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Grand Manoeuvre: Grand Manoeuvre: Grand Manoeuvre: Grand Manoeuvre: Napoleonic Miniatures Napoleonic Miniatures Napoleonic Miniatures Napoleonic Miniatures Wargames Rules Wargames Rules Wargames Rules Wargames Rules Game Play Game Play Game Play Game Play Example xample xample xamples.

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  • Grand Manoeuvre: Grand Manoeuvre: Grand Manoeuvre: Grand Manoeuvre:

    Napoleonic MiniaturesNapoleonic MiniaturesNapoleonic MiniaturesNapoleonic Miniatures

    Wargames RulesWargames RulesWargames RulesWargames Rules

    Game Play Game Play Game Play Game Play EEEExamplexamplexamplexamplessss....

  • Grand Manoeuvre Napoleonic Wargames Rules.

    Example of the use of regulating battalions in the rules. It is a cold October afternoon in 1805, and orders from the army wing commander, Archduke Ferdinand arrive for the division to advance; they are to engage the French on the rising ground to the north around the village of Haslach with all speed. Some disordering terrain will be encountered in the forth-coming advance; there are a couple of small copses ahead and to the left, a stream with some thickets and bushes along its course. All units in the command will take their direction and pace from the regulating battalion; this is the second battalion from the right, in the first treffen (or battle line). This is formed by the divisions first brigade the second brigade forms the second treffen and the right-hand battalion of this second line will in turn, follow the movements of the regulating battalion of the first line. The regulating battalions advance will be directed upon the village of Haslach. Intending to engage the enemy, the battalions have been deployed to line formation. The division then is arrayed in two deployed lines of six battalions, including two of grenadiers in the second treffen with skirmishers preceding the grand body taken from each of the first lines battalions third ranks.

    Demonstrating the theory behind the practice; the diagram above shows a regulating battalion directing the advance of its division upon a distant village and the mounted

    figure denotes the presence of the leading brigade-general. Planche XXXI Reglements 1791 Planches CESAT

    The units therefore will follow the movement of the regulating battalion, and according to their orders they will move at full speed. Players move the regulating battalion first, and wherever necessary, at the start of each turn players will roll for

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  • Grand Manoeuvre Napoleonic Wargames Rules.

    Example of the use of regulating battalions in the rules. each unit to see if it manages either to rally from a previous disorder (perhaps caused by enemy artillery fire), or to determine if it is able to march at full speed across the terrain features without becoming disordered. This procedure also includes the regulating battalion. If all the units within the command are of the same class and within the same elements of terrain, players may roll for the entire command to perform the manoeuvre successfully. This die roll is termed the unit class die roll and it is used throughout the rules for manoeuvres, combat and for morale checks. On the line of their march, a stream lies in the path of the two battalions on the left flank, (this is known as the reverse flank) and these units are required to roll to see if they are disordered in their attempts to step out whilst crossing the feature. Entering the normal range of the French artillery, the battalion at the end of the first line is disordered. At the start of the next turn the battalion must roll its unit die roll once to see if BOTH the disorder is removed AND (because it must cross a stream) that the battalion will be able to move at full speed to catch up with the rest of the line. If it fails the test it moves at full speed, but it ends the movement phase in disorder. Having come under some artillery fire prior to closing with the French infantry arrayed in front of the village of Haslach, unexpectedly, from some dead ground on the French left, and whose advance was covered by a copse of trees, a small body of hussars move forward to attack the Austrian right. This movement had not been observed by the Austrian brigade general and so it is left to the reactions of the individually surprised battalions there to attempt to form squares. If the French cavalry had been visible to the brigade general, then the command could have been halted and all battalions in the grand body could have followed the action of the regulating battalion by forming squares. Alternatively, the option would also exist to remain in line and engage the cavalry. Using their bonus movement into contact, the French cavalry is able to contact the second battalion of the first line. Each unit so contacted, must roll a new manoeuvre test to see if it manages to form square. The Austrian player acting as the battalion commander believes that he has a good chance of forming square to repulse the attack and possibly cause damage to the light horse. For the test there are two modifiers which apply; a +1 for skirmishers are covering the infantrys advance, and a -1 for the cavalry having emerged from dead ground. These modifiers cancel each other out and so it is a straight test using the battalions unit class die roll. The battalions skirmishers are removed from play as they attempt to rejoin their parent battalion. The unit, which is and trained one, fails the test with a roll a 2.

