28.0 1 28.0NA 3 Physiotherapy Space /Storage 15.0 1 15.0NA 4 Public Washroom 4.5 1 4.5

SubTotal 54.5 1.27 69.0HOUSE 1 Resident Rooms

NA 5 Resident Rooms and Bathrooms 24.0 23 552.0 NA 6 Bariatric Resident Room and Bathroom 37.0 1 37.0

SubTotal 24 589.0 1.27 748.0HOUSE 1 Family Space

NA 7 Resident Living Room 60.0 1 60.0NA 8 Resident Dining Room 72.0 1 72.0NA 9 Resident Activity Room 40.0 1 40.0NA 10 Servery/Kitchen 15.0 1 15.0NA 11 Pantry 15.0 1 15.0NA 12 Staff Washroom 2.5 1 2.5NA 13 Quiet Room/Space 10.0 1 10.0NA 14 Medication Room 12.0 1 12.0NA 15 Care Station & Nurse Mgmt Office 15.0 1 15.0NA 16 Storage Room 12.0 1 12.0NA 17 Resident Washroom 4.5 1 4.5NA 18 Tub Room (incl WC) 19.0 1 19.0

SubTotal 277.0 1.27 352.0HOUSE 2 Resident Rooms

NA 19 Resident Rooms and Bathrooms 24.0 24 576.0 SubTotal 24 576.0 1.27 731.5

HOUSE 2 Family SpaceNA 20 Resident Living Room 60.0 1 60.0NA 21 Resident Dining Room 72.0 1 72.0NA 22 Resident Activity Room 40.0 1 40.0NA 23 Servery/Kitchen 15.0 1 15.0NA 24 Pantry 15.0 1 15.0NA 25 Staff Washroom 2.5 1 2.5NA 26 Quiet Room/Space 10.0 1 10.0NA 27 Medication Room 12.0 1 12.0NA 28 Care Station & Nurse Mgmt Office 15.0 1 15.0NA 29 Storage Room 12.0 1 12.0NA 30 Resident Washroom 4.5 1 4.5NA 31 Tub Room (incl WC) 19.0 1 19.0

SubTotal 277.0 1.27 352.0Shared House Support Space

NA 32 Clean Utility Room 12.0 1 12.0NA 33 Dirty Utility Room 12.0 1 12.0NA 34 Staff Room (4 to 5) 14.0 1 14.0NA 35 Meeting Room 15.0 1 15.0NA 36 Commercial Dishwasher Room 9.0 1 9.0NA 37 Janitor/Housekeeping Room 6.0 1 6.0NA 38 Storage (incl. Power Wheelchairs) 25.0 1 25.0

SubTotal 93.0 1.27 118.0 Neighbourhood A Total 48 1866.5 1.27 2370.5

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NEIGHBOURHOOD C (One 24 room Standard House and One 12 room Mental Health House) Neighbourhood C has one House with 24 standard beds and another House that will have 12 Mental Health beds. The two Houses share a set of Support Spaces. The Neighbourhood Square functions in the same manner as noted for Neighbourhoods A and B. Figure 14: Neighbourhood C Relationship Diagram

House 6 is designated for Mental Health Residents and has been allocated a provisional set of spaces to allow for a more secure environment. While the total area allowance for the House is sufficient to accommodate a variety of configurations, the space allocations within the total may be adjusted during detailed design as the service concepts become more defined.

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Sub Component Design Guidelines

Neighbourhood Square C The Neighbourhood Square is envisioned to function in the same manner as the Squares for Neighbourhoods A and B. House 5 Resident Rooms House 5 has the same requirements as Houses 1 and 3, including one bariatric resident room. House 5 Family Space The requirements are the same as in Houses 1 and 3. House 6 Mental Health Resident Rooms This set of 12 rooms is divided into two groups of 6, each with a secure anteroom. For planning purposes the individual room area is the same as the standard rooms. The room size, configuration, finishes, and fit-up requirements will need to be examined further by the YG when the nature of the resident profile and range of services is more defined. House 6 Family Space The requirements are similar to those in Houses A and B with some adjustments in the size and function of the spaces. The entry to the House has been provided with a secure Anteroom. Shared House Support Space A set of support spaces serving both Houses and accessible by staff from both Houses via a secured staff circulation route.

