National Archives Records on Microform What they are and where to find them Archival Research Basics with the National Archives Lesson # 8 The National.

Download National Archives Records on Microform What they are and where to find them Archival Research Basics with the National Archives Lesson # 8 The National.

Post on 23-Dec-2015

215 views

Category:

Documents

2 download

TRANSCRIPT

<ul><li> Slide 1 </li> <li> National Archives Records on Microform What they are and where to find them Archival Research Basics with the National Archives Lesson # 8 The National Archives and Records Administration Pacific Alaska Region Seattle, Washington &amp; Anchorage, Alaska 9/1/2009 </li> <li> Slide 2 </li> <li> Microfilm and microfiche are used to reduce over-use of fragile original records and make them available to more people. </li> <li> Slide 3 </li> <li> Original documents are photographed and reproduced on rolls of film, called microfilm, or reproduced on sheets, called microfiche. </li> <li> Slide 4 </li> <li> Two microform types MicrofilmMicrofiche Each type requires a different type of reader in order to view the records. </li> <li> Slide 5 </li> <li> Microfilm Microfilm readers are used to view the document photographs on rolls of microfilm. </li> <li> Slide 6 </li> <li> Microfiche Microfiche readers are a different type of machine than microfilm readers. They accept the flat sheets of filmed images. Occasionally, there are machines produced that accept both types of microform records. Images from the University of Minnesota microform instruction page at http://www.lib.umn.edu/help/orientation/microforms/mgloss.phtml http://www.lib.umn.edu/help/orientation/microforms/mgloss.phtml </li> <li> Slide 7 </li> <li> What National Archives records are on microfilm? Series or parts of series that might be in need of preservation. Series or parts of series that might be used frequently and therefore might become damaged. Series or parts of series that were microfilmed by the agency before they arrived at NARA (so that is all the National Archives has). (For a definition of a series, see Lesson 5 - The Basic Unit) </li> <li> Slide 8 </li> <li> For instance, this page of the 1930 US census has been microfilmed and is on a roll with all other pages from the 1930 Census, organized by state, county, census enumeration district, and page number just exactly the same as the original documents. </li> <li> Slide 9 </li> <li> Many records have been reproduced in this fashion. For instance part or all of the following have been microfilmed: Military records Military records Immigration records Immigration records Naturalization records Naturalization records Records of US Consulates in other countries Records of US Consulates in other countries American Indian records American Indian records African American records from after the Civil War African American records from after the Civil War The United States Census The United States Census </li> <li> Slide 10 </li> <li> Do you have it all? Each NARA facility (with the exception of the facilities in Washington DC) have a COLLECTION of National Archives microfilm. Therefore, individual regional facilities will not have EVERYTHING produced by the National Archives. If a facility you wish to visit does not have the microfilm, contact them to see if it is possible to borrow specific rolls of film from another regional facility. (For a description of a COLLECTION see Lesson 2 Knowing Where to Look) </li> <li> Slide 11 </li> <li> Locating Specific Microform Records How do I know if the National Archives has microfilmed the records I need? If so, how can I tell if the facility I am going to visit has the specific microfilmed records I want? </li> <li> Slide 12 </li> <li> From your home or school you can figure out what microfilmed records we have and where you can see them by going online to www.archives.gov This National Archives website is absolutely FREE www.archives.gov </li> <li> Slide 13 </li> <li> Go to the main page at www.archives.gov and click RESEARCHERS </li> <li> Slide 14 </li> <li> Next click Microfilm Catalog in the center of the page </li> <li> Slide 15 </li> <li> The keywords sometimes are not exactly what you think they would be Try different keywords if your word doesnt work Dont use more than one or two words. </li> <li> Slide 16 </li> <li> OR use the advanced search (After all, we are ALL advanced now, arent we?) </li> <li> Slide 17 </li> <li> The Advanced Search Do you know the title of the publication or, maybe, just one word from the title? Do you know the federal agency or, maybe, just one word from the agency (like Army)? How about a subject term (like Civil War)? </li> <li> Slide 18 </li> <li> Maybe you can just choose from the subject catalog drop-down list. </li> <li> Slide 19 </li> <li> Be careful when adding dates. The dates are specific to the