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  • Grand Manoeuvre Napoleonic Wargames Rules.

    Example of the use of regulating battalions in the rules.

    Another game example from the battle of Amstetten.

    Oudinot`s Grenadiers arrayed to attack the Austro-Russian rearguard under the command of Bagration. The brigade generals are at the right of their brigades with

    each of the lines of brigades in columns of attack. Oudinot is centrally placed, on the divisions second line. 5th Corps Commander, Lannes is positioned to the rear, close

    to Oudinot`s reserve brigade.

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  • Grand Manoeuvre Napoleonic Wargames Rules.

    Example of the use of regulating battalions in the rules. The French player then declares that the cavalry had orders to engage, which included an added instruction for a feint charge, but previously in the turn, he had in this case, rolled for the initiative to actually charge the advancing infantry. In this case the infantry has failed to form a square and the cavalry then combat with the infantry. The result of the combat is that the line infantry rout with their morale affected and then the cavalry, failing to rally, directly pursue the routing square in disorder. This pursuit move takes them into contact with a battalion in the second treffen and this new combat is to be resolved immediately. The Austrian player decides that this second line unit (a grenadier battalion) will not attempt to form square; instead it will attempt to stand in line against the hussars. The hussars and the infantry are evenly matched in class but the hussars are disordered in their pursuit. In this pursuit combat the Austrian grenadiers` flanks are secured by the adjacent battalions and the French lose the combat with a disorder and a recoil result. With this result, added to their previous disorder, the French hussars become shaken but rallying in the next turn, they are successfully recalled by their cavalry colonels initiative. The hussars then fall back one move. In this time, in an immediate reaction to the cavalry attack, the Austrian brigade commander had halted the whole command. After the hussars` withdrawal and the reorganization of his command; the grenadiers moving forward to fill the gap created in the first treffen and the routed line battalion from the first treffen rallying, he resumed the advance. In this time however, the French battery of mixed pieces had caused significant damage to the rest of the Austrian first line which has been disrupted and weakened before it can close with the French infantry in front of the village of Haslach. This game play example of the use of regulating battalions is based upon the battle of Haslach-Jungingen (11th October, 1805) and our re-fight of it earlier this year.

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  • Grand Manoeuvre Napoleonic Wargames Rules Example of an Infantry Combat.

    In this game play example, six French line battalions were arrayed in line with skirmishers deployed. These advanced to engage an Austrian line of five line battalions and one grenadier battalion. The Austrian infantry were supported by two sections of light, regimental guns. The French were rated as C class and the all the Austrian battalions were rated as D class.

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  • Grand Manoeuvre Napoleonic Wargames Rules Example of an Infantry Combat.

    Turn One: In the first turn of combat the skirmishers of the advancing French line engage the Austrian infantry for the first time at long range. First however, on the roll of a six on a six-sided die, the Austrian regimental guns try to fend off the French voltigeurs; the second battalions guns make the skirmishers recoil back towards their parent battalion. See photo below:

    Austrian battalion guns push back French skirmishers. 6

  • Grand Manoeuvre Napoleonic Wargames Rules Example of an Infantry Combat.

    The skirmishers now attempt to disorder the rest of the Austrian line of battle, but at long range the formed units do not have a die roll against the skirmishers. The grenadiers and the first and second Austrian line battalions become disordered as a result of the skirmisher die rolls. These disordered battalions are marked with a blue marker in the next photo.

    The first and second Austrian line battalions become disordered. 7

  • Grand Manoeuvre Napoleonic Wargames Rules Example of an Infantry Combat. Turn Two: At the start of a turn, each disordered unit rolls a die to see if it rallies. In our example the Austrians first battalion and grenadier battalion were rallied. The French line now moves into combat range with the Austrian line of battle, but first the French skirmishers attempt to disorder the enemys formed line before their own line engages. In this turn, at normal musketry range, the Austrian formed troops have a die roll against the French skirmishers. The result of which, this time is that only the first Austrian line battalion becomes disordered. The skirmishers are now removed to the rear of the French line, and formed unit combat now takes place.