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Area Requirements

000000CORNERSTONE 0000001

nsm No. of Units Total nsm Conversion

Factor

Component Gross

(CGSM)NEIGHBOURHOOD C (House 5: 24 std; House 6: 12 Mental Health)Neighbourhood Square C

NC 1 Seating Alcove & Gardening Area 7.0 1 7.0NC 2 Family Meeting with Kitchenette 28.0 1 28.0NC 3 Physiotherapy Space /Storage 15.0 1 15.0NC 4 Public Washroom 4.5 1 4.5

SubTotal 54.5 1.27 69.0HOUSE 5 Resident Rooms

NC 5 Resident Rooms and Bathrooms 24.0 23 552.0 NC 6 Bariatric Resident Room and Bathroom 37.0 1 37.0

SubTotal 24 589.0 1.27 748.0HOUSE 5 Family Space

NC 7 Resident Living Room 60.0 1 60.0NC 8 Resident Dining Room 72.0 1 72.0NC 9 Resident Activity Room 40.0 1 40.0NC 10 Servery/Kitchen 15.0 1 15.0NC 11 Pantry 15.0 1 15.0NA 12 Staff Washroom 2.5 1 2.5NC 13 Quiet Room/Space 10.0 1 10.0NC 14 Medication Room 12.0 1 12.0NC 15 Care Station & Nurse Mgmt Office 15.0 1 15.0NC 16 Storage Room 12.0 1 12.0NC 17 Resident Washroom 4.5 1 4.5NA 18 Tub Room (incl WC) 19.0 1 19.0

SubTotal 277.0 1.27 352.0HOUSE 6 Mental Health Resident Rooms

NC 19 Resident Rooms / Bathroom (Group 1) 24.0 6 144.0 NC 20 Secure Ante Room (Group 1) 10.0 1 10.0 NC 21 Resident Rooms / Bathroom (Group 2) 24.0 6 144.0 NC 22 Secure Ante Room (Group 2) 10.0 1 10.0

SubTotal 12 308.0 1.27 391.0HOUSE 6 Family Space

NC 23 Secure Ante Room (House 6) 10.0 1 10.0 NC 24 Resident Living Room 30.0 1 30.0 NC 25 Resident Dining Room 36.0 1 36.0 NC 26 Servery/Kitchen 20.0 1 20.0 NC 27 Assessment/Interview/Treatment Rm 10.0 1 10.0 NC 28 Medication Room 12.0 1 12.0NC 29 Care Station & Nurse Mgmt Office 15.0 1 15.0NA 30 Staff Washroom 2.5 1 2.5NC 31 Resident Washroom 4.5 1 4.5NC 32 Tub Room (incl WC) 19.0 1 19.0

SubTotal 159.0 1.27 202.0Shared House Support Space

NC 33 Clean Utility Room 12.0 1 12.0NC 34 Dirty Utility Room 12.0 1 12.0NC 35 Staff Room (4 to 5) 14.0 1 14.0NC 36 Meeting Room 15.0 1 15.0NC 37 Janitor/Housekeeping Room 6.0 1 6.0NC 38 Commercial Dishwasher Room 10.0 1 10.0NC 39 Storage 10.0 1 10.0

SubTotal 79.0 1.27 100.5 Neighbourhood C Total 36 1466.5 1.27 1862.5

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NEIGHBOURHOOD D (One 18 Room House – 12 Palliative Care and 6 High Acuity Care) Neighbourhood D has one House with 12 Palliative Care and 6 High Acuity Care rooms. All rooms can be used for either function. An outside entrance to the House is desirable to facilitate all-hours entry by family members who may spend extended periods at the facility. An outside entrance would also facilitate discreet transfer of the deceased to off-site locations. Figure 14: Neighbourhood D Relationship Diagram

Sub Component Design Guidelines

Neighbourhood Square D The Neighbourhood Square is envisioned to function in the same manner as the Squares for the other Neighbourhoods. House 7 Resident Rooms The resident rooms in House 7 are all serviced with medical gases. The rooms are marginally larger than the standard rooms to accommodate residents who require a high level of care and have limited mobility as well as allowing for family groups to be present for extended periods in the rooms. Twelve of the 18 rooms are designated for Palliative Care residents and 6 are for High Acuity Care residents. The rooms would be outfitted accordingly, with an emphasis on a comfortable and non-institutional setting for Palliative Rooms and non-obtrusive but medically effective setting for High Acuity residents. In practice, any of the rooms must be able to accommodate either type of resident and will be used as required to meet fluctuating service demands.

