muhammad qasim rafique qasim@hcc.edu.pk ms. excel 2007

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Muhammad Qasim Rafiqueqasim@hcc.edu.pk

MS. EXCEL 2007

OutlineConvert Text to ColumnConcatenation by FUNCTIONFORMULASpilt a Work SheetFreeze / unfreeze column & rowsCommon ErrorsAbsolute, Relative & Mix Cell Reference (F4)Referencing cells from another work sheet or workbookHow to Remove DuplicateFormula auditing Group (Trace Precedent/Dependent/show formula etc.)Remember Your Actions (Watch Window)Filtering Data in MS. ExcelEntering Data in a SheetLower , Upper and Proper FunctionsMerge CellsCreate , Open & Save a Work Sheet/WorkbookExcel Sheet Limitations (How many rows/columns etc. )

Convert Text to Columns-for more infoFull nameFirst nameLast nameSyed AbbasSyedAbbasMolly DempseyMollyDempseyLola JacobsenLolaJacobsenDiane MargheimDianeMargheimSelect the range of data (one column cells at a time) that you want to convert.On the Data tab, in the Data Tools group, click Text to Columns.In Step 1 of the Convert Text to Columns Wizard, click Delimited, and then click Next.In Step 2, select the Space check box, and then clear the other check boxes under Delimiters. The Data preview box shows the first and last names in two separate columns. Convert Text to Columns-for more infoClick Next.In Step 3, click a column in the Data preview box, and then click Text under Column data format. Repeat this step for each column in the Data preview box.If you want to insert the separated content into the columns next to the full name, click the icon to the right of the Destination box, and then select the cell next to the first name in the list

=CONCATENATE(A1:A5,B1:B5)=CONCATENATE(A1:A5" ",B1:B5)=A1:A5& " " &A1:A5Convert one or more columns into one column. (using formula, and function)How convert columns into single column or concatenation the Concatenate function allows you to join 2 or more strings together.

TWO METHODS:BY FORMULABY FUNCTIONSplit a Worksheet-for more infoYou can split a worksheet into multiple resizable panes for easier viewing of parts of a worksheet. To split a worksheet:Select any cell in center of the worksheet you want to splitClick the Split button on the View tabNotice the split in the screen, you can manipulate each part separately

Freeze / unfreeze column & rows-for more info

You can select a particular portion of a worksheet to stay static while you work on other parts of the sheet. This is accomplished through the Freeze Rows and Columns Function. To Freeze a row or column:Click the Freeze Panes button on the View tabEither select a section to be frozen or click the defaults of top row or left columnTo unfreeze, click the Freeze Panes buttonClick Unfreeze

Common Errors

Common error messages, and their meanings, include:##### The formula produces a result that is too wide for the column#DIV/0! The formula attempts to divide by 0 (a referenced cell acting as a divisor may be empty, making its value 0)#REF! The formula contains an invalid cell reference (a referenced cell may not exist or deleted)#VALUE The formula has the wrong type of data (a referenced cell in an arithmetic formula may contain text)#NUM The formula uses an invalid number (a referenced cell may contain a value that produces too large, or too small, a result to represent)Absolute , Relative , Mix reference

Mix References: We can also use $B10 (a mix cell reference) instead of $B$10 ( a absolute cell reference ) to produce same result because we just need column lock . ExampleRelative References In the example above, Row 8 contains Relative References. Excel has automatically adjusted the copied formulas based on their location. For example, by copying the formula =SUM(B3:B7) from cell B8 to cell C8, Excel automatically adjusted it to read =SUM(C3:C7). The formula becomes =SUM(D3:D7) after being copied to cell D8.The formula has changed relative to its location. Absolute References In the example above, Row 9 contains constant or Absolute References. The first part of the formula is not adjusted, despite its new location. When the formula =$B$10-B8 was copied from cell B9 to cell C9, the B10 reference was not changed, even though the B8 reference was. The formula became =$B$10-C8. The constant or absolute reference to cell B10 was made by placing a $ in front of the column and row designation, in this case $B$10. Thus, no matter where the formula is copied, $B$10 stays the same. The formula becomes =$B$10-D8 after being copied to cell D9. The $B$10 reference is constant, or absolute.Relative Cell References

A reference that is adjust to cell new location is called relative cell reference.The most commonly used of the cell reference types is the relative cell reference. When you type a cell reference using just the column letter and row number, you are using a relative reference. When a formula with a relative reference in it is copied to a new cell, the reference moves the same distance that the copied formula moves. Example: A11

A cell reference that is remain constant regardless of cell new location is called absolute cell reference.

