National Alliance to End Homelessness Family Conference Assessment Tools Roundtable

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National Alliance to End Homelessness Family Conference Assessment Tools Roundtable. Charlene Moran Flaherty State and Local Policy February 7, 2008. CSHs Mission. CSH helps communities create permanent housing with services to prevent and end homelessness. Family Connections. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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  • National Alliance to End Homelessness Family Conference Assessment Tools Roundtable Charlene Moran FlahertyState and Local PolicyFebruary 7, 2008

  • CSHs Mission

    CSH helps communities create permanent housing with services to prevent and end homelessness.

  • Family ConnectionsPrevent children from entering child welfare systemReduce TANF caseloadNon-recurrence of abuse and neglect Increase in stability/self-sufficiency

  • Evaluation GoalsConscious shift from focus on outputs to investing in outcomesReduce the gap between knowledge and practiceWhich programs are effective?What interventions produce results? Where do we target investment?

  • Evaluation GoalsSupport activities that make a real difference in lives of familiesEvaluate the effectiveness of Family ConnectionsImplement method of understanding what works & what doesntIdentify best practices

  • Arizona Self Sufficiency Matrix Engagement toolBasic AssessmentEvaluation

  • Arizona Self Sufficiency Matrix

  • Arizona Self Sufficiency Matrix

  • Using the Matrix

    Periodicity of Data CollectionAt program entry and exitThree month interim All adults over the age of 18Complete by client together with case manager Score to the deficit

  • Models MeasurementIs this assessment technique valid and reliable? Using factor analysis, the instrument was found to measure overall self-sufficiency and 2 subscales: Economic self-sufficiencySocial/emotional self-sufficiencyTotal composite score

  • Models Predictive Equations are generated from data submitted to determine the predictors of change in social emotional and economic self-sufficiency and total composite self-sufficiency scoreEach individuals predicted change is uniquely determined based upon the clients individual characteristicsThese predicted changes constitute the expected change

  • Client Data568 unduplicated adult clients2/3 completed entry matrix84 clients with entry and exit matrices. 24 have been in the program 3 months60 terminated with less than 3 months The differences between those who stick and those who terminate are dramatic with longer term clients benefiting and the shorter term having minimal gains.

  • Change Entry to Exit by Time in Program

    Chart1

    0.331.17

    1.113.46

    1.444.63

  • Level of Functioning

    More than 1/3 of clients either homeless or being evicted. More than recently or currently homelessTwo out of every five clients had parenting skills which ranged from inadequate to dangerous Approaching 1/3 of clients assessed to be functioning at a crisis levelSchool age children of one in seven clients not enrolled in school

  • Entry Problem RankedProblem AreaScoreEmployment1.69Income2.19Food2.21Shelter2.54Childcare2.59Community Involvement2.66Family Relations2.67Mobility2.90Adult Education2.96Life Skills3.34Health Care3.38Parenting Skills3.49Mental Health3.76Safety3.96Childrens Education4.22

  • Change in individual ClientsChange in individual clients over time initially encouraging. 3 month matrices Typical client improved in social-emotional self sufficiency more than a quarter (.28) of a standard deviationImprovement in economic self-sufficiency was even more dramatic approaching half (.42) of a standard deviationThe overall change in self-sufficiency also approached half of a standard deviation (.44)

  • Change in Individual ClientsChanges in client scores not the result of focusing on clients with fewer challenges. Rather, the lowest functioning clients made the greatest changes. Hence, not only were the lowest functioning clients changing the most, but the increased correlations over time indicate that the impact is greater at 6 months than at 3

  • Change in Individual ClientsEntry to 6 months The service most related to positive changes in economic self-sufficiency is rent assistance. The best predictors of positive outcomes in social-emotional self-sufficiency are utility assistance and education and training. Changes in overall self-sufficiency - Same three variables occur, with utility assistance having as much positive impact as the education/training and rent assistance combined.

  • ApplicationWhat are the client characteristics that are indicative that an individual is more likely to benefit from a program?Do individual workers tend to be more effective with specific types of families?What is the differential impact of the varying services offered by DES and contracting agencies to clients and what is their cost effectiveness?Can we construct an early warning system which alerts us that based on client outcome that a worker, service delivery site or supervisor needs assistance in being effective?

  • ApplicationIs there an optimum time frame to work with families to maximize demonstrable effectiveness of intervention?Is there a substantive difference between professional and paraprofessional staff in client outcomes?How important is the time lag between first referral to FC and first interview with program staff in terms of eventual program impact?

  • Benefits/ChallengesBenefitsClient centered practiceContinuous program improvementTarget resources more effectively Increased investment in Incubator for new activity

    ChallengesProvider buy-inData collection/scrubbingEvaluation expertiseCost

  • Charlene Moran Flahertycharlene.flaherty@csh.org

    visit www.csh.org

    Local offices in CA, RI, CT, NY, NJ, IN, IL, OH, MI, MN, TX

    CSHs national teams assist supportive housing practitioners across the U.S.

    New Program - Multidisciplinary TeamsTeam LeadChild WelfareDVEmployment Generalists

    8 teams dv, homeless, at-risk of entry into child welfare system

    SSBG Funded

    HUD funded processPartnership w/ MAG, DES and Virginia G. Piper Charitable TrustProviders submitted tools already in useSSM tested well for validity and reliability

    Basic training score to the deficitThe predicted change for each individual is then compared with the actual changeTeams whose clients consistently do better than predicted are the most successfulTeams whose clients consistently under-perform the predicted change are the least successful Teams whose clients perform consistently with predictions are typical of their peers

    In the future we expect to primarily focus on the change in client functioning from program entry to exit. This approach, however, is initially problematic because early in our data gathering a disproportionate percentage of those with exit matrices are short term clients with the least programmatic engagement or commitment hence, their early termination. In the future we expect to primarily focus on the change in client functioning from program entry to exit. This approach, however, is initially problematic because early in our data gathering a disproportionate percentage of those with exit matrices are short term clients with the least programmatic engagement or commitment hence, their early termination. 84 clients with entry and exit matrices. 24 have been in the program 3 months or less while 60 terminated with less than 3 months in. The differences between the 2 groups are dramatic with the longer term benefiting and the shorter term having minimal gains.

    Results have not topped out /reached a point of diminishing returns

    Note changes in program, privatization of the Jobs/Employment services, change in funding streamClient level data vs. program level data

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