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House 7 Family Space The family spaces are similar to those on other houses but are sized to be appropriate for the smaller number of resident rooms and the medical condition of the residents. The setting should have the same attributes as noted for other family spaces with regard to view of outdoors and sense of connections among the spaces. House Support Space The set of support spaces will serve on House 7 and must be conveniently accessible by staff from within the House

Area Requirements

000000CORNERSTONE 0000001

nsm No. of Units Total nsm Conversion

Factor

Component Gross

(CGSM)NEIGHBOURHOOD D (House 7: 12 Palliative 6 High Acuity)Neighbourhood Square D

ND 1 Seating Alcove & Gardening Area 7.0 1 7.0ND 2 Family Room with Kitchenette 28.0 1 28.0ND 3 Family Meeting Room 12.0 1 12.0ND 4 Public Washroom 4.5 1 4.5

SubTotal 51.5 1.27 65.5HOUSE 7 Resident Rooms

ND 5 Palliative Care Resident Rooms 28.0 12 336.0ND 6 High Acuity Care Resident Rooms 28.0 5 140.0ND 7 Bariatric Resident Room and Bathroom 37.0 1 37.0

SubTotal 18 513.0 1.27 651.5HOUSE 7 Family Space

ND 8 Living Room 22.0 1 22.0ND 9 Activity Space 30.0 1 30.0ND 10 Dining 36.0 1 36.0ND 11 Servery/Kitchen 15.0 1 15.0ND 12 Storage 15.0 1 15.0NA 13 Staff Washroom 2.5 1 2.5ND 14 Medication Room 12.0 1 12.0ND 15 Care Station & Nurse Mgmt Office 15.0 1 15.0ND 16 Resident Washroom 4.5 1 4.5ND 17 Tub Room (incl WC) 19.0 1 19.0

SubTotal 171.0 1.27 217.0House Support Space

ND 18 Clean Utility Room 11.0 1 11.0ND 19 Dirty Utility Room 11.0 1 11.0ND 20 Staff Room 11.0 1 11.0ND 21 Meeting Room 11.0 1 11.0ND 22 Janitor/Housekeeping Room 6.0 1 6.0ND 23 Commercial Dishwasher Room 8.0 1 8.0ND 24 Storage 7.0 1 7.0

SubTotal 65.0 1.27 82.5 Neighbourhood D Total 18 800.5 1.27 1016.5

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ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF SUPPORT

Staff support functions need to be conveniently accessible to all staff and therefore should be conveniently accessible from the Village Centre via Main Circulation. The Administrative functions do not need to be highly accessible to staff or visitors but should be located to provide a suitable working environment. Figure 15: Administration and Staff Support Relationship Diagram

Sub Component Design Guidelines

Admin and Management Offices Components Ad1 through Ad7 accommodate administrative functions. They should be located so that they are conveniently accessible from the Village Centre but do not have to be in close proximity to the Centre. The components should accessible from an internal circulation route that connects to Main Circulation. Access to this area will be locked after normal operating hours and accessible to authorized staff only. The area will include a combination of enclosed spaces and screened workstations. All workstations and offices must have a direct or indirect view of natural light at minimum. Access to groups of offices and workstations should be organized so that the primary internal circulation route does not pass through workgroups.

Staff Support Spaces Components Ad8 and Ad9 must be accessible from Main Circulation. The Central Staff Room will serve as a lunchroom and break area. Family Visitor Accommodation Components Ad10 must be accessible from Main Circulation. It is intended to provide temporary short-term accommodation for visiting family members of residents in high acuity or palliative care.

