neoclassicism. clodion (claude michel), intoxication of wine, 1775, terra- cotta

Download Neoclassicism. Clodion (Claude Michel), Intoxication of Wine, 1775, terra- cotta

Post on 24-Dec-2015

219 views

Category:

Documents

3 download

Embed Size (px)

TRANSCRIPT

  • Slide 1
  • Neoclassicism
  • Slide 2
  • Slide 3
  • Clodion (Claude Michel), Intoxication of Wine, 1775, terra- cotta
  • Slide 4
  • Slide 5
  • Antonio Canova, Cupid and Psyche, 1787-1793, marble
  • Slide 6
  • Slide 7
  • Slide 8
  • Timeline of French Revolution and the Reign of Napoleon 1789- storming of the Bastille prison in Paris, followed by the Reign of Terror. Many associated with the old regime and the hereditary monarchy are killed. 1793- Louis XVI and his wife, Marie Antoinette, are beheaded by the guillotine 1795-99 The Directory rule by the middle class 1799 Napoleon becomes first consul 1803 Napoleon law code is issued 1804- Napoleon is crowned emperor 1806- Napoleon begins a building campaign in Paris with the intention of creating a new Rome. He takes Julius Caesar, who was also a consul before becoming a dictator, as his model. Like Caesar, Napoleon adopts the eagle for his military emblem and the laurel wreath for his crown. 1812- Napoleon attacks Russia but is forced to retreat 1814- Napoleon abdicates. Monarchy is restored under Louis XVII. 1815 Napoleon is defeated in the Battle of Waterloo. The Congress of Vienna established the borders of European countries, which last until World War I (1914-1918) 1821- Napoleon dies in exile
  • Slide 9
  • Jacques-Louis David, Oath of Horatii, 1784-1785, oil on canvas
  • Slide 10
  • Jacques-Louis David, Death of Socrates, 1787, oil on canvas
  • Slide 11
  • Jacques-Louis David, Death of Marat, 1793, oil on canvas
  • Slide 12
  • Jacques-Louis David, Napoleon at Saint Bernard Pass, 1800, oil on canvas
  • Slide 13
  • Jean-Francois-Therese Chalgrin et al., Arc de Triomphe, Paris, 1806-1836
  • Slide 14
  • Charles Percier and Pierre F.L. Fontaine, Place Vendome column, Paris, 1810
  • Slide 15
  • Slide 16
  • Slide 17
  • Antonio Canova, Maria Paolina Borghese as Venus, 1808, marble
  • Slide 18
  • Slide 19
  • Marie-Guillemine Benoist, Portrait of a Negress, 1800, oil on canvas
  • Slide 20
  • Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, Madame Riviere, 1805, oil on canvas
  • Slide 21
  • Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, Napoleon Enthroned, 1806, oil on canvas
  • Slide 22
  • Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, Oedipus and the Sphinx, 1808, oil on canvas
  • Slide 23
  • Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, Grande Odalisque, 1814, oil on canvas
  • Slide 24
  • Slide 25
  • Jean-Antoine Houdon, Thomas Jefferson, 1789, marble American ambassador in France Studied Classical and Palladian architecture; owned the first copy in America of Palladios Four Books on Architecture Saw the Maison Carree at Nimes, reminiscent of Temple Portunus in Rome.
  • Slide 26
  • Thomas Jefferson, Monticello, near Charlottesville, Virginia, 1769-1784 (rebuilt 1794-1809) The College and Hospital are rude, mis-shapen piles, which, but that they have roofs, would be taken for brick-kilns. There are no other public buildings but churches and court-houses, in which no attempts are made at elegance.
  • Slide 27
  • Colonial Williamsburg, Va.
  • Slide 28
  • Slide 29
  • Slide 30
  • Slide 31
  • Thomas Jefferson, State Capitol, Richmond, Virginia, 1785-1789 By helping to introduce classical architecture to the United States, Jefferson intended to reinforce the ideals behind the classical past: democracy, education, rationality, civic responsibility. Because he detested the English, Jefferson continually rejected British architectural precedents for those from France. In doing so, Jefferson reinforced the symbolic nature of architecture. Jefferson did not just design a building; he designed a building that eloquently spoke to the democratic ideals of the United States.
  • Slide 32
  • Slide 33
  • Thomas Jefferson, Rotunda, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, 1817- 1826
  • Slide 34
  • Slide 35
  • John Trumbull, Declaration of Independence, 1818, oil on canvas
  • Slide 36
  • Horatio Greenough, George Washington, 1832-1841, Marble
  • Slide 37
  • Slide 38