record. If the record says 1860- 1865 and you type in 1861-1865, your record wont come up. </li> <li> Slide 20 </li> <li> If you only want to see what is available at a particular NARA facility, choose one of them here. </li> <li> Slide 21 </li> <li> Once you click search a list will appear. </li> <li> Slide 22 </li> <li> Once you find something that looks interesting, click on the item. </li> <li> Slide 23 </li> <li> This is what you will see after you click the item. </li> <li> Slide 24 </li> <li> Viewing Locations tells you which facilities have this particular microfilm series in their collections. This means you could go there and see the microfilm. However, the facilities do not always have ALL of the rolls in their collection. Be sure to ask someone at that facility before you travel there to look at microfilm. </li> <li> Slide 25 </li> <li> You will need the publication number in order to locate the microfilm or microfiche in the archives. (You will also need it for the citation.) </li> <li> Slide 26 </li> <li> The publication title typically includes dates. (You will also need this for your citation.) </li> <li> Slide 27 </li> <li> The Record Group Number and the Record Group title identify the AGENCY (Again, important for your citation). </li> <li> Slide 28 </li> <li> This tells you the number of microfilm rolls there are in this particular series. You will need to know how to figure out WHICH roll or rolls holds the records you are seeking. This is particularly true if there are many rolls of microfilm in the series. </li> <li> Slide 29 </li> <li> The Publication details are where you will find more information about the record, as well as the ROLL LIST. </li> <li> Slide 30 </li> <li> This is the publication details for the item we were just looking at. You can see that it consists of ONLY a roll list. This roll list will help you figure out how the series is organized as well as which roll you want to look at. </li> <li> Slide 31 </li> <li> Occasionally, a series is too large for an online version (very large series sometimes are only available in paper format), or just not described in detail at all. These are usually very small series that are on a single roll of film. </li> <li> Slide 32 </li> <li> This particular publication detail gives more information. Originally, these were in paper format and many are available in National Archives microfilm research rooms as well as online. </li> <li> Slide 33 </li> <li> This type often includes some background information. </li> <li> Slide 34 </li> <li> And also includes a list of what is contained on each roll of film. </li> <li> Slide 35 </li> <li> A few of these publication details are VERY informative. This one, for instance gives Background Information on Alaska Bankruptcy Law, </li> <li> Slide 36 </li> <li> Alaska Court History </li> <li> Slide 37 </li> <li> A rather complete description of the records and what years they cover. </li> <li> Slide 38 </li> <li> Other Related Records </li> <li> Slide 39 </li> <li> A description of the way Alaska courts were organized and when, </li> <li> Slide 40 </li> <li> An index of persons declaring bankruptcy, </li> <li> Slide 41 </li> <li> And a complete listing of what is on each roll of film in the series. </li> <li> Slide 42 </li> <li> Where do you go to see the microfilm itself? A facility of the National Archives (be sure to check online to see if the film is there). A facility of the National Archives (be sure to check online to see if the film is there). Many are available through an LDS Family History Center. Many are available through an LDS Family History Center. Some Genealogical Societies have copies of selected microfilm. Some Genealogical Societies have copies of selected microfilm. Many are available for purchase from the National Archives (see frame 23 of this Power Point presentation) for use at home or in a nearby library. Most libraries have microfilm readers. Many are available for purchase from the National Archives (see frame 23 of this Power Point presentation) for use at home or in a nearby library. Most libraries have microfilm readers. Some public libraries have copies. Some public libraries have copies. </li> <li> Slide 43 </li> <li> Self-directed Assignment Searching for microform records will be practiced with supervision during your archival visit. You must be able to show the archivist or educator at the archives that you understand how to use the online catalog while you are there. Please practice using the online microfilm catalog before visiting the archives. </li> <li> Slide 44 </li> <li> Need help? The National Archives at Anchorage 654 West Third Avenue Anchorage, AK 99501-2145 907-261-7800 alaska.archives@nara.gov The National Archives at Seattle 6125 Sand Point Way, NE Seattle, WA 98115-7999 206-336-5115 seattle.archives@nara.gov ASK US! </li> </ul>

Recommended

View more >