    French skirmishers move to rear of battalions allowing them to engage the Austrian

    line. 8

  • Grand Manoeuvre Napoleonic Wargames Rules Example of an Infantry Combat. Formed unit combat is resolved by comparing units combat points, their die rolls & any modifying factors. Two Austrian line battalions (the fifth & sixth) have guns attached & so this modifies their die rolls against the French formed units. The new effects of combat in turn two are that the fourth, fifth & sixth Austrian line battalions become disordered & the second battalion becomes shaken, having previously been disordered by skirmishers. The shaken unit has the white marker in the photo.

    The situation worsens & the Austrians line becomes increasingly disordered. 9

  • Grand Manoeuvre Napoleonic Wargames Rules Example of an Infantry Combat. Turn Three: In a good turn phase of rallying, the fourth, fifth and sixth battalions are rallied, but the second battalion is still disordered and shaken - a units shaken condition remains even if it regains its order.

    The Austrians first line battalion fails to rally its disorder.

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  • Grand Manoeuvre Napoleonic Wargames Rules Example of an Infantry Combat. In combat the fourth, fifth and sixth battalions are disordered once again, the second battalion becomes dispirited (one morale stage worse than before, it is indicated with the yellow marker) and the third battalion becomes shaken.

    With a third of it battalions in poor morale, the Austrian brigade will be forced to test its commands reaction.

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  • Grand Manoeuvre Napoleonic Wargames Rules Example of an Infantry Combat.

    Turn Four: With 33% of its units in poor morale, the turn starts with a brigade command reaction test for the Austrians; this is based upon the average of the unit die rolls in the command. In our game the command reaction test was failed and the Austrian infantry routed for one turn

    The Austrian line fails its morale test and is now shown in the process of routing one move at the start of turn four

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  • Grand Manoeuvre Napoleonic Wargames Rules Example of an Infantry Combat. A Pursuit: Being in good order but having been engaged and halted for some time, the French commander requires a generals initiative to follow their enemy in an ordered pursuit. If he passes this die roll, his line can advance with his skirmishers deployed again within close combat range of the routing Austrian troops and a pursuit combat will take place in the same turn. In this example, I deliberately chose a scenario which would be decisive within a short period of time and game play, I therefore rated one side one class better than the other, but gamers of course are free to rate troops in their games as they think appropriate. Credits: Photographed at Bideford and District Wargames Club. Terrain pieces by Phil Martin. The Italian buildings made by Shawn Kelly Photos by Malcolm Williams and myself.

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  • Grand Manoeuvre Napoleonic Wargames Rules Example of a Cavalry Combat.

    A French cavalry brigade of two regiments of Dragoons supported by a horse artillery battery has taken up position between a wood and a village. They are ordered to perform a rear guard action against a larger Austrian cavalry force of two brigades; one has a regiment of Uhlans and Chevauleger, the other of two regiments of Hussars. The French cavalry and the Austrian Uhlans and Chevauleger were classed as C class troops and the Hussars as B class.

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  • Grand Manoeuvre Napoleonic Wargames Rules Example of a Cavalry Combat. Turn One: Austrian cavalry brigade of advances from beyond long range of the French horse artillery. The French horse artillery opened fire, but there was no effect on the Austrian Chevauleger; only a 1 was rolled against them!

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  • Grand Manoeuvre Napoleonic Wargames Rules Example of a Cavalry Combat. Turn Two: A French initiative roll was made to counter-charge the advancing Austrians and was passed. Being at just under 20cms away the two lines met in the middle. In the combat that followed the French Dragoons are disordered by the Austrian Chevauleger.

    Showing the die rolls and disorder marker, the second dragoons disordered by the Austrian Chevauleger.

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  • Grand Manoeuvre Napoleonic Wargames Rules Example of a Cavalry Combat. Turn Three: At the start of the turn, I tried to activate the Austrian reserves by rolling for the commanders initiative. As a regimental commander, this is more difficult to do; I require a 6 to do this. I fail the test. The French Dragoons are rallied and the combat continues in which the Austrian Uhlans become disordered.

    Again, showing the die rolls and a disorder marker, but this time the first regiment of dragoons disorder the Austrian Uhlans

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  • Grand Manoeuvre Napoleonic Wargames Rules Example of a Cavalry Combat.