Page 28: New Whitehorse Continuing Care Facility … (YG), administers senior/elder care, including all home care, respite services, and residential care. The Yukon population presents unique

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Area Requirements

000000CORNERSTONE 0000001

nsm No. of Units Total nsm Conversion

Factor

Component Gross

(CGSM)ADMINISTRATION & STAFF SUPPORT

Ad 1 Administration- General Office 35.0 1 35.0Ad 2 Other Office Spaces 34.0 1 34.0Ad 3 Copier, Mail, and Supplies Room 13.5 1 13.5Ad 4 Medical Records and Storage Room 13.5 1 13.5Ad 5 Administration-Management Offices 10.0 8 80.0Ad 6 Multiple Use Office Spaces 9.0 8 72.0Ad 7 RAI Assessors Shared Space 18.0 1 18.0Ad 8 Central Staff Room 60.0 1 60.0Ad 9 Staff Lockers and Showers M&F 60.0 1 60.0Ad 10 Family Visitor's Accommodation 32.0 1 32.0

Administration & Staff Support Total 418.0 1.20 501.5

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BUILDING SUPPORT

Ideally all Building Support components should be at ground level with access to the loading dock via Main Circulation. If more than one level is required to meet design and site constraints, a freight elevator will be required to facilitate movement of materials between levels. Figure 15: Building Support Relationship Diagram

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Sub Component Design Guidelines

Materials Management Materials Management components support the movement and storage of materials. • Bs1: Shipping and Receiving should be adjacent to the Service Entry to facilitate off-loading and

loading. The loading dock must provide weather protection for at least the loading area and be capable of accommodating vehicles up to a semi-trailer size.

• Enclosed inside space has been provided for Refuse and Recycling Bins (Bs2 and Bs3) to facilitate pick-up and drop off of materials during the winter months. However, if deemed acceptable the bins could be located outside the building.

• Oxygen Storage (Bs5) should be close to the shipping and receiving area. • The remainder of the storage components (Bs4, Bs6, Bs7, Bs8) should ideally be considered as

a large storage zone that can be subdivided into discrete secure storage areas for different materials, using gated chain link fence enclosures or similar methods. This will enable changes in the relative amounts of materials by type to be accommodated with a minimum of disruption and cost.

• Grounds Equipment Storage (Bs9) should ideally have an outside entrance as well as being accessible from within the facility.

• All components must be accessible from Main Circulation. Workshops The Maintenance Workshop (Bs10) will have durable utility finishes, venting, and suitable power supplies for tools and equipment. Central Laundry The Central Laundry will require finished spaces to meet health and safety codes. Venting and floor drains will be required. Food Services The Kitchen will require finished spaces to meet health and safety codes with appropriate venting and floor drains. Freezer and Cooler Equipment should be installed in such a way that they can be replaced at a later date without requiring extensive physical renovations.

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Area Requirements

000000CORNERSTONE 0000001

nsm No. of Units Total nsm Conversion

Factor

Component Gross

(CGSM)BUILDING SUPPORTMaterials Management

Bs 1 Shipping and Receiving 20.0 1 20.0Bs 2 Refuse Bins 40.0 1 40.0Bs 3 Recycling Bins 25.0 1 25.0Bs 4 Materials Management and Storage 90.0 1 90.0Bs 5 Oxygen Storage Room 15.0 1 15.0Bs 6 Family Storage 75.0 1 75.0Bs 7 Continuing Care Equipment Storage 90.0 1 90.0Bs 8 General Storage 60.0 1 60.0Bs 9 Grounds Equipment Storage 20.0 1 20.0

SubTotal 435.0 1.27 552.5Workshops

Bs 10 Maintenance Workshop 70.0 1 70.0 SubTotal 70.0 1.27 89.0

Food ServicesBs 11 Kitchen 130.0 1 130.0Bs 12 FN Kitchen 6.0 1 6.0Bs 13 Food Services Shared Office Space 13.5 1 13.5Bs 14 Dry Storage 40.0 1 40.0Bs 15 Freezer and Cooler 40.0 1 40.0Bs 16 Staff Washroom 2.5 1 2.5Bs 17 Janitor/Housekeeping Room 6.0 1 6.0

SubTotal 238.0 1.27 302.5Central Laundry

Bs 18 Facility Laundry 90.0 1 90.0 SubTotal 90.0 1.20 108.0

Building Support Total 833.0 1.26 1052.0