When writing a formula, the reference to a cell can be made absolute (the formula will always refer to the same cell) by prefixing the row and column with a $ character (secret code).(for example: $B$2). Absolute Cell References

A combination of relative cell reference as well as absolute cell reference is called mix cell reference.Mixed Cell References

A mixed reference is typed with column letter and row number with one dollar sign placed in front of either the letter or the number (Examples: $A5 and B$3). When a formula containing the mixed cell reference $A5 is copied to a new location, it will always refer to column A, but the row number will move the same distance the formula moved. When a formula containing the mixed cell reference B$3 is copied to a new location, it will always refer to row 3, but the column letter will move the same distance that the formula moved. Toggling Between Relative, Absolute, and Mixed References Pressing the f4 key on your keyboard lets you toggle between the different types of cell references. Pressing the f4 key once changes a relative reference to an absolute reference. As you continue to press the f4 key, it toggles through the reference types (absolute, mixed, mixed, relative, absolute, etc.). Pressthe f4 just after you have typed a cell reference, or position the cursor back on a cell reference you typed previously, to use f4 to change the reference type for that reference. Referencing a Cell from Another Workbook A cell reference to a different Excel workbook looks like this: =[Book1]Sheet1!$E$8 Excel allows you to build formulas and functions that reference data stored on different worksheets within the same Excel workbook. So you can be on Sheet2, and refer back to a cell on Sheet1. When referring to a cell on a different sheet, you type the name of the sheet followed by an exclamation point (!) and then the column letter and row number. If you are on Sheet2 and want to refer back to cell C4 on Sheet 1, the reference would look like this: =Sheet1!C4. Referencing cells from another work sheet or workbookReferencing a Cell from Another Worksheet How to remove duplicates in Excel 2007

Formula auditing Group

The formula-auditing tools are found in the command buttons located in the Formula Auditing group on the Formulas tab of the Ribbon. These command buttons include the following:

Tracing formula in excel - Precedents

Formula auditing groupPrecedents are those cells on which a formula is based.Select cellFormula Tab Auditing Tools Trace precedentTracing formula in excel - DependentsFormula auditing group

Note: A cell often serves as both a precedent and a dependent.

Dependents are the reverse of precedents.Select cellFormula Tab Auditing Tools Trace DependentsTracing formula in excel show formula

To display all formulas in their cells in the worksheet instead of their calculated values (just like pressing Ctrl+`).

Formula auditing groupSelect cellFormula Tab Auditing Tools Show formulaTracing formula in excel Evaluate FormulaSometimes, understanding how a nested formula (formula: A sequence of values, cell references, names, functions, or operators in a cell that together produce a new value. A formula always begins with an equal sign (=).) calculates the final result is difficult because there are several intermediate calculations and logical tests. However, by using the Evaluate Formula dialog box, you can see the different parts of a nested formula evaluated in the order the formula is calculated. For example, the formula =IF(AVERAGE(F2:F5)>50,SUM(G2:G5),0) is easier to understand when you can see the following intermediate results using evaluate formula.Tracing formula in excel Remove arrowsRemove Arrows: Clicking this button (or the Remove Arrows option on its drop-down menu) removes all the arrows drawn, no matter what button or command you used to put them there. Click the Remove Precedent Arrows option on the drop-down menu to get rid of the arrows that were drawn when you clicked the Trace Precedents button; and Remove Dependent Arrows to get rid of the arrows that were drawn when you clicked Trace Dependents.

Tracing formula in excel checking errorsError Checking: When you click this button or the Error Checking option on its drop-down menu, Excel displays the Error Checking dialog box, which describes the nature of the error in the current cell, gives you help on it, and enables you to trace its precedents. Click the Trace Error option on this buttons drop-down menu to attempt to locate the cell that contains the original formula that has an error. Click the Circular References option on this buttons drop-down menu to display a menu with a list of all the cell addresses that contain c

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