    Turn Four: I attempt to activate the Austrian reserve, but fail again! The lancers are rallied and the combats in this turn are all tied. Turn Five: Again, I fail to activate my reserve cavalry. Combats are all tied. Turn Six: In this turn I finally managed to activate the Austrian reserve and the Hussars advance in column towards the French right to attack its flank. In combat the Austrian Chevauleger are disordered. Turn Seven: The Chevaulegers are rallied and the combats are tied once more Turn Eight: The Austrian lancers become disordered. Turn Nine: Stationed on his brigades right and seeing the Austrian reserve approaching, the French general tries to make an initiative to retire, but the player fails the die roll. The Austrian Uhlans are rallied and the combats are tied

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  • Grand Manoeuvre Napoleonic Wargames Rules Example of a Cavalry Combat. Turn Ten: This turn the French general passes his initiative test and the command is ordered to retire. However the cavalry are engaged with the enemy and therefore need to make a test to perform the manoeuvre. These tests are passed with two rolls of 6 on the dice! They successfully disengage and retire half a move, but the leading regiment of advancing Hussars charges home on the first regiment of dragoons. The French horse artillery are limbered and move off. In the combat that followed, the first dragoon regiment became disordered.

    This photo shows the start of the turn and the French generals initiative test (he rolled a "4" and passed) and the two unit manoeuvre tests which were passed by rolling two sixes!

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  • Grand Manoeuvre Napoleonic Wargames Rules Example of a Cavalry Combat. Turn Eleven: As the rest of the French command retires, their first dragoon regiment becomes shaken and they are routed in combat. The Austrian Hussars, failing their reaction test, pursue them in disorder. In the pursuit the Dragoons are beaten again.

    Photo shows the first French Dragoons in a pursuit combat with the Austrian Hussars as the rest of the French command retires. Turn Twelve: At the start of turn twelve, the Hussars are rallied and the first dragoon regiment continues to rout Summary: Although beaten and forced to withdraw, as a rearguard action the French were reasonably successful in holding the Austrians for about ten game turns; equalling some forty minutes of real time. Ordering his withdrawal just in time, the French commander managed to save one of his regiments from defeat and he saved his artillery too. In this example scenario, I wanted to show a reasonably balanced combat between cavalry and then a decisive use of a reserve. This plan worked out very well, because the disorders caused on the regiments in the combats were all rallied for each of the next turns of fighting. It might have turned out differently however if these units were not rallied; in which case there may possibly have been a decisive result either way within three turns of combat.

    Photos by Malcolm Williams.

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  • Grand Manoeuvre Napoleonic Wargames Rules.

    An artillery firing example:

    A French infantry brigade is advancing on positions held by a medium Austrian artillery battery. The French formation has just come into view and the nearest target to battery is a D class unit in column at a distance of 29 centimetres (it is in long range). A second unit, also in column, is 7 centimetres behind the first at a range of 36 centimetres and this is a conscript E class unit.

    The Battle of Lodi by Myrbach In the first turn the Austrian battery rolls 1 d.6; the die roll is a 5. To this roll the following is added; +1 for the target being in column = net score of: 6 which means that the first unit is disordered. Because the main target was hit, bounce-through applies to the second unit and so it is diced for also. A 4 is rolled and to this the following modifiers are added: +1 for the target being in column and +1 for the target being E class. = net score of: 6 which means that the second unit is also disordered. In a second turn, all the French units have passed their rallying/manoeuvre tests and the columns are now at 13 and 20 centimetres range. They are both now in normal range. In this turn the Austrian battery rolls a 2. To this roll the following is added; +1 for the target being in column = net score of: 3 and because the first target was not hit, there is no bounce-through.

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  • Grand Manoeuvre Napoleonic Wargames Rules.

    An artillery firing example:

    Austrian Artillery in action at the Battle of Neerwinden 1793.

    In the third turn, the advance continues into short range; the leading French column has deployed to line and moved to a range of 5 centimetres. This time, in the firing, the Austrians roll a 4. This score of 4 is enough to cause a morale effect; the leading French column is shaken and routs one move. Bounce-through on the second French column does not apply, as this is close range firing, being largely due to canister fire.

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